Opinion: 7 Things All New Mountain Bikes Should Have

Jan 28, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  
Spinning Circles column Mike Kazimer


Somehow we made it to 2021. That number still doesn't seem right to me - I'm pretty sure everyone was supposed to have rocket packs, laser guns, and flying vehicles by now. Unless your last name is Musk, you probably don't have any of those things. Luckily, mountain biking still exists in this odd world that we're living in, and today's bikes are better than ever.

We were recently talking about the next iteration of the Grim Donut, a discussion that got me thinking about what features all modern mountain bikes should have, at least in my mind. There's a mental checklist I go through when I'm writing up a bike review, so I thought I'd get that list out of my brain and onto the screen. Without further ado, here's a list of what I'm looking for on a new mountain bike.




PNW Components Introduces the redesigned Rainier Dropper Post. The third generation of the Rainier Dropper Post maintains the consistency and reliability that the Rainier is known for while focusing on fitting more bikes and providing refined adjustability for the rider.
PNW Components' Rainier dropper is just one example of a post with adjustable travel.
Transition Sentinel V2
A size large Transition Sentinel has a 430mm seat tube, which makes it possible to run a long travel dropper without any issues.


Long travel dropper posts + frames to accommodate them

The average dropper post length has been increasing over the last few years, but there are still too many companies putting 150mm posts into size large frames, and too many frames being released that don't have short enough seat tubes, or enough insertion depth to run a longer travel post.

Sure, on shorter travel bikes a super-long post isn't as much of a necessity – those bikes will see more use on rolling terrain, where getting the seat as far out of the way as possible isn't quite as important, but it should at least be possible to run one. On longer travel bikes, I'd like to see more companies get on board and start shipping bikes with 200 or 210mm posts, at least on the large and extra large sizes. At the moment, I'd say the companies based in the Pacific Northwest are doing it best. Transition, Kona, and Norco all have bikes that come properly spec'd.

There are multiple posts on the market that allow the amount of travel to be customized, so I'm not sure why more companies don't use a something like the Trans-X Rad or PNW Components' Rainier post, where the travel can be altered up to 30mm in 5mm increments in a matter of seconds without any special tools.

On the other end of the price scale, I'm still waiting for a 200mm RockShox AXS post to come out. Right now, 170mm is the longest option, which means that there are a bunch of fancy bikes out there that would be even better with a longer post, but their owners will need to go retro and install cable and housing (or hydraulic line) if they decide they want more drop.


12 x 148mm rear axle spacing

There hasn't been a massive shakeup in the axle spacing realm for a few years, and my fingers are crossed that it stays that way. Most new XC, trail, and enduro bikes are showing up with 12x148mm Boost rear hub spacing, and there are even some DH bikes, like the Specialized Demo, with that spacing as well.

That brings us to 12x157mm SuperBoost spacing. I've seen all the graphs and read all of the justifications, and yes, it would have made a whole lot of sense if regular Boost had never hit the market, but at this point I think it's too late to change lanes again. There are lots of examples of bikes with relatively short chainstays, generous tire clearance, and plenty of frame stiffness that use regular Boost spacing; why shake things up for negligible gains?


Kona Process X review
Two axle positions makes it possible to choose either 435 or 450mm chainstays on Kona's Process X.


Size specific or adjustable chainstays

We're starting to see more and more companies rolling out size-specific chainstays, or chainstays with chips that allow them to be lengthened or shortened by 10mm or so. Maintaining an even front center to rear center ratio across all frame sizes makes a lot of sense, and it's a little surprising that it's taken so long for this to catch on.

After all, an extra-large bike with a 500mm reach and 440mm chainstays is going to feel a lot different out on the trail than a size small with a 430mm reach and those same 440mm chainstays. Having size specific chainstays makes sure that the bike's intended handling characteristics are maintained no matter the rider height.


Threaded bottom brackets

I'm not as vehemently opposed to press-fit bottom brackets as some – I haven't had any noise related issues in years - but given the choice I'd still always pick a threaded bottom bracket. After all, they're easier to install and remove over and over again without any frame damage, and much less likely to creak or get jarred out of place. It's still a little mind-boggling that you can pay more than $3,000 for a frame that doesn't have a threaded bottom bracket – if I was designing a bike this would be on my list of must-have features.


Raaw Madonna V2 review
There's nothing wrong with external cable routing if it's done right, like on the Raaw Madonna.
Specialized's internal cable routing is typically very well executed.

Cable routing that works

Internal or external, I'm not too fussed about where a bike's housing sits, as long as it's easy to live with and completely quiet. If its going inside the frame, I want to be able to run it through without using any dental tools, magnets, or shouted curse words. At the head tube, there might as well be ports to cleanly run the rear brake on either side of the handlebar, one of those smaller details that's often overlooked.


SRAM UDH

At the moment, the benefit of SRAM's Universal Derailleur Hanger is that it's inexpensive (around $15 USD), and should be easily obtainable from most bike shops. That means if you do break one, you won't need to go on a wild goose chase trying to track down a replacement. I also have feeling that SRAM has something up their sleeve that will make this a good feature to have in the future... I'm not sure what it is, but I know if I was bike shopping a UDH would be a point in the plus column.


Nukeproof Giga
The new Nukeproof Giga has lots of travel, and lots of room for a water bottle.


Room for a water bottle inside the front triangle

All of Levy's moaning has paid off, and the vast majority of new bikes now fit a water bottle inside the front triangle. Really, the only reason I'm including this point is to encourage the trend to continue. I know there are some holdouts that think carrying water is an unnecessary compromise, but that's a shaky leg to stand on given how many bikes currently exist that perform incredibly well, and manage to have room for a bottle where it belongs.

I'm also a fan of the two bolts that have started appearing on the underside of top tube, although I think there's a lot of room for some clever solutions in this space. A relatively inexpensive chunk of plastic that a tube and multi-tool could attach to shouldn't be that hard to create; in fact, I already convinced Brian Park to crank one out on his home 3D printer and it turned out much better than expected.


Final thoughts

The focus of this list of requests was more on frame features rather than specific geometry numbers. At the moment, I'm happy with where things are going in that department. The longer and slacker movement is continuing, but I think it's starting to slow down a little. There are limits to how far numbers can get pushed before you end up with a bike that's so narrowly focused it's missing the versatility that makes today's bikes so much fun.

I also avoided diving too deep into specific parts spec / pricing requests this time around, since that could be an entire article on its own, but I will say that an aluminum frame with good suspension, good brakes, and a basic-but-reliable drivetrain will always make a whole lot of sense.



What do you think? What's on your list of must-haves for a modern mountain bike?



487 Comments

  • 653 4
 Most importantly the supplier needs to have stock
  • 421 5
 Chicken, beef or vegetable?
  • 361 6
 Game Stop stock?
  • 165 5
 @moefosho: $GME TO THE MOON!!!!
  • 58 1
 @Yibh6009: HOLD THE LINE
  • 6 1
 @Yibh6009: i gots plenty
  • 42 1
 @tlilly: WE LIKE THE STOCK.
  • 19 0
 stonks
  • 3 0
 @stuie321 Good thing you didn't use the word 'inventory'.
  • 6 2
 HOLD TO THE MOON FOR NEW BIKE MONEY
  • 5 20
flag TH3MACK (Jan 28, 2021 at 16:29) (Below Threshold)
 @Yibh6009: Sheeple will be fleeced. ToooDaMoon my ass. What you don't know is the higher it goes better as it takes more of your peeps money.
  • 6 0
 Gamestonks
  • 6 1
 @Noeserd: DIAMOND HANDS PEEPS
  • 5 4
 @TH3MACK: The one voice of reason.... we all know what comes after the pump.... its the DUMP! Ah the old greater fool theory at work!
  • 2 2
 @jaytdubs: yes the long slow burn.......

stay solvent my friends.
  • 1 1
 Wondered where r/WallStreetBets was gonna land. Shoulda known.
  • 4 1
 @Yibh6009: DogeCoin to the MOON!! LOL
  • 2 1
 @bigtim: beef all the way
  • 2 0
 thanks god someone thinks like me
  • 3 0
 @Yibh6009: $AMC HOLD THAT LINE! BRING THE MOVIES BAAAAACKK!!!
  • 1 0
 @moefosho: Diamond hands!
  • 1 0
 amen to this, it happens way too much with everything in mountain biking, when does stock usually get replenished, because i need a new lid?

Sport has become more popular and the supply line for all clothing, protection etc cannot keep up
  • 1 0
 @BorisBC35: Diamond Hand Grips?
  • 197 8
 Throwing it out there - now that bikes basically work great and we’re down to the minor refinements —- I think it’s about time in a mature industry for some of the bigger players to step up and take responsibility / take back used / broken frames for recycling. Carbon vs. Alu less relevant if most clapped frames end up in the landfill anyway.

Take back your frames, break down the multi-material parts, and melt for new raw Alloy, melt for downcycled carbon items (GG), or evening just grind up for adding to concrete or whatever else can be done (most CF).
  • 70 0
 Several of the bigger companies already do offer carbon recycling, including Trek and Specialized.

www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/company/sustainability/waste_reduction

www.specialized.com/us/en/carbon-fiber-recycling-program
  • 15 0
 @mikekazimer:

Thanks for the links, didn’t know about the specialized program, that’s a step in the right direction. I noticed trek’s link doesn’t refer to a post-consumer take back. Sparked me to do more digging though
  • 20 1
 circular economy ftw
  • 7 0
 @AckshunW: *recycling of those programs don’t go into other bikes. Carbon gets used in other industry. Aluminum goes to scrap.

Pretty sure you can send a frame into trek for recycling, but you’re paying money to have them scrap it for you.
  • 14 0
 I could not agree more. I have 4 carbon bike frames hanging in my garage that were all warranties and the companies all said just to destroy the frame and throw it away. I just can't bring myself to throw them away and would love to recycle them somehow.
  • 9 0
 @usedbikestuff:

It’s ok with me if it goes into other industries, and makes economic sense if this either industries actually want to pay for the material. No reason aluminum needs to stay in bikes - the scrap market at large is already established. From working in arch metal production, I know where to take old alu for $$$, but scrapyards are weird and the average person has no clue where to go, and wouldn’t necessarily want to go there even if they did know it exists! And when it comes to a carbon frame, no idea where I’d go!

As to your point about trek—- exactly, the onus should be on the corp. with discounted shipping accounts and the chance to resell the material. And for the early ones who step up, virtue points for me and the Patagonia crowd.
  • 16 1
 I have been pretty vocal on this site regarding manufacturing domestically or at least responsibly. It is no secret that some far east manufacturers have questionable environmental and labor standards. Bring that manufacturing home. A frame with materials sourced domestically and manufactured domestically is going to have lower life cycle impact on the environment and is helping the people who you share the trails with.
  • 3 0
 @dtheio: more of a spiraling economy if it's carbon though.
  • 7 0
 @DangOLDangus: clean them, lie them on their side, get a handy friend (if you aren't that handy yourself) to machine up some legs and small brackets. Insert a custom piece of shatter proof glass inside each triangle: boom custom cycling related coffee table.
  • 1 1
 @DangOLDangus: Have you ever seen those kits designed to fix cracks in carbon frames?
  • 3 4
 Or you can get steel rigid or FS and never have that problem.
  • 1 0
 @greenpistol: check out instagram bieri_bike_care or carbon_reparatur
  • 5 1
 @adrennan: I love the thought of everything being made within a continent that uses it. The reality is though, if you made products within the US for the domestic market, you’ll see an increase in production costs, due to labour, logistics of raw materials being shipped to the US from the Far East and so on. For companies to stay afloat (comfort within the current profit margins) they will maintain whatever they can to maintain that profit margin. Would you go to work on Monday, at the same job, working the same level of productivity for 30% less wages?
This is how it would be seen my companies and investors/shareholders.
Ethical mindset will never conform with capitalism, unless the company starts out with it in its mission statement.
Big overarching point to this is though- you’ll walk into your LBS or go online to buy a new component and see an (insert preferred currency here) 50 increase for the privilege.

@mikekazimer , I’d love to see the industry ACTUALLY create an “Industry Standards controlling body”, that would hold companies accountable to their claims on frame sizing, new so called industry standards for components and all the other toffee that gets thrown around.
  • 2 0
 @DangOLDangus: Turn them into a novelty coffee table
  • 3 0
 You know that Patagonia are advocates of banning bikes in National parks in the US right? @AckshunW:
  • 1 0
 I'd feel much better about buying carbon if I knew it could be recycled.
  • 6 0
 @expat-taff: Poor choice of example on my part maybe! (Although I think there’s more to it than you allude....,? And if we as an advocacy group can’t define a clearcut divide between ebike and mountain bike...maybe they aren’t wrong).

But you get my meaning - the group of people that will “vote with their dollars” and gravitate toward consumer choices that align with their ethics is growing (myself included) - and an important force in the progression of these issues. In a lot of cases, only after the ideas have been developed and proven out can we imagine government intervention through tax credits etc, leading to wider-spread implementation. Eventually these material takebacks will be mandatory in many industries. I expect by 2040 this will be a very mainstream idea. We can’t as a society continue to landfill as much material as we are, and a lot of that starts with companies (by no means only bike companies) pumping out new & better product every year, attempting to obsolete last year’s. So to me it makes a lot of sense that they carry that downstream cost.
  • 1 0
 @2-1RacingUK: that just isn't true. My new Reeb frame cost probably a grand less than half the asian made frames out there. Keep in mind the upfront investment for a batch of frames is less because you just make them on an as-needed basis too
  • 6 2
 @expat-taff: Probably an unpopular opinion, but there’s lots of good places to ride in the US and more popping up all the time. I’m all for protecting our most precious resources and having a place to hike and enjoy the backcountry without enduro-brahs yeeing by. And some people would call me an enduro-brah, but I think there’s something to be said for some separation. Just like bike-only trails are awesome as well.
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff @AckshunW: I don't know of a post-consumer takeback program that involves shipping, but if you walk your bike/frame/parts into a Trek store the store will handle shipping/recycling/donating for you
  • 1 0
 @adrennan: maybe so within a US scenario. How about to the rest of the world?
On top of that, making “just in time” doesn’t work for industry that produces on such a grand scale. They are working on Asia for a reason.
  • 1 0
 @2-1RacingUK: I got my reeb months faster than I could have gotten many other Asian made frames. Vote with your dollar and companies will adjust
  • 3 0
 @AckshunW as someone that used to work in carbon forensics and has seen the insides of most frames out there, it’s a real struggle to get anyone to accept those beyond repair. Those places (within the UK) that can recycle CF (usually into thermoplastics) all require vast minimum quantities. As such we ended up with hundreds of frames either beyond economic repair, impossible to repair, or written off for the insurance/manufacturer. If everyone got together as a collective then it would stand a stronger stance. That would require an independent organisation and better manufacturer mindsets though, and that’s tough.

Repair and reuse is the most ‘efficient’ way to not waste a product. But we need to see big mindset changes; in favour of repair, an elimination of ‘new year, new model’, better standards in manufacture, and an actual standard in inspection/repair.
  • 3 0
 Recycling is it’s own industry.
Cars are recycled, but it’s isn’t the car companies that do it.
Aluminum is heavily recycled, and if you don’t recycle your aluminum bike, is that the bike company’s fault?

Frankly, the hate landfills get is unwarranted. They are locations for carbon sequestration. Every ton of carbon that goes into them is ~3 tons of CO2 that won’t be in the atmosphere. If carbon fiber is still useable after being put into a bike (not a guaranty), and if the energy needed to extract it is less than making new fiber (also not a guaranty), then sure, let’s get a cf recycling industry going. But most likely it’d be be better to find a way to repurpose old frames, to upcycle them.

And let’s not forget the blame on consumers—buy what will last forever, not what will break.
  • 2 0
 @gmdunn: I get what you're saying, recycling itself takes a large amount of energy so as long as there is a net gain it's worth pursuing and that is why repair and reuse is so vital. That lies with the consumer, retail, and manufacturer. Most products will last for at least the length of a humans lifespan (with regards to the material used, excluding wear and tear items), and pretty much everything breaks. If we've learnt anything from the recent (past 10 years) developments within the cycling industry is that probably 90% of the time the consumers are led.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: If we really are interested in helping the environment, the small number of frames that go back is minor. The real way the industry needs to step up is packaging. If I build a half dozen bikes at the shop in a day, I am embarrassed by the amount of non-recyclable material (especially closed cell foam) that goes in the garbage! It is multiple garbage cans full.
  • 1 0
 I have broken two steel frames. One I brazed back together twice now and have ridden as a commuter for 10 years @vindee:
  • 125 3
 Shock Fitment... If a Cane Creek Kitsuma or Fox Float X2 doesn't fit on a bike with more than 140mm of travel, its nearly just as bad as water bottle fitment for me. Give us room for a proper shock!
  • 49 2
 YES! Santa Cruz we are looking at you...
  • 15 0
 Scott Ransom is horrible for this.
  • 16 2
 Agreed! ditched my Hightower because it didn't fit a float x2. Also agreed on droppers, would love to not have to replace the dropper immediately on every single bike I buy.
  • 6 0
 @mfoga: If you think the Ransom is bad, try the Genius...

(I honestly thought the Ransom had been "fixed"!)
  • 7 17
flag netracer-enduro (Jan 28, 2021 at 15:50) (Below Threshold)
 @ironxcross: I guarantee you one thing Santa Cruz didn't forget to make it possible..... If you wanted burlier suspension why didn't you choose the mehatower... They make a different bike for that!!
  • 1 0
 @boozed: no idea mine is a few years old, it can fit the shocks you just can’t adjust them
  • 7 1
 @netracer-enduro: So I have to run a 160mm travel bike to be able to utilize an X2, Kitsuma or coil shock? Wake up friend.
  • 9 2
 Could we also stop having so many different shock sizes and mount sizes as well?
  • 4 0
 @mfoga: also a bash guide is not possible. odd for a full-blown race rig.
  • 1 0
 @mfoga: why? a Float x2 should fit or not?
  • 2 0
 @Hamburgi: I will fit but access to adjustments are blocked. The problem is the trunion mount is lower mount vs top mount like most bikes so all the adjustments are at the bottom. They wanted you use all their crazy levers and their shock.
  • 1 0
 @mfoga: Sorry what I meant was that, when designing the Ransom, Scott claimed to have fixed the issue the Genius has with external reservoir shocks not mounting up at all due to the shock orientation and lack of downtube clearance. It seems the truth is slightly more complicated than that, but (compared to the Genius) at least you can get one to mount!
  • 109 2
 Integrated downtube protection
  • 46 0
 And effective chainstay and possibly seatstay protecting on the drive side to quiet chain slap.
  • 6 3
 Isn't that pretty much standard for most manufacturers already?
  • 1 0
 So we can stop molding kydex to fit our needs...
  • 4 0
 It's easier to fit some rubber to a downtube or chainstay yourself that it is to change the axle spacing or re-weld the frame to fit a water bottle in though. Once all the other problems are fixed, I'll back you on this one though!
  • 83 4
 One thing all modern Mountain Bikes should have it is Lower Price .
  • 29 0
 I’m wondering which bike manufacturer it was that downvoted your comment.
  • 21 4
 Anime ever notice how people always think that their profession should come with a massive salary but everyone else bills people too much for everything? Just saying
  • 1 0
 @matthellstream: Don't know, but like, all of them?
  • 3 0
 @matthellstream: can’t be Intense, they are always on sale, making them the price of brand new 2021 frame sets from other companies
  • 11 0
 Yep exactly. TV's have gotten vastly cheaper over the years for the same quality. Bikes and bike companies need to go the same direction. I don't need a bike that's 20g lighter than last year's model. Bikes are already awesome. If bike companies want to make money, improve processes and make 'em cheaper so they can sell more volume. Covid has shown there's a market for them, but not everyone wants to drop $3k+ on an entry level bike.
  • 7 1
 @BorisBC35: As soon as every home in the western world starts buying a new high end bike every other year, your wish will be granted.
  • 6 1
 @BorisBC35: TVs are so different from mountain bikes I don't even know where to start. Better manufacturing definitely made TVs cheaper and better to a certain point, but now TV manufacturers sell your viewing data to subsidize their cost. Some even advertise themselves on their smart TVs. So kind of like with Facebook the TV isn't the product, you're the product.

theoutline.com/post/8421/smart-tv-cheap-roku#:~:text=With%20less%20demand%20for%20actual,a%20new%20revenue%20stream%3A%20advertising.&text=Prices%20may%20be%20low%2C%20but%20so%20are%20most%20people's%20wages.
  • 7 7
 Bikes ARE cheaper than they used to be. And better. My awesome-at-the-time Shockwave with Risse Champ forks, Fox shock (pre-propedal) MRP, ProStop disc brakes, RF Turbine cranks was five figures and a pile of crap. Broke something nearly every race. In today's money it was a million dollars. Now get off my lawn!
  • 3 5
 Just buy the cheaper models
  • 1 4
 @iamamodel: totally what I think! Cheers!
  • 2 0
 @iamamodel: no doubt they have (generally) gotten better. But they are NOT cheaper than they used to be. Not even close.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: like friend above said littel bit better but still alot of stuff was designed long time ago and marketing guys every year refresh them and tells you that now is better then ever or even tell you thats is something completly new but in reality it isn't and this is not applaying for everthing but for alot of things .

Look few articles back on Pinkbike , Ripley af and Devinci Marshall . Devinci made in Canada is cheaper than ripley made in Asia
  • 2 0
 @gmdunn: Adjusted for inflation my Shockwave was $15k. My 1998 Trek OCLV Team with full XTR is pushing $10k. Back then, nearly everything was boutique and nothing high end was made in Taiwan. There was less competition and little economies of scale.
  • 2 0
 @iamamodel: and adjusted fo inflation my carbon Scott Scale would be $1500, my XT stumpjumper would be $2300, and my XTR Klein Mantra would be $3100. Do full XTR full susp bikes from premier builders go for so little nowadays? Because I haven’t seen them. I do think there was a time when mass production & competition brought down price, but then it went backwards.

Bikes that used to go for $1500 10 yr ago were consistently very good, solid builds, and the same today are double that—and inflation isn’t that high. Yes, I do think you get more with that extra cash, but I don’t think the average rider benefits much, which means it’s a worse fidelity/cost ratio.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: Maybe in Australia time have stoped and bike prices are same or similiar now to time when you bought your trek oclv full xtr Smile . Like #gmdunn said few years back 2500$ new bike had very good equpiment and now 2500$ you will not be able to buy ripley affordable entry level bikeSmile
  • 82 14
 In frame storage
  • 7 5
 This^^^. Why smaller/other brands haven't jumped on this via licensing, designing their own or stealing one is beyond me.
  • 16 1
 @hellbelly: yeah, I don’t think I’d buy a bike without it in the future, but it would be nice not to be limited to Specialized or Trek
  • 5 1
 Absolutely!!! It makes so much sense, everybody needs to start doing it.
  • 29 6
 Not interested. The $2000 i save on a bike pays for plenty of fanny packs.
  • 14 2
 @fruitsd79: everyone is living in 2021 while you're already in 2031
  • 2 4
 Yes! This, to me, is a huge selling point.
  • 4 0
 Smaller brands likely haven't jumped on it because it's expensive to implement.

What would be best would be if @specialized or @trek licensed the frame side of the design for free in order to capture the market for the plastic parts.

In the same way that UDH is great for standardizing derailleur hangers, standardizing this now before mutant designs proliferate would be advantageous for everyone.
  • 20 6
 Actually not interested in this at all.
  • 2 1
 Yes. Definitely
  • 6 0
 meh...
  • 5 0
 Not really. Ifyou have more than one bike you swich between regularly it makes more sense to have it on you or a covenient little bag you fit to the frame, like the Wolf Touth mini roll tops.
  • 2 1
 @rideyrbike: Last bikes has it as well, but that probably doesn't help you in the US. For some reason everyone shit on their frame that is not more expensive than any other high end bike when purchased complete, you can spec it how you want, has size specific chain stays, Sram UDH, are the only company I'm aware of that acknowledges the importance of machining bearing bores in one machine setup, actually has enough progression for a coil shock, and just happens to be lighter than everything else (because they use a superior manufacturing process using an autoclave). Really seems like the perfect MTB if you can afford it. Their alloy frames are similar but lose the storage and aren't as easy on the eyes, sadly.
  • 2 0
 I forgot to mention the Tarvo is made in Germany, and the alloy bikes are finished in Germany. Full disclosure, I'm a fan, but haven't had the pleasure of owning one yet.
  • 2 0
 @FatSanch: That is a very nice looking bike, that Tarvo. I'm not in the price range, its $7200 US. that's three Megas. Or two GIGAs
  • 1 0
 I've never ridden a bike with in frame storage, but just having my steerer too long with an EDC tool results in a persistent and annoying rattle. It has always seemed like you would need to pack any empty space in a SWAT box with foam to prevent your bike from sounding like it is full of rocks.
  • 1 0
 @fruitsd79: It's expensive, no doubt. But my point is that it is comparable to a Spesh, Trek, etc. And represents a much better value to me. The single machining setup is a very big deal. I've had multiple frames that kill bearings in a handful of rides because of crappy machining. I don't have a lot of time to work on bikes and replacing pivot bearings that should last years is the worst. Most bikes are made in a handful of factories and it seems as if none of them understand precision machining. I am willing to pay more for a bike that affords me more time to ride.

Bike evolution seems to have leveled off, and I am trying to reduce consumption, so I've been on the hunt for a "forever" bike and the Tarvo fits the bill better than anything else I've found. I might end up on the alloy frame though because it is a lot cheaper and recyclable.
  • 63 1
 While mentioning axle spacing, can we also move towards a single standard for headset sizes, seatpost and BB diameters? And even though I have 35mm bars (my bike came with them), there is just no point to that either.
  • 20 0
 If we don't mention roadies, headset standardisation is almost perfect. ZS44/ZS56 or IS42/IS52 (which also have interchangeable bearings) dominates the market
  • 25 1
 I'm not a fan of the 35mm stem and bar combo on my (mostly stock) Honzo. undesirably stiff. If guys are sending Dark Fest with 31.8mm bar and stem combos then I sure as hell don't need it!
  • 2 2
 @lehott: That might just be a result of your particular bar/stem’s design, not the fact that it’s 35mm. Bike companies originally claimed 35mm allowed for more “tubular fine-tuning of compliance” so that it could be stiff in the right places but still comfortable. Honestly I don’t think the diameter plays a huge role. You can probably find plenty of overly stiff 31.8mm bar/stem combos as well as super comfy ones, and same goes for 35mm combos.
  • 2 0
 @jakawil: While I tend to think 35mm is mostly marketing, I agree there are some opportunities for tuning that very few companies take advantage - Oneup is the big exception. I also agree that you don't have to have a 35mm bar to have a jackhammer... I like Surlys, and I've got a Sunrise bar on my goofy fat/fun bike... that is the stiffest piece of metal I've ever owned. It's a jackhammer. A/Bing it with 35mm RF Atlas bars is night and day - it makes a 25mm aluminum bar feel like a noodle.
  • 11 0
 Ah, there it is, 35mm bars. Top of my list of utterly and deeply hated standards.
Thing is, most 35mm stems are heavier than 31,8mm stems (obviously), bars are not lighter, cuz you have to keep a certain wall thickness in the clamping area, where the most material sits and the icing on the cake is the volume split you achieve by introducing this bullshit, hence cost are higher (more development, tooling aso for same market volume). Oh, and harder to design not to be too stiff.
So what‘s not to hate? Btw, do you guys know who brought this shit up? Will be my #1 blacklister...
  • 1 1
 @ArturoBandini: you really want to get under people’s skin? Tell them that instead of paying a lot more for riser bars with their more complex shape/bends that can double the material used (and weight), just buy a stem with the proper length & rise.
  • 1 0
 @ArturoBandini: ardor.website/produce/interview-35mm-another-mtb-standard from 2014 talks with Easton, Chromag, and RF

They point to strength and weight in wider handlebars as the reason and then you get a monkey see monkey do effect as other people see it selling and maybe there is something to it in the engineering
  • 53 1
 How about:
-Alignment marks on stems, headsets, and head tubes.
-Attachment points for proper fenders for those of us in wet climates. No more zipties/velcro.
  • 4 0
 My cheap XCR came with a bolt on fender circa 2017. Not on the Yari though!
  • 11 0
 @fruitsd79: it boggles me how so many £200-500 rockshox units have come with dimples and a ziptie do route cables but a £80 suntour unit could come with a nice guide that bolts on.....
  • 3 0
 Don't forget the Laser etched guide on fork tube.
  • 2 0
 Suntour's complete range has integrated fenders.
  • 32 2
 ...."why shake things up for negligible gains?"... this does not sound like something the bike industry understands. I do agree with everything else though. Especially threaded BB's.
  • 1 7
flag DoubleCrownAddict (Jan 28, 2021 at 22:58) (Below Threshold)
 I agree with everything on Kazimer's list and downvoted nearly all the most popular comments except yours.
  • 28 3
 +1 for Long travel dropper posts + frames to accommodate them. I got relatively long legs for my reach, so I end up on a medium with a lot of seat post sticking out
  • 3 0
 While I agree on frame design to accommodate droppers its not because I am tall but short - When I got my Medium Bronson back in 2013, I could only just squeeze a 100mm dropper in, my Medium Sight VLT has a 100mm dropper and that's the limit of my legs.

My Nukeproof scout on the other hand has a 100mm but could be upped to 125 at least (no need that I have found yet though). My friend got a GT Sensor (I don't know why) and she cant use the dropper because at its lowest setting with its ridiculous seat tube its pedal-able height already!
  • 3 2
 Not sure I follow, even on my DH rig I prefer to have my saddle just above knee height which means that at 180cm tall and with quite long legs, 150mm of dropper is just perfect. So 170mm for people above 190cm and I really can't see a need for bigger. Unless people like to ride with saddle below the knee like dirt jumper but that is pretty rubbish for downhill performance really so why push for those super long droppers ?
  • 8 1
 @Balgaroth: it has to do with seat angles primarily. (Levy had an article on this some months back).
The steeper the seat angle the more a dropper post needs to be low and out of the way as it makes it difficult to actually drop behind the seat, especially as reaches become longer too. DH bikes do not follow this because they have such slack seat angles.
  • 1 1
 @Balgaroth: 200mm for 190cm a definitely once I got used to it, wouldn't want anything shorter, why would i tbe rubbish for dh performance?
  • 27 0
 Zero arguments against any of this
  • 23 1
 Aluminum frames with good suspension and wheels. I know it's been said a bunch of times already. I'm just not interested in spending $1000 or $1500 extra for a carbon frame the same way I'm not interested in spending $1000 or more extra for XTR or XX. Give me an SLX/deore drivetrain/brakes with an XT shifter and DVO suspension on an aluminum frame and good aluminum wheels.
There. $3500. Still a ton of money but not the $5500+ you'll spend for a carbon frame, full XT/GX, and performance elite suspension bike. If you're lucky. And carbon wheels? Are you kidding me? I'll ride them and probably like them if you give them to me for free but no way I'm spending an extra $1500 for them. No chance.
  • 8 2
 Ripley AF, Tallboy AL, Giant Trance, Vitus Mythique, Trek Fuel Ex AL, Specialized Stump AL...all aluminum, under 3500, with solid suspension and durable wheels.
  • 4 0
 A lot of riders would probably agree. Unfortunately punters in a show room go for carbon frame/wheels & shiny paint.
  • 26 1
 Publish STA at different heights, like Banshee.
  • 9 4
 and get rid of this 'effective seat angle' marketing scam
  • 15 3
 @Linc: Most companies tell you that they will measure effective STA at stack height. How's that a scam?
  • 7 4
 @BenTheSwabian: because it is virtually meaningless unless you happen to run your seat at that exact height.
  • 5 3
 @bogey: my lowest seat position at the stack height so this measurement totally useless for me
  • 1 0
 @BenTheSwabian: ha - they absolutely don’t. Go look at the Nukeproof Giga geo chart, for example
  • 22 1
 All Enduro and DH bikes need to come with good long lasting integrated "shuttle burn" protection on the bottom of the down tube. Nothing worse than having a 6K bike hanging off a tail gate without any protection. I know you can buy them but why not come stock on the bike?
  • 6 0
 Gotta protect the rig. I'm just gonna leave this here: RideWrap
  • 1 0
 @marrrty: before ride wrap I used invisiframe protection and without the shuttle pad under the top tube it tears right through the wrap, my glory and nomad each have holes in the wrap there from tailgate pads
  • 1 0
 @brownstone: Bummer. There is a product you can use to stop that from happening: Shuttle Armor
  • 1 0
 @marrrty: tried to order it couple of times now, not in stock....I’ll try again, but if I can’t find one, I see that the fuzzy side of Velcro works well too
  • 25 0
 1 - factory protective tape / film
2 - not tubeless ready, just tubeless
  • 5 0
 Great to see Nukeproof applying frame protection tape at the factory on the new Giga, it makes so much sense for brands to do this, economically and logistically. Let the weight weenies take it off with a haridryer if they are really bothered.
  • 20 0
 Pinkbike should make a poll with a suggestion at the end. For example: What do you want in a MTB? And then a series of sub-polls in which you could choose frame material, wheel size, geometry numbers, price, if it fits a water bottle and so on. Based on the users answers, there would be suggestions, such as: "this bike would fit you nicely".

It is becoming hard to do my work when I have so many options to look at and compare...
  • 9 0
 and it would, of course, provide you guys a lot of data about what features/characteristics people want in their bikes.
  • 4 1
 geometrygeeks.bike

Can refine by geo, wheelsize, travel, material etc. Not bottle cage though...
  • 5 0
 Read the most up-voted comment - "is the bike in stock" cuts your options down to a small handful Smile
  • 1 0
 They did run these polls. Last month I think. Or maybe November.
  • 28 4
 External cable routing FTW
  • 1 1
 Agreed. Internal cable routing, especially for hydraulic disc brakes, is not that great of an idea. Look at all the used brakes in the marketplace right now with cut hoses. You have to either know how to install new fittings and bleed the brakes, or take them to a bike shop and pay $50 for them to do it for you.
  • 2 0
 @SeanC1: And when you're on holiday and need to whip a new rear brake on quickly, external routing is a godsend.
  • 5 4
 @SeanC1:
Top tip: don’t buy used brakes if you don’t know how to maintain them yourself (which includes installing new hoses). There just are too many things that can go wrong if you don’t know what you’re doing. If someone else wants to get rid of them, there is a high chance something is wrong with them...
  • 2 0
 @SeanC1: Shhhhhh, lotsa good deals to be had on relatively unused brakes!
  • 2 0
 I have to find any benefit to internal cable routing, even for shifters.
I’m convinced it’s nothing more than a gimmick.
  • 17 0
 This is a great list, Mike. I hope the industry pays attention.

I'll add one more: companies need to ditch 203mm rotors. Why are there 200 AND 203 mm rotors? Since all the other sizes are metric, why 203? This is a small thing, but really annoying.
  • 4 0
 isn't 203mm a shimano thing?? Also, some rotors are thicker which also makes them less interchangeable with other brands calipers.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, the 200/203mm and 220/223mm Discs need to be consolidated into one size. Also hate the fact that some manufacturers offer 203 Discs but for the larger ones go with 220. Looking at you here, Magura.
And rockshox limiting rotor size to 220 vs. 223 mm is plain stupid. Probably wouldn't make a difference but made me choose a different brand.
  • 3 1
 @SeanC1: Literally everyone apart from sram uses 200. Get rid of that please lol
203 exists because 8 inches. Yes its an unusual number but changing 3mm won't change anything whatsoever. Might as well go to the more common size (203) then.

Do you also complain about 31.6 seatposts, 31.8 bars, 28.6 steerer too?

Edit: @Mr-Gilsch 3mm is such a silly reason to not buy a fork. They say 220mmm cause rockshox(sram) make 220 as their biggest rotor size.
  • 5 1
 @Mr-Gilsch: This is a very german sounding complaint. A couple of washers is all it takes, if that at all.
  • 1 1
 @zyoungson: thought I might join in here but apparently was wrong in doing so.
It's not that I wouldn't have mounted 223 mm anyways, but more so that I find it to be a stupid marketing move and I won't support that.
  • 17 2
 One thing bike reviews don’t cover are the things that break or stop working after a few months, and for me that’s hubs. I’m a normal weight of 190lb and my last two fairly fancy bikes came with hubs that were garbage (sun ringle and stans). How about bikes come with hubs that don’t die in a couple months?!
  • 7 1
 DT...
  • 2 1
 You must ride in a lot of mud, I have had zero hubs fail on me over a period of 20 odd years of riding and I didn't even service any of them... unless you are doing crazy amounts of distance that you are wearing the bearings faster?
  • 5 0
 This is important. I have had so many mid-tier rear hubs break down on me prematurely. AThese mid-tier shit hubs are all the rage in OEM.

The only ones which last for me are DT (350/240) and Chris King. Hope gets a pass for easy servicability, but not for outright durability. There might be others. But they are still outliers if we look at the selection of rear hubs in the MTB-market.

If someone designs a Boost hub for MTB-usage it should withstand MTB-usage. End of discussion.

How hard can it be to make a hub design which is solid enough to withstand shitty manufacturing? It is a relatively simple part. My hopes are high though since the new breed of E-bike customers will probably not accept this horrible reliability.

We need more independent "Paul Astons" in the bike industry to call out shitty products.

It is a bit like the good old Jihad attack against the MTB-community: ISIS. Terrorizing mountainbikers for years.

Disclaimer for the young ones: ISIS was a bad thing between square taper and hollowtech.
  • 3 0
 @SonofBovril: I rarely ride in mud, and even if I did, that’s no excuse for a hub to disintegrate in a month. It’s a mountain bike and should be able to handle some mud and dirt.
  • 1 0
 @SonofBovril: Check out this thread: www.mtbr.com/threads/2019-strive-8-0-reynolds-tr-309-wheelset.1139609/page-2

One of the posters is a friend of mine, I was there when his hub exploded the second time. Unfortunately I have the same wheels on my bike Frown
  • 16 1
 The must have this year is to actually get out and ride a bike.
  • 19 5
 34.9 seat tubes
  • 1 0
 @Civicowner: Because dropper posts
  • 2 0
 I would support this, despite having no plans to change from my mix of 30.9mm and 31.6mm seat-tubed MTBs.
  • 10 1
 I will say whenever the time comes to look for my next bike, it is going to be hard to abandon the relatively easy to adjust geo of my '21 Stumjumper Evo. I understand its not for every bike, but it'll be hard for me to put that cat back in the bag.
  • 2 1
 Completely agree. Evo is now my daily ride, and being able to adjust it that much is a game changer. Its going to be hard to ever go back to one geo setup.
  • 2 0
 @noplacelikeloam: also, yup. They did one hell of a job on the EVO. I love mine. I have zero complaints. Everything done well
  • 2 0
 I have never had a hankering for a Specialized but I do have a hankering for the current Stumpys
  • 5 3
 Meh. I don't really see the point TBH. To say it with the words of Colin Chapman: "If you give them the ability to adjust it, they will only adjust it wrong."
  • 5 4
 @noplacelikeloam: How's that a game changer though? How often do you even adjust the geo? And do you think that on an average ride you'd actually notice a difference between +/-1° HTA and STA settings?
  • 4 3
 @BenTheSwabian: I change it most times I ride. It takes a few minutes and is very noticeable when all combined. It sounds like a lot of work but it’s pretty much just part of bike setup for the day.
  • 4 2
 @BenTheSwabian: yeah he was referencing something far more complicated than steep vs mellow, rocky vs flow trail. It’s not exactly rocket science and if you’re dropping that much coin on a bike you probably have a clue as to what it all does.
  • 4 2
 @BenTheSwabian: It is pretty effortless to make adjustments. You could do them all trailside if you really wanted to, not that you would. And yeah you can feel the 2.5 degrees in the HTA and the difference of over 10mm of bb drop. That'd be absurd to think you wouldn't notice.
  • 2 0
 @BenTheSwabian:
I think it’s actually very useful for certain people. If the trails around your house are pretty mellow, you set it up in the steep postion for evening rides. If you then drive a bit further in the weekend to some more steep stuff with stones and roots, you can make it more slack, but still keep the bottom bracket high. If you then go to a machine built bike park during your holiday, you can put it in the low/slack position. You really do notice the difference between a 63 degree or 65.5 degree head angle.
  • 10 1
 A website where you see all the new bikes and their specs/ features side by side would be nice. This would save me endless hours trawling for information on bikes I'm never going to own.
  • 9 0
 99spokes.com is pretty decent
  • 1 0
 As is Vital's product guide
  • 4 7
 If only there was a website where you could search for other websites you were looking for, think I’ll make one called hoogle, or foogle, what you guys think?
  • 5 0
 Such a website exists! geometrygeeks.bike
  • 9 1
 No more dumb tool sizing where you need to buy a 69/420ith socket tool to open your fork and change tokens without damaging this piss soft aluminum nut.

Pretty much every tool you need for a bike should be able to be bought from your hardware store or found in your grandads shed. If they can do it with cars then they can do it with bikes.
  • 7 0
 My main ride is a Guerilla Gravity and one of the big reasons I bought it is because you can customize the parts spec without breaking the bank. Their parts picking program is bit derailled this year due to supply shortages, but every bike company should make it easy to swap out parts on your build.
  • 2 0
 Would love to see more companies offer this. Propain was the first i saw do it. The option to go higher spec on some things (e.g. suspension, brakes, drivetrain) but also lower spec on others (cockpit, finishing kit) is a big draw.

I could happily go for lower-tier suspension (such as the Yari which seems to be common at entry level) as my ability and type of riding doesn't require anything better. I have had Code RSC brakes though and would prefer not to have a lesser equivalent if i was shopping for a new bike. If i was to go for higher spec brakes on a traditional spec tier system, i'd also have to pay a significant price increase for a bunch of other stuff i didn't need.
  • 2 0
 @DidNotSendIt: -basically thats the reason i went used when shopping for something different recently -i found that i could acquire a rig that had been customized in areas i found important and not such a big deal in others,unlike when buying new (for the most part) where i had the option in platforms of just basic or decent or good or arm and leg across the board.
  • 3 0
 gg is very cool picking mine up tomorrow, purchased just for that very reason
  • 7 0
 One full sized bottle cage inside the main triangle plus at least one additional cage mount either on the underside or top tube for accessory mounting would be ideal. seeing XC and trail bikes with only one cage mount makes me sad
  • 10 3
 I know I will get down-voted.

However I have owned many Giant aluminum and carbon frames over many years and have never had a creak or issue with a PressFit BB noise. Although, I will admit they suck for removal. If you swap BB or frames for whatever reason you have a 50\50 chance of breaking a plastic PressFit cup during removal process.

But my issue is every single recent threaded BB frame I have owned has creaked like mad. 100% all of them... Including Transition Throttle and Vanquish, Kona Unit, NukeProof Scout (X2). All installed with either grease or anti seize compound.
  • 2 0
 I recently sold my 2013 Trance Advanced 27.5, it still had the stock shimano press fit BB which never made a peep and still spun smooth and free. Ironically I never had a problem with original square taper BBs with separate cups and loose balls, though they did require changing the grease every now and then. I ran the same BB and bearings in my commuter from 1990-2012 and only took the BB off because I was putting on a new crankset.
  • 3 0
 @dsut4392: I recently sold, or rather traded back to the shop I originally bought it from, my 2016 Anthem Advanced 27.5. I'd put one of Wheels MFG's BBRight bottom brackets in it after the stock one got chunky. Clever bit of kit if you ask me!
  • 1 0
 @bcoleman3: I had 2 Giant carbon frames, one zero issues, the other creaked like and old house, they wouldn’t warranty, they just tried all the goops and pastes, I tried the wheels mfg bb in it, still creaked nothing ever solved it. It’s a crap shoot..
  • 4 0
 Use plumbers tape on the threads.
  • 3 0
 For the price of a BB you can put 1 set on each frame if you want to swap, no need to play the lottery when removing it. Never had issues with Pressfit BBs as well, just too many brands not having the proper tolerances, we shouldn't blame the tech but the one who doesn't know how to integrate it. Pressfit BBs can allow the design of wider downtubes for stiffer properties around it and remove the thread that can be damaged one day. Threaded Pressfit BBs exist for the ones so afraid about it tho...
  • 2 1
 Well,I have the exact opposite experience..
  • 2 0
 Wheels Mfg BY with a couple of wraps of heavy duty Teflon tape on the threads along with some anti seize.
  • 1 1
 @dsut4392: +1

still on square taper entrylevel shimano bb in my everyday commuter gt grade and only after 15000 km the first bb failed.

Never ever gonna get there with DUB, Hollowtech or whatever new cutting edge standard they conspire.
  • 1 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: I should have said I've used plumber's tape also.
  • 10 3
 "It's still a little mind-boggling that you can pay more than $3,000 for a frame that doesn't have a threaded bottom bracket"

I'd say it's mind-boggling that you pay > $3'000 on a frame and manufacturers can't produce a PF BB to the correct tolerances.
Any engineer knows that PF is superior and the only reason people complain is because they don't know s---t. They blame BB design instead of manufacturers charging aerospace prices for products which are not up to standards.
The funny part is that then people want a BSA and stick a 30mm crank spindle in there...seriously??? That says everything!
  • 21 11
 no more shit sram guide/g2 brakes.
  • 2 0
 A fucking men.
  • 2 0
 Just got a new bike had G2 RSC. Didn’t even ride 2 weeks with them on. Absolutely no power at all! Stayed with sram and got Codes. Codes should be the absolute baseline sram unless you are riding XC I guess
  • 2 0
 @MillerReid: Guide RE should be the baseline IMO. Cheaper than Code but pretty much the same thing as the previous gen Code R.
  • 1 0
 @MillerReid: Did you burn the pads/rotors in properly? Got no problems with the G2 RSC on my bike.
  • 16 7
 A water bottle? Oh, is that a thing people care about? I hadn't noticed.
  • 2 1
 I tried using a camelback once, and I’ve never used a water bottle since
  • 5 0
 Well yeah, of course, this is a very agreeable list. The real question though is: what are you willing to compromise to put all the options in? And this answer will rightfully be different for every type of rider. So in my opinion it's not as easy to say "every bike should be like this". I love variation. Niche markets. Brands that go the conservative route instead of shoving the latest and greatest cool thing around the block on consumers. Brands that try the extreme geometries, materials and manufacturing, compromising something else. So while I agree with this list, of course, ejo wouldn't, I think it is not a good approach to try to streamline everything.
  • 6 1
 Shorter seat tubes with long droppers is something I have been on about for a while now.
I would also like to see all single crown forks over 150mm be replaced with dual crown forks. And those forks be made with a bias on performance/durability rather than weight.
Tires with inserts incorporated into the sidewalls would be nice too.
  • 2 0
 Now that you dont smack your knees on the dual crown when pedalling because bikes are sized properly I can see this becoming a thing.
  • 6 1
 If we're going to push for size-specific chainstays how about varying seat tube angle by size as well? It's pretty clear that riders with a tall inseam have a different relationship to the BB than shorter ones. Especially if the chainstays aren't getting longer by size.
  • 1 0
 Norco does that
  • 5 0
 Frame storage, wide range shock fitment, no proprietary parts like headsets, double-sealed pivots, collar pivots, integrated frame protection, chainstay protector that actually works to keep it quiet.
  • 5 0
 The idea of a standardized replaceable derailleur hanger would be nice.
  • 4 0
 Hows about a price related to utility, a suspension design not seeking to win a prize for the most bearings ever for a single pivot (a contradiction in terms if there ever was one), and at least a hole at the lowest point of the frame to let all the water out that comes in through the internal routing ingress points if you ride it when it's raining.
  • 8 2
 Better engineering solutions so bikes start getting lighter again rather than accepting them getting ever heavier for no good reason
  • 4 2
 We made a special lightweight dropper seatpost just for you. It doesn't drop, but look at how light it is! If that piques your interest, how about this 9-speed 11-36t cassette?
  • 5 0
 @AndrewHornor: Sounds amazing, can you also do a short and steep frame which will save some weight too? Also, the wheels seem too durable and rims too wide..what options you have there? And while you're at it, these 4 piston brakes weigh too much.
  • 2 0
 @ryan77777: why would a speaker frame need to weigh more? Changing angles doesn’t weigh anything. Why can’t wider wheels be made lighter and stronger? They have been in every other sport?
  • 2 0
 Or rather, accept that MOST riders are not mad bombers who need excessive strength in everything. Build a line of bikes for people who benefit more from light weight more than excessive strength.

And those riders don’t need dropper posts, 150 mm of travel, super slack angles, giant handlebar dia, etc.
  • 1 1
 @gmdunn: people who live in Houston TX shouldn't speak for MOST mountain bikers, but aren't you just describing XC bikes in general?
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: MOST Mountain bikers don’t live in the mountains, so drop the ad hominem. The vast majority of every market is not the extreme high end.

Yes, I’m describing a type of XC bike. But again, those XC bikes are either many thousands of dollars with geometry that assumes you’ll be going 30 mph, or they’re heavy as lead and oozing cheapness.
  • 1 0
 @gmdunn: I only clicked your profile because your comment suggested you live somewhere flat. It just happens that I spent one miserable school year and three awful summers there in my teen years, so I have sympathy for the location. I can see how you read that as trolling and apologize for it. Hear this out, I haven't looked at them much, but I wonder if a modern gravel bike would offer the light weight and classic xc geometry to suit your trails without breaking the bank. Only downside is I think it would still be nice to have a suspension fork for those bayou roots.
  • 1 0
 @CM999: shorter mostly - slightly shorter tubes plus less slack HTA means better bracing angles so less 'reinforcement', etc.. Think of a ruler on it's narrow axis and how you can flex it more the longer it is. Savings is probably in the tens of grams.

Narrower wheels is trickier but most obvious is less material. Of course a wider rim offset could get better bracing angle so might be stronger...but then you have to design for that.

FWIW, I'd take modern geo/wide rims even if it weighed 10lbs
  • 5 0
 "There are limits to how far numbers can get pushed before you end up with a bike that's so narrowly focused it's missing the versatility that makes today's bikes so much fun."

Truth.
  • 5 1
 I tried reading all the entries and didn't see these.
1. size specific shock tunes. Don't tell me that an XS rider will likely weigh the same as XXL. So why doesn't the shock tune change?

2.Transferrable warranties.
If the bike is within warranty period and has been maintained and the owner shows a legitimate receipt, why is the warranty no longer valid for most brands?

3. Touch up paint.
If you're not going to provide decent frame protection out of the box, then at least some paint...

I could find more if I kept on thinking I imagine.
  • 2 0
 1. What makes you think that's not the case? Do you have an example of a serious manufacturer who does not put different shock tunes on different sized bikes?

2. Some offer that and it sure would be nice, but considering that the manufacturer has no influence on how (not) thoroughly you check a used bike before purchase or how much the seller is lying to you, I'm not surprised it's rare.

3. Yes to that, protection, paint or both. I might actually like the paint idea more since I think plastic film looks pretty bad on anything from phones to bikes.
  • 1 0
 @bananowy:
On the shock tune point, it's what a select few marketing teams highlight. Norco for one come to mind.
If they did it, they'd talk about it. They generally don't, so from that it's evident to me at least that this doesn't happen.
Additionally, having spoken to enough bike shops & retailers, it's what they tell me.
  • 1 0
 @The-Reverend: Tell me more on how size-specific shock tunes should work?
I'm 184cm and weigh 78kg. I typically ride a size L.
I have a friend who is 188cm and weighs 72kg, his S5 Stumpjumper wouldn't want to be any smaller..
Another friend is about 172cm and weighs about 90kg, rides a size small.
  • 2 0
 @dsut4392:
Just saw this, sorry for the slow reply.
It's challenging, and I'd suggest doingnitnin bandings.

Granted there will always be situations where a tall person is very light, or a shorter person is heavier. In the main taller people weigh more than shorter people. One tune fits all isn't that great.
  • 1 0
 @The-Reverend: I completely agree on the averages, but the range of weights that will ride any particular size bike is wide enough that I don't think size-specific tuning of shocks is going to be beneficial on stock bikes. What we get with tuning for the average across all sizes is bikes that work OK for almost everyone out of the box after setting air pressure and twiddling the rebound and compression dials.
Go to size specific tunes and bikes in M and L will work exactly the same as they do now, the _median weight_ rider of a XS or XL bike may see a small improvement, but size XS bikes will be almost unrideable for short fat people, and XL bikes will ride like an early brain shock epic for tall light people.
  • 4 0
 Tyres:
I want to see foam insert technology integrated into the side walls such that we can fit tyres that protect against wheel damage whilst also damping the air spring aspect of the tyre.
In this way, I think overall wheel mass might be reduced as well as performance and reliability being increased.
  • 3 0
 Yes. Foam insert with magical bulletproof yet supple and supportive sidewall skin (I said magical). 4SSkin? Seriously though, seems like we should be there by now, sidewall tears and losing air doesn’t seem to be a problem on that friggin Mars rover.
  • 2 0
 @emptybe-er: Good call on the name! Sounds like something Cove would have come up with back in the day.
  • 7 0
 the only thing standard are the 9/16 pedals under our feet
  • 4 0
 shhhhhhhhhhhh don't say anything and they won't notice...
  • 14 0
 *Bike industry starts work on press-fit pedals*
  • 1 0
 Probably mount the bearings in the crank arm next. “This new standard will allow us to fit a bigger bearing whilst still allowing the low profile pedal body we know our customers value above everything else....”
  • 1 0
 @Afterschoolsports: and it'll need a special tool to tighten the pedal since the bearings gonna spin while you put it on.
  • 2 0
 @Deoratwo: press fit of course!
  • 3 0
 Also bike models on good frames with proper wheels and suspension, but made more affordable by groupsets like Deore. and more affordable cockpits. We have too much good technology and component advancements to not have this option and I feel like not many people care too much about how high end their drivetrain is.
  • 2 0
 For online dealers I like Komking.de’s way to do it, they offer more build options than any other shop I’ve seen so far and the end total price is still lower than the comparable complete builds offered through lbs*. (*At least in Sweden). Only limitation is the number of frame manufacturers they work with but Santa Cruz is one of them.
  • 5 1
 "yes, it would have made a whole lot of sense if regular Boost had never hit the market, but at this point I think it's too late to change lanes again."

PB Tech equivalent of "Get Off My Lawn"
  • 5 0
 @mikekazimer What is wrong with syntance UDH? it was in place for last 10 years rather then new Sram UDH ??
Agree on Water bottle and Storage inside downtube
  • 4 0
 Is Sram UDH hanger just a way for Sram to get frame makers to prepare for this?

bikerumor.com/2019/09/16/srams-universal-hanger-concept-could-make-coaxial-mounted-hangerless-derailleurs-a-thing
  • 4 0
 I'd like to see companies selling 26" enduro/trail bikes. It's kind of a shame having to break the bank going custom. They just look so dang fun. Also it'd be sweet to see down tube storage in all bikes.
  • 7 0
 What about T47 tho?
  • 5 1
 Vote with your wallet. If folks refused to buy pressfit BB frames then they would be dead already. Same with all the other things mentioned here.
  • 2 0
 Agreed. But complaining about dumb standards on pinkbike is also a good way to vent.
  • 5 0
 My biggest complaint about my GT Sensor is the longass seat tube at 480. C'mon GT
  • 2 0
 My friend has one - the 4 inches of dropper on my bike are taken up by the seat post on her bike. Crazy.
  • 3 0
 Been riding a 3rd gen Commencal Meta with 490mm seat tube in size large. Drives me crazy. Might just cut it one of these days
  • 2 0
 @Austinowens720: if you can give it a shot. Unfortunately l can't due to its design otherwise I would try :-/
  • 6 1
 Water bottles are over rated its just extra weigh plus your body is already 70% water so just like dont get thirsty duh
  • 1 0
 Coach Klein: Gatorade not only quenches your thirst better, it tastes better too, idiot.
  • 5 0
 Standard eyelet shock with no Trunnion mount is at the top of my list when shopping for a frame.
  • 2 0
 I think different chainstay lengths for different frame sizes make a lot of sense to keep the bike balanced, but wouldn’t that also change the amount of rear travel as well? I’m not sure what consequences this would have on ride quality either, but it may not be as simple as lengthening the stays and calling it a day. Just a thought…
  • 1 0
 That would be true if it was the actual chainstay/swingarm that was a different part. On Norco bikes at least (they were quite early to do size specific rear-centres), the actual chainstays are the same, but the bottom bracket moves forward on larger sizes.
  • 2 0
 Adjustable chainstay AND adjustable reach.
If you set and forget there are still lots of reasons for have this: Having both means the bike will fit a wider range of heights. You're less likely to have bought the wrong size as you can decide on which you prefer after buying, not before. It'll be more suitable for kids or anyone still growing. When you resell it later, you'll have more people interested in buying it.
I'm curious of how much extra that costs a manufacturer and weakens the frame. I was very surprised when canyon did it on their downhill bike but not their trail bikes.
  • 3 0
 The bike industry can do one this year, never have they made more money, for less service, less quality or value. I am going to ride my old rig rather than convincing myself a new bike is going to improve my ability.
  • 3 1
 I have one:

how about wheelsets that both save some coin, as well as put emphasis into reliability where it counts...the rear wheel and hub. Look, we all know that budget bikes get absolute cheezzzzzzze wheels and hubs(cough*novatec+non-welded al dente rims*cough). but what if you spent like $60 on a solid DT350 rear hub, left the shitty hub upfront and beefed up the rear hoop? it's a compromise, but one that would be understandable and made it obvious you are thinking through the decision beyond "what cheap shit can I put on this bike so that I can drop an XT derailleur on it so people think they are getting an XT build".
  • 2 0
 "why shake things up for negligible gains?"

This question can be asked about literally anything that's changed about bikes in the last 40 years. "Negligible gains" stack up and create tangible gains. If everyone though like this, Boost never would have happened, so then your argument that Boost is good enough literally wouldn't exist.
  • 7 2
 I want mine to come with a pile of Cocaine in the down tube!
  • 3 0
 preach! "aluminum frame with good suspension, good brakes, and a basic-but-reliable drivetrain"

For so long new bikes have been the reciprocal of this!
  • 2 1
 With nearly all XC bikes having boost these days, I think it’s only a matter of time until boost vs non boost is the only way to distinguish a mountain vs gravel bike.

At least until some innovative marketing mind comes up with 145 semi-boost because it has the optimal amount of stiffness, tire clearance, and q-factor for all of your grountain needs.
  • 5 0
 I think it's the curly bars...
  • 6 0
 too late. Focus have already released the Atlas gravel bike with boost spacing
  • 5 0
 Trek does 141mm QR dropouts on its cheaper hardtails. Boost without the thru-axle. Rage-inducing.
  • 2 0
 It's interesting that size specific chainstays make sense for MTB but you still see the same short chainstays length on road bikes across all sizes. I suppose due to more dramatic rider weight shifts in MTB.
  • 1 0
 They are using the same wheel size, basically the same tire size and no suspension. Keeping the rear tire tight to the seat tube is also good for aero. There really isn't much reason to have tons of different chainstay lengths.
  • 2 0
 @RonSauce: yeah but the ride feel of the xxs road bike probably doesn't feel the same as xxl with the different FC:RC ratio. Although they do tend to vary the head angles between sizes slightly
  • 2 0
 @ashmtb85: if you're on a XXL you probably shouldn't concern yourself with the handling of an xxs. The bikes don't need to be longer, if anything they should put smaller wheels on the xxs. You can get a longer road bike if you want.
  • 1 0
 I'm onboard with the insertion depth problem. I have enough exposed seatpost on my medium Megatower to run a 210 mm drop post, but no post, even the OneUp that long will fit in my frame. The longest post I can fit is the 170 mm OneUp, which is only 10 mm longer than the BikeYoke I'm currently running. I'm eagerly awaiting the 200 mm Reverb AXS and searching cushions for a spare $800.
  • 1 0
 I've always been a short chainstay guy, but the recent trend in scaled sizing has got me interested. I ride XL frames and have stuck to around a 430mm chainstay length but, I just picked up a Forbidden Druid with 450mm chainstays on the XL frame. For many reasons I'm very excited to ride this bike, that being one of them. Winter will be over in a few months.
  • 1 0
 "Sure, on shorter travel bikes a super-long post isn't as much of a necessity – those bikes will see more use on rolling terrain"

Except you guys keep telling us that short travel is the shit, because it makes stuff harder. So those short travel bikes will probably be used on some more agressive stuff than rolling terrain, stuff that might benefit from maximum seat-post drop. Or does not having maximum drop of the seat-post also play into that "making shit harder" shtick?
  • 1 0
 Only levy says that. And well, that's just levy haha
  • 2 0
 "I'm not sure why more companies don't use a something like the Trans-X Rad"

Maybe because you guys often shit on bikes that spec lower-end posts, especially those that use that common replaceable cartridge.
  • 1 0
 threaded bottom brackets with 30mm spindle cranks are a bit of a headache. Can't tell you how many bottom brackets I've gone through. Those bearings are tiny and the seals usually suck. Maybe T47 as a standard would be better than BSA?
  • 2 0
 THIS: "I will say that an aluminum frame with good suspension, good brakes, and a basic-but-reliable drivetrain will always make a whole lot of sense"

Every bike should have an aluminium version with a decent build kit!
  • 1 0
 Give me most any new standard that makes the bike better. I want progress, I don't want to look back. I'll take the ones that work for me and ignore the others. Steepen that product development that helps the rider have more fun. I have zero nostalgia for old stuff that doesn't work as well as the new stuff. Life is change, humans are creative, and I ain't my grandfather so bring it.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer serviceability of parts. I would say that this goes along with durability, but for example a OneUp or PNW dropper post is easily serviceable by a novice mechanic, where as a Fox Transfer can't be serviced without special tools. Suspension forks that can offer quality performance and don't require a detailed bleed, more open bath, would be another items to reduce turn around waits and service complexities that keep people off their bikes.
  • 1 0
 Really, bikes need two water bottle holders in the front triangle. One is just a step in the evolution. Currently, only xc bikes seem to have two like the Orbea Oiz, Specialized Epic and others. Btw, those bullshit ones underneath the frame don't count. Having two bottles is really nice, which I have on my Oiz, as it allows you to go for a three hour ride or so without having to wear a pack.
  • 5 2
 Yes water bottle, most of us ride 1-2 hours every ride.
I don’t want to carry a backpack.
Keep simple & stupid
  • 7 7
 I'd love to see more dropped toptubes, it looks cool and makes some tricks easier. Combined with this I'd rather have the water bottle on the toptube sandwiched by a seat tube gusset. Means frames aren't ugly as sin just to get room for a water bottle plus it's in a super handy place to reach
  • 1 0
 Completely agree. While dropped top tubes have always been around they’ve also been surprisingly overlooked even by makers of bikes intended for ‘radical manoeuvres’. I’d also go as far as to say they’re safer to ride, way easier to bail when necessary.
It is tricky to package suspension designs along with bottles etc but it’s not THAT big a task these days when the benefits are so great.
  • 2 0
 @ProperPushIrons: Got an example? Not picturing this
  • 2 0
 @ryan77777:

The kellys e bike is nicely dropped

www.pinkbike.com/photo/19244715
  • 4 0
 Yes to all of this. Headset and seatpost size standards would be good too.
  • 5 5
 "There are lots of examples of bikes with relatively short chainstays, generous tire clearance, and plenty of frame stiffness that use regular Boost spacing; why shake things up for negligible gains? " Could you identify a couple? Also, what is "generous tire clearance." Maybe you don't run 2.6 tires so room for a 2.4 is generous for you. Some companies are notorious for claiming 2.6 but it's super tight and scrapes the frame if there's mud. More than a few companies, Evil, Knolly, and Salsa included, have found they can only offer 2.6 tire clearance and other things like sufficient stiffness or short chainstays with super boost. That may not be true for all frame designs, but then should companies abandon their design and make what everyone else is?
  • 3 0
 My growler is a 135mm qr and it's a plus tire bike. Ditched the qr for a bolted axle and it's plenty stiff with all the tire clearance. Axle spacing isn't the issue, frame design is.
  • 5 0
 @Jheitt142: yeah, and downhill bikes were using 135mm rears until not too long ago. I don't recall too many pro racers breaking axles. Sizing of certain components had been updated to try and make something new and exciting and then marketing the crap out of it. Pinkbike writers always push these new sizes and designs as part of the marketing machine, even if they aren't needed in the first place.
  • 4 0
 Moulded chainstay protector
  • 3 0
 "next iteration of the Grim Donut," that's all I needed to read. Bring it. And call it the Grimmer Donut, please.
  • 1 0
 Or the grim donutter?
  • 2 0
 The Happy Eclair = e-bike version?
  • 3 0
 Such as the ability Ibis gives you to run factory suspension on their deore builds
  • 4 0
 One up seatpost start this adjustable seatpost not pnw.
  • 3 0
 You have clearly not tried to route a brake line through the chain stay on the new stumpjumper (as shown)..
  • 4 0
 Installing the dropper on a new stumpjumper made me want to set the bike on fire and throw it into a river. Easy install, my ass.
  • 3 0
 dont care if the gear cables in or out as long as its one piece outer beginning to end.
  • 4 0
 Mike should start his own gig. I’m sure his bikes would be dialed.
  • 3 0
 Think so too. He seems like a really knowledgeable guy with an eye for details. His reviews are on point anyways.
  • 3 1
 I am still riding on the 12x142 “gravel standard” hub. I was going to go superboost next bike just to spite all the people on 12x148
  • 3 0
 For trail bikes it hould be called stuperboost.
  • 1 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: maybe I will hold out for ExtraBigly Boost
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer It makes sense why you had / have an affinity for the Norco Optic, as it has a few of those items on your list (dropper post / size-specific chainstays).
  • 3 0
 *reads list and nods approvingly*

*goes into garage, looks at Firebird 29 with NONE OF THESE THINGS*
  • 1 1
 Can we get more bikes with size specific bar rises whilst we’re at it? As a tall rider it sucks to have to outlay a few pineapples on a new handlebar for your new bike before you ever ride it. If you’re buying a bike with a reach ~500mm, chances are a 25mm rise bar isn’t going to put you in a great riding position.
  • 2 2
 Modern mountain bikes need durable parts. Every time something breaks, I know exactly why. It was designed with one, ONE, metric in mind. Weight. Why not make a groupset, tire, ect. where DURABILITY is the selling point, and weight is secondary. Durability matters more than weight for most of us who don't race, or race casually. It should be the rule not the exception. It feels like I spend just as much time working on my bikes as riding them and the only way to change that is heavier parts built to last.
  • 2 0
 They’ve got one. It’s called deore...
  • 5 1
 Amen.
  • 14 13
 I think they should just all move on to 157 spacing. 148 was a stupid choice and it shouldn't have been made. You can't cling to bad choices due to the past.
  • 11 1
 Should have gone from 142 to old DH 150 instead of 148. KISS.
  • 5 1
 @Staktup: 157 is the old 150 standard, with longer end caps to make it easier to install/remove the wheel. But they're otherwise identical.
  • 2 2
 Or maybe frame makers could get smart and start making asymmetric rear ends to offset our asymmetric hubs, instead of just making them wider. Cannondale has caught on. A 6mm offset yields near perfect symmetry between the flanges for a boost 148 hub. Hope also solved the issue with an asymmetric back end and a 130mm hub with zero dish. Narrow rear end, stronger wheel, but people were appalled at the new hub standard. Let's stick with 148mm and get smart with the frames. Screw off with the wider hubs, wider back ends, and asymmetric hoops that are all a compromise already.
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: I've done some bikes like this (way back in the day we did offset 135!) but people have a really hard time wrapping their brains around things that aren't symmetrical. In at least a decade of offering offset 148 now, only a couple of people have been willing to go for it.

Superboost is an easier sell. And it's not as if you can hot swap a symmetrical 148 wheel into an offset frame anyway.
  • 1 0
 @waltworks: I get it, 100%. I'd still love to see it catch on however!
  • 3 0
 Loving all the Mike vs. Mike jabs! Keep that up!
  • 2 1
 @pinkbike, can you guys also make an article with the worst "inventions" in mountain biking? Like those Shimano brake-shift-levers. Or Suspension stems. Or...
  • 4 0
 I will not hear a word against the brake-shift levers that I got gifted from a sponsored rider who wasn't using them for some reason. They may have been wacky, but the shifting and braking individually worked really well. OK, I'll hear a few words against them.
  • 2 1
 Anybody else out there realizing that clutches and chain tension dependent suspension are responsible for crushing/twisting rear der cages?
  • 1 0
 Tell me more about that
  • 2 0
 @kasahacker: So after years of multitudes of bikes coming through the shop with rear mechs often being twisted outward not inward and customers and my own experience describing no stick, wreck or reason for the instant loss of gearing I've formed a hypothesis. Based i guess around Newton's 3rd law in which for every action there is the equal and opposite reaction. The forces during sharp bottom outs/ or instant compressions where in the instant that forces are applied a multilink suspension design rotates somewhat backwards putting tension on the chain which is responsible for pedal feedback or "kickback" as i like to call it. When this occurs and the rider is either weighting the crank resisting the backwards rotation and or pedaling at the same time those equal forces have to go somewhere and my theory that it finds the weakest member of the drivetrain, the cage between the pulleys. Compounding the situation on more modern bikes is the clutch/resister plate which resists the cage from moving forward to allow for chain growth. I believe the engineers would call this "the moment of inertia" where all the players start moving- at that nanosecond the forces have to be absorbed somewhere. We didn't see this ever or maybe very rarely before clutches and long 11spd and now 12spd rear derailleurs cages. They have also noticeably gotten thinner and more fickle and really really expensive with no legit repair. I have many frustrated riders that are getting sick of it. The only answer to me is to make the cages much more robust (it isn't like weight is an issue now seeing as top level suspension bikes are easily 32+ lbs.) and also should be fully replaceable!! Come on industry!
  • 1 1
 I'd like to see more companies make frames that can accommodate both 27.5 and 29 wheel sizes by different derailleur hangers or axle positions and be able to adjust geo with flip chip.
  • 3 0
 why not threaded head tube ?
  • 1 0
 Agree on the 148mm boost particularly regarding entry level bikes. There's no reason something like a roscoe or rockhopper should come with 141mm axle spacing.
  • 1 0
 Great list. I would add room for wide tires, say 29x2.6. Not necessarily needed on all bikes/ for all riders but why not have the option for those who want this.
  • 1 0
 But you need superboost for that on evil, pivot, salsa, knolly. And you know some 148 bikes can’t run them
  • 1 0
 @ces1965: that’s why I’m “requesting” the change.
  • 1 0
 I can agree with all of this, but would like to see some geometry adjustment for BB height for those who actually ride tech and or charge hard
  • 2 0
 Internal storage for alu frames, cmon, trek did that, why others waiting? Probably most sellable feature after modern geo
  • 2 1
 PB losing credibility pushing the threaded or nothing nonsense. o well. when it becomes Pink E-bike it will be fitting anyway.
  • 1 0
 Hey now, we do at least have laser guns in 2021. Go visit just about any Shipping and Receiving department and be prepared for a major disappointment.
  • 1 0
 THE POINT IS MADE IN THE LAST SENTENCE, THUS MAKING ALL ENGLISH TEACHERS GLEEFUL:::


"will always make a whole lot of sense."
  • 1 0
 Couldn’t agree anymore with @mikekazimer on all of the must haves
The only one I’d add would be Swat or Trek frame style storage
  • 1 0
 Same size brake rotors front and rear + decent brakes.
No more down speccing shifters with more expensive derailleur.
Appropriate tire casing.
  • 10 7
 Where is the SWAT Box?
  • 46 0
 Normally in the down tube.
  • 10 0
 @bigtim: Oh thanks, my Stumpi is in the basement and I forgot.
  • 18 18
 I'll never ever understand the water bottle thing..Not against frames having them of course but will always carry water, tools etc. in a pack.
  • 21 3
 For people that don't wear packs. I don't wear a pack. I hate them. Unless it's an insanely long ride and 1 water bottle won't cover it. I personally like tool straps for my tools and water bottles for my water. Anything else I stuff in my brothers pack. LOL!
  • 6 0
 Because when I go for a short ride, i want to have a bottle and i want the easiest way to drink when i ride, i dont want 20 kg pack on my back.
  • 6 0
 I was the same way until I started using one (again). Now I try hard not to carry water on my body unless I am going really long. Even a 2 bottle ride works if you drink the first bottle in the 15 minutes before you start the ride, then carry one on the bike for the second half. Carrying water to drink in the first 30 minutes is unnecessary (drink before riding), as is carrying extra water that gets consumed in the last 15 minutes of a ride. Water does nothing for you unless it is in your body, and putting it in does nothing until it gets absorbed......

I used to carry way more water than I really needed, especially for rides that are on trails that never stray too far from the car like we have in the northeast. Out west, long loops, remote riding, carry extra so you don't end up dead.
  • 2 7
flag Explodo (Jan 28, 2021 at 13:33) (Below Threshold)
 I agree. A bottle means stopping to drink...screw that.
  • 1 1
 @Skarhead89: So you need a 20 litre bottle?! lol

I drink before a short I ride, that's it.
  • 2 3
 @Skarhead89: Huh?..Reaching down for a water bottle while riding is "easier" than drinking from a hose next to your face?
20kg pack??..fyi they have these things called hydration packs nowdays-some of them are designed to place most of their (7lb.-10lb.) weight close to your hips.
  • 5 0
 Packs are hot and sweaty in Australia. I avoid them if at all possible. I do my daily 20km loop with just a bottle.
  • 2 1
 @Skarhead89: 20kg lol what? you riding with 19ltrs of water...............?
  • 2 1
 @nojzilla: maybe he carries every bike tool and a repair stand with him?
  • 1 0
 @Skarhead89: The standard blue bottle for water coolers is 19l Big Grin
  • 10 8
 Bikes with no less than 76 degrees seat angle on any category.
  • 11 1
 75 is just fine for most riding and I lived in Colorado 10 years until recently. Personal opinion of course, but 76 starts feeling too upright for anything but climbing for many.
  • 5 1
 As an XC racer, I'll have to categorically disagree. An XC race bike with significantly more than 75° STA would suck. Because of the STA itself, but also because what it inevitably implies for the rest of the geometry.
  • 4 1
 @BenTheSwabian: yeah this is true, a bike meant for more rolling terrain is a bit more comfortable with a not so steep SA
  • 2 0
 @BenTheSwabian: I highly disagree, as someone that is tall then a current XC bike feels awful with the current slack 74'ish STA, 76 is the minimum for me on any bike type. I also ride XC for that matter.
  • 3 3
 A water bottle on the bike is a must, but how big of a water bottle should bikes be able to carry? The largest I can fit on my Medium Scott Ransom is 24oz. Any thoughts?
  • 1 0
 I run a 1litre water bottle in my medium scott ransom, and thats with a dpx2 shock. U just need to shop around for the right cage.
  • 1 0
 @up-left-down-right: Thanks for commenting! What bottle cage do you use?? That'd be awesome to get that large a bottle on my frame.
  • 1 0
 @up-left-down-right: 1 litre! are you a camel?
  • 1 0
 @jf94: Zefal two piece cage, with a Zefal magnum bottle. Fit cage an bottle with no air in the shock, fully compressed.
  • 1 0
 Quality parts, bottle cage, wide bars, tubeless, 1x drivetrain, dropper, that seems like a lot to ask but it is not.
  • 1 0
 Almost every bike now comes with 800mm bars and most cut them down (previous article this week shows most pros at 760mm or so)
  • 8 9
 Here’s a question: threaded bb’s are hassle free, easy to maintain, quiet. Why can’t we have threaded headsets and threaded cartridge bearings for pivots along those same lines? Would make maintenance so much easier.
  • 2 3
 @rickybobby18 A threaded headset just makes sense. Standardizing the thread dia. and pitch would be relatively easy for everyone to agree on right? Good. Let's get it done.
  • 8 0
 some companies struggle with alignment issues as it, I don´t think we need more places where they can f*ck up lol.
  • 5 5
 @pcledrew: That was the standard before threadless headsets came along in the early 90s. Having owned a threaded headset I can say I never want to go back to that!
  • 6 4
 @SintraFreeride: I mean the cups, not the bearings. Basically it seems like anything that's pressfit on a bike would benefit from becoming threaded.
  • 5 0
 @SintraFreeride: The old headsets you speak of are threaded steerer tubes, those did suck. These guys are asking if the cups could be threaded into the frame like a BB instead of pressed in. The one downside I can think of is the threaded cups would take up more space so to run the same size bearings head tubes would have to be bigger. It would be cool though.
  • 3 0
 @rickybobby18: but only the cups have to be pressed in once, and as the bearings are not there really is no difficulty servicing them. And a proper headset lasts a decade without changing bearings.
  • 2 0
 @jzPV: I guess so. Maybe pivot bearings are more applicable then. If you could thread your bearings in/out it would make maintaining them so much simpler.
  • 3 0
 @rickybobby18: Biggest issue I can see with pivot bearings is that they would likely end up needing to be specifically made to include tool fittings. Press-in bearings are literally dime-a-dozen, just look at a McMaster or Grainger catalog and I guarantee you can find bearings that will fit your bike. Also I can see suspension rocker links and whatnot having to be made larger to accommodate bearings with tool fittings on them.
  • 1 2
 Great idea! Press in cups are huge source of creaking, they can deform the headtube and just generally suck. In reality, press fit headsets suck no worse than a press fit BB. It would also make for a more robust assembly and greater head tube strength
  • 4 0
 @rickybobby18: "Basically it seems like anything that's pressfit on a bike would benefit from becoming threaded."

...or simply manufactured to the correct tolerances!
  • 2 0
 @pcledrew: assuming people stated to actually put threaded headset cups in bikes..... How likely is it that they will actually run one standard? Oh yeah not at all!!
  • 5 0
 What kind of problems are people having with headsets that need a new hardware standard to resolve?
  • 4 0
 @nurseben: How does making the assembly threaded instead of pressfit make it stronger? Unless you make both the bearing cups and the head tube thicker, you're actually weakening them by cutting threads (less material + stress risers). Press-fitting only causes deformation if it's not done properly (learn how to wrench) or if the parts aren't built to the right spec & tolerance (which will cause at least as many issues for threaded parts).
  • 3 0
 Never had a problem with squeaky PF BBs. I have toasted a few bearings, but it was only from one company. Also, once I got the PF BB installation/removal tool I like PF BBs.
  • 3 0
 @shami: It will also make having anglesets and reachsets quite tricky.
  • 1 0
 @SintraFreeride: Good point
  • 1 0
 @nurseben: or just a ZS system but with replaceable bearing bores/sleeves. I love the idea of zs but bearings sitting directly in the frame possibly hammering and deforming frame material when the headset is loose really sucks. It does seem like threads would make replacement and maintenance easier for most people.
  • 1 0
 @nurseben: whoops sorry I meant “integrated” rather than zs headset
  • 1 0
 Or companies could just view the pinkbike comment section to create the best bikes ever?
  • 2 0
 Gas Tank fuel bag bosses.
  • 4 6
 I actually bought a bearing press, so because I have the cheap tool to remove a BB (just like I had to buy the cheap tool to remove a threaded BB), I have to give my preference to press fit now. I appreciate a metal frame with absolutely no threads on it to corrode (except those precious water bottle cage mounts)
  • 3 1
 Standard shock sizes and flipping brake pads and spokes!
  • 2 0
 Down tube AND top tube swat storage. Let's put that hollow space to use.
  • 1 0
 This will probably be the one and only PB article where everyone will agree with!? Lol
  • 2 1
 OEM shuttle pads would be nice too for any bike that crosses over into the shuttle market - >120mm rear travel?
  • 1 0
 Quick swappable UDH and derailleur? Swap AXS wireless between 5 bikes to help myself justify the price! Lol
  • 2 2
 One thing i would love to see more of is long travel hard tails (Dartmoor hornet being one). But bottle cages are extremely important, and are a deciding factor for me.
  • 6 0
 There are so many long travel hardtails.

Ragley, Production Privee, Chromag, Cotic, RSD, Kona, Stanton, Pole all make at least one and that’s just off the top of my head.

A glut.
An over abundance.
A plethora.
A cornucopia.
Our cup of long travel hardtails runneth over.
  • 2 0
 @melanthius: Unfortunately the Production Privee ht’s have old school geo, my medium Shan 27 is just 410 mm in reach and sta is 73,5 degree.
  • 2 0
 @melanthius: 180mm dual crown compatible? That's what I meant. But I see your point
  • 2 0
 The bike I have on order has 6/7..... Not bad!!
  • 1 0
 Axle and bb standards should be the same HD to enduro Would make parts sharing much easier.
  • 2 0
 Well, I'm 55. The most important thing is a motor. Razz
  • 1 0
 No mention of trail etiquette to sanctioned and unsanctioned trails. This writer knows better.
  • 1 0
 An industry standard in building things to last a reasonable length of time.
  • 2 2
 All MTB's?? So water bottles an droppers on a jump bike or a DH bike? Nowt wrong with press fit if done properly. External routing works fine. Etc etc etc
  • 3 0
 DH brakes on all bikes.
  • 1 0
 OK, so if ALL bikes should have a water bottle cage (I agree) shouldn't they ALL have a handy-dandy storage hole underneath?
  • 1 0
 UDH and chainstay flip chip bites themselves a bit. biggest drawback of UDH that I can see..
  • 1 0
 Fork with a bolt-on fender. Why the F are we still zip-tying things to our multi-thousand dollar super-bikes?
  • 1 0
 Excellent article - and published on my birthday. I learned a lot from this article and agree with everything said!
  • 2 0
 100% agree.
  • 1 0
 A compass pointing to my closest microbrewery!
  • 1 0
 The last ticks every box, even mullet or 29 options.
  • 1 1
 What's with backward compatibility? It's suck that there is no xd or microspline Cassette for 10 speed
  • 1 0
 Really looking forward to that grim donut 2
  • 2 1
 Are we just going to ignore the backwards caliper adapter?
  • 2 1
 I'm glad someone else noticed it. I recently emailed Kona about a spelling mistake on the Process X webpage. Something about that bike makes errors happen.
  • 3 0
 @waffleShirt: maybe it is correct and you need to flip it around for the forward axle position. Could that be it?
  • 1 0
 @bogey: what about running a 220 mm rotor with a +40 adapter? Or running a 180 mm rotor with no adapter?
  • 1 2
 Wow, for once a list of innovations without a single item I'd disagree on! That being said, strapping water bottles directly to your frame is sooo 1990's...
  • 1 0
 Tune in for my next article, “10 Things Every Hand Should Have.”
  • 1 1
 Specialized and good internal cable routings should not be mentioned in the same sentence, just sayin
  • 2 1
 Gear box and shaft drive.
  • 1 0
 Clearly the 197x12 thru axle is an exemption, gotta fit those 5" tires
  • 1 0
 8. front brake on the right...................... lol
  • 1 0
 Abillity to choose specs and color like Orbea, Propain, Cotic are doing.
  • 2 0
 coffee maker.
  • 2 1
 I don’t give a shit about one thing mentioned on that list
  • 1 0
 Nicer aluminum beats carbon
  • 1 0
 Handlebars with more than 9 degree backsweep.
  • 1 0
 Give us the 3d print file boi
  • 1 0
 Saint Deore got robbed
  • 2 2
 I’d like 2 water bottles and some variety of in-frame storage.
  • 3 2
 20 mm front axle!
  • 1 0
 Swat box
  • 1 1
 31,6mm ID seattube for all bikes!
  • 1 0
 Replacement Decals.
  • 1 0
 Or no decals
  • 1 0
 motor
  • 5 7
 1. Metal Frames 2. Metal Bars 3. Metal Cranks 4. Metal Rims 5. No Gravel Bikes 6. No Ebikes 7. No Mullet Bikes
  • 3 2
 Nothing wrong with mullet bikes as long as it's 26"/27.5" but the rest is spot on Smile
  • 3 2
 @JanB: ah ah ah

no 24/26 love?
  • 1 0
 @JanB: Cheers
  • 1 1
 @Civicowner: 24/26 is ok to, as long as it's with 3" Gazza Smile
  • 2 3
 Motor! . . . . . . not...
  • 2 3
 mountain bikes have seriously devolved since the freeride days.
  • 1 0
 I had my coiled sx trail down to modern 170mm bike weight, maybe a bit lighter but suspension and frame design/manufacturing is better now for sure.
Wagon wheels are no fun but I’m assuming the bike industry will figure that out just as the motor vehicle industry has.
  • 1 1
 Remote rear lockouts
  • 1 1
 What is a "tube"?
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