DH Bike Review: Orange 279 - A Staple of British Downhill Racing

Mar 1, 2023
by Matt Beer  



Orange Bikes might have the most recognizable silhouette when it comes to mountain biking. Primarily, their UK-made frames have used a relatively simple single-pivot design for over two decades. Back in 2001, Greg Minnaar took the World Cup overall on the freshly produced Orange 222 for the prestigious Global Racing Team. British downhill legend, Steve Peat, has also proudly raised his Orange 223 over his head for queen and country at the Fort William World Cup in 2005. Since then, Orange has continued to build prototypes and progress their aluminum craftsmanship at their headquarters in Halifax, U.K.

The 279 name signifies that the bike rolls on mixed wheels only, and there’s something about the bold tubes and minimalist design that brings a cult following to those that have swung a leg over an Orange.
Orange 279 Details

• Frame: Aluminium
• Wheel sizes: 29/27.5
• Single-pivot suspension design
• Travel: 198mm
• Fox Float X2 shock
• 62-degree head angle
• Reach: 443, 460 (tested), 480, 496mm
• Chainstays: 465mm
• Weight: 16.15 kg / 35.6 lb
• Price: $8,800 USD ($3,854 USD - frame w/shock)
orangebikes.com




Contents

bigquotes“Rallying down the trail on the 279 is mechanical, like driving a bare-bones, manual-everything sports car. You feel and hear every ounce of trail through the frame, yet there's a steadiness to the bike that makes the nostalgic characteristic worth accepting.” Matt Beer




Orange 279 - photo Satchel Cronk

Frame Details

Their latest evolution of downhill bikes still uses the classic Orange method of bending aluminum sheets to form the tubes of the 279. A broad palette of colors is on tap, from a metallic British Racing Green to a bright and suiting Fizzy Orange. All frames have a three-year warranty, excluding the 279. Due to the nature of downhill racing, Orange only provides a 1-Year Racing Warranty, even though their frames are made in the U.K.

In order to position the shock, the downtube is interrupted with a peculiar mount and with a fixed geometry setting. Readers have been curious about how detrimental the exposed shock hardware could be, but that forward mount barely rotates. Orange spec the 279 with a Fox Float X2 which produces 198mm of rear wheel travel, although we’ve seen their factory team mount an Ohlins TTX coil shock too.

From a quick glance, fans of externally routed cables would be enthused to see the housing run from the handlebars and to the outside of the downtube, only then to learn that it enters the swingarm. Around the headtube, the routing could be done with two more cable mounts to keep them from rattling on the descents. Most downhill bikes these days use a 157mm rear hub spacing that allows the end caps to rest in the swingarm, but Orange has stuck with a flush 150mm width. Removing the axle is not the cleanest execution either. Two male bolts thread in the female axle and use pinch clamps on either side of the dropout. This area seems to be over-complicated compared to what most manufacturers offer these days.


Orange 279 - photo Satchel Cronk

Suspension

That one-piece swingarm is mounted to the front triangle slightly above and forward of the 36-tooth chainring. No geometry or progression changes are found, but an interruption in the downtube has been designed to optimize the position of the forward shock mount. Comparing the height of the two mounts, the slightly lower forward mount adds some progression to the leverage ratio. Doubling up on bottom-out resistance, the Fox Float X2 ramps up at the end of the travel.


photo

Geometry

Long chainstay enthusiasts, hang onto your hats; this is a wild one - the rear center length of our test bike is 5mm longer than the reach. Yes, the chainstays measure 465mm for all four frame sizes, while our medium-sized frame gets a 460mm reach. When comparing sizes this time around, we took the massive chainstays and slack 62-degree headtube angle into account, because that made the 279 the bike with the longest wheelbase in the test.

Orange doesn't adjust the chainstays in accordance with the front center; I can't imagine how the size small frame would ride with its 443mm reach.

Another outlier is the seat tube angle, which, for a downhill bike is quite steep at 76 degrees. Last season, one of Orange's factory riders actually built the 279 into a full-fledged enduro machine and raced it at the Crans Montana EWS.

Specifications
Price $8800
Travel 198
Rear Shock Fox Float X2 Factory 250x75
Fork Fox Factory 40 Grip 2 29
Headset Hope Black - ZS 49/56
Cassette SRAM PG 720 DH 11-25t 7spd
Crankarms Truvativ Descendant DH 165mm 36t
Chainguide MRP G4
Bottom Bracket SRAM DUB BSA
Chain SRAM PC1110
Rear Derailleur SRAM GX1 DH 7spd
Shifter Pods SRAM GX1 DH 7spd
Handlebar Burgtec RideWide DH 800mm
Stem Burgtec Direct Mount 50mm
Grips Strange Grappler Lock-On
Brakes Formula Cura 4 w/203 rotors
Hubs Hope Pro 4 12x150
Rim Stans Flow Mk4
Tires Michelin DH 22 Racing Line 2.4
Seat SDG I-Fly Saddle I-Beam
Seatpost SDG I-Beam Aluminium



Orange 279 - photo Satchel Cronk
Orange 279 - photo Satchel Cronk

Specifications

A handmade frame will never be inexpensive, but the $3,850 USD asking price, including the Float X2 and your choice of color, isn't out of this world.

If you’re not going to custom-build your Orange, then there's only the Factory-level complete bike with premium components. Those include a matching Fox 40, SRAM GX DH drivetrain, Formula Cura 4 brakes, and a Burgtec/SDG cockpit. A mixed-size wheelset used Hope Pro 4 hubs laced to Stans Flow MK3 rims are topped off with Michelin's robust DH 22 Racing Line tires for $8,800 USD.






Test Bike Setup

Excitement and nostalgia were about when I pulled the 279 out of the box. I knew where to start with the Fox 40 settings and trimmed the bars down to a wider-than-normal 780mm to compensate for the shorter reach.

As I tinkered with the 279 setup, I realized there was a narrow window to adjust the height of the fork in the crowns. Like the fork used on the Antidote Darkmatter, the short 48mm offset and 45mm stem combo meant that I couldn’t lower the stanchions in the crowns as much as desired. This ate into the actual reach number, which was on the shorter side to begin with.

Orange referred me to Fox’s Float X2 tuning guide for a baseline and I started with the shock at 30% sag.

That proved sensitive enough off the top, but on the first lap, I soon learned that wouldn’t be enough support as the shock wallowed through the middle of the stroke in deep berms. From there, I bumped the pressure up to 200 PSI to yield 27% sag and backed off the compression slightly. Raising the pressure led to a rougher ride, but did achieve the much-needed support through the mid-stroke.
photo
Matt Beer
Location: Squamish, BC, Canada
Age: 36
Height: 5'10" / 178 cm
Weight: 170 lb / 77 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @mattb33r





Orange 279 - photo Satchel Cronk

Descending

Believe it or not, this was my first proper go on an Orange, even though they’ve been around for decades. Secretly, I hoped that the single pivot and wild geometry would outshine the other complex machines we had lined up.

Suppleness is one quality the 279 doesn't offer, at least with the air shock. Off the top, it’s a choppy ride and those large square tubes aren’t quiet about it either. The chain and cables send echoing tunes along for the ride. You can’t blame the Float X2 - that’s just the nature of the air spring curve. However, it can deal with the larger hits very well in a linear, understandable manner where each large impact feels consistent throughout the travel. The air shock also adds some progression to the end of the travel too. Pounding through the worst bike park conditions requires a firm grip on the bike and this is where it shines.

Given more time, I’d spring for an EXT Arma coil shock to take the edge off and let my body absorb the heavy hits. Although you’d lose progression from the air shock, the Arma has that trick hydraulic bottom-out function to ward off clunks at full travel.

Cornering this long and slack Halifax vessel is a bit perplexing. The 275 rear wheel helps to lean the bike over with little effort, but the 465mm chainstays don’t snap out of corners like the Nukeproof Dissent 297 did. It gets on best when carving long wide arcs through turns.

Part of that comes down to the length versus the reach. I felt somewhat cramped by the high stack and short reach while trying to coax the long wheelbase of the Orange through slow trails. A more stretched posture would help gain some leverage to push or pull the wheels through twisty turns. On the other hand, point the 279 down a wide-open track and it will blow your mind. The balance and traction that the huge wheelbase offers are unworldly. I’d say that the 279 has a hint of Grim Donut V2 to it. Basically, the faster the corners, the more planted and stable this stiff ship rides.

Much like the cornering qualities of the 279, those high bars and short cockpit feel don’t provide the most agile handling in the air. The balance and confidence are there, you’re just not going to yank the bike into any shapes quickly. The 62-degree head angle puts the front axle miles ahead of your hands, slowing down the timing before your front wheel comes off of the lip. A long and low, racer-style approach to jump, is the way to go on the 279.




Orange 279 - photo Satchel Cronk
Orange 279 - photo Satchel Cronk

Technical Report

Formula Cura 4 Brakes: The last Formula brake I tried was the oval-piston R0 model. A lot has changed with the Cura 4. Now, they run on mineral oil and have 4-pistons that manage heat well, plus the lever shape is straighter and the pivot is closer to the handlebar. There’s a decent amount of power that arrives with minimal deadband, but the organic pads weren’t the right spec for a downhill bike. Metallic pads transform these brakes into serious contenders with SRAM Code RSCs.

Burgtec Alloy Handlebar: The battle of Britain: Burgtec or Renthal? These Ride Wide alloy bars come stock at 800mm and feature a 5-degree upsweep and 9-degree backsweep. When bolted to the mega slack Orange 279, this gave the illusion of my hands landing behind the steering axis, adding to the squished cockpit presence. Personally, I’d go for another bar, like Renthal’s FatBar with a 7-degree backsweep for a straighter, “elbows up” position.

Stans Flow Mk4 Rims: Alloy wheels were a smart choice here for the 279, allowing flex and forgiveness to the otherwise stiff frame. Despite getting tortured through the upper reaches of the Whistler Bike Park, these rims came away unharmed and only required minor attention after day one.




Orange 279 - photo Satchel Cronk
Orange 279
photo
Nukeproof 297

How Does It Compare?

Facing off against the Canfield Jedi, there could not be two more polar opposite bikes. The Jedi’s small bump compliance was silky smooth, versus the 279 which was fiercely firm. One suspension pivot point did an adequate job, but the Jedi was unreal in the braking bumps. Soon into the first day, I learned to pay extra careful attention to not drag any rear brake through corners on the 279. I can’t say that Orange didn’t stick to the ground as well, you just feel a hell of a lot more feedback when you’re on the binders.

Compared to another mixed-wheeled bike, the Nukeproof Dissent 297, the balance was worlds apart too. The shorter chainstays of the Dissent 297 were keen to dive through the top end of the travel to the sag point, almost too eagerly, whereas the Orange required a good amount of force to get into. The Nukeproof proved to be sportier through rolling terrain and track well across stutter bumps but didn’t have that mean stance and composure needed for flat-out sections that the 279 loved.




Orange 279 - photo Satchel Cronk

Pros

+ Splayed out wheelbase is insanely stable at speed
+ Handles repetitive, mid-size compressions well without surprises
+ Geometry negates the need to go around objects

Cons

- Lots of vibration and noise through frame
- Air shock compromises suspension sensitivity
- One-year warranty on an expensive, UK-made frame



Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesPut your earplugs in, buckle up, and hang on. The Orange 279 is a bike that’s meant to be ridden hard and aggressively - don’t bother with mellow grades or machine-built surfaces. Just lead it into high-speed corners and hold on through the rough bits.

Each axle feels miles away, giving you a safe sense that the wheels will plow straight through anything in your path. Playful and comforting are not on the ingredient list here.
Matt Beer






Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
352 articles

250 Comments
  • 268 5
 I'm on to you Pinkbike, re-using reviews from 10 years ago pretending they're new...
  • 123 8
 tbf how much can a filing cabinet really change from year to year though?
  • 38 6
 @bkm303: as complex as a filing cabinet, sounds like one going down the trail
  • 10 1
 @bkm303: as technology increases filing cabinets become more and more redundant...
  • 20 0
 Yep. They're really going downhill.
  • 9 0
 @YukonMog: yeah but there's something about putting your hands on physical media, you know? Like when you pull previous years' tax forms out of your bike it's just so satisfying.
  • 31 1
 @bkm303: I own an Orange and love the bike. The in-frame hanging file folder storage is second to none.
  • 19 0
 @j-t-g: or the old “skeleton wanking in a biscuit tin”
  • 11 3
 @sewer-rat: "Uglier than ET with skin cancer"
  • 157 0
 4k for a frame with a one year warranty. Yikes
  • 61 0
 There's enough material there for at least five one-year frame warranties.
  • 6 13
flag MTBrent (Mar 1, 2023 at 9:29) (Below Threshold)
 I think the 1 year warranty is if you're racing. If you can prove not used in competition, the 5 year warranty exists. I think...
  • 19 1
 @MTBrent: Orange says that downhill bikes are excluded from the standard 5 year warranty unfortunately
  • 34 1
 They should rename it Lemon.
  • 16 1
 @MTBrent: "please prove a negative" would be the worst warranty policy ever
  • 5 0
 They will sell at least 3 bikes....
  • 2 0
 @Danquo: from the sounds of this review, you probably shouldnt buy this if you aren't using it in competition/aren't fast enough for competition, so it's a kinda moot point.
  • 80 10
 This review makes it sounds like the Orange is just all-around sub-par compared to the others. Badly balanced, harsh suspension, agricultural frame. Doesn't corner, doesn't jump, quite expensive and can't be very durable either if Orange only gives it a one-year warranty. Looks like they themselves don't even believe in their product. Oh, and mullet-only is an instant fail anyways.
  • 148 1
 When the Brits come in out of the rain they are going to be very mad to read this
  • 162 0
 Lucky for you most of us can’t read
  • 17 7
 @mtmc99: hahaha we are certainly not. Horrible looking bikes. Loved by fat old guys that think they need girders to stop them snapping frames.
  • 30 0
 @mtmc99: Fun fact: in Great Britain, it rains indoors too.
  • 10 0
 @mikealive: can confirm. On a rainy winters day most of us will run inside and jump straight into the shower to warm up
  • 14 1
 'Agricultural' might be the best adjective I've seen used for these things. I'd take a John Deere over and Orange any day
  • 32 1
 @mtmc99: We love being miserable, so if anything, that's made me actively want to buy one
  • 13 2
 That was my experience demo-ing an Orange this past summer, and I really wanted to like it. Slow up. Slow down. Loud. Heavy. Not fun to pedal. Weird rear suspension ramping. I rode a propaine right after and was reminded our friends out in the Europe continent can make a damn good bike.
  • 7 4
 They remind me of porsche with there 911 they know full well its not the best design idea and have dabbled in the past with various linkage driven bikes ST4/Blood/Strange 225 but like porsche with there front engined cars they dropped them and went back to trying there hardest to get there original idea to work well
  • 5 1
 @mtmc99: No future, no future , no future for you !!!!
  • 1 1
 @bjb245: It's a farmer's filing cabinet.
  • 22 0
 @mtmc99: you can't beat an English summer, best day of the year.
  • 1 0
 @bjb245: The use the phrase Agricultural like we're still pullimng ploughs behind Clydesdales.
  • 3 0
 @bjb245: Looks like something that gets pulled behind a tractor from Clarkson's farm
  • 2 0
 @watchtower: it was a day and half last year.
  • 3 0
 @thenotoriousmic: It didn't rain for 4 months last summer!
  • 5 0
 @thenotoriousmic: It was a bit too hot to go outside though, wasn't it
  • 2 0
 @McMeta666: I think they consider themselves to be more like a Caterham or similar no-frills fast car with no traction control etc. and potentially more fun than something more comfy and forgiving.
People love Oranges because they are really good fun to ride, but as I said in another comment - I wouldn't want one for a DH bike.
  • 8 1
 @chakaping: My dad's 2CV is "really good fun" to drive too...
  • 2 0
 @chakaping: caterham and morgan are both examples i thought of but i didnt use to save people out with the uk having to fire up google but your right they are more correctly comparisons
  • 1 0
 @McMeta666: Maybe you should look at GT2 and GT3 results. 911's are quite good at that.
  • 1 0
 @jlauteam1: I'm not saying they are at all bad cars, in fact there engineering is so good there exceptional. What I'm saying is if your designing a car 99% of people arent going to stick the engine over the back axel
  • 3 0
 @McMeta666: I’ve been on a few orange demo days mainly just for fun and they all ride really well know loads of people who ride them. Two bearings, one axel and a one piece swing arm there’s no binding when the bike is flexing the rear suspension stays super sensitive. I’m not sure I’d get one but they are legitimately good bikes.
  • 2 0
 @McMeta666: Ok fair enough, I hear you. That engine over the rear axle does something wonderful to increase grip for corner exit acceleration and I think that is where it gains all it's advantage. Corner exit speed = passing people.
  • 5 0
 @watchtower: that’s a Scottish summer. An English summer is several weeks of our entire infrastructure failing because the sun came out.

It’s then flowed by an English winter where our entire infrastructure fails because three drops of rain got cold enough to become snow.
  • 1 0
 @jlauteam1: I'm not even sure it's that anymore, all of the fun of a modern AWD 911 is the stupid hard launches it can do.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: wicked bikes
  • 1 0
 Driving around the world like a mechanic, I'll say that, for example, Bruni was running on a mix of wheels for a long time and the demo was for 29" for sale. The bikes that could be seen in the boxes were 29" Wink Gwinn said that they need to improve the intens because it turns hard. Others have a contin tire sponsor but run on painted maxxis. Now it's marketing and sales that count hahaha
  • 3 0
 @mtmc99: we are busy queuing up in an orderly fashion to reply to this
  • 1 0
 @watchtower: I laughed way to hard at the truth
  • 57 1
 Only one year warranty? Hard to justify the price when everyone else is offering better
  • 4 0
 Bad warranty, but what other DH bike is going to engender so much awesome PB commentary? That has to be worth something Big Grin
  • 6 1
 @jackalope: Orange, riding the "no such thing as bad publicity" tiger til it's fossilised.
  • 2 0
 @BenPea: TBF, Ronny J Dio always did endorse riding a tiger
  • 56 8
 I think Oranges look good, dont @ me.
  • 48 0
 Gotta get down on @Froday
  • 6 0
 @froday
  • 5 0
 @Froday funday!
  • 19 0
 @Froday fails
  • 5 3
 Your a lizard @Froday
  • 3 2
 @browner: you're*
  • 2 1
 I like the look of them as well, never rode one but the lack of water bottle space on the trail bikes and this having a 1 year warranty as well as the price just being damn too expensive I probably will never own one either. Doesn’t help most reviews slate them for being harsh rides as well.
  • 53 8
 Another ‘home run’ for Orange. Ugly bike, stupid price, and 1 year warranty, who’s gonna buy this???
  • 16 7
 there's always someone... like Pole Bikes.
  • 14 2
 I'll be honest I like the way Orange bikes look and imo the price isn't that stupid for a frame made in not Southeast Asia. The 1 year warranty though...
  • 7 0
 They look way better in 3D. I was looking at a sliver switch 7 at the weekend and it looks incredible in real life in my opinion. Really impressive how they weld all those tiny pieces of folded aluminium into that shape. I hate the stickers though. They need to go.
  • 8 8
 Defo not ugly
  • 4 6
 and ugly welds
  • 1 2
 Agree re the warranty but even Trek, a brand that say offer lifetime warranty don't include the rear triangle as being part of that frame, even tho thats the part most likely to crack. I wonder if orange count their rear "triangle?" as part of the frame.
  • 5 1
 @carole-baskin: I worked for Trek until last year and I have never heard that warranty policy. I don't work for them any more but credit where credit is due Trek's warranty was always very solid in my experience. I don't believe that to be true about not considering the rear triangle to be the frame. I'm very confident they would warranty that for you.
  • 3 0
 @tom666: I worked at a Trek dealer for almost 15 years, they definitely had policies for certain frames as well as swing arms and linkages...look here under the, "2 Years" header:

www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/warranty_policy
  • 1 1
 @93EXCivic: I wonder.. if they sell 5 of those frames total, as more would be surprising, they probably cannot grant more than one year warranty, as otherwise, their business model would implode?
  • 1 0
 @therealmancub: It says on there the main frame and any suspension swing arms are on lifetime but rocker links and other hardware on two years - however I guarantee if the Trek store I worked at called the warranty department with a customer who seemed genuine, had a receipt for the bike and had a cracked rocker link I bet my life they would have found him a replacement link or another frame. In my experience so long as there was a receipt they would always side with the customer. We warrantied a Madone that was 6 years old and had been ridden more than 10,000 miles in the owner's estimation. The proprietary seatpost was starting to have some play inside the frame. We got him a brand new Madone frame and fork. Super robust warranty in my experience.
  • 1 0
 @saladdodger: 1 year warranty feels like they're doing their best to only sell 5 frames lol
  • 37 2
 "Orange Bikes might have the most recognizable silhouette when it comes to mountain biking."

Trek Session: "Am I a joke to you?"
  • 2 0
 Actually back in the day the Trek Diesel looked like an Orange
  • 4 4
 What do you mean? Every damn bike looks like a Session. So certainly not recognizable.
  • 5 0
 @DavidGuerra: you must be new here
  • 1 1
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: Apparently I am. Just stepped into the saloon.
  • 3 0
 @kazwei: The Trek Pro Issue DH, now that was a recognizable silhouette.
  • 26 2
 So almost $4k for a frame that only has 2 pieces instead of 4, a reputation for breaking and being crooked, and a 1 year warranty? Lulz.
  • 10 0
 Intense has entered the chat!
  • 17 2
 i was a full orange fanboy. couldnt wait to own one. cracked it in 4 places. this bike will crack too. as much as i want to like them they are really not good.
  • 2 3
 I always look at the frames and try to seek out the weakest points in all bikes; looking at this one I was thinking exactly what you just wrote. ...Yes, you can't tell things just by looking at them, I know, but this one wasn't giving me any visual assurance.
  • 4 1
 Why do they still crack? How can a company be known for durability issues for 2 decades and still exist?
  • 4 0
 @spaced: hype/nostalgia/Peatty/Minnaar/luddites with strong aversion for 2 or more suspension pivots. And an intense passion for marketing the benefits of moving a main pivot a couple millimeters up and forward one year, only to reverse it the next one.
  • 5 0
 @southoftheborder: I really like how their bikes look and they were pioneers of good geo back in the day so I have some positive thoughts towards them but I'm surprised they seem unable to make a reliable product. Are they really that set to fit the stereotype of an unreliable british product (yikes their cars, never buy a Range Rover). Then again why should I be surprised. I work for a British company, my managers are British and yeah being bad at your job is kind of like Guns for Americans. It's a point of pride.
  • 16 1
 1 year warranty on a frame that has ALWAYS been known to crack, way to stand behind/believe in your product Orange. Honestly kind of pathetic
  • 2 1
 I wonder how long it has been known to crack for since it’s a pretty new model?
  • 16 1
 Struggle to see how you'd pick this with no race pedigree, a penchant for cracking, over something like the Demo or Session.
  • 1 1
 Availability is the only reason.
  • 2 0
 there are tens of well made smaller brand bikes. I've had my banshee legend for 10 years. Those bikes ride amazingly and are bombproof.
  • 10 7
 This is really the one thing I absolutely I don't get about Pinkbike field tests. The bike selection for the field tests is always eclectic at best and sometimes straight-up weird.

This test would have been so much more useful and relevant to the majority of DH riders, if PB would have just tested the most popular DH bikes. Including any of the following: Canyon Sender, YT Tues, Propain Rage, Trek Session, Specialized Demo, Santa Cruz V10 and Commencal Supreme - aka the bikes people actually buy.
  • 1 4
 @Muscovir: Availability.
  • 3 0
 @Muscovir: pretty sure they have been reviewed somewhere when they were new models
  • 3 0
 @Muscovir: i think they did within the last couple years. Supreme, demo, sender and i dont remember the 4th
  • 1 0
 They reviewed a bunch of the current mainstream DH rigs a couple years ago... Supreme 29/27, cube, demo, sender, session... The only one that isn't current anymore is the supreme 29/27 since the v5 is being released this spring.
  • 1 0
 PB editors got tired of the old "looks like a Session" joke.
  • 4 2
 No race pedigree? Are you mental? Steve Peat, Missy Giove, Mick Hanna, the Goat to name a few. I wouldn’t buy this bike but your facts dude…way off the mark.
  • 6 0
 @Intense4life: He's talking about the current bike, not ones from 30 years ago. I know they look the same, but still.
  • 1 0
 @Muscovir: How are they gonna buy them if magazines don't show them?
  • 15 0
 The skeleton comment, the skeleton comment please please the skeleton comment...
  • 12 0
 You know, Pinkbike, just when I thought you couldn't possibly be any dumber, you go ahead and do something like this... AND TOTALLY REDEEM YOURSELF!! Moar dh content plz
  • 2 0
 MOAR DH! ONLY DH!
  • 14 0
 So to sum up......rode like shit......warranty shit......price shit
  • 13 4
 "Long chainstay enthusiasts, hang onto your hats; this is a wild one - the rear center of our test bike is 5mm longer than the front. Yes, the chainstays measure 465mm for all four frame sizes, while our medium-sized frame gets a 460mm reach."

And: "While that front-to-rear center ratio seems somewhat normal for the large and extra-large frame sizes, Orange doesn't adjust the chainstays in accordance with the front center."

Front center and reach are two different things. So in actuality for the size medium tested the front-to-rear center ratio isn't THAT extreme.
  • 9 7
 Yeah, stopped reading after I realized PB editor has no clue about what a front center is. Kind of disappointing...
  • 3 0
 They likely would have liked this bike more in the larger sizes. The front center would have been more well balanced with the chainstay.
  • 2 3
 @ashmtb85: Actually, the front-to-rear center ratio would get "worse" as you move up in size because the chainstay stays the same while the front center gets longer (will have to weight that front end more on the large than the medium to maintain front wheel traction). But yes, it sounds like the reviewer would've liked a little more reach (and less stack). And the longer reach on the large would help in getting more weight over the front, which would be important on the large given the longer front center, whereas the medium has a more "balanced" weight distribution between front and rear tires (body positioning is a moving variable of course).
  • 3 0
 @Lotusoperandi: actually I think the reach on the sizes is fairly in line with what you would find on a normal Enduro bike of equivalent size. However the chainstay is very long. Again this implies there is better balance in the larger frame sizes. It all depends on what one considers an ideal front center/ rear center ratio.
  • 3 1
 @ashmtb85: Front center and reach are two different things. Two different measurements.You cannot interchange these two terms. They are VASTLY different from each other.
  • 4 0
 That's a good point. But if the bike feels cramped while having a monstrous rear center, that's going to be an issue on the trail. Wrong words, but I think he was trying to convey an actual problem he was having.
  • 2 0
 @Lotusoperandi: reach along with how slack a bike is contribute to the front center measurement of the bike. The point I was trying to make is that the overall front center in the size medium likely doesn't feel balanced with the long chainstay length. This could potentially be remedied by going up in size as the larger sizes have BOTH a longer reach and front center with a static chainstay length across all sizes.
  • 1 0
 Mountain Cycle did it first
  • 11 1
 Hard no. Ear plugs, god damn. "I'd like to buy a bike 15yrs out of date please"
  • 10 0
 1 year warranty? I want to like these guys, but they seem to be determined to do whatever it takes to make that impossible.
  • 7 1
 Ok for what it’s worth. I own an Orange Alpine 160. I bought the frame on EBay from a gent in the UK. I had him send it right to Orange where they refurbished the entire frame and even installed a set of works headset cups for me. US customs destroyed the headset cups trying to pound them out with a screwdriver looking for contraband. I hadUPS take it back while I filed a claim which took months. Orange customer service paid to have the frame shipped back to them. Removed the headset cups, redid the entire finish and sent what was a used second owner frame out to me free of charge! Their customer service is second to none. So I wouldn’t worry about the warranty. It’s only the DH bikes that have the one year warranty. As far as the way it rides I installed a CC DB CS coil shock and a coil fork. The thing goes through anything and is plenty quiet unless you use the Fox air shock. I love my Orange and I think they’re a great company. The thing is a complete tank and doesn’t break. I’d gladly buy a new Orange.
  • 5 0
 It’s a shame that orange had become an iconic World Cup
Winning bike when Steve Pete was onboard to an expensive British brand which has been and will always be pretty similar in design and shape when it comes to the frame geometry and shape, wether or not that is a brandable good ethic. My buddy bought an Orange alpine from which he had to send back to Orange twice due to a new frame paint fading or bad pain job immediately upon purchase from which the next frame had an issue with the shock mount. One of the frames had a paint chip near the bottom bracket that looked like it had been coloured in with a pen before purchase. Orange needs its World Cup winning status back from which they are still a popular bike and brand in the uk with potential.
  • 3 0
 I think Lotus needs to recover it's Grand Prix winning status in F1 with its 1980s JPS machine.
  • 9 4
 No ones going to scroll all the way down here to read this, so i'm going to say some things that might be hard to hear, but its all in the name of constructive criticism, here goes. Levy is incredibly good in front of a camera, and it becomes clear when some others get in front on it. I really want to like Matt Beer, he looks incredibly fast on the bike, and is obviously very knowledgeable both in terms of bike set-up, but also the finer points of bike feel and nuances. I love his technical insight, and I think that maybe PB isnt taking better advantage of that. But he needs someone to play off in these reviews, He looks miserable, and unhappy to be there. Both Levy, and Quinney provide some confidence, and added personality to video segments with Matt. He needs to let his personality shine through, hes got this, hes friggin awesome! Maybe Levy and Quinney are such big personalities that a Kazimer and Beer are required to balance things out. Also, maybe things went off the rails when filming, or footage was lost, but the editing was not up to what I'm used to from PB videos. Obviously theres some significant changes going on at PB in terms of how field tests are being run, or organized, and time will tell. but I feel like Matt was left to do this more on his own, and I think he needs some additional support to reach his full potential. I like the PB team, and am only hoping to provide some constructive criticism. I'm not sure I could do any better, but i sure could make sure Matt has a beer or two before stepping in front of that camera. Make ya a deal PB, let me know when the next field test is, and I'll be the un-paid intern for 2 weeks to help out. No joke, I'll book holidays, and work my ass off for 2 weeks to provide help and support to these tests. I'll clean bikes, get em ready for beauty shots, make sure they're ready to roll for the testers, and make sure everyone stays hydrated.
  • 2 0
 LOL. I would be there with you!
  • 1 0
 If I remember right Matt did this DH testing in parallel with the trail bike field test.
  • 2 0
 I felt like Matt was reading off a script someone else wrote. I don’t know if that was the case or not, but if it was I’d love to see him have a little more freedom with videos in the future. I agree with you on the points that he has great opinions on nuance and the finer details of bike feel/set up. Maybe let Levy and Quinney deliver the “witty” marketing blurbs about the brand/bike and let Matt dive into the real details about the set up and ride?
  • 2 0
 @norcorider-13: Those are good points, Maybe thats why the 3 of them worked well in the enduro field test videos.
I wanna tell him its ok to let his hair down!

Bet hes way faster on a bike though.....
  • 4 1
 You might be overthinking this a bit pal. This might not be as entertaining as some of the two-hander video reviews PB put out, but Matt's doing a perfectly good job of delivering his own script and IMO he is the best reviewer PB has for describing ride feel.
  • 2 1
 @chakaping: Thanks for the input pal......
As noted more than once, really appreciate Matts insight on the tests, and the info he provides is great.
He just doesnt look like hes having a good time in these solo DH videos so far. The script is off, the editing is off, and in reality, I dont think we got the info we are used to from both PB and Matt.
  • 1 2
 @chakaping: There also wasnt the typical Field test intro video, and hype that goes along with it, or maybe I missed it somewhere along the way.
I know they talked about it during the trail bike test, but I dont remember a welcome video, with all the beauty shots, and intro to the bikes, location, trails used, etc.

Feels rushed, or maybe footage was lost, and theyre trying to piece it together, thats always a posibility
  • 1 0
 I think matt is on the same level as everyone else there, this isn't very 'produced' content. It is just an attempt to deliver information to a wider audience. If they really were focused on production quality they would have to deliver in a manner where us as the audience feel like we are friends of theirs. I sure hope Levy doesn't slowly yell talk at his friends like a robot as he does in PB videos lol!
  • 5 0
 Dh race bike gets slated for only being good at going really fast down a race track. Main complaints are that its not as comfy as a cadillac and you can hear noises when you hit something.
  • 7 0
 Looks like not the ugliest of oranges
  • 8 1
 That warranty is a huge red flag, these frames LOVE cracking
  • 2 2
 How many have you ridden and they broke? If so, you probably have photos you can show, I'm curious Smile
  • 9 2
 Nobody:

Pinkbike: Orange 279 Review
  • 6 1
 World champ for worst services and ugly bikes In the red corner Orange bikes. In the blue corner Pole bikes. Orange is wining this one now
  • 1 2
 Orange service is really good!
  • 6 2
 Paul Aston Really liked his 329 and breakage wise it seems to do a lot better than some other of his bikes. Also Fergus Lamb won the ArdRock enduro in 2021 on his Orange so they've got something going on.
  • 5 0
 The plural of "anecdote" isn't "statistics". That's a very small sample you're picking here. Almost las if they were... I don't know... Cherrys?
  • 4 6
 Thanks for the Paul Aston update. I'll make sure to do the exact opposite of whatever he thinks.
  • 8 1
 My Orange 329 was a fantastic bike: but I installed an OChain and custom-tuned NSR coil shock which really transformed the overall ride. Without Ochain and the Fox air shock, it's gonna be harsh as Matt says in this review.
  • 2 1
 @astonmtb: I appreciate that you give bikes a fair shakedown, swapping a few parts around to find the true potential of a frame outside of the stock spec. PB does a good job of a reviewing a bike right off the showroom floor but you go the extra mile to get the most out of a bike that might not be great in stock form. Similar to anyone that purchases a bike that may not be perfect.
  • 2 0
 @southoftheborder: lol, maybe it's the rider not the bike eh?
  • 1 0
 @WillW123: That's actually a wonderful summary.
  • 5 1
 @drbino: in that case, I hope you enjoy your long stem and offset, tiny reach, steep head angle, shit brakes and average stock suspension.
  • 3 0
 Orange is so bold, they have new purple bikes that they put GX AXS on with aluminum cranks and rims and want $8,800 USD. They used to be decent values. Now they might need to start making gutters with all of their sheet aluminum. Bozos.
  • 7 0
 Looks like an Orange
  • 24 3
 Looks like a lemon
  • 5 0
 "Doubling up on bukkake, the Fox Float X2 blows out anywhere in the travel".
  • 2 0
 "...yet there's a steadiness to the bike that makes the nostalgic characteristic worth accepting."

Orange could have at least made the price nostalgic. 9 grand for the mountain bike equivalent of a 1986 Vauxhall Cavalier is taking the piss. Even from them.
  • 5 3
 I don't get all the hate for Orange, particularly from people who probably won't have ever seen one on the trails, let alone ridden one. I get that aesthetics is subjective, and the general herd mentality is to hate anything that looks different. Here in the UK I see an Orange on pretty much every ride I go on. They are everywhere! I don't own an full suspension Orange myself, but I do have a couple of classic orange HTs and in all of the owners groups there is never a bad word to be said about the bikes, or the service from Orange as a company. From what I hear, the bikes are incredibly robust, reliable, take an absolute beating even in UK winter conditions and just work. They hold their value incredibly well too... The standard warranty on all new bikes BTW (except the downhill bikes) is 5-years too. As far as value goes, these are not mass produced in a factory in China, so what do you expect? Plus the entire industry is charging silly prices at the moment...
  • 2 3
 They are outperformed in every single metric by a Vitus which is half the price, and they just don't ride that well. This entire review was pretty nice to the bike, because from what I'm reading there wasn't anything he really liked about the frame.
  • 1 0
 Have to agree, having owned four Orange Bikes over a 9 year period. When you buy an Orange, you’re buying into the whole ‘Handbuilt in Halifax’ thing with the full suspension bikes, and paying a premium for that. Only two bearings, pretty much bombproof in UK conditions and easy to change.

I had great fun riding mine, particularly the Alpine 6, but they are really better suited to aggressive riders, which I’m not.
Would I go back to one? I don’t know, but they’ll always be thought of with affection.
  • 2 0
 Came on to the comments to read what the Orange fan boys are saying, but it looks like a bunch of honest reviews.

Slaughtered!

Having raced (and hated racing it) and orange, the review reads like nothing has changed for orange in the last 15 years!!!!!
  • 2 0
 The way this is written he seemed to have decided he wasn’t going to like it before it was even out of box. I own a few oranges and they are extremely well made, really fun and very capable bikes, customer service is second to none also so don’t be put off by one man’s opinion
  • 7 2
 1 year warranty + reputation for breaking = avoid
  • 2 3
 I've never heard of anyone breaking an orange. I live in the states so i dont see that many, but I've seen some people really thrash them for years on end without any issues
  • 5 1
 Bravo! Not for the limited warranty, shock choice or price, but for not using autoplay!
  • 5 0
 Another dh bike review? Maybe Pinkbike is going to be good again.
  • 1 0
 MOAR DH!
  • 1 0
 I needed a new frame and stumbled upon a mint Orange Stage 6 warranty replacement frame for next to nothing, had all the parts to change over, so no extra cost. After reading some reviews and a lot of horror storys, I decided to go for it anyways. TBH I can't complain, geo wise it's well good. Pretty carvy in long turns and predictable in the tight stuff. Full retail is absurd...
  • 1 0
 it really is a shame about the warranty. You buy orange for that agricultural build so you want a agricultural warranty. I think they have let themselves down in that department. Obviously they cant be very confident in there design or build quality. Having owned multiply orange bikes in the past im disappointed.
  • 1 0
 I love Oranges and have one as my short-travel trail bike. They do demand a very proactive riding style but they reward it with more fun than any other bikes I've ridden. That said, I wouldn't consider one for a DH bike - just too much of a handful for me in that context.
How did you feel it compared to the other bikes for fun @mattbeer ? BTW I had an EXT Storia on my old Stage 6 and it smoothed the edges off a tiny bit compared to an X2, but mainly just gave better grip on steeps and composure at speed.
  • 2 1
 gotta say since I bought an aluminium bike 3 years ago I now hate riding my carbon bikes. Hard to believe a Trance 2 did this to me after all I bought into every lie that I was fed from compliance to strength it all pales in comparison to a finely made alu frame. I noticed the carbon ping ponging down the trail out of contraol while the alu plows through everything better.
  • 1 0
 Always amused by the same old comments that accompany any article about Orange Bikes, most of which are likely made by people who’ve never even ridden one.

There’s little doubt that Orange Bikes are certainly the biking version of marmite, you either like or loathe them, but as someone who has owned four of the machines from Halifax, I will say this.
I never had any problems with the two Fives, the 324 or the Alpine 6, that I owned and in fact, the latter was a great bike. Without question, my passion and love for biking was built on riding these bikes, and although I’ve been on a Transition Patrol for three years now, I’ll always have a soft spot for the British brand.

Worth noting too, that Orange have, in the Switch 7, produced a bike with a linkage for the rear shock, which a departure from their norm.
  • 1 0
 I made the mistake of buying one once . Never again. It looked amazing nice colour was good at big bumps untill you used your back brake. And terrible on small bumps and stops working as soon as you brake.And 1 years warranty is a joke. Avoid like the plague. Small bumps and using brakes a lot is what UK riding is all about. So as far as I'm concerned they are shit at the thing they do most.
  • 1 0
 Bought mine 2nd hand new. Cracked 3 times with one catastrophic failure on the dowtube. After contactong orange after the 3rd crack asking wtf, thats not normal (im a bit above average skill wise) they offered to buy a new frame with a slight discount. Upon not accepting it they ignored other attempts.

Also, the rear end was misaligned, the bearing housing was a bit oval. Monda.like gmbn crab. Sheite bike, rode ok tho.
  • 3 0
 @mattbeer , Is there a list somewhere of all the DH bikes that will be reviewed?
  • 2 0
 Yalla? ;-)
  • 6 0
 @kingpine @qbensis The four in the group test were the Canfield Jedi, Orange 279, Antidote Darkmatter, and Nukeproof Dissent 297.
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer: Thanks pal!
  • 4 2
 @mattbeer: so the long awaited dh ‘field test’ doesn’t include a single dh bike that anyone will actually buy, at least not in north america (V10,demo,sender,frs,the new supreme,tues,session,slayer etc)
  • 2 0
 @mick06: TR11...
  • 6 1
 @mick06: PB is limited to what brands will send/have available. As they explain after every single field test when people whine about the bike selection.
  • 4 0
 @mick06: I like pb reviewing something other than the same 5 companies. as to NA bike parks, Canfield is pretty popular in the US. can't speak for the land of politeness and maple syrup though.
  • 2 0
 @mick06:

They already reviewed the supreme, demo, sender, cube, & session a year ago or so.
  • 2 0
 @mick06: Please explain why no one in North America would purchase a Jedi? North American company with a bike that's priced well for today's insane market and that has seemed to received good reviews. Those don't seem like "unbuyable" traits to me.
  • 2 0
 @mick06: I'd love to try them all, but with all group tests, it's impossible to try them all. We've already tested most of the bikes that you mentioned and you can bet there will be more to come.
  • 1 0
 Haven’t had an orange in the last 5 years but did enjoy the couple I had before that but even then I felt they were over priced and over weight for what they where.

Perhaps I’ll check a new one out some time
  • 1 0
 Great review and good work by Matt, but it would be better as a conversation like the other field tests. Give Matt a buddy like Alicia or Levy and these reviews will come alive.
  • 6 3
 The price is steeper than any trail this bike will be ridden on
  • 2 0
 It looks like the seals will bottom out on the crowns. What's the measurent used compared to foxes 137.5mm setting?
  • 4 1
 That seat angle is bizarre.
  • 1 0
 I imagine it's to allow for the travel without touching the seatube and without further increasing the chainstay length.
  • 1 0
 @aly-14: I couldn't work out whether the comment was on the seat angle or the seat tube angle
  • 1 0
 @boozed: yeah, i wasn't clear. meant the steep seat tube.
  • 3 0
 Big shout out to Satchel Cronk! What a name
  • 3 0
 Where’s the climbing write up??
  • 4 3
 Any DH racer that wins on this would have ultimate street cred. Never gonna happen but it would be on the Gwin chainless win level of street cred.
  • 2 4
 Did you read the review? Seems like it's ready for serious speed across serious terrain. Maybe not so good to mellow out.
  • 1 1
 @DavidGuerra: I'll take you 10:1 on any amount you want that no world cup will be won on this bike
  • 3 2
 @mariomtblt: Whether it will or not depends on many factors besides the bike's ability to do so. So your bet is irrelevant, however what do you think makes this bike unsuitable for that? It seems to be up there with any other, it's not a less sensitive rear end that would prevent that. And the review mentions its outstanding traction, great "attack" ability and superior chassis solidity. So the ingredients are all there, I don't understand your bizarre bias against this bike, but maybe you can explain it to me.
  • 1 0
 @mariomtblt: not with you at the helm, that’s 4 sure!
  • 1 0
 @Durtwrx: haha no arguments there!
  • 2 2
 @DavidGuerra: All the winning bikes on the worldcup these days have been developed and tested by the fastest racers in the world. Guys like Bruni, Pierron, Minnaar,
You think some guy who races an outdated single pivot Orange is gonna show up and beat the best in the world because you read online that it has great "Attack ability" and a solid chassis? haha
It's not a bizzarre bias against a bike, its a reasonable interpretation of reality.

The top guys in the world could not win on this bike
The guys who race for orange could not beat the top guys in the world on any bike.
Facts
  • 2 1
 @fwp39: That's complete bullshit. The bike is not outdated in the least. A single pivot bike is and will always be a top performing design. So it's a stout bike, the rest is up to geometry. Different geometries can work better or worse in different courses. I'm not a fan of long chainstays but I would enjoy trying this out. Many DH racers do enjoy long chainstays and it's in fact a more "fashionable" feature or buzzword than short ones, but the relative advantages or disadvantages depend on the course. So yes, the vantages or disadvantages of the geometry details are up to discussion, personal preference also plays a part, the rest is a matter of 1: suspension setup and 2: solidity of the bike. Newbies really pay too little mind to bike solitidy and overvalue bikes that are actual noodles, which shows when they are ridden at the top level. And this bike has it, and can really be a top performer.
  • 2 1
 It's funny that I don't see this repulsion against Evil bikes for instance, whose braking performance is just as average. It's a very strange phenomenon, which for some reason seems exclusive to kids under a certain age, who also lack the technical background to understand the structural benefits of single pivot designs.
  • 1 1
 @DavidGuerra: I started riding in the early 90's, I ride a single pivot. I have nothing against single pivots. I love the simplicity of a single pivot.
Amoury Pierron, Myriam Nicole, Matt walker, Jordan Williams, all have been winning on single pivots.
The Orange is an outdated design, its not even a linkage driven single pivot.
How has this Orange suspension design changed in the last 20 years? It hasn't evolved
If you think this orange is on par with the top race rigs on the Worldcup you sir are delusional
  • 1 1
 @fwp39: Why don't you call 4-bar designs outdated? They have been around for as long. They have been beat by single pivots for as long. A linkage adds progressivity to a single pivot bike and makes the shock configuration more foul-proof, but it's perfecty possible to get a more than satisfactory behaviour with no linkages. The way the shock is placed can also be optimized. The shock can be tuned for more progressivity. You are getting hung up on a small detail that most often won't even matter in the slightest. I could list you all the small things that make a difference in high level racing (where everything is already very optimized) and this is near the bottom. This bike might not be optimal to tackle the Red Bull Rampage, but a less progressive design will actually be better in a lot of courses. Now please go comment against the new single-pivot, linkageless Brazn bikes and we'll continue the discussion there!
  • 1 1
 @DavidGuerra: so is this your job application for Orange Bikes?
  • 1 0
 @mariomtblt: Oranges are too expensive, insufficiently warrantied, not bottle-friendly, the geometry is not quite to my liking, and I rather have my eye on a Crossworx Dash290, but I don't want to see them bashed for the wrong reasons.
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: yeah my only real gripes were really only the first 2 points, I actually think they look alright hah too bad
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: When was the last time a non linkage driven single pivot won a worldcup?
  • 1 0
 @fwp39: I think that would have been Tracey Hannah on an Orange 223 at the 2007 Schladming World Cup and Matti Lehikonen on the Honda RN01 at the 2006 Balneário Camboriú World Cup.
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer: Matt that is an amazing memory! You are my favorite addition to the Pinkbike review staff, love hearing the opinions of a former WC level racer. Carries alot more credibility.
  • 1 0
 @fwp39: I had to dig to fact check, but the Earthed video series still play on repeat in my head. Thanks! All of our editors bring their own bits of clout to the table.
  • 2 0
 Why did you put a Dual Compound DHR2 on the front wheel which is a harder compound than on the back?
  • 2 0
 Rumors say the next frame will be 1k more expensive and will have a 6 month guarantee
  • 2 3
 Strange to see how this design is so little understood. This is one of the few bikes that doesn't flex all over the place. For that I will always cherish it. I don't even care if a flexy bike offers more traction in certain situations. Rigidity means control and precision.
  • 1 0
 Oh do you own one then??
  • 1 2
 @darkstar66: No, just desired one back in the day due to being single pivot, but couldn't afford it and ended up getting a Prophet. Later I was also looking at a used DH one, but it was at the opposite corner of the country. And now I'm commenting based on the reviewer's impressions regarding rigidity, that confirm my intuitions about the design.
  • 3 0
 8k and a shock that last one day.......
  • 3 0
 Which is noisier: the frame or a blown X2?
  • 3 0
 Nothing wrong with orange, it's my 5th favourite colour.
  • 1 0
 Another DH rig review! youre spoiling us! I have an 1999 Orange Ms Ile - kind of like the Crush but not digging any of their full suss bikes ov er the last few years
  • 1 0
 Orange bikes really need to read all the comments on here, maybe they will re think their warranty policies and design a new frame at last
  • 3 1
 What rhymes with orange?

No, it doesn’t.
  • 1 0
 Always reminds me my first full - Haro X6 - but they asked a way less for that
  • 2 0
 I can't tell if you like the bike.
  • 3 1
 worst part is the brake hose that goes straight up from the calliper.
  • 2 0
 Cant be unseen.
  • 1 0
 Yeah Magura and Shimano calipers have orientable hoses, looks much nicer.
  • 1 0
 Anyone know which bikes were tested? I see the Orange, Nukeproof Dissent and the Jedi which others were included?
  • 1 0
 And the antidote.
  • 2 1
 Sounds like Bender's bollocks during an earthquake
  • 3 2
 idk what it is...but these are uglier than Pole bikes.
  • 1 0
 Aluminum downhill bike is lighter than many carbon enduro bikes.
  • 2 1
 Orange, go home you're drunk...
  • 1 0
 Bring back the floating brake !!!
  • 2 0
 I like it.
  • 1 0
 I’m pretty sure those rims are Stans EX3s not the newer Flows mk4s ??
  • 1 2
 Orange, trying the same outdated bullshit for all eternity. lack of creativity and effort. This is big hit freeride bike now and nothing more.
  • 2 1
 My eyeball says that head angle is NOT 62 degree. Anyone agree?
  • 1 1
 Their bikes don't seem to have changed much since they first came out while all the companies have made advancements
  • 1 0
 That price for an alloy frame with 1year warranty? Nope.
  • 1 0
 4 grand is aloooot for what it is
  • 1 0
 Didn't know there were sports cars with which you can manual everything.
  • 1 0
 Still picturing Steve Peat on this bike
  • 1 1
 I cannot think of a wider spectrum between a bike I would love to purchase and a bike I wouldn’t be caught dead on.
  • 1 1
 *obligatory farm gate comment*
  • 2 1
 First out of the gate with the gate comment. Bravo.
  • 1 1
 Everyone else: holes in frame for storage
Orange: Hold my pint
  • 1 0
 Just GX DH, not GX1 DH.
  • 1 0
 Downtube = gross
  • 1 2
 Make it carbon and put a 180 single crown on it then setup for all mountain and I’ll buy it.
  • 1 0
 YAWWWWWNNNNN
  • 1 3
 I thought orange sucked before reading this. I still think they suck.
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