Patrol Releases Carbon Fiber Kids' Bike Range - Across the Pond Beaver

Sep 9, 2020
by James Smurthwaite  

Kids have it pretty good these days with their Facebooks, Fortnites and fidget spinners, but sometimes they aren't so lucky with their mountain bikes. If you buy the wrong one you can end up with a heavy frames, adult sized controls, poorly damped suspension and a temper tantrum every ride. One brand hoping to help kids swap screens for singletrack is Patrol with its new range of carbon fiber kids' bikes.


The Indonesian brand today announced two full-carbon hardtails aimed at kids with a load of features you'd generally expect to see on adults' bikes. The two hardtails are separated by wheelsize with a 20" version and a 24" version; both bikes have full internal cable routing, disc brakes and 2.6" wide tires from Vee. The bigger wheelsize does get an increase in travel though, jumping from 100mm to 120mm. The bikes are apparently intended for "all day fun" so there's also a water bottle mount inside the front triangle.
Details

Frame: Patrol carbon
Wheelsize: 20" & 24"
Travel: 20" - 100mm, 24" - 120mm
Routing: Internal
Price: $1,099 - $1,499
More info: patrolmountain.com


While not cheap for a child who will grow out of it in a few years, a carbon frame should bring the weight of the bike down and make it easier for a child to maneuver. We haven't been given exact weights of this frame but, given there are very few carbon kids' bikes around, we imagine they're among the lightest you can buy.

Range overview

Both wheelsizes have a base model and an 'S' model. The base models run 1x9 drivetrains RST Spex 20 or Snyper 24 forks and child specific bars stems and grips. Jumping up to the S model gets a Manitou Machete J-Unit fork and a 10 speed drivetrain.

Patrol C020/C024 frame highlights:

- Full carbon construction
- Internal cable routing
- Threaded BB
- Bottle cage bosses
- Designed for disc brakes
Patrol C020/C024 specification highlights:

- Manitou Machete J Unit suspension (S Build bikes)
- Easy to use, yet powerful disc brakes
- SRAM drivetrain
- Vee Tire Co. Crown Gem tires
- Child-specific bar, stem and grips

Patrol C020

Frame: PatrolL 020 carbon
Fork: RST Spex 20, 100mm travel
Read mech: SRAM X5, 9s
Shifter: SRAM X5
Chainset: SAMOX, 145mm, 32t
Cassette: 9s, 11-34t
Brakes: CLARKS Clout 1
Wheels: Alex Rims MD30 with Patrol hubs, 32h
Tires: VEE Crown Gem, 20×2.6
Price: $1099


Patrol C020 S

Frame: Patrol 020 carbon
Fork: Manitou Machete Junit, 100mm travel
Rear mech: SRAM GX, 10s
Shifter: SRAM GX
Chainset: SAMOX, 145mm, 32t
Cassette: 10s, 11-34t
Brakes: Clarks Clout 1
Wheels: Alex Rims MD30 with Patrol hubs, 32h
Tires: VEE Crown Gem, 20×2.6
Price: $1349

Patrol C024

Frame: Patrol 024 carbon
Fork: RST Snyper 24, 120mm travel
Rear mech: SRAM X5, 9s
Shifter: SRAM X5
Chainset: Samox, 155mm, 32t
Cassette: 9s, 11-34t
Brakes: Shimano MT200
Wheels: Alex rims MD30 with Patrol hubs, 32h
Tires: VEE Crown Gem, 24×2.6
Price: $1249

Patrol C024 S

Frame: Patrol 024 carbon
Fork: Manitou Machete Junit, 120mm travel
Rear mech: SRAM GX, 10s
Shifter: SRAM GX
Chainset: Samox, 155mm, 32t
Cassette: 10s, 11-34t
Brakes: Shimano MT200
Wheels: Alex rims MD30 with Patrol hubs, 32h
Tires: VEE Crown Gem, 24×2.6
Price: $1499






133 Comments

  • 52 0
 "lightweight" should be the the top focus of bike companies making kid's bikes IMO
  • 11 0
 Yep, have two Commencal Ramones 16" for my twins boys. They are solid bikes but not light at all. They are definitely pushing more weight around relative to their size.
  • 3 0
 If you don't live somewhere with shuttles/lifts for park laps. A ton of the young rippers all seem to ride park a majority of the time. I agree, though, if a kid is going to be doing much pedaling AT ALL, then weight should much more of a concern. Sadly, it hasn't been even for people making "trail" bikes for kids (I'm looking at you Specialized Rip Rock).
  • 6 0
 @Hogfly: The Rip Rock is such a POS. It should be marketed towards parents with kids who don't ride at all. The fork is useless as are the mechanical disc brakes. Heavy and the geometry is in the back-seat.
  • 6 1
 I remember buying our older son's first pedal bike. It was an 18" Trek with training wheels. He was coming off a Wishbone balance bike which was a very manageable weight for him. We started on the Trek without training wheels, but it was so heavy he would tip over before gaining enough momentum to stay upright. We had to regress and put the training wheels on. Total downer, because he was a rocket on the Wishbone.

The more I worked on that Trek, the bigger POS I found it to be. The hub bearings didn't spin anything close to freely, and the BMX-type crank kept coming loose. I took the crank apart and found the BB shell was out of round! To top it all off, the thing weighed more than my wife's hardtail stumpjumper.

I found a 20" Micro BMX race bike at a used bike shop and jumped on it. The kid became a rocket on the bike again. The next night, after hours, I abandoned that Trek on the doorstep of the bikeshop that sold it to me.
  • 3 0
 @twozerosix:

In hindsight, it's definitely a POS. That being said: it was my kid's first bike, and he ripped it. I was sold by the shop on the fat tires and the traction and cushion they'd provide. I am ashamed to say I convinced a bunch of other dads the bike was awesome as well.

Anyway, the options are much better now than they were then. Just glad my kid wasn't turned off totally by that bike and emerged to love riding.
  • 3 0
 Completely agree lightweight is the biggest factor. It bugs me a bit when parents complain about their kid’s $400 bike being too heavy for them. There are options out there like Early Rider, Prevelo, Trailcraft etc but you’ll have to pay for them. When it came down to it, you’re the one that bought the bike and carried the heavy thing out of the store!

My 3 yr old rides a heavy Commencal Ramones 16 and I’m ok with it. It has disc brakes (for safety) and he beats on it with little consequence. It’s what we can afford and we have a great time!
  • 1 0
 @derekr: you have a big three year old i just bought my 4.5 year old a Ramones.
  • 4 0
 @derekr: My kids ride the same bike. Somehow it's still no where near the heaviest. The Ramones weigh just over 17lb. Probably all in the crazy amount of spokes in each wheel.
  • 3 0
 I've been selling bikes on and off for 25 years and the most important feature is weight. I got a Pello 14" for my four year old and, while not the lightest, it's pretty good and real durable. I swapped the coaster hub for a freewheel and saved 500g.
I always tell people to buy their kid the lightest bike they can find.
And I agree, the Trek kids bikes are pretty lacking, although my daughter's Trek balance bike was light and rolled super smooth. Plus it was pink.
  • 1 0
 I ended up getting my kid an Orbea mx - the weight is fairly good overall. The big problem with kids bikes, and not just at the lower end of the price range, is the forks. Always cheap and heavy, and often a cheap coil damper that can't be adjusted for weight easily. I don't know about the rst here but I'd bet it is the same... I'd rather an alu frame that weighs more and a decent mix range air shock option (Reba or similar? ) as the total will be more balanced, have better control and be more appropriate to the child's weight. Make the head tube tapered so we have the option to upgrade if we want whilst you're there... There's very few non tapered forks out there.
Rant over!
(ps. I know nothing of the manitou fork here so may be off the mark with that particular fork!)
  • 2 0
 @Albe23: Same here. And Ramones 14 is even heavier!
For my older one I went this Summer with BMC Blast 20. The lightest reasonable priced mtb for kids. With modern geo. I'm really happy with it. The only less than perfect thing are tyres. Good for around the neighbourhood but skinny for the trails. It's written 2.4 but they are more like 2.0.
I'll go with Crown Gems 2.6 instead
  • 2 0
 Yes, but correctly sprung, correctly geared with ergonomically proportioned controls are equally or more important. Early Rider seem to have got the balance right IMO.
  • 1 0
 Yep, checkout the new Woom Off collection with kids' sized components, hydraulic brakes and a rigid carbon fork, weighing less than 8kg for a 20" bike. My 5 y.o. daugther's been ripping the trail centers all this year on it. Worth every penny.
  • 1 0
 @notphaedrus: Here in Ch they are very popular. However, the height of the top tube is just ridiculous
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: I think they solved the high top tube issue with the recent hellion models.
  • 2 0
 @Albe23: Same here. Got my boy a Ramones 20", mainly because of the cool looks. But I kinda regret it now. The weight is one thing. I ordered a lot of carbon parts form Aliexpress to shed some of it. But then there are the cranks that are 145mm long (for a 105-115cm kid) WAY too long. My boy almost hit the face with his knees when cruising along. And for almost a year he was not strong enough to use the gripshift. And then when I had to order a new drop out, it took a week or two until he was able to ride again. So bottom line: I'd much rather go for the BMC Blast today. IMO it's the best deal; cool looks, decent weight, good parts (hydraulic brakes) at an okay price. Or EarlyRider Seeker. There are even lighter bikes (Woom for example) but these come at a steeper price I am not willing to pay.
  • 1 0
 @handro: I think that Ramones 20 is way too big for a 105-115 cm hight. He would be much better off with 16" bike
  • 1 0
 @slimboyjim: yeah, its a shame that kids forks suck so much (functionally useless) until you spend over $800...
  • 2 0
 @handro: tiny hands trying to operate GripShit is the dumbest thing...
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: right, sorry. The bike is for 115-135cm. And cranks should be around 10% of body size... So still, Commencal seem to use the same cranks on all kids bikes. And for 20" bikes they are too long.
  • 3 0
 Lightweight and Ergonomically correct. Short cranks, short reach brakes, smaller diameter grips/bars, trigger shifters, narrow and short saddle (otherwise it gets in the way of standover), low Q-factor cranks/pedals, appropriate gearing, 1x, functional squish or no squish... It shouldn't be that hard for Trek or Spesh or Giant, but they get it OH SO WRONG...
  • 1 0
 @laksboy: How does the fork perform on an $800 adult bike? Kids bikes have all the same components at lower production numbers. Less materials, but that is just a fraction of the cost on these parts. They use heavy BMX parts so that we can walk out the door with a fully functioning bike for $300-400.
  • 2 0
 @handro: Idk about 20, but on Ramones 14 &16 were ok. However, it it could be also the height of the seat. My kids can barely touch the ground with their toes when seated
  • 3 0
 @derekr: How hard and more expensive is it for spesh/trek/giant to spec a lighter springrate in their heavy non-adjustable forks suitable for a 30-40lb kid? It should be $0. It's a spring. It shouldn't come stock with a spring that I can barely move at 170lbs... the fork on my kids 1k Trailcraft is excellent. Forks on more affordable kids bikes should at least function. Similar to those on 500 adult bikes.
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: Indeed. Just checked the website: 14&16 do have 114mm cranks, 20" come with 145mm cranks... I ordered some 114mm cranks in the big canton ;-) Now it looks MUCH more natural. My son's racing around all day with his friends rather than touring bigger distances. Hence the seat is a little lower.
  • 3 0
 @handro: bike-components.de has the 3min19sec 115mm crankset for 45 euros, with a 104mm bcd replacable chainring and a square taper bottom bracket included in the price. i bought that one for my daughter's bike so I could offer her a more decent gearing on the orbea mx.
that is the next thing that most kids bikes offered by large adult bike brands screw up: they either have cranks with chainrings that cannot be removed, or some odd 5 arm cranks for which you cannot source lower gearing (kona: 36 t front on the 20" shred, orbea: 34 t front on the 20" mx, both with an 11-32 t cassette).
  • 1 0
 @Hogfly: That's good to hear. My friend's kid ripped it right over a berm at WBP and broke his wrist. Not blaming the bike of course, he wasn't the best rider, but the bike completely didn't belong in the park.
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: The BMC Blast looks like a solid bike and the Geo looks spot on. Currently I'm trying to figure out what I want to do to lighten up the Commencals.
  • 1 0
 @handro: I went with Commencal because I caught a sale on the both of them. Which I'm now using to upgrade the bikes a bit. I might go the same route you did. I'm hoping I can find a shorter set of cranks. I live just down the road from Profile Racing so I might just call them up and see if there is anything that can be done. I believe they make 125mm which is the smallest I've been able to find from them at least. Looking for something closer to 95-100mm.
  • 1 0
 @Albe23: I've been successful in calling up Prevelo and getting them to sell me a pair of their cranks aftermarket. I think Spawn offers short cranks on their website too.
  • 1 0
 @laksboy: Awesome, thank you for the tips!
  • 2 0
 Totally agree. I have been slowly finding ways to drop weight on my kid's Park Cycle's 14. The handlebar/stem combo is a brick. the seat tube is thick steel. the rims are steel. So far just adressing the stem/bar combo and the seat tube is helping.

I've heard, but haven't verified that part of the problem is the testing for kids bikes requires the same strength as adult bikes. If I can jump on my 3.5 year old's bike without breaking it, then it is too heavy.
  • 1 0
 @Albe23: Stock tyres on Ramones are non folding and unbelievable heavy. My kid went through 3 rear tyres so I ordered from somewhere in Ch and recived folding models. Much lighter.
Crank and wheels are ali heavy. I mean, complete bike is overdone. I don't think you can do much if you don't spend 500 chf.
  • 1 0
 If I would try to lighten the Commencal, I would first change the wheels. Maybe Chinese carbon rims, Shimano hubs and folding tyres. Mechanical disc brakes are also an anchor. Some Shimano brakes and Ashima rotors would be a way to go. You can find light kid's specific cranks but they don't come cheap.
  • 24 0
 Pretty cool.. but kids weigh nothing. Can't someone just make a light plastic bike that doesn't cost and arm and a leg. Drives me crazy how affordable kids bikes use almost all the same components as bottom tier adult size components.

If we're told we have to pick two of strong / light / cheap.. shouldn't their be a light / cheap option.
  • 9 0
 Seems like a frame made out of the same material as the cheap composite pedals that I ride could be made!
  • 7 2
 Cmon, there are huge range of kids bike's on the market right now:

you can buy solid entry level for 200-300$

Also CF frame that bike park approved for 1000$ quite compatible price, especially if you have multiple kids - it will work up to 6 years and then could be ebay'ed for half of the price;

As for example I have 3 kids (with minimal delta ) - so all ski/bike gear cycle for 6 seasons and then sold out for happy new owner within like 1 day after posting of local marketplace
  • 8 0
 @nickmalysh: "solid" is right. my daughter is riding a Cannondale Cuju, which retails for $600 CAD, and is pushing 23 lbs. I know there are lots of other options out there, but pound for pound, kids are at a huge disadvantage. My 40lb kiddo has to push more that half her weight; would be like me riding an 85 lb bike.

You are certainly correct about resale though. You can get good money out of used kids bikes if they are taken care of.
  • 2 0
 @nickmalysh: Any bike for 200-300 that is solid is not available in my neck of the woods. Not enough are made.
  • 2 1
 At some point, 3D printing a bike frame for kids will be a viable option. Some of those resins are strong.
  • 23 0
 Awesome. Have my 6 y.o. on a Trailcraft hardtail and he loves it. Love to see development of more capable kids bikes that they can actually MTB on. My son is conquering singletrack that I wouldn't have hit until I was 12 years old and I credit him being on a lightweight hardtail with capable brakes, suspension and other components for that. He is already hooked! Smile
  • 2 0
 Yes, this is awesome!
  • 1 38
flag nismo325 (Sep 9, 2020 at 14:13) (Below Threshold)
 So your saying the only reason your kid is good at biking is due to you buying him an expensive bike? world class parenting right here lol not one mention of your kids skill or commitment
  • 13 0
 @nismo325: Mention of skill: "My son is conquering singletrack that I wouldn't have hit until I was 12 years old"
  • 7 0
 @nismo325: thats not what hes saying - dont be a douche
  • 3 0
 @nismo325: learn to read
  • 2 0
 @nismo325: no, he's crediting it to buying him a high quality bike, among other things. And not some trash bike by a big name producer like Spesh or Trek
  • 6 0
 haha to be clear CLEARLY my son is a highly capable rider, especially for his age. Given the topic of this article, my comment was to praise the benefits of a lightweight well-built mountain bike vs. what Trek / Spesh and others offer which are heavy, poorly spec'd bikes made for riding around town vs. descending singletrack.

I definitely appreciate that these bikes aren't cheap. I think all-in I put about $1,000 into my son's Trailcraft. But if that means he can go riding with me in the mountains it is $1,000 well-spent!
  • 16 0
 Everyone: Why?
Patrol: Weight.
Everyone: Four paragraphs + lists of specs and nowhere is weight listed... #fail
  • 1 0
 Yeah, I'm trying to compare them to Commencal's lineup for some sort of reference.
  • 3 0
 @Albe23: both have too long cranks for the wheel sizes. Otherwise both sweet bikes.
  • 4 0
 If there is no mention of the weight, it's probably too high for the price and more worthwhile to look elsewhere. The major manufacturers usually produce miserable kids bikes at premium prices. Good point regarding the crank length, I had the same thoughts.
These above seem to be no exception,typical me too products by an adult bike manufacturer.
If you want good kids bikes for urban use, there are quite a lot of dedicated producers in europe: early rider, islabike, kubikes, kania, woom.
And for mountain use, there's early rider who are offering a range of park rated bikes, and woom with their really well designed woom off range,which offer great value for money.

Commencal offers not too bad deals but their weight is generally too high, especially for the 12-16" range. But at least they mount usable brakes.
  • 12 0
 This is a joke right? Carbon frame to be light and then they spec the worst or the worst ULTRA heavy alex30 wheels with big tires lol??? I swear these people dont have kids that legit ride. We have these alex wheels btw...its insane how heavy they are. They are hanging on the wall.

Frame weight is secondary, it's literally all about rotational weight. If someone wants to make a nice light kids bike, throw Stans Crest mk3 on there and call it good. Trailcraft does that or Speedbikegear Wayne can ship you a custom set for 450$. Itd be nice if they were just stock by now.

We tested the Stans (with dhr/dhf) alongside the Alex wheels. INSANE difference on the trail. Kid hated the Alex wheels. Plus the Stans hold up just fine to heavy hits. My 8yro is sending 8ft drops and 14ft gaps off 7ft ramps and they arent out of true yet (32h and 1300g). Even with some deep send crashes.

Someday they will figure it out. It sucks having unnecessarily heavy components come stock.
  • 2 0
 4130 frame--carbon hoops! I like the looks of the carbon frame though--cleaner than the adult version in the background, and no pinstripes or busy paint. They should make an adult version with flex stays which change shape where tire clearance is needed....
  • 1 0
 The trailcraft rims are 20h, which makes them even lighter. If 28 or 32 holes are strong enough for a 29" rim, then why on earth do 99% of 20" rims have 32-36 holes? (Retorically speaking).
  • 1 0
 I built a set of 24" Spank Spoon 32h, used CK rear hub, Deore front, 14ga spokes. Roughly 1400 grams and bulletproof, came in under $400. Looked at the Stan's but a lot more money.
  • 2 0
 @laksboy: our orbea mx 20 team, which is supposed to be their lightweight premium option (because it has an aluminum fork) also came with 36 hole rims in the rear wheel. Probably to make sure that my 6 yo can huck to flat from the roof and keep rolling...
  • 12 1
 f*ck yeah! just what we need $6k kid's bikes! Woohoo, keep cheering for driving up the average cost of bikes across the board.
  • 3 2
 There’s been some good articles on PB in recent years about how the average price of bikes is actually decreasing with time.
  • 1 0
 @GPP2117: LINK?
  • 1 0
 @GPP2117: at what price point, what brand what country? not here.
  • 10 0
 Is this included in that $250k estimated cost to raise your kids to the age of 18, or is this extra?
  • 18 0
 $251,499
  • 2 3
 $250k only? Shit that's cheap. Just my wife going on maternity leave has hit our income by $75k for the year even with the $30k she gets for the year from the government.
  • 13 1
 @cueTIP: Well thanks for filling us in on your wifes income that no one asked about lol
  • 10 0
 The humble brag is strong with this one
  • 1 0
 @cueTIP: wait, your government pays maternity leave? In our country moms just have to leave the kids home while they work and hope nothing bad happens to them.
  • 1 0
 @cueTIP: That would almost certainly put you well above median income so its probably also low for you
  • 1 0
 @cueTIP: we get it, your wife makes bank
  • 1 0
 @LukeBurgie: that’s somewhat unique to the US. Paid maternity leave is definitely the norm across Canada, NZ, Australia and Europe.
  • 2 0
 @milesofpain: first time I’ve heard a nurse’s salary be called “making bank”
  • 10 0
 I dont think some of you realize how much people are willing to spend on bikes for their kids.
  • 10 0
 I'm those people. Also: the resale market has been very good, especially this year. The kid can ride the $@$& out of the bike for three years, and then the parents sell it for 20% less than they originally paid.

Flipside: I haven't had a new bike in six years.
  • 8 0
 built in life-long hobby buddies.
  • 4 0
 @twozerosix: yep, absolute no brainer assuming you've got the money to stump up in the first place and even more so if you have 2 or more kids that the bike can be passed down to.

I recently got my oldest the Canyon Neuron and from the very first ride he was miles faster on it after 5 years on a h/t.

A luxury item for sure but without doubt the best money I've spent this year.
  • 2 0
 @twozerosix: Same, once my kids are big enough for 20"+ bikes I know that is going to hurt the wallet. Currently their Commencal Ramones 16 are working out well enough. I spent more money on their pedals (Chromag Radars) than I ever have on myself....
  • 2 0
 @Albe23: the BEST kids pedals
  • 2 0
 @Albe23: My 9yo is liking the Kona Wah Wah in the smaller size. Price is right too.
  • 7 0
 Why can't kids bike come with half decent gearing on the back. 32fx34r is shit and they grovel on pretty much every climb. It's beyond me why the 34 cassette can't be swapped out for a 46 or so. Total game changer and the added cost would be so minimal. Can you imagine how much whinging there would be if adult bikes came out with a 32x34, yet we're big and strong and kids are tiny and lugging a bike that itself weighs a huge percentage of their bodyweight around.
  • 8 0
 The derailleur would probably hit the ground. I would prefer a smaller chainring: when is a kid going to need 32/11 as a top gear?
  • 7 0
 That 32 tooth chainring matched with 145mm cranks on the 20-inch bikes seems to be a serious oversight.
  • 1 0
 My boy is using 28 x 36 on his 24" and still needs a few breaks on the long climbs, he's in good shape too. Meanwhile I'm back there with 30x42. Kind of unfair. I guess it will make him stronger...? Agree that the 32t is too much in front.
  • 3 0
 @MaplePanda: I put a 36 cassette on my kids 20" bike and it was level with the rim so very close but it was never an issue.

But yes, a smaller front def makes a massive difference.

I got an 24" Islabike Creig and it's got a 48 on the rear so there is miles of room once you step up in size.

IMO the gearing is the most important thing on all bikes yet kids bikes miss the target nearly every time which is just plain dumb.
  • 1 0
 @fitztek: 145 cranks on a 20" wheeled bike. Pet Peave of mine... My 2 littles love their 20" Trailcraft and Prevelo and my 13 year old is gunning for my bike... Which means it's almost time for a new bike for old dad.
  • 1 0
 @Muzled: I've bought three Isla's, two of them new. Great, great bikes. Re-sold for nearly the original purchase price.
  • 3 0
 Agreed. Islabike beinn 20" is one of the few where you get a better than 1:1 ratio in the first gear. As you wrote, for most other brands, it's the other way round. 36 front, 32 back. What a joke. Most adult brand manufacturers don't seem to invest more than one single thought into the "design" of their kids hikes. They just produce overpriced and underspecd me too products. I have a whole quiver of konas for myself which I love, but their kids bikes are an insult. For my kids I'm super happy with Isla, early rider and woom. These also have excellent resale value. And the benefit to actually make the kids want to ride.
  • 1 0
 @Muzled: What about when you go off a jump or something and the derailleur flaps about? Or when there’s a rock close to the wheel? All sorts of things can happen.

Plus, a 36 tooth and a 46 like OP mentioned are significantly different.
  • 1 0
 @MaplePanda: Its a good way to teach kids what side to lean their bike against a wall, or how to lay it on the ground. Its also a good way for parents to develop good technique in re-straightening derailleur hangers.
  • 2 0
 @MaplePanda: late reply sorry maple - he rode that bike until he was 6 I think so wasn't doing any jumps at that stage.

I'm sure all sorts of things can happen, just saying that none of them did while he was on it and it was (miles) better than riding the shit gearing it came with.
  • 10 3
 Carbon fibre on a kids bike eh?
  • 2 0
 + paint color "Mimosa". This looks like a bike for very small adults.
  • 6 0
 Talks about weight, does not list weight. Also, those Vee tires are nice, but hhhheeeaaavvvyyyy.
  • 2 0
 My kids have never had super expensive bikes. They are pretty good bikes, better than I had at their age, but I have avoided suspension as much as I was able and only one of them has disc brakes. That being said, they never throw tantrums. I don't know if they are just better than other people's children, or what, But they don't do that stuff. They didn't do it in stores when they were little either.
My kids deserve the incredible bikes, but all I got was a broke dad so they will just have to keep shredding on what I can afford until they get jobs. I will say, bang for buck, rallies tokul 24 is a pretty killer bike. I pulled the fork off and put on a Manitou SXE with an a lighter elastomer and a lighter oil to shave off some weight and improve performance, but other than that the bike was plenty for a 10-year-old right out of the box. I think I paid $400
  • 2 0
 I think most of the topics have been covered, but my take as a bike dad...

Carbon is fine, if it is actually doing something. Is it actually lighter, or engineered for better vertical compliance and lateral stiffness? No mention of either, so unlikely. And has been mentioned by several others, component weight seems to make a bigger difference on a kid's bike than the frame.

Then you get to the component spec. The cranks are too long and the gearing on the 24" is crap. I mean, who doesn't want to drop $1100+ on a bike just to immediately start parts swapping so their kiddo can climb a fire road without a hike-a-bike? I guess you can at least commend them for good forks and hydraulic brakes?

Also, the renderings are hot garbage. Not only are they not well executed, they are shown with the incorrect components.
  • 2 0
 My 5 and 3 year old love getting out on singletrack and I fully credit that to really light weight bikes that we started them on. This price point seems spot on compared to high end aluminum kids bikes. Fantastic.
  • 1 0
 Honestly - that is awesome news, As for the article please include weight, since for the kids bike weigh super critical comparing to adults, especially when we are talking about 5-8 y/o ( 20' size )

So fat Early Rider rocks the Market with light weight bikes, however it is hardly available in NA
  • 1 0
 Do these kid's frames have to pass standard CEN and EFBE tests to be allowed to sell? I would hope that they would be allowed to pass different standards that are specifically set for lighter weight riders. Otherwise there's a lot of lost potential in basically having to overbuild the frames for test standards set for an adult rider.
  • 2 0
 My 10 year old just inherited his mom's old Tallboy. I could barely keep up with him climbing on a 30+ pound hardtail, now I just hope a bear doesn't eat him before I catch up. Kids bike components are a complete joke.
  • 4 0
 Check out Woom off air us.woombikes.com/products/offair4
Sub-20 lbs and much less expensive
  • 1 0
 So while we’re on the topic of the big S and Trek kid bikes being POS, whiteout doing a crap ton of research why is a good 20in kids bike between 5-700$ that would be recommended. She’s 6, is already riding on dirt and has been riding consistently for about 3 years now. We don’t live in a mountain region. Let’s hear your suggestions.
  • 1 0
 Rocky Mountain vertex 20 (a bit heavy) or Woom Off Air 4 (awesome and super light but a bit over your budget).
  • 1 0
 Nit sure about brand availability at your location. Over here I Europe, I'd suggest as follows:
Lightweight without suspension but still for off road use:
- woom off 4: 699 eur
- early rider seeker 20: 600 eur
- also interesting: kubikes, kania bikes, islabikes

Lightweight with suspension:
- woom off air 4: 899 eur
- early rider hellion 20: 1200 eur

Not that lightweight with or without suspension : commencal Ramones, orbea mx
  • 1 0
 Scour the country for a Isla Beinn 20". Swap the hybrid tires for Specialized 20"x2.1". Portland tends to have a bunch since the HQ used to be there. Offer to pay shipping costs.

portland.craigslist.org/mlt/bik/d/portland-islabike-beinn-20/7190997910.html
  • 3 0
 @jfyfe: I bought the vertex 20.

But I went kinda crazy

Had spawn tubeless ready rims laced to stock hubs and then added spawn tubeless tires.

Then added spawn cranks to reduce crank arm length.

Then added dropper post. But that was for me as I got tired of raising and lowering seat 10 times a ride.

Bike and more importantly fork and other components has survived 2 years .

The two most important changes were tires and crank length.

Year after they come with bigger tires.
  • 1 0
 The biggest issue I have with off the shelve kids bikes, is their old fashion steep geo en 3 x drive trains. Good geo gives them confidence and a 1x leaves more attention for the trail. That's where the industry should look at. Whyte bikes is doing quite well in that regard.
  • 4 0
 Bet ya kids on these bikes will have really nice teeth.
  • 1 0
 Eh... so kids have short legs right? Generally it's hard for them to... stand over their bikes. On these frames the top tube arcs upwards. Yeah. That's just... I don't even know.
  • 2 2
 Nice bikes, but way more than any kid needs for riding around. Parent's need quality, affordable bikes for the kids. Quality bikes can be made for less than 1,000 bucks... Manufacturers should aim at 200 - 400 price range.
  • 1 0
 Who said 1st world problems. Easy to make a light strong Jr bike in alu or steel. Metal also hold it value better when the kid outgrown the bike after 7 months..
  • 1 0
 My son has a steel Cotic Bfe in XS. Rides like he stole it. Resulting in a lot of scratches. Just wonder how a carbon frame would hold..............
  • 1 0
 Cue the “when I was a kid we hand carved our bikes from felled trees and used round rocks for wheels” comments
  • 3 1
 Finally a bike for the sons and daughters of dentists.
  • 6 4
 Ok cool... But, why?
  • 5 0
 why not?
  • 7 1
 Aluminium kids bike have too much rear triangle flex.
  • 3 0
 The article mentions weight. I think that’s the differentiating factor. Imagine riding a bike that weighs half your body weight or more on singletrack. They’re expensive and the market will tell them if making a carbon kids bike was worth it. I’m interested to see if this general segment of performance kids bikes continues to catch on.
  • 1 0
 Because Yeti doesn't make them!
  • 4 1
 @Loche: what kind of kid rides a bike and says
"Too much flex in the back, unrideable"
  • 1 0
 @Loche: I would have thought a smaller triangle would have less flex
  • 1 0
 @Bikerdude137: you'd be surprised
  • 1 0
 @nordland071285: that scares me... how hard do these 6 year olds shred?
  • 1 0
 @Bikerdude137: no, it's just some kids perception after they hear its flexy from another kid with more expensive bike who feels the need to brag
  • 1 0
 @nordland071285: ah, but i feel like 5-7 year olds don't brag that much
  • 2 0
 asdf
  • 1 0
 This!
  • 1 0
 Absolutely worth it as resale is high as well. See Spawn
  • 2 0
 Spawn is nice specs but they are pretty heavy. The woom in 20" variety is close to three pounds lighter then the 20" spawn.

Too bad the patrol press release that says the frame should be lighter but they have zero full build weights.

Looks like i will get a woom or a spawn for my daughter this spring.
  • 1 0
 I love it how many adults this bike would be an upgrade for...
  • 1 0
 For children of Dentists only presumably...
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Honzo
  • 2 2
 Negative Ghost rider...
  • 5 7
 Sigh...

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.025471
Mobile Version of Website