OneUp Chain Guide - Review

Jan 5, 2016
by Mike Levy  
OneUp chain guide review test

With a slim aluminum backplate and tiny slider, OneUp's $45 USD chain guide is about as minimalist as a guide can get. The Canadian company says that their 35 gram guide doubles the usable life of narrow-wide chain rings by increasing security (NW chain rings lose some of their retention power as their teeth wear) thereby saving riders money in the long run while also acting as a lightweight bit of insurance.


There's not much to the pared down OneUp chain guide, but what is there is pretty clever. Because there's no skid or lower slider, the guide's aluminum backplate can bolt to just two of the bike's three ISCG-05 chain guide tabs - there is no ISCG version - and like any guide, the mounting holes are slotted to allow it to be clocked correctly on your bike. Height adjustments are made by loosening a single aluminum bolt that holds the guide's upper element in place. This section slides vertically on the backplate, and there are laser etched height markings to make setup mostly a no-brainer.
OneUp Chain Guide Details

• Intended use: keeping your chain on
• ISCG 05 mounting only
• Aluminum backplate
• Compatability: 26t - 38t chain rings
• 5.5mm of chainline adjustment
• Black and green sliders incl.
• Weight: 35 grams (w/ hardware)
• MSRP: $45 USD
www.oneupcomponents.com / @OneUpComponents


OneUp chain guide review test
OneUp chain guide review test

OneUp chain guide review test
  The slider's height is adjusted vertically via a single, aluminum 4mm bolt, and laser etched markings tell you where to position it.


The slider, which OneUp says is glass reinforced thermoplastic, attaches to the upper element with a single 4mm hex bolt, and a fin that's shaped into the back of it helps to keep it from ever rotating. It's all pretty simple, and very nicely made, but it's how OneUp went about making the slider horizontally adjustable that's interesting.

Rather than space out the backplate from the frame as per the norm, or build in some sort of slotted adjustment, OneUp went with thin spacers that fit in between the slider and the backplate. Each one is about a millimeter thick, and dimples on the spacers help to keep everything aligned. A gauge is included that tells you how many spacers to use, or you can just sight it from above.




Installation and Setup

Do you own a single 4mm hex key? Then you've got this. The guide attaches to your bike's ISCG 05 chain guide tabs, but because it only bolts onto the forward two mounts, you can install it without having to remove your drive-side crank. This is a huge plus for someone who doesn't enjoy, or doesn't feel comfortable, working on their own bike, and it greatly speeds up installation. And, if you have to remove your crank for whatever reason after the guide is on your bike, you can just rotate up or remove the slider rather than having to take the whole thing off.


OneUp chain guide review test
  Thin, dimpled plastic spacers are used to center the slider over your chain ring.


Before bolting the backplate on, and before installing the slider, use a 4mm hex key to set the height of the slider to match whatever size chain ring you're using. You're doing this now because some chain ring and crank combos can block access to this aluminum bolt once the guide is on the bike. Clock the backplate until the flat edge where the slider is going to sit is horizontal to the ground, and then snug up the two steel, countersunk ISCG 05 mounting bolts to 5Nm.

While most other chain guides ask you to space the entire backplate out from the frame, which can be a finicky, annoying job to get correct, OneUp supplies thin plastic spacers that go between the slider and the backplate. The guide also comes with a nifty little stepped feeler gauge that, by holding it up against the backplate, tells you exactly how many spacers to use to have the slider centered over the chain ring. I mounted the guide onto an older Stumpjumper that has even older SRAM cranks and a Blackspire chain ring and ended up having to use three spacers.
OneUp chain guide review test

After the guide was installed, I realized that I'd need to raise it up slightly higher than would have been ideal; otherwise the chain ring tabs for the crank would rub on the slider. I was able to fit a 4mm hex key through to reach the adjustment bolt and get it sorted, but the slider did end up sitting a touch high.



Performance

The pint-sized OneUp chain guide is obviously not about offering chain ring protection or even adding tension to the chain, rather it's a 35 gram piece of insurance that has no interference on your drivetrain. The slider is wide enough that there was no contact between it and the chain, and the cutout in the side of it allowed crud to escape rather than pile up and possibly cause an issue. The short length of the slider also keeps it from interfering with your bike's chain stay or swingarm, and all of the above makes it pretty much invisible once it's on your bike. In fact, it spent a few months on a test rider's bike, and he actually forgot it was there.


OneUp chain guide review test
No drag to be found here.
OneUp chain guide review test
The slider ended up sitting a touch high to clear the spider, but there was no issue.


As you've probably guessed, there were no dropped chains while the OneUp guide was on the bike, despite the slider having to sit a bit higher due to it needing to clear the crank's spider. Then again, the bike was already fitted with a clutch-equipped derailleur and a narrow-wide chain ring, and the rider couldn't recall the last time he lost a chain. But, at just 35 grams, there's not really much reason to not keep using the little guide if it doesn't cause any issues.



Pinkbike’s Take:
bigquotesThe OneUp chain guide weighs just 35 grams and costs $45 USD, making it a pretty reasonable component to consider using, and let's not forget that it's basically invisible while doing its job. I'd say that it's the minimum amount of insurance for someone who might be doing a few enduro races, or simply a smart add-on for anyone who would rather not worry about dropping a chain, but also doesn't need full-sized protection. - Mike Levy




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174 Comments

  • 129 1
 What's this a reasonably priced component that's does a job just fine. We can't have that crap here!!!!
  • 19 3
 I've got something to moan about. ISCG 05 only
  • 21 5
 Find all standards at 77designz.com
  • 11 4
 The 77 designz stuff is great I run it on one of my bikes, i am pretty sure the 77 designz is lighter.
  • 42 0
 On top of the unique height adjustment system this guide covers 26-38T rings, has 5.5mm of chainline adjustment and is both Oval and Boost compatible. To our knowledge, this is the only guide available that can make these claims and hit our $45 price tag or 35g weight.
  • 10 10
 I just looked it up the 77designz is 23 grams and $58 usd.
  • 12 0
 You had me at 'Boost compatible'. Take my monies.
  • 9 0
 @OneUpComponents Oval compatibility is huge. Thank you for staying on top of innovation!
  • 10 13
 77 designz is working on their oval compatible version now. @OneUpComponents do you have a lightweight bash that is compatible with this?
  • 10 0
 It's like you actually think of the consumers or something @oneupcomponents. I think you're confused. Thats not how this industry operates.
  • 1 0
 Big fan of oneup. Quality components and a company that stands behind their product.
  • 6 8
 ooooh I got neg repped for asking a question... ooooh, and no answer...
  • 96 5
 This probably won't retain any hate from PB users.
  • 21 65
flag therealtylerdurden (Jan 5, 2016 at 21:15) (Below Threshold)
 HATE IT.
  • 14 0
 Love it. I'm aboutt to sell my bike and was pondering keeping hold of my AMg for the next bike. Now i know about this guide, I can happily let the AMg leave with the rest of the bike.
  • 7 0
 its just like cigarettes. they help you quit by giving you nicotine patches.
  • 6 3
 Of course the American hates it... Ah shucks I did it again!
  • 19 0
 My wife keeps telling me that I don't "need full size protection" but I beg the differ.
  • 3 1
 @jaame - take it off and sell it separately
  • 10 7
 looks like a copy of the 77 designz version. Their version also integrates with a bash, you can run just a bash, the chainguide, or both.
  • 2 0
 Thought we might get the first puns of 2016 on this one.
  • 7 0
 Haha that joke did not go over well!
  • 5 0
 the 77 designs one doesn't have as much adjustablility, and isn't oval ring compatible. Its also about $10 more, which doesn't sound like much but thats nearly 25%. The 77 designs one is lighter, however.
  • 1 0
 I thought they were all oval ring compatible? You just size up by 2 teeth no?
  • 2 0
 This is pretty hit and miss in our testing. Up sizing 2T generally covers the high point of the oval but often leaves the chain exposed at the low point.

If you have a 32T oval, our guide will work when set at 32T - no need to size up.

Here's a quick video:
www.instagram.com/p/7qJyIxwbdz/?taken-by=oneupcomponents
  • 1 0
 My AMg buzzes the bottom of the guide if I set it up at 32. It's about 33, then twisted clockwise as much as the slack in the rail will allow.
  • 54 0
 What’s great about OneUp is they keep coming up with stuff to make your bike better, stuff that should be obvious but apparently isn’t because they do it first or they at least build better mousetraps. Long live the entrepreneur!
  • 2 1
 Well said, and long live competition to drive ingenuity up and pricing down. Looks great, simple and effective. To quote Happy Gilmore, "The price is right, Bob!"
  • 34 0
 Had mine for about a month now. Simple and does what it's supposed to do. It also works with oval rings which is a plus for me
  • 24 1
 aaaaaaand answers my question. Thanks!
  • 4 0
 Same here I have it since 1 month ago and love it, easy to install, clean and work as a dream, I got it installed in my Nomad with a XO1 crankset and 30T Wolftooth Components oval ring.
  • 27 1
 This is the MTB equivalent of the mini-skirt.........and we all like those! :-)))
  • 3 1
 Touche.
  • 1 0
 @gabriel-mission9. That is shocking.... Maybe I should have put "and normally we all like those"... LMAO
  • 21 0
 Looks identical to the guide on my Specialized Enduro... awaits legal letter
  • 3 0
 The height adjustment system is completely different
  • 3 1
 Sorry - i forgot about the plastic washers/spacers.
  • 1 0
 Haha you beat me to it! Very similar to the enduros one, guess we have saved 45 dollars.
  • 1 0
 Its the same, but I had to replace the specialized one as it didn't support a big enough chain ring.
  • 22 0
 $45 35 gram insurance option to not mess up your strava time. got it.
  • 2 0
 I never got hurt on my bike until I put the strava app to use. Now fast is never fast enough.
www.pinkbike.com/photo/12345325
  • 3 2
 Or insurance to not blow a chain through a fast, rough, technical section and eat total shit...
  • 4 0
 @properp what the f$ck happened??
  • 11 0
 looks like he was so long on his ride he started his period
  • 6 0
 @properp I never new a fat bar would be so lethal next time I get into a fight with a road biker im using one of them. I can just imagine. Road biker " EAT MY CARBON FRAME" Me " I shall take out your man hood with my renthall fatbar"
  • 2 0
 " I shall take out your man hood with my renthall fatbar" - whoa, whoa, NSFW!
  • 2 0
 @plyawn well you have to see @Properp photo to understand it
  • 2 0
 Seriously I can't move until I hear the story on that. Did it snap or did you get gouged by the end of it?
  • 4 0
 I want to here it to
  • 9 0
 Story time. Go.
  • 2 0
 Come on @properp Mike levy is
calling you out
  • 2 1
 @properp doesn't appear to sit in front of his computer waiting for Pinkbike to refresh like the rest of us so I'll tell a crash story while we wait. I was riding down a smooth but off-camber section of trail last year on April 1st (appropriate right?). Suddenly my rear tire washed out. At about 15-20mph I stuck my foot out to catch myself. The front of it caught an exposed, bowling ball sized rock (think tip of an iceberg). After I got done cursing and jumping around like there was a firecracker in my ass I realized I couldn't walk or pedal. My rear tire was also flat. A good citizen came along and prescribed me a strong painkiller and an ace bandage. I then used my bike as a crutch and hopped on 1 foot 2 miles up and out to the parking lot. Surgery and 3 months of non weight-bearing later I'm still only 70%. I don't have a bloody crotch to show but learned that in the blink of an eye you can go from JRA to total suck.
  • 1 1
 @properp doesn't appear to sit in front of his computer waiting for Pinkbike to refresh like the rest of us so I'll tell a crash story while we wait. I was riding down a smooth but off-camber section of trail last year on April 1st (appropriate right?). Suddenly my rear tire washed out. At about 15-20mph I stuck my foot out to catch myself. The front of it caught an exposed, bowling ball sized rock (think tip of an iceberg). After I got done cursing and jumping around like there was a firecracker in my ass I realized I couldn't walk or pedal. My rear tire was also flat. A good citizen came along and prescribed me a strong painkiller and an ace bandage. I then used my bike as a crutch and hopped on 1 foot 2 miles up and out to the parking lot. Surgery and 3 months of non weight-bearing later I'm still only 70%. I don't have a bloody crotch to show but learned that in the blink of an eye you can go from JRA to total suck.
  • 1 0
 so is this true or do you know him
  • 1 0
 Just commenting so I get notified if he tells the story
  • 1 7
flag PielPic (Jan 6, 2016 at 15:00) (Below Threshold)
 I call bullshit. Blood become brown on clothes after an hour...
  • 4 0
 Impaled by the end of carbon fat bar.Took a bad flip in a root garden. It took 14 stitches to close up the hole. 2 mile hike back to van. 45 minute ride to hospital. I used my glove to fill the hole to get the bleeding to slow to make it to ER. No BS carbon bars are tuff. You should of seen the van seat if you liked the shorts.
  • 1 0
 @pielpic he could have token it when he was in the hospital and why would someone fake and if you notice most of it is brown
  • 3 0
 And yes the Fat bars(and bike) are fine. Just needed a little washing after the crash. My biggest dilemma was to ditch my bike or push it out of the woods. Yes I pushed the bike out.
  • 1 0
 dang dude that's crazy
  • 1 0
 well now I know to never use strata oh and a fat bar will work great if I get into a fight with a road biker
  • 2 0
 @gavlaa I'm 40 I stopped menstruating a long time ago.
  • 1 0
 That bar impale you in the groin? Did it have bar ends?
  • 2 0
 Yes renthal kevlar grips with bar plugs
  • 1 0
 True storey took him to ER myself.
  • 1 0
 Even more proof right here m.pinkbike.com/photo/12345340
  • 5 0
 @PielPic You want me to send you the ER bill? That is bigger bullsh#t than your comment.
  • 3 0
 pink bike is making me mad I try to downvote @PielPic comment even more but it wont let me
  • 1 1
 @ryan83 you did pretty well with the story. The hike out was about 2 miles. Yes I went in the blink of an eye from JRA to total suck
  • 18 1
 I bought narrow wide because you... pinkbike... told me I had to have it. I would never drop my chain... now I need a chain device? Why... lol
  • 2 0
 you don't. Until your N/W starts wearing. As soon as you start dropping chains you know your N/W is shot.
  • 2 0
 My narrow wide worked like a charm, until it started wearing down. Now I drop a chain every once in a while. Sram sells dirt cheap, $20 NW rings that are steel and will probably last longer than the rest of your bike.
  • 3 1
 you don't really need a narrow wide ring if you are using a clutch derailleur and/or chainguide. I've backed off my clutch tension since running a chainguide.
  • 1 0
 Me too Wayne. My guide does rub in the 42 when the shock compresses on some climbs I do that have whoops in them. Also the bolts that came with the Oneup guide wouldn't thread into my Bronson so I used others I had which threaded in fine. Finally, I am not able to rotate the guide enough to get the thing level. Maybe it's a frame issue?
  • 13 0
 One Up has really come a long way! Glad to see a small company expand and invent new products so quickly tup if I hadn't had my MRP guide already I probably would have went with this.
  • 19 4
 They have definitely one up'd the competition with this one.
  • 6 5
 This article really cranked me up.
  • 11 2
 this article will help guide my future purchases.
  • 12 1
 Narrow wide chains are supposed to stay on the ring, no guide needed, so the marketing department says. And, this guide 'doubles the usable life of narrow-wide chain rings', so the marketing department says. Can we verify any of this?
  • 15 0
 I can. I lose chains on every downhill with a narrow-wide after they are over a month old. With the One-up guide I run my rings for about 6 months now without loosing a single chain.
  • 8 0
 No matter what they say narrow wides don't make it impossible to drop a chain. And as they wear out it makes it more likely that you'll drop a chain. This chain guide prevents that from happening as your chainring wears.
  • 4 0
 I wonder if a narrow wide chainring is needed at all with this guide, mainly if you are already running a clutch derailleur... Thoughts?
  • 2 1
 I built similar guides long before narrow wide and clutch derailleurs even existed and they worked really well with regular rings. At the end of the day it doesn't really take much to keep a chain where it belongs.
  • 3 0
 I imagine with a regular chainring and upper guide the worst that could happen is it falls off the bottom but the top guide will never let it fall completely off so once you pedal forward the chain will feed back onto the chainring.
  • 7 0
 @Vans4life14 - We did a lot of testing using a regular (narrow-narrow) chainrings. The only issue we saw was the potential to lose the chain when backpedaling.
  • 1 3
 You likely could double the life of your narrow-wide ring but it's going to come at a cost to your chain and cassette. Once the ring starts wearing down you'll start dropping chains. I've seen it first hand.
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents I dont' mean to get too nit-picky, but what about this plus a narrow-wide and a non-clutch derailleur? I imagine it would work pretty good, but was there any testing?
  • 2 0
 I had a NW ring and a non clutch dr with no chain guide and I didnt drop chains often at all. Worked pretty good for me. I imagine with a non clutch dr, NW and a guide it would work pretty good. I did have chain slap though.
  • 1 0
 Yeah for a while I ran a n/w and no clutch and it worked good for a while but later on I did start to drop chains occasionally. That was also with a 9 speed chain so it probably didn't hug the chainring as much as a 10 or 11 speed chain.
  • 10 0
 This chain guide is a no brainer. Been running my for about 5 months and haven't dropped a chain since. Forgot it was there until I read this review.
  • 8 0
 Like the minimalist design. Wish it could mount in direct mount front derailleur location though.
  • 3 0
 My thoughts exactly. My 120mm bike doesn't have (or need) guide mounts but I would run this if I had the option
  • 1 1
 Hi,
Bike24.de sells Sixpack iscg adaptors for €8.57 plus shipping. (search for "iscg Adapter") not Sure what shipping to UK would cost, but it might be a solution.
Bye
  • 4 0
 now to have the mental battle over needing a true bashguard/chainguide or this lil guy.

i do tend to bash logs from time to time but i also havent killed a chain ring bashing said logs....

ugh pink bike comment'ers figure it out for me!
  • 3 0
 Check the guide bolt for tension and put some adhesive on it. Mine fell out last week,luckily i only lost the bolt the guide stayed on. Great product.
  • 4 1
 Just ordered one from crc £32 in the uk. I wish I had one when I travelled two thousand miles to race and dropped a chain one minute into stage one on a stair set
  • 4 0
 Forgive I couldn't be bothered reading all that but do they work with OVAL chain rings ??
  • 3 1
 @superbikes - You bet it is...
  • 4 0
 @superbikes : yes they do work with oval and can handle all the Standards.
  • 1 0
 I was told narrow wides retain chains. They only retained till I got to the real deal then on a 5 day trip I lost count of how many times I dropped a chain. I was passed by on my 66 by XC bikes. All I could do was rechain and pass them but... Faster I went the more I dropped. Thx to Santa for the one up!
  • 4 1
 WATCH OUT !!!!!!!!!!! It is incompatible with Bronson 2, 5010 2, Tracer T275, Rocky Altitude 27.5 according to the OneUp website
  • 2 1
 interesting. Nobody running an Altitude would use one anyway as we all believe in the power of the N/W to hold our chains in place.

wonder what RM model OneUp has as first pic that comes up when you load their site. It's running this guide but could be an Instinct or Thunderbolt but surprised the ISCG tabs vary on those relative to the Altitude.

And the listed bikes are all ISCG05 but OneUp advises, "out of spec ISCG tab placement". What does that mean?
  • 1 0
 Probably clocked wrong or offset too far from spec.
  • 1 0
 I run one on my altitude with a one up 32 oval. It sits high on the low point in the oval but still covers he chain.
  • 2 0
 good lookin product. looks useful for 1X riders that don't use a clutch.
IMO, if you have yur chain length dialed, run a clutch + a N/W chainring
and yur not sending it off cornices....yur ok w/o it.
  • 5 1
 I'm sure this review will guide several readers to their website.
  • 1 0
 I see what you did there.
  • 4 4
 This is a sweet product if you already have a 1x set up and want more security... but seriously, a clutch derailleur, a half-chainguide, a fancy chainring... it's a lot of effort to get most of the security of a chainguide, no?
  • 2 0
 My chain has trouble falling off my narrow/wide even after crashes (like, hasn't happened yet), so I am having trouble understanding when these things are useful.
  • 3 0
 Because the narrow/wide itself wears over time (just like everything else on the bike) and loses it's ability to retain the chain. A guide on the top takes over the duties of the narrow/wide.

If you put it and a narrow/wide on at the same time, you will extend the life of the narrow/wide.

And of course, the elephant in the room asks, "Havent' we come full circle"?
  • 4 0
 If you have to ask why you need a guide then you probably don't need a guide.
  • 2 0
 I tend to smash into things with my chainring so I need the extra protection on the bottom.but I like the less is more approach!
  • 17 1
 I use a nice thick chamois and thick cream for extra protection on my bottom. Smile
  • 11 0
 @iamamodel That's only because you're a model
  • 1 0
 I use this guide in conjunction with a blackspire bashguard.
  • 3 1
 The guide you seek then is the MRP AMG v2. It is similar to this but includes a plastic taco bash guard. Both are excellent, minimalist chain guides. All you really need with clutch derailers nowadays.
  • 1 0
 My chain tends to drop every ride without the guide..maybe it's just my riding style
  • 1 0
 Got it for my new Whyte G160 as its got a Boosted chain line and this was the easiest one to fit. My old E13 one on my old bike would have needed longer bolts and washers to space it out and this was a lot easier to fit.
  • 1 0
 Looks great, and I was happy to see a sub 50 dollar price... I was waiting for the $125 MSRP, only to be pleasantly surprised. This would probably be a good investment on my AM rig.
  • 1 0
 Though's Blackspire rings are the best in the world! Kinda makes this test bogus, the chain won't fall off with that Snaggletooth ring. They should have used a crapy old ring to get a propper test.
  • 1 0
 They are nice. Very tall, squared teeth. But then the WolfTooth and AbsoluteBlack tooth profiles look very similar to the Blackspires to me.
  • 1 0
 in a comment above OneUp says

"We did a lot of testing using a regular (narrow-narrow) chainrings. The only issue we saw was the potential to lose the chain when backpedaling."
  • 2 0
 After all the sram bla bla bla about nw... Here we are again... Using a chain guide bc the chain will drop sooner or later. It makes me skeptical about anything sram claims.
  • 3 0
 I love the small profile of this guide!
  • 1 0
 Been running my for about 5 months and haven't dropped a chain since. Forgot it was there until I read this review. Also works with mt AB oval ring!
  • 1 0
 Thats interesting to know as I've got an AB oval too. got any pics?
  • 3 1
 @Funkhouser, are you the same person as @skeen95 and @slave2trails? Do you work for One Up?
  • 1 0
 er.. nope? Smile ive got pics tho...
  • 2 0
 So was it just easier to copy?

slave2trails (4 hours ago)
This chain guide is a no brainer. Been running my for about 5 months and haven't dropped a chain since. Forgot it was there until I read this review.

I cannot trust you! although I'm also interested in the pics.
  • 2 0
 i saw his reply and thought i couldnt have said it better myself. just concurring...
  • 3 1
 That bike is begging for a 42T tho...
  • 1 0
 Oh it has! 11sp hadn't arrived & I couldn't wait to build it!!
  • 1 0
 Great little product! I shaved the outer edge of the guide with a dremel to accommodate a RF bash ring and now have the best of both worlds (IMO of course).
  • 1 2
 WATCH OUT !!!!!!!!!!! It is incompatible with Bronson 2, 5010 2, Tracer T275, Rocky Altitude 27.5 according to the OneUp website
  • 1 0
 Is it a chain retention solution for those drivetrains with clutch deraileurs and narrow-wide chainrings, where dropping a chain is as possible as winning in lotto?
  • 1 0
 I don't understand why the big guys do things like.....hey lets make it electric.....when the small guys are doing great things for the unmentionable parts.
  • 2 1
 Wow, something actually affordable on pinkbike? Am I in the wrong page or what?
  • 1 1
 I have one of these for sale (www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1906245) brand new. Ordered as I didn't realise a chain guide came with my new Stumpjumper...
  • 3 1
 OneUp = K.I.S.S.
KEEP IT SIMPLE STUPID
Great product.
  • 1 0
 What is the lightest chain guide I can Install on a Pivot Mach 429SL (1x11) Race Face 30T crank?
  • 1 1
 these are useful for 1X riders with clutchless r. derailluers.
IMO, if you have yur chain length dialed, & use a clutch..and you don't ride off conices..yur fine w/o it.
  • 1 0
 How long do chain guides like this tend to last in general? Do they see a lot of wear and tear and need replaced often?
  • 2 0
 OneUp might put my local hardware store out of business...
  • 1 0
 A 32T STEEL NW chain ring weights ~ 100g. So what is the point in using alu NW ring + such a device ?
  • 2 0
 I saved 35 grams and $45 buy not buying this product.
  • 2 0
 Help me Mr Dirt
  • 2 1
 No need for chain guides anymore
  • 8 9
 Looking for:

HDM
S3
E-Type
ISCG 03

It´s worth to check the orinal version of 77designz.

It´s only half the weight!!!

www.77designz.com
  • 1 0
 I dont have iscg...... dammit
  • 2 0
 Taco! I NEED TACOS
  • 1 1
 You can find beautifull tacos here: 77designz.com
  • 2 0
 But its not carbon. Smile
  • 1 1
 Great product, though I think Shovel.bike chainguides are more sexy!
  • 2 2
 Too bad it is not Made in 03 iscg mount Frown
  • 6 7
 Check the one from 77designz!
  • 3 6
 I like the BB 77designz one better and it's lighter.
  • 1 3
 This is too expensive. I will never pay more than 1$ per gram in the bike industry.
  • 2 0
 Do you take that aproach on all your purchases?
  • 1 0
 yes I do my general exception is rear shocks. You can still buy a very expensive bike with that ratio.
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