Oregon Will Be First US State to Tax Bicycles for Transportation Projects

Jul 15, 2017
by Richard Cunningham  
Scott Genius 2018
Oregon's $15 bike tax will amount to a 0.15-percent increase in the cost of this 2018 Scott Genius - slightly more than its handlebar grips.


The State of Oregon has no sales tax, which is one reason why so many people call the state home. But that may change, at least for bicycle buyers. The Oregon state legislature recently pushed through a massive (for Oregon) tax measure that raises fees on automobile registrations, taxes, fuel, and charges bicycle retailers a 15-dollar tax on every bicycle they sell with a sticker price over $200, and 26-inch or larger wheels. E-bikes will be taxed one-half percent of their selling price. The bill sailed through both houses and is now on the Governor Kate Brown's desk, who is expected to happily sign it into law.

By government estimates, the bill will shake down the citizens of Oregon for a whopping 5.3 billion dollars for transportation spending, with bicycle retailers getting squeezed for an estimated 1.2 million per year which by far, is the tiniest slice of the pie. According to the State of Oregon, the bicycle tax will be earmarked for infrastructure like bike ways and pedestrian paths. No mention was made, however, about off-road trails.

Predictably, Oregon's cycling community is up in arms about being dinged 15 bucks on a one-time purchase, and there can be no doubt that, if the Beaver State is successful, greedy governments throughout the USA will follow suit. As usual, however, there are two sides to the issue. How often do we fly the "Share the Road" flag without any consideration for sharing the costs to maintain them?
27.5 Huffy Men s 3.0 Carnage Mid-Fat Plus Tire Mountain Bike Volt Yellow at Walmart 179.99
Most of Walmart's bicycle range flies under the radar of Oregon's bike tax, the 27.5" Huffy Men's 3.0 Carnage Mid-Fat Plus Tire Mountain Bike sells for $179.99.

Gasoline taxes in California alone are the equivalent of driving down the freeway and tossing $2.25 out the window every 60 minutes. Count cars on the road and you may arrive at the conclusion, that Oregon's fifteen buck a bike tax is a ceremonial levy to assure automobile-driving taxpayers who will be doing the heavy lifting (and the heavy using), that cyclists are finally raising money instead of awareness.

The sweet lemonade that could pour forth from Oregon's bike tax may be that off-road cyclists will be able to leverage their contributions to pressure lawmakers to fund mountain bike trails. The tax does not discriminate between mountain or road bikes and so far, the revenue is set to be spent on paved improvements. Armed with the numbers, Oregon's mountain bike community may be a be able to make a good case to squeeze some trail funding from the state's coffers. Portland would be a great place to begin - where mountain bikers have traditionally been given the short end of the stick.
flag of oregon

Time will tell if taxation leads to greater representation for Oregon's mountain bikers.


335 Comments

  • + 160
 That's great news. If there's one thing our government does well, it's using tax money wisely...
  • + 10
 HaHa I paid income tax in Oregon 2 years ago while living in Washington... it's to fix the roads... I'm scared to even drive over there. There are roads in Portland in neighborhoods that are still gravel!
  • + 21
 Out of all things you can tax, you tax bicycles? Pretty random.
  • + 16
 @pigit77: it's pretty evident if you've been there. you see more bikes than cars most of the time. wish more cities had that going on.
  • + 19
 If the money goes where they say it will go then it will be a good thing.
  • + 41
 @Motoracer31: but its Portland; gravel roads are hipster
  • + 2
 @Motoracer31: True story. Had a sidewall puncture from a pothole while driving my A3 this past winter and several people I know have had the same. The roads here are horrible, but I highly doubt this will go into fixing them. The state is broke and these tax measures are likely just a way to try and get some of that money back. And while $15 on a $1K+ bike would hardly break the bank, time will tell if some of these funds can be used to create more mtb trails, such as in Forest Park (no single track, just fire roads). Plans are in the works and with the recent development of the Gateway Green, I'm optimistic that we can continue the development in other areas and if this $15 helps us get there, I'd be happy to pay it. I wonder if this would also be charged on direct sales?
  • + 9
 Soooo...technically the poorest people pay the highest tax. Great job Oregon. Politicians at their finest.
  • + 9
 @scary1: wealthy people don't ride bikes? They would only pay more taxes then the wealthy if they bought a more expensive bike. Poor people don't generally buy new bikes anyway. This tax doesn't apply to Craigslist sales. This will be felt more amongst the wealthy, who are generally the people spending thousands on a bike.
  • + 22
 Totally! I can't think of the last time I thought that I should give the government more money! Especially in the state of Orgegon where the term "ear marked" means wasted or misplaced. Talking to you Portland Public School System!

If they plan to raise $5.3 billion from the 4 million people that live in Oregon, then that's more than $1300 per person!?!?

I would much rather see the state impose a "I just moved here from California, and want to screw up the real estate market" tax!
  • + 13
 @wda1wustl: 1 million up votes for the California tax. Maybe The Trumpster can just relocate the wall and put it around California instead.
  • + 6
 How about this, if this spreads across the US, and u (government) take our money, then you open/ legalize and maintain more trails. Deal? Deal!
  • + 5
 @dwmetalfab: so why make it go down to $200 ,then? Its a 7.5% tax on that bike. A .75% on a $2000 bike
  • + 3
 @scary1: Yep, regressive AF . It should only be levied on bikes 1,000 and up.
  • + 5
 @endlessblockades: it's supposed to be a use tax. You use the roads so you need to pay for them. They can't do it at a pump so this makes sense to them. A $200 bike uses the same amount of road as a $8000 bike.
  • + 26
 Thought this quote was relevant
"A government big enough to give you everything you want is a government big enough to take from you everything you have."- Gerald Ford
  • - 3
 @lobohusky: You must be high. Seriously? MTB trails?
These funds will go into the general fund to pay for a small fraction of the unfunded liabilities (retiring state employees) they will need to pay for and illegal immigrant legal fees and freebies.
The problem with liberals is they eventually run out of other peoples money and begin feeding off themselves.
California will be filing BK in less than 10years. Illinois is very soon.
  • + 3
 It all goes into the Goverment general fund.
  • - 34
flag chasejj (Jul 15, 2017 at 16:02) (Below Threshold)
 @dwmetalfab: Great idea. Hope it gets built right after I immigrate to Idaho. The last thing I want is any more Californians following me. As long as I show them my guns, moto bikes and Cummins powered truck at the state line, I think I'm good.
We will start by oulawing any Priuses, Subaru's or Teslas from crossing. I'm pretty sure you stop those vehicles and you've filtered out the trash.
  • + 32
 @Josefe: Most of the people who will be paying this tax likely also pay a use tax in gasoline, and in vehicle registration, and an income tax on top of that. And maybe even property taxes. They've already paid for use of these roads 20 times over. Give me a break.
  • + 18
 @chasejj: Lived in Idaho. If you outlaw Subi's there wont be very many cars left.
  • - 9
flag chasejj (Jul 15, 2017 at 17:49) (Below Threshold)
 @SacAssassin: Been there as well.Seems like a Subaru driver in Idaho and one in Cali are 2 entirely different drivers. One is doing for cheap transport in snow and the other to make some political statement.
  • + 2
 @TheR: @TheR: literally could be said about every tax. I'm all for changing how our govenrmemet (Oregon) spends its money. I pay every one of those taxes and some twice. My point was that it's not necessarily a regressive tax because it's not based on the cost of the bike but rather the use of the bike.
  • + 12
 @TheR: let's not forget the 1 billion dollars in revenue my state received from marajania sales last year. Your correct they take about 40k of taxes from my check each year, i then pay 6k in property tax, then they tax all the food and stuff I buy, plus my gas, and then my registration, then I pay toll roads, funny how they hit the responsible people who are educated and get good paying jobs and work hard to get where they are, just to pick up the slack for the lazy. Not fair.
  • + 11
 @chasejj: I for one would like to step up and defend the PNW Subaru population.
I drive a Subaru. And I've taken it up montana passes in the winter that aren't maintained. I've taken it up trails that I've seen heels turned around on. I've camped in it, I've shuttled laps with friends with it, ive used it and abused it. I've parked next to sparkly, chromed up, blinked up pickups in Idaho while my subarus been so caked in mud you wouldn't have a clue what color it is underneath.
Don't mock the humble Subaru. Ive been politely waved down more dirt roads in Idaho, montana, and Wyoming than I can count.
  • + 3
 @chasejj: dammit. Jeeps, not heels.
  • - 10
flag chasejj (Jul 15, 2017 at 23:22) (Below Threshold)
 @aks2017: So your not an unkempt lesbian with a rainbow sticker and decal that says "I'm with Her". Noted.
  • - 4
flag Compasteedee (Jul 16, 2017 at 0:00) (Below Threshold)
 @scary1: dentists, doctor's and lawyers are the only ones who can afford the bikes I'd like to ride, so this it's really a tax on the rich.
  • + 9
 Lol. You know what I like to do with organizations that are bad with the money I give them? Give them more of my money. But hey, its the government. They know whats best so why even question it?
  • + 4
 #taxationistheft
  • + 3
 @wda1wustl: if you were selling your house and someone from CA was going to give you more $ than some broke hipster, you wouldn't take the $? Right...
  • + 2
 @Rider656: I pay $100k in taxes from my check and 40K in property tax just to pick up the slack for your laziness. Not fair.
  • + 3
 @Rider656: you pay $40k in Oregon income tax? Well that means you make over $400k a year.
  • - 5
flag unrooted (Jul 16, 2017 at 8:41) (Below Threshold)
 @LuvAZ: and how many people are you using to make your money?
  • + 3
 @Atrak: exactly government officials always do exactly what they promise you
  • + 0
 @LuvAZ: you are always free to move under the bridge you don't have to pay any taxes there
  • + 5
 @chasejj: Wow man, you're like so hip and anti-establishment.
  • + 8
 @chasejj: Go back to facebook, grandpa.
  • + 0
 Actually I'm quite surprised it wasn't a state with Republican controlled Legislature. Here in Wisconsin, the Republicans are proposing all sorts of things to raise money for roads. They even are proposing toll roads which Wisconsin has never had, plus extra fees for hybrid and electric cars.
  • + 4
 @Rider656: "funny how they hit the responsible people who are educated and get good paying jobs and work hard to get where they are, just to pick up the slack for the lazy. Not fair."
This is a false narrative. Relatively few of your tax dollars are going to "the lazy." As an example, food assistance and unemployment is less than 5% of the federal budget.
Its frustrating to constantly see people complain that a tiny fraction of their taxes are "unfairly" going to "lazy" people via programs like providing food to poor children, but rarely seem to complain about the ultra-wealthy paying absurdly low federal tax rates.
Seriously, you want a legit example of unfairness? Hedge fund managers are taxed at a fixed 15% federal rate on their income. That benefits .01% of our population, so why aren't 99% of us angry about it? Even you, as a 1%-er making $800k/yr, should be angry about that.
  • - 2
 @unrooted: he said property tax... still would like to see what house garners $40k in property tax! $100k in income tax would put him around $300k income.
  • + 1
 @scotttherider: no, he stated "they (his state) take $40K in taxes from my check each year." He referenced his property taxes as $6k.
I came up with $800k income based on this:
1) he says his state took in $1B in marijuana tax last year. So must be either WA or CO
2) it can't be WA since WA has no income tax so he wouldn't be paying anything to state via paycheck
3) CO has a flat rate of 4.6% income tax . . . so >$800k income to yield $40k state tax.
  • + 1
 @unrooted: it can't be Oregon. He says his state took in $1B in marijuana tax revenue last year. Only CO and WA did that. OR was only $60M.
And that means he must be in CO and making >$800k/yr. Or he's misleading us about his tax payments.
  • - 2
 @Inertiaman: I copied what he said... 100k in taxes from his check...I'm assuming he's talking generally speaking state/Feds.... 40k in property taxes. I pay $2,800 in property taxes on a roughly $350k house. In my area $40k in property tax would be on a mansion with a few hundred acres.

LuvAZ (6 hours ago)
@Rider656: I pay $100k in taxes from my check and 40K in property tax just to pick up the slack for your laziness. Not fair.

Edit:I see now LuvAZ was quoting off of someone else... my bad. Still rider656 has something going good...lol
  • + 1
 @dwmetalfab: i can get behind this.
  • + 1
 @scary1: Actually Oregon voters have voted down "sales tax" which this seems an awfully familiar.
  • + 3
 @Atrak: except that's never happened in the history of all governments in the world. Governments allocating money to one program is like trying to piss in one corner of a swimming pool. It just doesn't work that way.
  • + 2
 @dwmetalfab: Completely false. it's $15, not a percentage of the sale price. As the first caption in this article pointed out, it's a trivial percentage of the price of a high-end bike. It's a 7.5% tax on a $200 bike.
  • + 2
 @Motoracer31: $1.4bl deficit... So you have to stab the people for money to replace what was wasted, mismanaged or imposed.

And... www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/06/you_might_soon_pay_tolls_to_dr.html
  • + 1
 @XCMark: yea I saw that, such bullshit. Gives me one more reason to not go over to that side of the river haha its going to ruin so many businesses that thrive off of us going to get tax free items. Glad I dont work over there anymore
  • + 1
 @Motoracer31: didn't you read that the do not discriminate between road and mountain bikes?
  • + 2
 Welcome to Connecticut!!!! ....That will be $5,000 for the air you just used reading our welcome.
  • + 1
 @Josefe: This makes perfect sense since a $200 & $8000 bike use the same space as a car.....
  • + 1
 @EastCoastDHer: not sure what you're getting at. Cars are taxed much more than $15 at the time of purchase here. Both bikes can and do use roads that the cars use.
  • + 3
 @dwmetalfab:
Sorry to bust your envy bubble, but a lot of high end buyers buy components and roll their own. As written, this tax will not touch people who do that.

This tax is a charade. If you want to collect a fee to use a recreation area with developed infrastructure, fine. Oregon has a Ski Park system and I never had a problem buying a pass. All the money goes to keep parking plowed and for porta loos at XC ski trails.

Same thing for XC bike trails? Not a problem. This tax is not that.
  • + 1
 @lobohusky: I'm with you ... the roads here are horrible. I drive from Canby to Salem for work everyday in a pretty burly vanagon setup for off road and even with all the suspension work the ruts on I-5 and sneaker chuck holes suck.

I'm not sure I agree with the threshold of the tax and the fact that direct sales aren't included in this (had this discussion with my brother in-law who works in the bike industry here in Oregon).

I'd like to see it on say $400.00 / $500.00 and above as their price point targets those that are struggling to make it as it is and probably buying a Walmart bike.

As an asides, have you been to Alsea Falls yet? The Corvallis IMBA chapter is partnered with BLM and they are jointly developing that area and will be into it with over 20 miles of trails when the project is complete (two more shuttle days coming soon too *August and in September I'm told*)
  • + 1
 @Thustlewhumber: luckily this was also reported on by someone else.. huffington post is usually #fakenews
  • + 1
 @dwmetalfab: Fool, I'm on my way to Bend right now! Meet me at the 7-11 across from 10 Barrel at midnight to show me some hospitality. Localism is schism, gism.
  • + 1
 Us here in California pay a hell of a lot more tax into the federal budget than you. You're welcome. @chasejj:
  • + 2
 @unrooted: sounds like enough to not be bitching lol
  • + 1
 @Atrak: It wont...
  • + 1
 @wda1wustl: "I would much rather see the state impose a 'I just moved here from California, and want to screw up the real estate market' tax!"

I couldn't agree with you more... In Utah our moron of a governor has this vision of making Salt Lake City and the Wasatch Front the new Los Angeles. People are moving here from California in droves and it seems like 90% of them are taking up mountain biking as a hobby. Sure, its good for our economy but it is hell on our infrastructure (including our recreation). Soon enough Utah will be paying a bicycle tax to fund the 3 new freeways we need to build thanks to Gov. Herbert's genius idea...
  • + 1
 @aks2017: I doubt you took your subie anywhere a jeep couldnt go...
  • + 1
 @MTBCAM8: Attracting tech jobs is a really good idea, you jackoff. You can't blame or connect the two of Herbert attracting those jobs and Utah having a really good local emphasis on MTBing as well as the sport itself becoming incredibly popular. How did you get into MTBing? Seeing as how you recently joined this site this year, you starting riding only a couple years ago.

Educate yourself before making absurd comments, you friggen jerry.
  • + 0
 @MTBCAM8: stop with the localism..
I hate a lot of things about CA. but people moving to Oregon is not the source of your problems. I would start by changing your attitude, that chip on your shoulder is holding you back.
  • + 1
 @Josefe: so, mtn bikes are exempt?
  • + 1
 @demoflight: This is definitely true. I've lived in Eugene all my 29 years and there are a TON of cyclists. The caveat to that is the motorists are clueless and pay no attention to us despite being so saturated with bikes. Maybe this bill could help with that, I don't know.
  • + 2
 @wda1wustl: All of this. We're full California. Pls stop moving here.
  • + 1
 @scott-townes: Scott, I got into mountain biking because of my parents. And I've been riding for 6 years and racing the UGS for 4 years. Ive been commenting on here and even on YOUR replies since 2012. I made a new account because 2 years ago, c*nts like you made this site a joke and I started getting my news from Vital. My user name was MTBCAM88 at that time. So ya Im no noob to pinkbike or riding. And yes you CAN make a direct connection between the two. Ive lived here my whole life and just in the last 10 years, during the tech boom, all these morons from California saw an opportunity to strike gold here. And Im not saying it is 100% the cause of the boom in mountain biking popularity, but the correlation is undeniable and if you dont see it then you are blind.
  • + 1
 @Beez177: I live in Utah, not Oregon dumbass...
  • + 1
 @scott-townes: I guess you prefer clogged trails and long lines at the bike parks. If thats your cup of tea then more power to you. It aint mine man...
  • - 1
 @MTBCAM8: same argument, I meant Utah , but yeah go f*ck yourself hick
  • + 1
 @Beez177: Haha hick? Dude I listen to nothing but metal and I f*cking hate horses. Im as far from hick as you can get. Clearly youve never been to Utah...Have fun living in Commiefornia and trying to survive because youre paying ridiculous taxes.
  • + 1
 @tipsword:
I used to live in Alsea. There were bicycle and motorcycle trails all over the hills. I have ridden a trail from my house outside of Alsea to the falls many times. It has the possibility to be a world class riding area.

When I lived there the trails were all unofficial and all user maintained. Starker Forests used to be very good about allowing recreation on their lands as long as you registered with them and didn't tear up the area. Their web site says that Mtb riding is a permitted activity.
  • + 1
 @Motoracer31: I also lived in Portland for 5 years, and visit twice a year, I have never seen a gravel road, could you let me know which roads you are referring to?
  • + 1
 @shawnhoffarth: Maybe in the deep S.E. - Felony Flats area?
  • + 1
 @scary1: It is a flat tax to be sure, but it is exempt on bikes under $200. The poorest people aren't buying $200+ bikes - never mind new bikes at all. This is another middle-class tax, making regular, working families pay while letting the rich and corporations off the hook.
  • + 0
 @dwmetalfab: No, it will be felt more amongst the middle-class and average income earners, as is the case with every flat tax. You're right that poorer folks won't be hit by this, but conversely what's $15 to some wealthy person shelling out $4000 for a new bike, as compared to someone paying $300 at Walmart?
  • - 1
 @MTBCAM8: I typically don't ride trails jerries ride or bother with bike parks anymore mainly because of gapers like you. "Ah man I'm like so kore because I started riding two years ago! what's up with all these noobies riding their bikes now??"

You are literally the worst kind of person.
  • + 3
 @scott-townes: Ok Scott, whatever makes you feel better man. Never said I was hard core, in fact Im just a semi-decent rider. Nothing special. 90% of my riding is trail with my wife, and teaching my daughter to ride up at Ogden Bike Park. From what I can see from your pics, you are 10x the extreme level I am. Ive never been to Virgin or Grafton. I dont huck huge step-ups and gaps anymore. As I said, Ive been riding for 5 years and in those 5 years I went hard core for about 3 of them and ended up with a lot of medical bills because I was pushing myself too hard. I forgot why I loved mountain biking. I was too focused on being a rider like you. Nowadays Im just chill and prefer a good trail ride and workout to a 40 foot table top.

Dont sit there and judge people you've never seen even riding a bike. Thats the typical Utah MTB'er attitude right there. And thats exactly why I stopped hanging out with douchebag riders like you, and why I focus on riding with my family and enjoying the sport.
  • + 2
 @MTBCAM8: "Don't sit there and judge people you've never seen riding a bike"

I'm not judging you based on your riding. I'm judging you based on your shitty gaper opinion that's trashing newer people getting into the sport when self admittedly, you've only recently started MTBing.

"Wahh mtbing here is too popular because of all the city folk moving here and picking up riding! I mean who do they think they are? Me 5 years ago?! Why can't people stop riding as soon as I started so it wouldn't be so popular!"
  • - 1
 @MTBCAM8: ARE YOU THIS INSUFFERABLE IN YOUR MARRIAGE JESUS CHRIST
  • + 0
 @scott-townes: Boy, you really need the last word in this thread dont you? I hope you spend as much time riding as you do punching keys. If you do you'll be in Rampage soon enough.
  • + 0
 @anchoricex: Yep and my wife loves it. Gets her so moist...
  • + 1
 @lobohusky:

OK, really people..... You all mention about using this tax for mountain bike trails, are you REALLY serious??? Do you see gas taxes being used for developing 4 wheeling trails for trucks??? NOT!!!! and that money never was, nor ever will be used for that. Just like this tax money on bikes....it will be used to make you all safer on roads that were designed for cars and trucks and semi trucks. Little whites lines to make bike lanes on our poorly designed road infrastructures, will NOT keep you safe no matter who's fault it is or was, in a accident between you and your bike, you will always loose and most likely be hurt very badly or die. If you want to go out on mountain trails, do so at your own risk. Or here is an idea, get off your cheap cheap mind thoughts, raise money and buy your own d\land to do that stuff on, then when it's not right you can get in a fight with yourself as you look in the mirror. So quit being so dang cheap, I mean you all spend 15 bucks for a couple glasses of wine at your "Biking events", only to piss it out later, so quit grumbling and step up to the plate and help pave the way for safer biking.

Phtttt
  • + 54
 In Britain a chocolate covered cake is considered a staple food item and exempt from sales tax. A chocolate covered biscuit (cookie to you americans) is considered a luxury item and is taxed. Mcvities successfully won a court case against the British government to remove tax from Jaffa Cakes, which are (according to the court case) very small cakes, which are packaged and consumed like biscuits.
Completely irrelevant to this article, but I just love the fact that chocolate cake is tax exempt in Britain.
  • + 12
 Bikes are like my Chocolate cake. They are a staple luxury, so that means i can stop paying taxes on my bike parts right? And i will have to finish each ride with a piece of chocolate cake. There it is all problems solved.
  • + 5
 And now Pinkbike wants tax free cake
  • + 43
 The new wheelsize is coming boys! No more 29". No more 27.5. No more 26" (yes #26isdead)

25.5". Super light. Very playful. Superb handling. Coming January 2018. Also 25.5" will only be compatible with 145x12.5 half-boost hubs and the new PF69.5 bottom bracket
  • + 5
 ..And the price difference for the new and improved 25.5" bikes will be just slightly more than a 26", 27.5" or 29" equivalent! ...But it PROBABLY makes you 0.0015s faster on SELECT enduro tracks!
  • + 2
 Maybe we need to start measuring wheels from the spokebed instead of the tire tread?
  • + 2
 WRONG #26aintdead
  • + 1
 Actually, 29er has a bead seat diameter of 24.48", is it exempt?
  • + 33
 Every nation in the first world is broke . And not just by a little unfunded liabilities total over 350 trillion world wide. If we give these fools even a nickel they will use it to help borrow a dollar . Total liquid cash on the whole earth is about 13 to 14 trillion. Government can never make good on any promise that involves your money.
  • + 4
 Truth telling will get you downvoted severely here.
  • + 6
 Trigger warning*
  • + 2
 Have to wonder how much of that $15 even makes it to the intended use after the politicians get paid.
  • + 2
 @JayTucc: -$7 in debt.
  • + 31
 As someone who lives and commutes in Vancouver and has ridden in Portland, a $15 one time tax on the purchase of a new bike is not that much to help maintain and create cycling infrastructure. Oregon has fantastic cycling infrastructure. If you're not paying any sales tax, it is literally less than pretty much any amount of sales tax in Canada on a bike over $200. And that money isn't earmarked for anything.
If I lived in an area where I didn't have to pay a tax for something of course I would resist it, but realize what you have and if that's what it's going to take to maintain it, then be open minded about it.
  • + 1
 This Portlander is definitely open to it. I think the underlying tone and concern displayed in Mr. Cunningham's article is how this might open the floodgates for other states to follow suit in any manner they see fit. $15 is hardly a speck on the line items of a receipt when buying a bike and accessories for it. But once something like this gets approved, it becomes easier to change. For example, in 2 years someone might recommend we change it from purchases to anyone who rides a bike must register it and pay an annual fee or increase the purchase tax from a flat rate to a percentage. Time will tell, but if this money does anything like it should, then it sounds like a good thing for MTBers (more trails!).
  • + 6
 @lobohusky: I didn't rad anything that says more trails, though; only paved paths. Not the same thing.
  • + 13
 @lobohusky: Take it from someone with initmate experience with these fees. As soon as the legislature feels the pinch, they take earmarked money and shove it in the general fund. The earmarked part is used to sell you on a new tax, that is all.
  • + 6
 The bike tax dollars are not going to maintaining anything; Oregon is running a $1.8 billion deficit and needs some quick cash is all. www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2017/01/a_18_billion_deficit_in_a_time.html
  • + 3
 @lobohusky: only problem I see is that we'll get paved crappy green flow trails. I want to see whistler and squamish trails in Oregon. Techy, rooty and HARD! Its not just a matter of getting trails, its getting something that is worth while for your Bronson you just bought.
  • + 2
 @chasejj: Someone please push this comment to the top!

"Take it from someone with initmate experience with these fees. As soon as the legislature feels the pinch, they take earmarked money and shove it in the general fund. The earmarked part is used to sell you on a new tax, that is all.”
  • + 4
 This is government greed.
  • + 33
 Oregon: We just hooked every new bike owner for $15 to spend on whatever we want.

California: Hold my Gluten-Free, Vegan, Kombucha
  • - 2
 Im drinking a gluten free, vegan(? whatever) Kombucha right now. But mine's organic and made in Portland.
  • + 2
 @whoozh: ....Is it free range?!
  • + 18
 everyone needs to read this... momentummag.com/free-rider-myth

“Bikes don’t pay for the roads.” You see it again and again. It appears on editorial pages, in blog comments, and shouted from car windows, often accompanied by the accusation: “Freeloader!” or something ruder.

The bicycle freeloader myth is a strong and pervasive economic belief. It’s implied in rules that require cyclists to stay off certain roads, or ride in a manner that does not affect car traffic. And it’s enforced through media headlines, police standards, and the behavior and discourse of cycling advocates and detractors alike.

But is it true?

When you take a trip on a bicycle, you do not pay for gas, and thus you pay no gas tax. You do not stop and pay tolls (and you are generally not allowed on toll roads). You do not pay a license or registration fee, part of which goes toward paving, maintaining, and policing the roads you ride on. Most car insurance companies do not cover bicyclists, so often you do not pay for that either. And you do not pay for parking. No doubt this all seems terribly unfair.

Of course, though there are many people out there who solely get around carfree, chances are good that any given person out riding a bicycle on the road also owns a car, or rents one from time to time. When they do so, they pay all the same fees, fines, and taxes as an everyday motorist does, and just as grudgingly.

But here’s the thing: Cars don’t pay for roads, either.

The idea that roads are funded by user fees paid by people who drive is one of the great myths that buttresses our entire way of life. While the veneer on that myth has been crumbling for some time, we have only recently been forced to begin to look hard at it. And the difference between riding a bicycle and driving a car is surprisingly vast – but not in the way most of us imagine.

What if I told you that by driving a car you become a freeloader, a drain on the economy? That people who bicycle instead are subsidizing a road system that they are largely not welcome on? In order to break even on the cost of roads and pay for every driver who uses them each year, we would need 54% of commuters using a bicycle as their sole means of transportation.

It’s not great news for most people. After all, driving a car is extremely expensive; and if you live in the US a car may be your best bet or only way to get to work and otherwise go about your life. Unfortunately, it is also true. Driving is one of the most heavily subsidized things we do on a daily basis.

Cars pay for about half of the cost of our roads, all told. That’s it. Half.

So where does the rest of the funding come from for all that asphalt? We all pay it – whether or not we drive.

Most of what we pay for the roads is not paid directly, but through our taxes. Every time we pay sales tax on a purchase, property tax on our homes (directly, or indirectly through our rent), or income tax on what we earn, a portion of that goes directly into our transportation system.

A portion of all these taxes are paid into a general fund, which is where most transportation money comes from. But the real costs of building roads end up being much higher over the years than what the budget can afford. A growing amount of road costs are paid for with borrowed money. We must eventually pay off these loans through our taxes, with interest that can amount to two, three, or more times the original cost of the project.

Worse, this funding gap increases every year. With the economy dragging, we drive less, and as fuel and material costs rise, construction grows more expensive.

Roads are enormously expensive to build and maintain. If you look only at the highway system, the user fees paid by drivers come much closer to paying for them than half, though the system still operates at a loss. But if you look at local roads, on which most of our daily travel happens, the gap is even wider. The cost to maintain local roads is, on average, more than 6 cents per mile for each car each year. How much of this do drivers actually pay? Less than a penny. What does this mean for bicycling? While people do not pay to ride bicycles on the road, bicycling also costs almost nothing – less than 1% of money spent on transportation infrastructure goes to anything bike-related, and bicycles do not contribute significantly to other road-related expenses like potholes, crashes, or congestion.

People who ride bicycles also pay taxes, which means they often pay more into the road system than they cost it. By one estimate, a carfree cyclist would overpay by an average of $250 a year – a few dollars more than the amount the average driver underpays. While cyclists represent all income levels more or less equally, the half who ride for transportation alone and do not own cars are on the lower end of the income spectrum. For them this is the very definition of a regressive tax – like the lottery, a program by which the poor subsidize the better-off.

By that measure, to pay for the cost of keeping one driver on the road, you need someone else who is not driving – that is, paying taxes but putting minimal wear and tear on the system. But two thirds of people in the US drive and most of the rest travel in cars and on buses as passengers. It’s a recipe for debt, yet there is a constant demand for more roads to be built so that more of us can drive farther and more often.

Despite a growing number of bicycles on the roads, there are not nearly enough to balance out this equation. But even if motorists were to double the fees they pay – and if those fees were indexed to inflation – it would still not be enough. Our road system is in bad shape, and we have not been able to spend nearly enough on it in the last decade to keep it even in minimally good working order.

That’s just the beginning of the story, though. Roads, economically unsustainable in their own right, result in towering externalities, costs or benefits attributed and paid for elsewhere, indirectly. When you take these costs into account – from health to safety to local economies to global energy – by the most conservative estimate, the cost to keep each car on the road is 30 times the cost of each bicycle.

Yet not a month goes by without some clever politician deciding that the best way out of our transportation funding crisis is to license and register bicyclists. Every year it is up to weary bicycle advocates to do the math once again to show that there is no way for such a scheme to break even on its administrative costs, never mind the cost of accommodating a sudden increase in cars on the road and passengers on transit.

The humble bicycle, long a scapegoat, may yet prove our salvation from a transportation system running at a deficit. This is not so far-fetched as it may seem at first glance.

Take Copenhagen, where forty years ago the incursion of cars and roads looked very similar to that in today’s US cities. But today, 84% of the city’s residents regularly ride bicycles. Each mile traveled on a bike earns the city, by one analysis, 42 cents. That same mile driven in a car costs the city 20 cents. Bicycling rates there have begun to decline in recent years, and city leaders are scrambling to make bikeways more comfortable and convenient. They know they can’t afford not to.

In the US, we can’t afford not to either, but it’s harder for us to see – bicycling hasn’t grown into normalcy in the same way. But when you consider that almost 70% of our car trips are under two miles – a forty minute walk or a twelve minute bicycle ride – change seems more feasible. More than two thirds of people in the US say that they wish they bicycled more often, and an increasing number are doing so. The barriers are real, but can be overcome cheaply and quickly. And the benefits multiply and spread into every aspect of our economy and our lives.
  • + 8
 The real article is always in the comments.
  • + 1
 -"Cars pay for about half of the cost of our roads, all told. That’s it. Half." ......
Which is way more then bikes pay.
If a larger percentage of riders were using their bikes to ride to work they would have a stronger argument. For now a small one time tax on a new purchase for recreation is a small price to pay to live in one of the coolest places/states in the world.
  • + 13
 So America is now taxing bicycles as a use of transport? Only in a country where there is huge profit in keeping you sick and where climate change is met with government level denial would they want to charge people to use a push bike as transport.

Wouldnt it be more sensible to give a small tax relief on commuting cycles below a certain value (above a certain level they are just a luxury good) to encourage people to ride to work and also provide updated infastructure at no cost to the cyclist.

On a slightly different note - I wonder how bat-shit mental people in the USA will go when the reality that you wont be able to get a new petrol/diesel car 30 years from now hits?
  • + 3
 i love my country, but I hate the direction we seem to be going.
  • + 1
 It's $15 to help support cycling infrastructure (hopefully). Relax.
  • + 8
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: Americans (I'm American) get so worked up over taxes. The accepted notion is that all tax money is completely wasted, that it's always misallocated and the local/state governments absolutely blow at using the funds. I have a friend who works as a Transportation engineer and he's given me a look into the first hand battle it takes to get any transportation project approved because of this cultural witchhunt of any and all taxes. It's so hard to get any funding for any project that it sure as f*ck looks like there's nothing to show for tax money. He also has given me a nice look into how f*cking awesome and amazing infrastructure development and parks and all that cool shit everyone on PinkBike uses every day is and how your tax money is honestly getting used pretty god damned efficiently. Most Americans see headlines on the news about misappropriation of funds by a corrupt politician or see one failed project and think it's representative of all tax usage. They have zero grasp on the scale of how much stuff is already in the works funded by taxes, and zero grasp of how much their standard of living is seriously propped up because of taxes. We're pretty f*cking dumb down here.
  • + 7
 @anchoricex: I have a pretty good grasp on the total spent on the 15 year "war" in the Middle East, one we're still in by the way. Not to mention the 30+ year "war on drugs" we've been fighting.
  • + 1
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: Its $15 to get a foot in the door and then...bicycle riders/commuters should get a tax break on purchasing a bike. i'd bet a fraction will be used for "cycling" infrustructure.
  • + 12
 @anchoricex: yes we get worked up because we're sick and f*cking tired of paying taxes for a government which gets bigger and bigger and does less and less. If you look at how much tax we pay it's ludicrous:

10-40% fed income
7% sales
5% property
6-2% health insurance
0-13% state income
Total tax 28-71%

50k 52%
100k 60%
200k 70%

How much tax do you pay in other countries? ALL taxes you can think of!!!

Note the health care "tax" here I count as 6% based on a middle aged person making 50k. It's about 3k per year for the crappiest gov plan. I use averages for property tax. If you live in the middle of nowhere here your tax could be almost zero. Or if you live in a big city it would be very high like 10%.
  • - 8
flag meathooker (Jul 16, 2017 at 7:01) (Below Threshold)
 It's irritated me for years that cyclist get free reign of the road and don't pay taxes to maintain them. Imo the taxes should be higher.
  • + 6
 @meathooker: that's sarcasm / an attempt of humour surely?
  • - 4
flag anchoricex (Jul 16, 2017 at 9:45) (Below Threshold)
 @Rasterman: Once again you're only looking at the amount that gets deducted and you have little to no grasp on how the funds are appropriated and how much of your life is already propped up by tax-funded projects/services/utilities etc. Your opening statement is nothing but a sweeping and meaningless generalization, it literally means nothing to sit there and say "governments getting bigger and bigger and does less and less!" I've learned to go against that tired dad-from-facebook circlejerk, there's a shit ton going on that you don't even realize directly benefits you and your families. That's my point, you want to live in a developed country with big populations? Prepare to pay taxes for infrastructure/utilities/social services/etc. The tired notion that your government does nothing is prevalent in every civilization since the beginning of mankind running around in tribes. It's even worse now that you have news outlets highlight the shortcomings with huge emphasis, and it makes people like you think that the government does absolutely jack shit. It forces you to ignore the huge abundance of things they actually do and only focus on where mistakes are made.
  • + 2
 @FindDigRideRepeat: I suppose I'm suggesting that at a local level there is a lot of good going on with the government (as the bike tax for Oregon seems to be well intentioned with its direction to benefit bike-related trails/projects/infrastructure). In some ways federal things do good for Americans too, but I absolutely agree with you on the misappropriation of defense/military/wars/etc. Anyone who falls for the need for war narrative of Americans vs. the baddies is a damn idiot. The war on drugs is even worse IMO. In those regards our federal government is hugely wasteful.
  • + 4
 @anchoricex: There was no Federal income tax before the founding of the Federal Reserve in 1913. The Federal Reserve is about as "federal" as Federal Express. The USA tax structure is based off of deficit spending and all U.S citizens are enslaved to the debt that it creates.
  • + 1
 "So America is now taxing bicycles as a use of transport? Only in a country where there is huge profit in keeping you sick and where climate change is met with government level denial would they want to charge people to use a push bike as transport."

Speaking in broad terms when it comes to large nations is foolish. Right now our Rob Ford's are in ascendency and yours aren't. The idea that our entire country had been subverted to these is ideals is naive.
  • + 3
 @big3D: How is my statement foolish or naive? It is a fact. There is no general fund fo infrastructure. The money for infrastructure is borrowed by the U.S government from the Federal Reserve, a private,for profit international bank. The money is created out of thin air and loaned to us at interest and our federal income tax is used for the express purpose of paying off that debt. That is our national debt.
  • + 1
 @FindDigRideRepeat: At this point its safe to say drugs have won. Opiod overdose is the number one cause of death for Americans aged 50 and younger. Not terrorism, Not auto accidents, Not even preventable accidents like playground injuries, Not even medical malpractice.
  • + 1
 @anchoricex: ....You're not from Connecticut, Are you?! .....
  • + 1
 I quoted and responded to the original comment, not you. @vistacruiser:
  • + 1
 @EastCoastDHer: I didn't believe you. Seemed impossible, but I stand corrected. This is shocking news.
  • + 1
 @anchoricex: If I could downvote your posts 1000 times I would. It is clear where you are coming from.Go back to take a nap in the swamp.
  • + 1
 @EastCoastDHer: Connecticut: where the state beaches are filled to capacity every weekend but they talk of closing them because they're "too expensive" to run. Maybe if they didn't siphon everything into the $5 billion state pension plans we'd be okay...
  • + 1
 That's not true your misusing that stat that's accidental death and through a little googling around 50000 people died from opioids yet 88000 died from alcohol I love a drink as much as the next guy but your stat is misleading overall drugs don't make the top ten 40000 people died in driving accidents an 10000 of those were drunk driving.@EastCoastDHer:
  • + 13
 This is idiocy. Auto drivers don't pay enough to subsidize their roads and infrastructure and the associated costs from our car dependency are staggering. Cycling should be an obvious alternative and free from all taxation and in fact subsidized. The reason cycling is a default form of public transport in Holland and Denmark is because there is safe infrastructure that separates bikes from autos. This costs money but our default auto infrastructure which no one questions is orders of magnitude more expensive.
  • + 12
 I think most people are under the mistaken assumption that the gas tax funds all roads. IT DOESN'T. In my city, all CITY roads (ie the ones bikes ride on) are funded by sales tax. Sales tax is transportation-mode-agnostic. Bicyclists are as likely to pay $x in sales tax as are car drivers.

In other words, the people who currently put almost all of the wear and tear on the roads we ride on are currently paying the SAME AMOUNT as the people who hardly put any wear and tear on them (us bicyclists). Check out your city's annual paving budget and tell me what that means to you. Hint: it's in the millions.

Cyclists are ALREADY paying an unfair share for the roads we ride on, it's not the other way around.
  • + 5
 No one is likely paying their fair share directly. A bicycle puts nearly zero wear on a road. A car is nearly zero even. A passenger truck puts some. Freight trucks and such do nearly all damage and account for all road damage and costs. Now everything is subsidized and so many costs are hidden trucking is not as efficient as it could be.

In the end we are all using these services so what does it matter? If you want to charge fairly then any vehicle over X pounds should be charged tolls via GPS. It would be an insane rate, but it would appropriately cause efficiencies in the market place to happen. It would change how we move and deliver things, it would make the economy more efficient. Rather than subsidizing delivering a tiny lightweight box via a 8000 pound truck and tearing the crap out of our roads. We would get it a more efficient way.
  • + 1
 @Rasterman: If I could upvote your posts 1000 times I would.
  • + 15
 A basic economist principle is to tax things you don't want and don't tax the things you do want. . . Fuck oregon.
  • + 9
 "How often do we fly the "Share the Road" flag without any consideration for sharing the costs to maintain them?"

1. Mountain bikes, by definition, do not need maintained roads to ride, so this is irrelevant on pinkbike.
2. Drivers don't share the road very well anyways, so why does it matter?
3. Bikes aren't even allowed on highways.
4. How many people who commute on bikes ACTUALLY don't drive cars as well?
5. If anything, bicycles should have tax credits, not tax deductions. What tf kind of incentive is this shit?
  • + 3
 Thats what amazes me about the UK for one, they have a "Ride to Work" program that allows you to purchase a bike without paying the Taxes! Granted your employer needs to be registered with the program, but thats still awesome and it makes sense.

www.cyclescheme.co.uk
  • + 11
 When does the first ride writeup come out for the Huffy
  • - 2
 @dualseason: that was pretty good. They need to try another that comes with disk brakes now to see if the brake issue is any better.....
  • + 9
 What about those greedy pedestrians??? Where's the shoe tax?

I hate politicians. Who else gets paid to sit around and dream up ways to make things worse?
  • + 10
 Taxation is theft.
  • + 5
 Just another thought - In the US you can pass a law taxing the bicycle as a form of transport (something that helps promote fitness, reduces the wear on road surfaces and is basically carbon neutral with the exception of its manufacturing / sale) but you cant manage to put any kind of legislation in place regarding the absolute shite you feed yourselves (junk food tax, harmful chemicals in your food banned elsewhere) and the ability for any old turd to purchase a guy and shoot somebody else, regardless of the persons mental state.

Seems there is a little more power in place in the food / gun / church lobbys than the cyclists, eh?
  • + 1
 Nahhhhhh! It's 'Merica. We love bikes and coffee.
  • + 2
 Not a single person in the US is forced to eat anything. We are free time grow our garden (as I do). Buy organic meat, etc. Yes, lots processed junk here. However 100% a personal choice to feed on self with whatever they desire. So your smug, condescending point is?
  • + 3
 @bman33: Well, as an educated person with the financial freedom to make such a choice of course you are not forced into eating crap - Have a thought for those with a less fortunate level of education / finance though, I am sure you are not obese either and you are able to pay for your own health care?

We are not all born equal and in no way was my statement smug or condesecending unless you think that the points I am making are not true in any way?
  • + 3
 @Racer951: it's ok, he makes enough to buy expensive food and has a good enough job to spend his free time gardening. He "absolutely" has the right to judge how poor people eat.
  • + 5
 @bman33: pretty tough to grow your own food when you live in a big city, don't know the value of good nutrition and work 50 hours a week to scrape by. Fast food is also the most cost effective food source on a caloric basis. So you're right that no one has a gun to their head (in this scenario anyway) but there are a lot of forces pushing in this direction.

I think the GP post's main point is still valid though. Taxation, even a tiny amount like this, discourages the behaviour being charged. It's unlikely we don't all agree that the world needs more bikes and riders, not less.

...with the exception of bearded hipsters riding single speeds. If this tax gets just one off the roads I'll label it a success!
  • - 2
 @plyawn: Not sure we need more roadies , actually. They're f*cking annoying as shit here in the SFBA.
  • + 2
 So what the hell is Alberta Beef, exactly?
  • + 1
 @Racer951: So a tax on junk food is going to help "poor" people out how? By making food more expensive? And for the record, I don't eat organic much. I have like three plants in my little garden, hardly enough to feed me 100%. I came up in a very blue collar/no college family. So one. needs college to make proper nutritional choices ? Interesting
  • + 0
 @bman33: use your common sense, if junk food was more expensive people would look for alternatives - you are not making food more expensive, just shite thanks bad for you - fast food and sugar loaded drinks.

And no, college education isn't needed to understand basic nutrition but I didn't mean that by the term education - many people lack the basic understanding of what is acceptable to eat regularly, that's why so many are obese to the point of ruining lives.
  • + 1
 @bman33: you are wading into controversial waters my friend. Google Monsanto. I'm with @Racer951 on this one. Monsanto should be uninvented.
  • + 1
 Holy shit it's the Canadian Bernie Sanders.

Adding a tax to unhealthy food isn't going to cause less "financially fortunate"/ educated people to seek healthier alternatives. They're poor for a reason and it's probably not because they're good decision makers. I'm not saying that just to be a dick, I grew up surrounded by poverty, I know how it works.
  • + 1
 @Boondocker390: Im not from canada, im from the UK where we are beginning to see the result of the influx of junk food and sugary drinks - We have actually proposed a 'sugar tax' to put people off drinking it as it is causing so many issues - Of course the drinks industry have heavily lobbied the government though and its likely not to happen.

Talking about growing up in poverty - snap. I witnessed parents giving 50p to their child and sending the to the local corner shop to get dinner, which was then a few bags of crisps. When the parents cooked it wasnt much better, a 'farm foods' pizza at £1.00 or cheap beef burgers or similar.

Dont you actually sell mcdonalds and similar foods in your schools in the USA?! Utterly mental, kids are not going to think of nutrition, just what tastes better to them.

I know it is unfair to penalise the many for what is considered the few that abuse themselves with too much junk but with projections that half of the uk will be obese (yes obese, not overweight - a danger to health) by 2030 maybe it is more than the minority that are beginning to abuse their body with junk?

Anything that is harmful if consumed on a regular basis needs to have a deterrant in place to prevent its abuse - Or the other 50% of society will have a very rough ride trying to pay for all of that healthcare the people with obesity and its related illnesses will require (diabetes, heart disease etc etc)
  • + 2
 @Boondocker390: Truth telling will get you downvoted relentlessly in here. You must be suppressed.
  • + 4
 They just increased my property tax by 50% and car registration 300%. Funny how my neighborhood has thousands of million dollar homes that have extremely high property tax and they still complaining they need more money. Government needs to be more creative on generating income, not just easy way out and tax. Build something, sell some, make something people will want to buy.
  • + 8
 lol what
  • + 13
 What you're describing is socialism. I'm told it doesn't go over well down there.
  • - 3
 They are making something people want. It's a transportation tax to reinvest into transportation infrastructure.
  • + 5
 @rivercitycycles: Yikes man. Must be nice to feel so much better than those homeless a*sholes trying to stay warm during the winter. How dare they?

Have you considered the idea that maybe homelessness, addiction and crime are symptoms of deeper societal problems and perhaps not caused by the existence of light rail?
  • - 2
 @tinfoil: he's American, just ignore him. People in this country love to pick on and blame those worst off. For everything. And you can't rationalize with him either. It's just the political culture these days.
I happen to appreciate his commentary, now I know where not to buy tools in the future.
  • - 3
 @rivercitycycles: congrats on the being a d!ck and all.
  • - 4
flag schofell84 (Jul 15, 2017 at 13:06) (Below Threshold)
 @rivercitycycles: yep. If you think there's nothing more to people's woes than bad decisions your are both a d!ck and a moron.
  • + 7
 @rivercitycycles: I say we load up all the homeless and ship them to Ogdensburg New York!
  • + 7
 @tinfoil: Portland has a huge homelessness issue that he's just touching base on. Most of the homeless population in Portland is in the situation due to drug use and their own choices not because of societal issues. Addictions a bitch.
  • - 4
flag mollow (Jul 15, 2017 at 13:57) (Below Threshold)
 @rivercitycycles:

And just when I thought you couldn't be any more stupid
  • + 0
 @rivercitycycles: So for example having an abusive childhood which manifests as issues in later life is a 'life choice'? Okaaaay.
  • + 2
 @scotttherider: you have any statistical research, personal experience or interview evidence to back up your claim? Or did you mean to say 'some' instead of 'most'?

I'd be willing to bet you a new Nomad that 'most' homeless folks are due to mental illness or physical disability.
  • - 1
 @chrisingrassia: I have personal insight on this situation. My brother spent 4 years homeless on the streets of Portland because he was living for his next shot of heroine. He was given opportunities to go to rehab but decided he'd rather stay homeless then get clean. He didn't steal from people at least. He'd find cash receipts from stores go in shoplift items off the receipts and return them....I thought it was a clever means to pay for his habit....
  • + 0
 @wallheater: @rivercitybicycles Curious fellas... anyone on this thread ever been homeless?
  • - 1
 @MX298: Thats probably the smartest solution you could come up with isnt it?
  • + 1
 @scotttherider: yeah good thing he only shoplifted and didn't steal from people.
Jesus Christ I weep for the future of my intellectual country.
  • - 4
flag scotttherider (Jul 15, 2017 at 14:52) (Below Threshold)
 @chrisingrassia: only reason I brought anything up about my brother is because you asked if I had personal experience in regards to the homeless in Portland. No need to be a dick about how my brother funded his habit. Would you rather he have robbed and stole shit from individuals and caused damage to their lives? Personally our society is headed to hell in a hand basket but you being a dick about my personal insight on a topic isn't needed. What's your opinion from your communist state of California? I'm sure such a great state has no homeless population or drug use inside its borders....
  • + 9
 Judging by the lack of response, I'll take that as a 'no' to my previous question. Myself, I have been homeless at a couple points in my life, once for about 5 months. In my experience, you can break the homeless population down into 3 groups: Homeless because of mental illness or drug addiction, homeless by circumstance, and homeless by choice.
Those battling mental illness need help, and those with drug addictions need help, the difference being that the addict needs to be the one to initiate the change. Otherwise, it's wasted resources trying to reform an addict that isn't ready to change--and some never do, unfortunately. The mentally ill need access to group homes and medication/counseling.
Those who are homeless by circumstance are trying to recover and get off the street. Medical bills, lost a roommate and can't afford rent, lost a job, etc. This was me. Being homeless is an absolute chore, and quite boring. It's ok for about 2 weeks and then I was over it. Luckily, for those that want help (food, shelter, job placement assistance) you can track down access in most decent sized cities easily. Find work, pay bills, save money and then get a place to live again...it can be done.
Lastly, there are those homeless by choice. It's a lifestyle. Most are crafty enough to have a friend that will let them borrow an address, get an EBT card, etc. but make no mistake, they believe they are 'beating the system' or somehow 'escaping the chains of society' (while befitting from the programs set up by it).

So you guys are both right, just neither completely so. There's probably more homeless people on that train trying to stay warm than you think, it's just that some of them aren't drug addicts with major mental issues, so you wouldn't notice that they are indeed homeless. Does that excuse the behavior of some homeless folks? Not at all. We all have our own issues--and you can't control how I handle mine, I can't control how you handle yours... some people are much better about it than others, but that doesn't mean the walking shitshows get a free pass to do as they please. In short, people can be dicks, and inconsiderate of the space that they share with others. It's just easier not to give a f*ck when you're hanging onto that bottom rung of the ladder.

Lastly, if you want to help, donate to a food bank or shelter. Or, buy a cup of coffee for someone. Giving money to people on the street usually serves to enable their current life choices.
  • + 6
 Also, this bike tax is bullsh*t. It's estimated to raise about 1.3 million a year. *IF* that is sectioned off and goes directly to bicycle infrastructure improvements, that still buys what... like a mile of concrete path?
  • + 0
 @mikealive: Thanks for your insight man. I believe you are honestly the best person to weigh in on this at this point. I like your point of view on the assistance programs and the fact you used them as they were meant to be used as well.
  • - 1
 @rivercitycycles: Try BART in SF Bay Area. Roving bands of thugs and drug dealers and they won't even release descriptions or the video to remain PC. Liberalism is a mental disorder.
  • - 2
 @tinfoil: Yeah! drug use and permissiveness and a*sholes who cater to them all day and not hold them responsible for their behavior.
Oh.... and the 300+ NGO 501c scammers sucking donation money for a career of making victims of them all.
Don't get me going.
  • + 1
 @scotttherider: He's still stealing.He's a criminal. Jesus. Are you retarded?
  • + 0
 @mikealive: No .It wll pay for a consultant and a shit load of do nothing state employees to look into a concrete path and estimate how high to raise the tax next year to pay for a concrete path.
  • + 11
 @chasejj: you and I live in the exact same area, and likely experience the exact same BART. You are being an old crank, and you and rivercity are being generalizing fools. BART distributes almost a half million people around the Bay area EVERY single day, it's the economic lifeblood of the entire region. Just go ahead and try to imagine another half million cars on the road every day if it didn't exist. You can't possibly position your diatribe in that somehow all BART does is support drug dealers and thugs, and you even have the gall to somehow attach your idiocy to a rant against 'liberalism'?! It's patently ignorant to have that opinion. Yeah, there may be like 30 or 40 throughout the day on the trains, but you're making a mountain out of a sand grain. Mass public transport makes a nation function. Americans wouldn't understand that though unless you loved somewhere else for a while or unless we started paying $9/gal for gas
  • - 1
 @chasejj: he's a f*cking drug addict... drug possession and its use is a crime.... shoplifting is a crime.... no I'm not retarded. I probably contribute more than most to this modern shithole we call society in what I do intellectually. I probably also contribute more annually in taxes then your income as well. I recently passed my American Welding Society D1.1 Certified Welding Inspectors exam with an 89% overall score my first attempt. That exam sports a 65% failure rate. What I do for work helps your f*cking retarded state in its feeble attempt to store and move water about that's designed to facilitate the states population in the early 80's. Here's a good read from the perspective of 7 years ago....FYI it's only going to get worse for Cali...
ngm.nationalgeographic.com/print/2010/04/plumbing-california/bourne-text
  • - 3
 @chrisingrassia: hey go to Canada for high gas prices...lol that's not an attack in any way shape or form. Last time I was up there it came out to almost $6/gal.
  • + 1
 @mikealive: Ummm.... I didn't reply because I've been at work all day. My quick lunch break comment highlighted that there are a load of reasons why people can end up homeless and it's not always due to a 'life choice' as was insinuated on here, so I'm not sure why I'm being singled out. Mental health is a huge issue here with little support (places like Riverview closing for good or bad.....First Nations persecution and the stripping of their culture via the likes of the Residential School program etc....).
  • - 7
flag chasejj (Jul 15, 2017 at 19:58) (Below Threshold)
 @scotttherider: Nope. But maybe in several decades you'll get to where I am. Buy a house or 5 and have some kids. Be married for 30 years. You'll be in line with me then. You'll see the light then or you are retarded.
  • - 2
 @chasejj: About to purchase my 4th rental house and have 3 kids. Coming up on 10 years of marriage. So hopefully by my 30th we should be enjoying an early retirement. Well by retirement I'm looking at becoming a consultant in my field in order to travel the world with my wife while getting paid $150+/hr. Thanks for your glorious insight into my life. I've been extremely blessed so far in my life and career that started as a simple blue collar trade.
  • - 3
 @scotttherider: So you have achieved all this in your life and can't see that your brother is a f*cking thief when he rips off stores to pay for a drug habit. Moral equivocating that if it isn't .....what? mugging people on the street it somehow OK?
I call BS on your whole story here. You cannot achieve what you say and be that detached from reality. I'm Done. Good luck to you.
  • - 3
 @chasejj: My brother was a prime example for me to learn from growing up of what not to be or do. Believe me I've made my own mistakes so far in life and quite frankly I don't really care what you think you know about me. In the past 5.5 years since I've been working my current job I've averaged 3500 hours a year working 72-84 hours a week, been to 27 states 4 Canadian provinces and spent a 3 month stint in South America. I spend a large part of my time contracted in California and the only good thing about your state is the prevailing wages they pay me down there. My moral compass may be slightly skewed in the sense that I believe even though my brother was a thief at least he wasn't directly victimizing and traumatizing people. He's since been to prison and served time for his transgressions. If you don't mind me asking what's your field that had you working with the government? If you've looked at my profile you'll see I've stated I work on hydroelectric dams. So I've gotten to interact with the USACE which is similar to some of the comments you've made about government spending on other areas of this thread. TVA isn't quite as bad as the core of engineers. The Bureau of Reclamation seems to be the best of the three government agencies I've worked with just seem to cut corners to save on costs where they shouldn't.
  • - 6
flag chasejj (Jul 15, 2017 at 21:33) (Below Threshold)
 @scotttherider: You talk to much. I don't reveal such detail to people I do not know or will ever know.
  • + 5
 @scotttherider: such a weird d*ck-swinging conversation.
You're only 31, hopefully you realize there's more to life than money and possessions. Props for working hard, but trying to rub it in people's faces how superior you are will make you no friends.

I'm 32, have zero assets and zero properties, married for 1yr, and my wife makes 3x what I do. But I have lots of mountain bikes, so I'm happy =)
  • - 1
 @chrisingrassia: I do realize there's more to life then possessions and money. I'm trying to set things up for my kids future ultimately. I grew up with nothing and had nothing nice so I set out to change that for myself and family. I'm trying to work my way up in my company to get to a normal 9-5 job that has me home every night. Believe me or not but I'm the first person on trails that allows others to take my bike for a spin at the bike park and have made numerous friends here on Pinkbike that I've stayed in contact with and keep in touch with. I'm the first to admit when I'm wrong but when people that don't know me attack me over stupid irrelevant things let alone accuse me of being retarded I take offense and will bring up my achievements so far in life. Take it as you will.

My career choice I will brag about shamelessly though. I may spend as much time working as I do but the people I work with are like family and we have an awesome time doing it so it's literally a dream job playing all the time. Plus prior to it I'd been in California, Oregon and Washington.

Ive got three bikes in a sense... darkside with rear end flipped in the high position and a 6" for trail/all mountain, flip the chips to low and throw the 8" Fork on for DH and bike park then my ole hardtail XC racing bike from 02.
  • + 2
 @chasejj: Shit talker of the day! Congrats!

Blissful isn't it?
  • + 2
 @chasejj: just wanted to leave this here for YOU specifically today.
imgur.com/gallery/BNP9C
  • - 1
 @chrisingrassia: it's always nice seeing strangers helping each other!!
  • + 0
 @chrisingrassia: Funny-I saw that today on Imgur. Poor f*cker was mugged by the 5 MS13 gang bangers at the top of the escalator in Civic Center Plaza.
  • + 1
 @chasejj: now we can just make BS up to fit our narrative?
  • + 4
 $15 isn't much, but the government keep inching up income, property, sales taxes, registration fees exc.. and the money never goes where it's suppose to. A lot of time they use the money for more code enforcement ( tickets ) to generate more revenue. Government is sucking people dry slowly but surely under the promise of improvement.
  • + 3
 Its true, bikes account for a negligible amount of the wear on roads and the needed maintenance. However, so much of our streets in North America are in need of costly updates for cycling infrastructure. This $15 tax could help cycling infrastructure projects gain more validity and political backing when cyclists are directly contributing over a million a year to the state’s transportation budget. Might be a small price to pay to give transportation planners and engineers the ammunition they need to make cities more bikeable.
  • + 3
 I'm honestly pretty down with this. I frequently hear people moaning about all the cyclists in the middle of the road who "Don't even have to pay gas taxes or register their bikes blah blah blah!" (As if 99% of people who bike don't also own cars...) If we could shut those people up, that would be great in my opinion.
  • + 2
 Read up on the Pittman Robertson act. It could be much worse for bikers than this. This isn't a terrible idea if the money were directed towards infastructure for the bikes intended use (roads for road bikes, trails for mountain bikes). Oregon will spend the vast majority of this money to its former employees though through PERS...
  • + 4
 This will create a disincentive to purchase a bike for some consumers. It just HAPPENS to be threshold that WalMart falls under for their bike prices?
Shocking.
  • + 1
 Might as well close your LBS now.
  • - 2
 @schofell84: said those exact words to my mom on the subject. Also said it's starting at $15. So when's it going to be increased and by how much.
  • + 2
 I live in Portland and the tax is bullshit. It's to appease all the people who cry foul that bikes "don't pay their fair share!". This is primarily driven by complaining from Portland areas constituents who are upset that there are bike lanes. They never take into account that the vast majority of us own cars and already pay our share. I also ride the bus, which doesn't contribute anything towards road repair. The entire transportation package that was passed will pour money into widening roads in the Portland area in hopes of reducing congestion (which it won't). The only upside is that they are also looking at putting tolls into the city, which will cut traffic and raise money. The reality is that our city has a rep as a bike town, and it's not true and is undeserved. I've lived in several cities in Oregon and this is the least bike friendly place I've lived.
  • + 2
 As a former 40 year resident of Oregon I feel very comfortable saying the following:
The government of the State of Oregon is corrupt and dysfunctional. The former governor resigned in disgrace when it was discovered that his GF was "consulting" on "solar energy" projects. The history of Mayors in Portland is a colorful list of WTF.

This is just a clumsy attempt to increase taxes. Period. Years ago they instituted a "Snow Park Permit" to park at ski resorts that the state plowed. Fair enough. And the fee was designed to collect the actual cost. Build facilities bicyclists want and charge to use them? Not a problem.

But remember that "bike lanes" are built for car drivers. I can ride on the road without any problem. I can't keep track of the number of times people pass me and cut me off when I am riding at or above the speed limit.

The good news is that the law puts this tax on bicycles with "wheels" 26 inches or greater in diameter. I have a lot of bicycles, and not a one of them has a WHEEL that large. A 29'er is normally about 25 inches in diameter. If I was still living there it would not apply to me because I don't but bicycles. I buy frames, forks, wheels, brakes... Yup, the folks who wrote that tax were not very bright.
  • + 2
 In Canada, if you live/ride in a city your property taxes pay for a huge part of road upkeep. Income tax covers a gigantic piece of the provincial/federal cost. Sure we don't use an gasoline and pay the gas tax in this one instance, but (1) most of us still have cars and drive regularly, (2) If you're riding a 3/4/5-grand-plus bike odds are you pay more income tax than a lot of people, and (3) bikes don't do any damage to roads the way heavy cars and trucks do. Meanwhile we relieve traffic congestion, make cities more vibrant and accessible and improve our health at no cost to the government.

So before you tell me to pay my fair share for the privilege to ride my bike on a road why don't you raise the sin tax on tobacco once again or jack me another nickle on a six-pack.
  • + 5
 That's what happens when liberals run things, wouldn't live there, too many wackos.
  • + 2
 So let's see how well Oregon is doing...More tax revenue than ever due to marijuana legalization, multiple counties passing levies on fuel (for roads) and we still need more money!!! They're like a bunch of snot nosed, whiny, little children who've spent all of their allowance on candy, complaining that they need more money. Insolent Cheats and liars, the whole lot of them!!!
Honestly, we all can say "It's only 15 bucks" , but we also know that nothing will change and they'll come back to us again trying to pick our pockets, because it's never enough if you can't spend what you have wisely.
  • + 2
 The law is written in wheel size, not tire size, so even 29ers are tax exempt.

"29er rims have a diameter of approximately 622 millimeters (24.5 in) and the average 29" mountain bike tire is (in ISO notation) 59-622 - corresponding to an outside diameter of about 29.15 inches (740 mm)."
  • + 2
 Indiana residents already pay (or are supposed to pay) $20 per year to register mountain bikes ridden on State Park, State Forest, and National Forest Trails (the vast majority of trails in the state). So far this seems to have gone more towards plugging deficit holes, and less towards any increased support of soft surface trail building and maintenance. (with one notable exception- the forest service does now cut downed trees of State Forest trails... eventually)

On a lighter note, the Huffy Carnage 3.0 ... a bike whose very name describes what will happen to the rider if the bike is used on real MTB trails.
  • + 5
 I'll have to scratch bikes off the list of things worth driving the hour to Oregon to buy.
  • + 2
 What's your sales tax rate in your state?
  • + 6
 @pdxal: I see where you're going, I just don't like the idea. I'm tired of increasing taxes and fees on everything. Local and big government get plenty of money from us as it is, they're the problem not us.
  • - 1
 @SoPitted: Income tax rates have fallen for decades below their highs. We live in a very low tax era.

Governments don't have a spending problem, they have a revenue problem.

Funding shortfalls just get pushed down to the local level.
  • + 6
 @qduffy: Perhaps they shouldn't be spending if they don't have the revenue. I can't tell the bank they aren't getting the mortgage payment because of revenue problems
  • + 2
 @pdxal: for a $200 bike you're giving an $18 donation to the state here in California.
  • - 1
 @mrgonzo: plus you guys get killed on income tax too. You guys get it from all angles!
  • + 2
 This is just more bullish** and you all know it.

Solution? Drive to a nearby state and buy your bike there. F*** Oregon. same with California. Absolute worst politicians in the entire country. We all know that the $$$ from this will NEVER ever be put into trails, or multi use trails, or whatever else they say it will be put in for. It's going to go into Pensions that the stupid state can't afford to fund. Downrate me all you want but thats the truth. We all know how "straight" politicians are. Anyone that believes this will go to "what its intended" has wool over their eyes, and is just as corrupt as the POS politicians they elected into those offices.

I feel bad for those of you who live up there.
  • + 0
 "Solution? Drive to a nearby state and buy your bike there."

...and give even MORE money to the govt, awesome idea dumbass. You'd have to go to AK, MT, CT, or NH to pay less - a flat $15 on a $2k bike is a 0.75% effective tax rate. You'd pay around 4x as much where you live - are you raging against the machine every time you buy anything?

I feel bad for those of you who live down there.

Here in CO they said taxes on pot would go to schools and local govts. Guess what? It went to schools and local govts. Find something else to be angry about. Plenty of taxes do exactly what they were supposed to do. Maybe it won't go to trails, but dedicated money for bike infrastructure improvements in cities would be great.
  • + 2
 @bkm303:
Money is fungible. It moves freely... Will the million or so be an increase in spending? Duuuuurrrrrrr? And as for bicycles "paying a fair share", last time I looked road construction comes from three places:
1) Gasoline taxes.
2) Trucking ton mile fees.
3) General tax revenue. That is income, sales, and property taxes.

When I buy my bike bits online, I am paying the second. Because I don't want my house taken away and I don't want to wind up in prison. I pay the third. When I happen to drive a (pardon my language) "car", I pay the first. Bikes add almost no wear to roadways. Bike paths are there for car drivers: I can ride in the lane.

By the way, we have some nice recreational facilities near where I live that were built and maintained by volunteers. What a concept!
  • + 0
 @Dangerous-Dan: you're responding to points I never made, dude. Yes, most bike owners are also car owners and pay numerous other taxes.... mindblowing stuff, but you're missing the point.

In most cities the existing infrastructure was not designed with bikes in mind. Changing that takes money, and if non-cyclist voters have the options: (a) take fungible tax money to add bike infrastructure or (b) use fungible tax money to fill the potholes and widen the highways, which option do you think they'll choose?

Yep, some recreational areas are maintained by volunteers. Some others are protected by govt regulations and maintained by a mix of govt funded professionals and volunteers. Still others are maintained using money from private companies, paid in exchange for access to the natural resources in those areas. Shockingly, there are even for-profit recreation areas where people PAY to have fun!!!!!! Again, mindblowing stuff. It's almost as if there's no one-size-fits-all economic model for recreation, or anything else.
  • + 1
 @bkm303: There's always YT in Nevada - no sales tax. Taxes are necessary, but sometimes a big purchase requires a little maneuvering.
  • + 2
 It's a tax to fund our broke ass state. They are trying to find ways to pay the retired government employees. Meanwhile
Walmart and such sells their crap and no tax! If they just taxed bikes below $200 they would collect a lot more money.
But we don't want to cut into Big box stores profit, let's just cut
into bike retailers profit some more. Disgusting display I can't even put into words how "uncool" Oregon has become. I used to be proud to live here... No more..
  • + 2
 Not that Hawaiians are usually considered to be trend setters, but we've been doing this forever. I think in the late 1990's it went from a biannual thing to a one time, $15 fee for 20" and up. It's works well, look how wonderful our infrastructure is. Sigh.
  • + 1
 How's the riding out there? Going to Oahu soon
  • + 1
 @VNIMAL: it's been a wet summer. Our soil here doesn't handle wet well. Turns into sticky/slippery mud. What are you looking for, riding wise?
  • + 1
 @oldfut: Any, more enduro-ish/downhill type trails. Does it have alot of variety?
  • + 1
 @VNIMAL: ehhhh. We've got a little of everything. Some down hill in town. More enduro out in Kailua. More xc on north shore.
  • + 1
 @oldfut: I have so many questions, can't wait to get out there and see it!
  • + 3
 doesnt this aid the death blow to the local retailers... insane and sad, in the end, these types of taxes are about killing independent small business
  • + 5
 Worst. Tax. Ever. Won't. Fix. Shit.
  • + 1
 About damn time cyclists started paying for all the damage and stress placed on paved infrastructure! I'll bet the average bridge has a whole 30 seconds removed from its lifespan by the sheer number of bikes that use it...at the end of the day it's 15 bucks, but their justification is unnecessary and probably unfounded. Whatever.
  • + 4
 Whats funny is that it probably won't even be used for anything bike related #oregondeclaresbankruptcy
  • + 5
 Where's the pink bike poll on mountain bikers' political standings?
  • + 1
 Can I remind the author that most of us who ride bikes also own/insure a vehicle? I'm a little tired of the argument that cyclists need to share the costs of maintaining the roads - you truly mean cyclists need to pay to maintain the road twice...

"without any consideration for sharing the costs to maintain them"

@RichardCunningham
  • + 1
 My town or village whatever you want to call it, in the Chicago suburbs has a 9 % sales tax on everything. Most towns around me, and Chicago, the rate is 10 % or higher, some go up to 11 % sales tax. Lets add in 5 % income tax to the state, and the highest gas taxes in the nation. Don't get me started on my blisteringly high property taxes. Any wonder why people voted for the Trumpster?
  • + 4
 And as an added bonus, your state is damn near insolvent! How about that!
  • + 1
 The tax is BS, and so is this article. New trails are not built with taxes or leverage of said taxes. They are built by hard working people who likely *drove* to the trail. There are more trails in Oregon that one person can ride in a lifetime, and more are being built every day. Good luck out there.
  • + 3
 Always new taxes.... never more efficient use of existing taxes. I wonder what the total taxpayer bill is for all the politicians and their pensions....
  • + 1
 At first i was a bit angry. Taxing bikes?
I see your spin on the situation.
It gives people who ride to work or for recreation more leverage for advocacy.
My gas pays for these roads is innacurate as all tax monies go into the general coffiers .
The 15$ tax gives us legitamacy to share the road /trails.
  • + 1
 I am appalled to find this sentiment proliferated in a pinkbike article, "How often do we fly the "Share the Road" flag without any consideration for sharing the costs to maintain them?" And "that cyclists are finally raising money instead of awareness" This is the same kind of rhetoric screamed right after having a driver who's late for work drive down the bike lane "cause bikes don't pay for the roads, roads are for cars"

You should really do some research before you ignorantly pop off like that; and realize the transportation fund is paid for not only by automobiles and gas tax'/ but also by other taxpayer funding, which we are already paying into with our tax dollars, fedral funding, and efforts to NOT be part of the problem of traffic, emmisons, dangerous driving, parking etc. by using a humble and sustainable alternative, the bike.

Furthermore, your enphacis on directing tax dollars towards building mountain bike trails is illcontrived. If there is anywhere such levied funds should be spend it is clearly on making our state safer and more accessible for bicyclist; rather than building some (lame) public trails for the affluent mountain bikers to ride.

once again RC, your out of line.
  • + 4
 Share the road. Ou know because ALL roadies don't have cars or anything.
  • + 3
 I understand your thinking for sure but eaze up on RC, he does have a point. Here in Utah the general car driving public rake the biking community over the coals whenever funds are used to build bikes lanes, trails, ect. Even when a roadie gets plowed (which there has been several high profile deaths here) it always gets turned around that the cyclist shouldn't even be on the road because they don't pay a user tax for highway upkeep or something to that tune.

I hate taxes like everyone else but if this happens here, i'll be the first to shove it down drivers throats the fact that we indeed do pay our share.
There's ALOT more to this and I could write a novel on this subject but you get the point.
  • + 2
 @getsomesy this times a million!
  • + 2
 @bndrace: your utah general public are ill informed! Maybe have a read of this momentummag.com/free-rider-myth
  • + 2
 @app-uncture: LOL, tell me something I don't know!
I could also write a novel on all the a*sholes that gave me a hard time while on my road bike.

Thanks for the link.
  • + 1
 @bndrace: if it is for bike lanes and paved trails then make the roadies pay the tax. why the f*ck should i pay extra for a trail or DH bike so the roadies can have more access
  • + 1
 @wiscobiker: Because there's alot of us "cyclists" that do it all, I mt. bike, road ride & BMX race. Please don't try to split us all up and point fingers just because you don't ride road.
We are all on two wheels & should have each others backs......at least that's how I feel.
  • + 6
 Lets make a list guys! Correct or add as needed:

1. Mountain bikes, by definition, do not need maintained roads to ride, so this is irrelevant on pinkbike.
2. Drivers don't share the road very well anyways, so why does it matter?
3. Bikes aren't even allowed on highways.
4. How many people who commute on bikes ACTUALLY don't drive cars as well?
5. If anything, bicycles should have tax credits, not tax deductions. What tf kind of incentive is this shit?" ... like in what world is it reasonable to give a Tesla CAR a $7,500 tax CREDIT, when the switch from an electric car to no car is 2x that of switching from a gas car to an electric car, in tCO2e? (See link)

m.phys.org/news/2017-07-effective-individual-tackle-climate-discussed.html

Just looked into this ... there's gotta be a new federal tax credit that is similar to this older one:
www.irs.gov/irb/2009-30_IRB/ar07.html
  • + 0
 @bndrace: feel free to donate to road bike infrastructure then. i dont see why people who only mountain bike should be subjected to a tax that was designed to appease motorists that disapprove of road bikers not paying tax to maintain roads.
  • + 2
 @wiscobiker: Oh, you'll NEVER appease motorists. We could be taxed $$$ and the vehicle driving public would still bitch about cyclists.
Utah passed a law here a few years ago that a cyclist could go thru a red light if the light didn't change because it didn't pick up the bike. You would of thought they were cancelling Christmas or something, the uproar was a joke.
Seeing that I try to commute a few times a week to work, I don't have a problem with it.
  • + 3
 It isn't that big of deal but it seems silly to tax mountain bikes to build paved paths and bike lanes that mountain bikers will never ride.
  • + 1
 People are up in arms over a sales tax that amounts to .03% on a $5000 bike and goes towards improving cycling infrastructure? In BC we pay 5% federal Goods and Services Tax and it could and does go absolutely anywhere. That's with a an exemption of the 7% Provincial Sales Tax too, which many retailers charge anyway and pocket.

Cry me a river.
  • + 3
 And one state north in Washington sales tax is around 10% in some areas.
  • + 15
 Misused funding is very common in America, I think a lot of OR people have the right to be skeptical.
  • + 6
 But $15.00 USD that's like 5000 Canadian pesos
  • + 0
 @taquitos: ...and remind me again what the income tax is in Washington? I'd trade no sales tax for no income tax any day.
  • + 0
 @justincs: when you guys switch to pesos? I'm gonna start buying bikes in Canada now.
  • + 1
 @twd953: 0% Smile ... Regardless $15 isn't a lot. Although personally I think bikes are great for commuting and if anything that should be incentivized.
  • - 3
 @justincs: please know I'm being a smartass.
  • + 1
 I just rode in Oregon for the first time this last weekend, I live in Nevada, and honestly, I'd send in 15 bucks to ensure that the roads are maintained to get to the trails up there. That place is incredible. And if it makes the roads safer for folks roaming through town checking out the breweries and whatnot, I'm on board.
  • + 1
 This is such bullshit. I've had this argument used against me too by a former co-worker, "Well, you're using the road but not paying any taxes." Helllloooooo, I do have two vehicles, and have a job; therefore, I *have* paid my taxes to use those roads. Whether I'm behind the wheel or in the saddle, it doesn't matter.
  • + 5
 And it's begun......
Coming up next. "The Shoe Tax"
  • + 2
 @Morebike: Oregon is home to Nike. No way in hell are they are going to tax shoes around here.
  • + 5
 Money never goes where it's supposed to....
  • + 4
 I don't know if id be too happy to pay a tax to pave my favorite bike trail...
  • + 1
 Dude, in Canada I pay taxes for them to take down the bike trails I build. It's called a, "infinity circle A-f*ckshit" I.C.A.F. in legal documentation.
  • + 2
 I have mixed feelings about this, but one positive that I do see is that now that there is a bicycle tax bicyclist will have much more political leverage to shape new road projects in favor of bicycles.
  • + 6
 Good job commie fags
  • - 4
flag MmmBones (Jul 15, 2017 at 12:23) (Below Threshold)
 That's California, not Oregon
  • + 5
 @woodwerker California is communist. Oregon is socialist. It's a no win deal.
  • + 1
 @chezotron: nailed it! I'm all for the state of Jefferson breaking off!
  • + 2
 Eff that! Getting taxed twice for road use. Cyclist should get a tax break for not flooding the atmosphere with hundreds of pounds of co2. ill raise the bet. i dont want to pay taxes for schools. I dont have kids.
  • + 6
 Taxation is theft.
  • + 1
 E-bikes get taxed at 0.5% of their sale price which puts the break-even at $3000 with respect to bicycles. I bet that's gonna have some interesting unintended consequences once enough people figure it out.
  • + 4
 Piss on my head and tell me it's raining is all that's going on!
  • + 3
 Stupid idea, not surprised. I feel that the author is giving a reach-around to the idea of taxes.
  • + 2
 Not supporting or resisting the Oregon tax. The point was: It's going to happen. suggest two sides of the issue, and then discuss how the tax may be used to leverage something beneficial for off-road riders.
  • + 4
 Building your own bike is getting even cheaper!
  • + 3
 Good idea but just further drives people to buy online, hurting the local economy.
  • + 2
 Your right. Another nail in the local bike shop coffin.
  • + 3
 Or just sell the bike with 20" wheels and offer a free trade up to the proper wheels.
  • + 1
 lets not all forget this is a flat fee tax of $15. This is still significantly less than a sales tax we see in most states. crossing my fingers some of this cash is kicked down to help fund the local trail systems :-)
  • + 1
 This money will be reallocated to give the state legislators a big fat raise. It's hard work coming up with new ways to steel money out of peoples pockets and call it a tax.
  • + 0
 If the bicycle tax is actually used to improve bicycle paths, off-road trails etc I'm ok with it. Hell if my tax dollars actually did something useful for ME, I'm ok with them.
  • - 1
 Let's be honest, bikes over $200 are a luxury item. If your bicycle is purely for transportation you'll largely be unaffected by this tax unless you're too good for a Walmart bike. I love bicycling, I will happily admit that it's a ridiculously expensive hobby, which is why I primarily but used gear. If you can afford to spend more than $200 on a bike you can afford a $15 tax. Here in VA I'd be out significantly more than that for a middle of the road $2,500 bicycle with out current tax structure and I have no idea how those funds are used. If I knew that tax money went directly to better biking infrastructure in my local cities and towns, I'd be thrilled. Granted, I'd be happier if it went to trail work and land access, but if the local roads get safer for nerdy roadies, I'm ok with that, too.
  • + 2
 One plus: With E-bikes getting taxed at 50% hopefully there will be less of them
  • + 1
 And once again another pinbike thread has been an amazing piece of entertainment whilst unleashing the foulness from bowels. Good job everyone!
  • + 2
 $15 a bike, to cover the sales mans hourly minimum wage. taxes are hip. atleast, that's what their voting record says
  • + 3
 To pay for the new abortion law... what a mess the US is.
  • + 1
 Good thing I bought my new bike in PDX a month ago. Although even with the tax it's still way cheaper than buying a bike in WA or other surrounding state.
  • + 0
 More mountain bike trails with that tax money. Push it! E bikes should be taxed. 20 bucks not 15. If you make enough money to buy an E bike and are too lazy to climb then pay the extra tax! Liberals are the devil!!!
  • + 1
 If the tax bothers you that bad just buy a used bike private party. It's worked great for me so far. Nearly all my bike purchases have been used.
  • + 1
 I'm okay with this. I take pride in paying my taxes, not like the draft dodging commie a bunch of idiots elected this go-round.
  • + 5
 Not wanting to pay tax is "commie"? Interesting logic.
  • + 7
 Paying my taxes makes me angry. I just had to pay $500 in property taxes based on the value of a car that I bought 6 years ago, and paid sales tax on when I bought it. I take no pride in paying that, because if I didn't eventually I would end up in jail, and that's the only reason I pay them. There is no pride in being a victim of a glorified protection racket
  • - 1
 @vntim: then stay off the roads you don't want to pay for.

The taxation is theft crowd really has no F'in clue how much work is involved in making a society function.
  • + 1
 @schofell84: So inform us d!cks how much work is involved in making a society function! Do you work for the government?
  • - 2
 @rivercitycycles: I actually have before.

You cryasses claim your being raked over the coals then when your gubmint funded infrastructure and society has financial woes you blame it on gubmint, the people just trying to do their job.

How about you get the people that can afford lobbyists to pay their fair share of taxes?
  • + 7
 @schofell84: I had short contract position where I actually had to hold my nose and work for the Fed Government. I can tell you with absolute certainty. They actually try do nothing all day long. The only reason they even show up is to get their paycheck. Literally , I observed EPA employees and GSA employees sleeping under and at their desks. Meetings for nothing. Ice cream socials! Playing guitar for 3-4 staff for hiurs in their office. These were $200K a year attorneys at the EPA! Unfreaking believable. I cannot express how happy I was when that contract was up and I got the hell out of there.
Governement waste is far greater than I ever assumed it was. IMO 3/4 of every dollar spent at government level is wasted money with no return on the investment. The more we can reduce it's size the better.
  • + 5
 @schofell84: I have no problem paying for roads, and I do pay for them. It's a lot of the other stuff I have problems with. Not to mention the waste that exists in the government
  • - 3
 @chasejj: Glad your experience was as nice. I worked at a psychiatrist center where no one was paid enough, the facilities we're falling apart, and the community had to rally together to keep the place open.

But sure.


PS, sounds like you rode unicorns to work everyday too. (I call BS)
  • - 1
 If you are a serious cyclist in Oregon, you should be happy to spend $15 to better your riding experience. As for the rest of the bill it looks as though residents are more up in arms about the taxes as a whole - especially if they didn't pay many to start with.
  • + 8
 Misappropriation of tax funds is my biggest concern. Would love to see the money truly go towards what it will be ear marked for, but Oregon has had major budget issues for years running. Eliminating the kicker tax refund would be more effective, but political suicide
  • + 3
 Way to go Oregon!
  • + 3
 I want a huffy carnage!
  • + 2
 Tax? I buy individual bike components and assemble them into a bike.
  • + 1
 Buy online and ship to Oregon. make sure you buy from a free shipping website.
  • + 1
 They can still tax you that way.
  • + 2
 Two words. BLOW-ME! Fuckin' red tape machine.
  • + 1
 Because bixe are such a strain on transport infrastructure. Mountain bixe doubley so
  • + 1
 I wonder if online retailers will get around the tax seems like it will affect lbs the most
  • + 2
 And Oregon is a BLUE state!
  • - 1
 It's blue because of Eugene north along I5. I live an hour South and it's a different state!
  • + 1
 Sales will go down in Oregon and peeps will buy out of state or internet like a ton of folks do now.
  • + 2
 Please don't move here, do you even vote?
  • + 1
 Of course shes happy to sign the bill. Her pockets get lined with cash...
  • + 0
 I don't live in Oregon, but I'd be happy to pay $15 every 3-5 years to ensure good pathways throughout the city.
  • + 4
 "ensure"

That's the issue
  • + 2
 We need a FAT tax.
  • + 1
 Awe....pinkbook is growing it's roots ....
  • + 1
 5.3 billion? over how many years? I think you may have meant million.
  • + 1
 New wheel size 25.9 (tax free size)
  • + 1
 Hahahaha... hahahahahahah....wtf.
  • + 1
 its all over now
  • - 1
 Grow some balls and tax gas more. We all need a firm kick in the ass to use less of that crap
  • - 2
 The planet's dying, better tax 0 emmison transportation! (Not that it's actually that big of a deal, not a huge tax)
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