OneUp Components' EDC Tool and New Pedals – Sea Otter 2017

Apr 20, 2017
by AJ Barlas  
OneUp Components is a name that has infiltrated the industry with their unique take on a range of scenarios that the team behind the brand see as needing a simpler, more accessible solution for. Their latest offerings which they are getting ready to launch, possibly in the coming weeks, are no different and they were happy to show us around some of the products, namely being the Everyday Carry tool (EDC) that everyone caught a glimpse of recently on Richie's bike during the opening EWS event in New Zealand, and a couple of new platform pedals options.

OneUp Everyday Carry (EDC) Tool

The EDC tool is OneUp's solution to being able to carry the parts needed in order to be a prepared rider out on the trails. The goal behind the tool was to utilize the space already available on all mountain bikes, which resulted in them designing it to fit into the steerer tube of your fork. The star-nut is no more, and instead, the team has an easy and secure solution that will be able to be completed by the home mechanic or at your local LBS. On top of that, the team wanted the tool to be easily accessible and quick to get down to business with, making it straightforward to remove from the steerer tube and take apart, allowing riders to focus on the repairs at hand and not waste time mucking about with the tool itself. The tool will be available very soon and will be priced around the $60 USD mark. Keep an eye on the site for more on that.

OneUp Components EDC Everyday Carry tool all of it s parts which include tire levers a multi tool C02 and chain tool as well as the high volume pumps that they are now producing too which also integrate with the EDC tool.
  OneUp Components' EDC tool and all of its parts, which include tire levers, a multi-tool, a chain tool, and room for a C02 cartridge, plus their high volume pumps that they are now producing too, which also integrate with the tool.

OneUp Components EDC Everyday Carry tool locks down inside your steerer tube and includes a smooth finish at the top.
The tool locks down inside your steerer tube and has a smooth, close to flush finish at the top.
OneUp Components EDC Everyday Carry tool slides in and out of the steerer tube with ease
Gone is the star nut, and the team have a simple solution to achieve a secure headset, and enable the mount for the tool.


In addition to the multi-tool, OneUp is also releasing two high-volume pumps. The pumps, which are 70cc and 100cc (about 30% more than your standard hand pump), also integrate with their EDC tool. The tool slides and secures into the handle of the pump in the same way that it fits inside the steerer of your fork. An extra bonus is that the head for the pump can also double as a C02 inflator, giving riders the ability to seat the tire bead more easily, or just get a lot of air in quick and touch it up with the hand pump.

OneUp Components new pump has a trick end piece that doubles as a C02 inflator
OneUp Components new high-volume pump.
OneUp Components pump with an end that doubles as a C02 inflator
The pump features an end that doubles as a C02 inflator.


Oneup Alloy and Composite Pedals

OneUp also has their first platform pedal about ready for availability. The pedal, which has been fully designed and developed in-house by OneUp, features a solid platform size coming in at 110mm x 105mm (L x W), ten pins per side and rolls on four cartridge bearings all the way through (no DU bushings here, folks). The bearing that the team used for the outer end of the axle needed to be small to allow them to still get the slim profile that they were after, so they used three bearings here to help distribute the load and aid with durability. At the crank side of the axle is a regular, larger sized pedal bearing.

OneUp Components brand new Alloy pedal. The pedal will retail for roughly 125 USD
  OneUp Components brand new Alloy pedal. The pedal will retail for roughly $125 USD

Weight for the Alloy pedal is approximately 350g and it features a slight contour/convex profile, going from 12mm thick at the axle down to 8.5mm at the edges. The lead edge of the pedal is also shallow to help prevent getting hung up when encountering pedal strikes. On top of all of this, the team spent some time on the serviceability of the pedal and once a simple seal is popped off the pedal spindle, a cassette tool can be placed over the top of the spindle, making removal of the axle straightforward.

OneUp Components Alloy pedal in green. The pedal includes 10 pins side that can be removed to adjust the feel that you desire.
OneUp Components Alloy pedal in green. The pedal includes 10 pins/side that are easily removed to adjust the feel to your liking.
OneUp Components Alloy pedal features a contoured convex profile going from 12mm thick at the axle to 8.5mm at the ends. .
The Alloy pedal features a contoured/convex profile, going from 12mm thick at the axle to 8.5mm at the ends.

OneUp also has a Composite pedal that follows the same outline as the Alloy, still features 10 pins per side (more than most other composite pedals) and still has the same profile, though a little thicker than the alloy, going from 18.5mm over the axle, down to 12.5mm at the edges (this is thanks to a more traditional axle, to keep it at a competitive price point with other plastic pedals). The Composite pedal weighs approximately 350g as well.

The Alloy pedal will retail for around $125 USD and the Composite will be around the $50 USD mark. Each will be available shortly, so keep an eye on this space.


Limited Top Guide Colors and Full Switch Line

OneUp also had some new, limited colors for the replaceable top piece to their chainguide. The orange was originally done to match the Yeti EWS teams bikes and while they were at it, red was added to the mix.

OneUp Components chainguide top piece


They also have their full selection of Switch chainrings that integrate with their spiders, which cover a lot of direct mount options including, SRAM, Hope, Race Face, e*thirteen, and Cannondale. The system replaces their direct mount rings and they can cover off multiple offsets (including Super Boost), while also making it possible to change your chainring without removing the cranks.

OneUp covers a wide range of the direct mount chainrings available with SRAM Hope Race Face e thirtheen and Cannondale.
  OneUp covers a wide range of the direct mount chainrings available, with SRAM, Hope, Race Face, e*thirtheen and Cannondale.

OneUp s spider for the Hope cranks.
OneUp Components Switch chainrings. Their Switch ring and spider system replaces any direct mount chainrings that the brand did in the past.



MENTIONS: @OneUpComponents




127 Comments

  • + 60
 Wait... where's the star nut go?
  • + 8
 its not wheelie approved
  • + 4
 Star nut? Oh crap... OneUp didn't think of that!
  • + 26
 Looks like that cassette lockring cap (in green) at the top is going to have some way of threading in compression, but this is guesswork on my half, upvotes until OneUp answer our questions!
  • + 222
 @camcoz69 - In the garbage.
  • + 1
 Looks like the tool fits into your steer tube and preloads the headset like a length of allthread would.
  • + 2
 @OneUpComponents well how does the tool grip the inside of the steerer tub?
  • + 3
 Looks like a cassette lock ring looking device will thread into the tube instead.
  • + 3
 @OneUpComponents

My guess:
The tool goes inside a tube which is treaded (on the inisde) at the top, and bottom.
Compression lock ring at top and bottom
Just cut the top to fit your steering tube length.
Or something like that.
Do I win anything?
  • + 1
 @RedRedRe: Probably just slides in from the bottom and rests against the underside, and bolts at the top, kinda like the old star nut replacements from alien or whoever made them that had the huge bolt from one end to the other.

Never trusted the star nuts tbh but that thing felt safer subliminaly
  • + 8
 @Enzyme: my understanding is that there's nothing to trust with a star nut, and that it's just there to preload the stem, steer tube, headset interface. After that, the bolts clamping the stem to the steer tube do all the heavy lifting. I've even heard of weight weenies taking the bolt out and hammering out the star nut to save a few grams once everything's set up. Of course, if you do that and have a crash that turns the stem, you're completely effed, so I do hope this tool has something you can use to preload everything.
  • + 3
 @Altabird: correct... the starnut is just for preload, once it's set you don't need it at all
  • + 1
 The cutaway makes me about 90% certain that they're threading the inside of the top of the steerer tube.
  • - 4
flag TheDoctoRR (Apr 20, 2017 at 20:47) (Below Threshold)
 Is there a reason OneUp is dodging answering how the tool mounts in? That doesn't inspire confidence...
  • - 2
 Regardless of how it will lock, it is a cool piece. However the convenience on not having to pull the multi tool from the pocket is greatly offset by the inconvenience of having to bring a cassette lock tool in case the headset gets loose? But this probably more of a racing kit.
  • - 3
 Just loosen the stem steerer clamp, push down on the stem, and re-tighten. Should be fine.
  • + 1
 @DavidMakalaster: yeah, but that would definitely void the fork warranty...
  • + 0
 @RedRedRe: I'm willing to bet a company with the credibility of OneUp could easily negotiate with suspension companies to thread the last 8mm of the steerer and retain a warranty. It's a standard practice on BMX bikes and was just the way every bike was for about 90 years.
  • + 3
 Worth it just to get rid of that horrible invention (the star nut)
  • - 4
flag FabianJ (Apr 21, 2017 at 1:33) (Below Threshold)
 @OneUpComponents: 3 bearings on axle sounds like a rookie mistake to me!
  • + 2
 So a cassette tool is needed to tighten the headset, rather than an Allen key? Nah mate.
I'm all for the death of the star nut especially in alloy steerer tubes.but don't really want to carry a cassette tool on my trail rides.
  • + 5
 @nojzilla: when is the last time you had to adjust the preload of your bike on the trail? You really should be checking that before you ride, because you know that can lead to ... you know ... death or paralysis
  • + 2
 It looks like the lockring tightens the outer tube and uses the taper of the steerer tube to tighten against, and the inner tube has a twist-lock system using the rubber topcap. It's fair to assume there will be a lockring tool within the central tool tube if you need to adjust your headset. I just wonder if there will be a straight tube variant. Clearly there is a bigger press release coming when they actually release the product
  • + 3
 @dv8416: times when I've had new H'sets pressed an they've bedded in on the first ride.... when my stem has shifted an I need to straighten it, I like to check the pre'load too. Not really that unusual is it?....
But, you seem to be missing my main point that a cassette tool is needed instead of the Allen key that's allready on my multi tool. BMX has the right idea in that most preloaders that work on a threaded steerer, even largely hollow lightweight designs only need an Allen key not a cassette tool... And the large spanner needed too
Oh an I'm a pretty competent mech so pretty safe from any impending paralysis... Or death
But, I'm pretty metal so bring it!! \M/
  • + 2
 @nojzilla: Well put. Props on the reply.
  • + 1
 @TheDoctoRR: One Up just needs to have Richie Rude send the last jump of the Whistler EWS race again, then pull out the kit. Mic drop.
  • + 31
 Holy cow OneUp is killing it with innovative products at very reasonable prices and homegrown in Canada to boot. I wrote them once with a stupid idea and they responded with a very well explained response as to why it was stupid. Most companies just don't take the time to even respond. It's so awesome to have a competitive aftermarket to help us hack our way through the rediculous industry standards with reliable products, clear instructions and someone who you can contact and get a response from.
  • + 15
 What was the idea?
  • + 2
 C'mon , elaborate !!!!!!!!!
  • + 4
 We need to know what this idea was...for science.
  • + 1
 Something like Ali Gs icecream glove? m.youtube.com/watch?v=48TR0vUPQCs
  • + 22
 An article about a device that lets you store small round objects in your steer tube and it just happens to show up on 4/20. Coincidence... The unicorns dancing on this mostly eaten tray of brownies definitely suggest otherwise...
  • + 3
 Unicorns? I'm not sure if that's supposed too happen
  • + 1
 Did you mean on 21. 4.?
  • + 19
 Canfield Pedals??
  • + 6
 Exactly what I thought!
  • + 1
 derivative
  • + 2
 @erikkellison: agreed. I'm curious how they got around Canfield's patent on on convex pedals.
  • + 2
 Po1nt had that design wayyyy before Canfield. Regardless.. These look rad
  • + 3
 Convex pedals??
  • + 1
 How about RF Atlas? Exact same bearing and axle setup. Almost same shape too.
  • + 2
 @tcmitchell: because convex pedals suck, even the patent lawyer knew that and just laughed at them.
  • + 0
 @mrleach: Atlas pedals are a touch lighter for equivalent footprint, have the inward facing pins, and more concave shape... I see no reason to ride anything else, but more options is still a good thing
  • + 1
 Crank Bros Stamp pedals?
  • + 1
 @iggzdaloc: Which pedal? Only Point 1 pedal I know is the podium, and that's not convex.
  • + 1
 @medina: not convex.
  • + 1
 @mrleach: not convex. I'm starting to think... yup, needs to happen.
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/convex
  • + 1
 @uuuu: methinks it's high time you rode on some convex pedals.
  • + 1
 I wasn't a fan of thin pedals, I preferred chunky platforms with a nice deep concave. Until I tried HT, they have a surprising feel of deep concave grip for such a thing pedal. Convex is a concept I just can't get my head around when it comes to pedals
  • + 7
 @OneUpComponents will you be able to use your edc tool on a couple different bikes. I guess what I'm asking can you buy the star nut replacement separately so you can move the tool from bike to bike ..
  • + 9
 Yes you will be able to purchase the top caps separately.
  • + 7
 @mountainx definitely. The tool will drop into as many bikes as you setup.
  • + 1
 @OneUpComponents: best piece of news of the day !
  • + 4
 Send the green alloy pedals. This is how small companies survive. Innovate and stay a step ahead of the big boys. Would love to see someone get into the suspension link replacement game. Want a more progressive suspension feel, just buy a different link. How pro would that be? Maybe my stumpjumper wouldn't bottom out on everything.
  • + 4
 You need some volume spacer in your shock.
  • + 2
 Got one. It's just a very linear design..
  • + 2
 @BigballmcCall: easy. just ride slower Wink
  • + 3
 @BryceBorlick: if I ride any slower I'll tip over.
  • + 3
 That tool is cool as hell but I have to wonder how much it weighs. I would think that the people who don't ride with packs and could benefit from this might care a thing or two about stuffing a tool into their feather weight forks...
  • + 44
 The full system is under 100g plus ~20g savings over a typical starnut preload assembly. The tool alone is about 50g lighter than any other multi tool with both a 2mm and an 8mm.
  • + 4
 @OneUpComponents: Thanks for the reply! That's a nice little selling point that I wish was mentioned in the article.
  • + 2
 @OneUpComponents: Wow that is impressive
  • + 1
 @OneUpComponents: take my money! I want one. I just ditched my seat bag for a seatpost mounted second water bottle
  • + 1
 @OneUpComponents: So how does it work? Is the too sort of like an expansion plug as well?
  • + 1
 @OneUpComponents: When can we expect these to be made available?
  • + 6
 @OneUpComponents just checked your site, when are the pedals available for purchase?
  • + 4
 Pedals will be dropping next month. Stay tuned.
  • + 7
 how does it replace the star nut?
  • + 1
 My gueeeesssssss is that the tool is somehow also an expansion plug, like you'd use with a carbon steer tube.
  • - 3
 you probably need to cut threads into the steertube. BMX has been doing this for a while
  • + 3
 The tool reminds me of the Cannondale Head Wrench I had 10 years ago...
Which did not have the issue of the preload (lefty) or the neat push/open system.
Curious to see how it works, for sure there is a cap or something at the bottom of the fork
  • + 1
 @OneUpComponents Great stuff from you guys. All your products are well made, well thought out and reasonably priced. Apart from the Switch chainrings which I thought were an april fool's joke, all your products hit the nail on the head in terms of design and functionality.

10/10 recommend your products all the time.

and from Squampton to top it all off.
  • + 1
 @OneUpComponents how is used the CO2 cartridge with the EDC headtube? there is any part of the tool used as the head inflator. Love your components I got many of them and I'm waiting that EDC since showed by Richie on Instagram, good and nice job guys, keep going and best of the success to all.
  • + 1
 also curious about this @OneUpComponents
  • + 1
 The pedals look like they will give the Canfield Crampon Mountain pedals some competition:

Crampons: 106mm x 112mm convex platforms, hybrid sealed bearings/DU bushing system, 400 grams, 10mm at axle, 6mm at edges, 11 pins per pedal, $149 USD (although Canfield offers free shipping on the pedals)

OneUP: 105mm x 110mm convex platforms, full sealed bearings, 350 grams, 12mm at axle, 8.5mm at edges, 10 pins per pedal, $125 USD

The OneUP looks to use a much larger bearing at the crank end (similar to the Spank Spike and Ooozy), good for durability but the hump could be an issue For example here www.bikemag.com/gear/tested-spank-spike-pedals/#79WhXEO8Dc11kzYu.97 a reviewer commented on the Spike: "The massive inboard bearing necessitates a hump in the pedal platform. That hump, in turn, had a tendency to lift the ball of my foot off the pedal and reduced the traction a bit (bummer). On the upside, that massive bearing is seriously stout and the seal is excellent."
  • + 1
 This pedal looks like an open mould design with a few changes, It does nothing to move me away from a concave design such as the Vault, Tmac or Nukeproof that's for sure. I really dislike huge bulges by the axle and the way everything is assembled and bearings preloaded from the crank end, its very much like the new crank brothers pedal and I wouldn't copy anything they have done in terms of engineering...
  • + 2
 How do I get the different color guides?! I want orange or red for my Nomad! I am about to purchase the bashguide as well and would love to have the red or orange! instead of green!
  • + 3
 That tool is certainly one of those 'wish I had done that', looks like a great tool and I really hope it works well in practice and not just in theory!
  • + 5
 Shut up and take my money!
  • + 3
 I'm not usually one to say this about mtb accessories, but @OneUpComponents you can take my money.
  • + 2
 Dang OneUp. They keep one-upping things with innovation. Well-earned company name. I’m a fan.
  • + 1
 @oneupcomponents sent you guys an email from Spain couple of weeks back. Let me know if it hasn't gone through. Have fun at SeaOtter
  • + 3
 well designed, large, thin pedal. i like.
  • + 2
 Man oh man WHY would you design a convex profile for a pedal??? Is it so important that we sacrifice grip for clearance?
  • + 1
 How is grip sacrificed? Have you ridden Canfield pedals?
  • + 1
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: running stiffer dh soles like 510 impact don't allow the shoe contact with all of the pins. Concave just feels like your foot sinks in and stays there. I have not ridden the crampons. Have you?
  • + 1
 @ibishreddin:Got them on both my bikes, no issue with grip.

Maybe you should try something before speaking out of ignorance.
  • + 1
 Canfield pedals (and presumably other convex designs) offer more grip. Your shoe doesn't sink into a concave pedal unless the ball of your foot is over the axle (I don't know anyone who descends on flats that way). When your shoe is on the pedal, arch-over-axle/ball of foot on leading edge of pedal, the shoe wraps around a convex design, increasing grip. In the stiffest soles, maybe completely flat is best, but I have a few different designs, and I prefer Canfields with impacts and freeriders.
  • + 2
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: not ignorance, have you ridden dmr vaults? Super concave and they are the best flat pedals i have ever tried.I have ridden both convex and concave flat pedals and generally prefer the feel of a concave design is all. Will have to try some crampons though to see what the buzz is about, as they sound like a great option.
  • + 1
 I completely agree with erikkellison my crampons with a set of free riders are so gripp that sometimes I wonder if I'm clipped in. Another great thing is there super thin so pedal stiles a less frequent. Overall I haven't found a better flat pedal than a Canfield Crampon
  • + 3
 I think that I have a flat pedal addiction.
  • + 2
 @OneUpComponents Very well done. Can't wait to see the pedals and EDC tool pop up on your site.
  • + 2
 I cant tell you how many times i wanted a different color upper chain guide. We're living in good times,people!
  • + 1
 Whaaaaaaaat Up, I mean Oneeeeeeeeee Up, take my money! Star nuts are nutz!!
  • + 3
 Pedals want
  • + 1
 @oneupcomponents Availability?
I'm ready to buy, that tool looks awesome, does it requires special stem?
  • + 1
 The fact that @OneUpComponents is dodging the question of HOW this replaces the star but doesn't exactly inspire confidence.
  • + 1
 Does it have something to pump the CO2 to the tyres? Or is just room for a Co2 cartridge?
  • + 1
 Where's the picture of the composite pedal?
A video or pics of the steerer tube tool in use would be great, too.
  • + 2
 Can I have some stickers please?
  • + 1
 Yeah, me too!
  • + 2
 Can I have some decals?
  • + 2
 @scruff0372: Good morning Scruff. You're up early!
  • + 2
 My shins started to hurt just reading about those pedals.
  • + 3
 Those pins look murderous.
  • + 2
 Are the pedals compatible with crank boots?
  • + 1
 @OneUpComponents: what is the minimum length that the steer tube needs to be?
  • + 1
 I guess the star nut i swapped with some kind of expanding-casette-tool-magic-cylinder?!
  • + 1
 So I don't fully get it. The pump also fit into the steerer tube? Mind blown
  • + 2
 If you're being serious: not quite, the tool designed to fit into the headtube storage system will also fit into the handle of the pump if you'd rather carry it like that. Sans top tube setup.
  • + 2
 @NateMob: That makes a whole lot more sense! Reading on a phone sucks.
  • + 2
 Good looking and innovative products!
  • + 1
 Definitely getting the pump/tool combo, brilliant! The red chain guide might also end up on my Scout
  • + 1
 You teased us a month ago with that EDC tool and now THIS....!! When will it be available????? Come on guys!
  • + 1
 @oneup always making legit stuff at a realistic price!
  • + 1
 How long is the edc unit? How long does my steer tube need to be?
  • + 1
 These will be my new favorite pedals!
  • + 1
 Shut up and take my money! (2)
  • + 2
 I love @oneupcomponents
  • + 1
 Is the EDC safe to use with a carbon steerer tube? @OneUpComponents
  • + 1
 Send over the EDC !
  • + 1
 just sell me it !!!

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