Pedals, Hubs and More - Interbike 2015

Sep 18, 2015
by Mike Levy  
Interbike 2015
  We've shown you VP's range of VX clipless pedals before, but the company better known for their platform offerings has since tweaked the design for better performance. They'll still be compatible with SPD cleats, meaning that you won't ever have trouble tracking down cleats when the time comes, but VP has tinkered with the binding mechanism itself. The result is a higher release tension on the far end of the scale that hasn't effected the softest setting, as well as lighter entry action that should make it easier to clip in. Internally, they spin on two sealed bearings and two LSL (Lightweight Self Lubing) bushings, and VP also sell all of the internal bits separately.


Interbike 2015
  True Precision's Stealth mountain bike hub boasts what is essentially instantaneous engagement yet has basically zero freehub drag due to a one-way roller bearing clutch, something that also makes for a silent ride when you're coasting (hence the Stealth name). True Precision has updated the design to include better sealing all around, with a new seal between the freehub body and the hub shell, as well as an aluminum dust cap that protects the new sealed bearings (which replace needle bearings in the older design) in the freehub body.



Interbike 2015
  This push bike from Kiddimoto is almost cool enough to make me want a kid of my own. Almost, but not quite. MotoGP fans will recognize the #93 as Marc Marquez's digits, and Kiddimoto even offers an all red version with Ducati-esque lines that's a pint-sized model of World Superbike legend Carl Fogarty's ride.



Interbike 2015
  I'm probably more of a sucker for dog toys than my dog is, which is why Cycle Dog's Flat Tire Flyer had me more interested in a frisbee than would usually be considered normal. Cycle Dog reclaims used tubes (get the frisbee's name?) and turns them into dog toys like this frisbee, balls and chew toys, and they even make about a thousand different coloured leashes and collars out of the discarded rubber from flat tires.



Interbike 2015
  Kore's 40 and 42 tooth Mega Range cogs will extend the gearing range of either SRAM or Shimano ten-speed drivetrains by slipping onto the freehub body before you side the rest of your cassette on, sans 15 or 17 tooth cog. The CNC'd chain rings are available in black, blue, green, purple, red, orange and silver, and the 42 tooth versions weighs 81 grams. Kore also includes a longer B-tension screw in the kit that's required for pulley clearance.



Interbike 2015
  There are a load of different narrow / wide chain rings to pick from, most of which are pretty much the same thing, but Kore's Stronghold chain ring is actually quite different: tiny bumps have been machined into the tops of the teeth that are said to actively hold the chain from bouncing off vertically. The shape releases the chain as the ring rotates, though, thereby not causing any chain suck. The Stronghold chain rings are available in 30, 32, 34 and 36 tooth sizes, and in all of the common mounting options.



82 Comments

  • + 44
 I wanna try out that norrow wide chainring. I like when a company pays attention to detail
  • + 16
 whatever happened to the FSA skil saw blade? I thought that was going to go places (besides into my calf muscle).
  • + 43
 If those hubs arent as loud as a motley crue concert they arent worth buying
  • - 3
 The Wolf Tooth N-W chainring I had wore out, and when worn, it looked like that Kore. It had grooves that DEFINITELY led to chainsuck - nothing got caught, but under tension, every damn chain roller that released from every tooth made a noise. I would be impressed if the Kore, with a little wear, somehow managed to avoid chainsuck/noise like I was experiencing. It was REALLY annoying on my Wolf Tooth (though their rings, when not worn, work great for sure).
  • + 1
 FSA's hook tooth N/W ring is available to buy
  • + 1
 Just remember not to mix it with Flat Tire Flayer Wink
  • + 2
 Renthal's rings have been doing the same thing forever
  • + 1
 And the SRAM rings, they are actually very detailed.
  • + 3
 Stainless steel narrow wide chain rings, why is no one doing them, wearing out any of those alloy ones far to quick.
  • + 2
 Stainless would be lovely, 400 grade probably (like cutlery)
For the same kind of weight they can be heavilly machined out.
At the end of the day it doesn't look as bling (unless its the 80s...), and is tougher on tooling
  • + 1
 Bla bla bla... it's just like this one really
www.hopetech.com/product/retainer-ring
  • + 16
 I came for the pedals...where are the pedals...?
  • + 7
 Came for pedals as well, maybe a typo for pedal-bike
  • + 6
 unless I'm missing the sarcasm train, refer to the first photo
  • + 12
 yes, sarcasm...1 clip'd pedal doesn't really do it for me....
  • + 4
 For pedals, check out The Gravity Cartel. Checked the block for me. Not a huge selection but it's still a good pedal.
  • + 2
 Roger that.
  • + 4
 That was one pedal. The title says PedalS
  • + 2
 Does the cleat look more outboard to anyone else? Maybe absence of the outboard 15 mm retension makes it look further out.
  • + 2
 Digging that pedal for some reason. I thought there was a version on yesterday's bike check. Nino's bike I think
  • + 0
 Pedals. They said pedalS. ped...ALSSSSSSSSSSSS see those s's... that means multiple or plural or more than one pedal... unless they are legal douche and can say that you have to have 2 pdeals to make a set. I came for hopefully a few flats and a few clipped
  • + 1
 Tfreemam I was commenting on the photo which shows one pedal. Are you the type of person who calls a fork forks, lighten up dude.
  • + 2
 TFreeman
  • + 1
 Like a wise man once said, "if there is a fork in the road take it!"
  • + 15
 I prefer loud hubs for all ears to hear. Yes, bears and hikers they look every time.
  • + 1
 I like silent hubs, but on crowded trails, it's definitely nice to not have to announce my presence, and have my hub be the signal that lets hikers know to step off the trail. Just choose your freehub grease wisely.
  • + 7
 I like it quiet. I like just the sound of suspension and tires. If I need to make sure people hear me coming, I'll yell something out. I'd never rely on my freehub to be loud enough. And if it were...what if I'm the one missing out on warning calls?
  • + 3
 In my exp. Noisy hubs make naff all difference in England all walkers are ignorant c@#ts who won't move 1 inch and if they do its the wrong way and only when you have come to a complete stop. Sheep are considerably more considerate and intelligent. But insist on running in front of you for half a mile before realising if they turned off the path that they wouldn't have to run
  • + 1
 @fr3er1d3r cant agree more especially when you drive into tacky berms
  • + 1
 I also feel like a high performing part doesn't need to be loud. In fact, that a stealthy and quiet part is more tamed and controlled than something really loud is a sign of something better built. But I know that's not true for everything but if it's a mechanical thing...I feel that the really loud one is cheaper to the quiet one.

I put thick dabbles of very thick/tacky grease in my freehub and ratchet ring to achieve silence. Lasts a few weeks or so depending on how often it's ridden. Sometimes you can tweak the spring ring that applies pressure to the pawls to loosen up by taking it out and carefully bending it, opening it up. That makes the biggest difference of all adjustments or grease. But you might risk losing too much tension and the pawls not ratcheting quickly/accurately/powerfully enough and risk stripping something overtime. But you can usually tell pretty quick.
  • + 11
 This years Interbike is a yawner. Between Sea Otter, press camps and Eurobike theres not much that is not already known. Good thing its stopped raining where I live because I can go ride my bike now.
  • + 8
 ya there is NO new wheel size.......what a bore.
  • + 15
 You don't ride in the rain?
  • + 1
 Torrential rains. I'm not made of sugar, but that amount of water will find its way into everything. Not really feeling the overhaul so I took a pass for a few days.
  • + 4
 I just built a set of true precision hubs to derby dh rims. I'll tell you these hubs are the best hubs I've ever used and I think I've tried all the big names. The silent coasting is absolutely a new and welcome experience on the trail and machining is brilliant. I really can't say enough about them!
  • + 1
 Bummer about the tire though
  • + 8
 New as in something Shimano did in the 90's? Shit, I'm turning into deeight again....
  • + 2
 Cool , can you notice less drag at all ?
  • + 1
 You give your hubs to a really good mechanic and you'd notice less drag. You buy new hubs vs the beaten Shits we all rise on, you'd notice the difference. It could be a bit biased hahaha
  • + 4
 Love the idea for the cycle dog Frisbees....however they are terrible. Ours fell apart in about 4 days, and my dog doesn't even chew on them, just fetch and drop. Their collars are sweet though.
  • + 4
 Anyone have any comparison between the stealth mtb hub and the onyx hub? I'd like to try a hub that uses that design but I'm not sure which company is most worthy of my money
  • + 5
 I'm wondering the same thing. From what I've heard, Onyx is the way to go. The sprag clutch is apparently better than the rollerball system. Also, onyx'z come with ceramic bearings right out of the box.
  • + 3
 I raced a Stealth hub a few years back in BMX. It was heavy but great engagement. I'd recommend them again.
  • + 2
 Havent tried the new Stealth hubs, but my Onyx is spinning great. I wonder what the weight difference us though
  • + 2
 I wonder the same. I'll try and find out in a bit. I know an onyx is like 445g. Which is heavy, but even though it's going on my XC bike, I want that engagement more than the 200g it adds to my bike
  • + 3
 I don't know how the Stealth hubs are but I have experience with using Onyx hubs. I run them on all three of my bikes, front and rear, and they are fantastic. The ceramic bearings will roll forever and the seals are great for keeping everything out. I've put these hubs through their paces, riding in everything from hot and dusty to cold and wet, and riding DH, all mountain and DJ. Never once have I given any of them a bit of loving maintenance. The weight of the hubs might sound heavy but you don't notice it as its at the centre of all the rotational weight on the wheels. Once you try the instant engagement, it will blow everything else out of the water.
  • + 2
 Quote from: www.trueprecisioncomponents.com/tpc-products/pro-rear-hub

"The engagement system on Stealth hubs is the fastest on the market. This translates into zero lost motion when starting to pedal."

I've raced them and I've never been able to feel a gap if there was one. Again, that was in the BMX day's. But I never had issues. Plus there is a really cool hummmmmm when costing.
  • + 1
 Stealth Hubs are best on the market hands down....so much less drag than a regular hub...best thing Ive ever put on my bike
  • + 1
 hi guys and gals does anyone have any links of the reviews of the new hope dh rim by any chance as im building a wheelset and debating wether or not to stick with the mavic 721 rim or go for the new nope ones which are out in around a months time. thanks
  • + 4
 i like the sound of those true precision hubs. if you'll pardon the pun. i want some.
  • + 1
 Hey guys, I have a question: If I have a 9-36 cassette, and I want to convert to 1x, is it possible to put one of these 42 tooth extended range cogs without messing up the derailleur? (I have shimano xt, 3x)
  • + 18
 where did you get a shimano 9-36 cassette?
  • + 6
 Ha...the moment where people answer a question with another question...priceless
  • + 4
 Oh wait sorry it's an 11-36.
  • + 4
 As long as you have an XT or better cassette, and a derailer with a clutch, you're in business.
  • + 0
 You can use an SLX cassette too--just need a hacksaw.
  • + 4
 I feel like the narrow/wide and expander cog ship has sailed.
  • + 4
 Yeah, I'm thinking at this point, with the price of Shimano 11 speed, might be better just to switch to 1x11 and keep the ratio's.
  • + 2
 What is Shimano doing with their new stuff to keep the chain on? Or are they doing nothing, and telling us to run guides again?
  • + 2
 That's exactly what I was weighting on this week. 75$ for a cog or 400-550$ for a 11speed setup. While the extra range would be nice, I still went with the cog. Not worth it unless every part of your drive train is on the way out.
  • + 1
 I honestly don't see why you wouldn't run a small chain guide. Less than 100g on a 30lb bike to bullet proof your drivetrain.
  • + 2
 Been running a NW + clutch derailleur for what, 2 years now? I can't remember dropping a chain once even on heavy duty DH tracks. If I raced maybe I would put one on for extra safety but otherwise I really don't see the point anymore.
  • + 1
 @plc07

That's what people say, but my experience was much different.

I dropped 1-2 chains per ride. I dropped chains riding rush in coner canyon for christs sake on the most bermed and smooth trail in that canyon.

If i went and rode the south side of suncrest where its rocky I'd drop them even more. Granted, this was on a 4" travel 29er xc bike.

I feel like very rough trails for long periods of time are what drops chains. I never dropped one in park city, but i dropped them in corner all the time and when i was blasting down gravel roads. I went back to 2x10 and went back to having a much more reliable setup. God forbid my bike weighed 380g more (i weighed)

I also killed 2 derailleur clutches and 3 nw chainrings per season. If i used a chainguide i could use them for longer and just use 1 of each per season.

1x10/expander cogs were a bandaid to fixing price gauging by srams 1x11.

Now prices are down, availability is up there really is no reason to not get an 11 speed setup. An xt casette with an expander cog is 2/3rds the cost of just nutting up and going 11 speed now you dont even need an xd driver.

The reliablity and lack of tinkering required is worth the price difference alone. Once you've owned an 11 speed i dont think an expander cog even becomes a thought.

Where all my arguments fail, is for lift serviced dh rides, wich you dont even need an expander cog for.
  • + 1
 @UtahBikeMike

I too have dropped plenty of chains with a narrow wide....though usually it was while attempting to pedal through rough terrain...or using a long cage dérailleur...or improper chain length.

Cost for 11 spd stuff is definitely down...but a normal old 10 spd 11-36 is usually plenty. so I personally just buy cheap 10 spd cassettes and live with it--though I'm still relatively young and not too heavy.

your mileage may vary.
  • + 1
 There was one occurrence where I dropped chains like mad on soft trails and I later found out it was because my derailleur and its hanger were bent to shit, once I replaced those it never happened again. I'm a big fan of rough trails and honestly, the idea of dropping a chain never crosses my mind. I'm not saying I don't believe you but with my experience, I have a hard time seeing how one could drop a chain with a proper setup.

I also suspect chain length has a lot to do with it. I don't set it up how sram/shimano tells, I just compress the suspension, completely extend the derailleur and then add a link and call it a day, so it is pretty much always at the bare minimum. Never had an issue. For both shimano and Sram, you can adjust the tightness of the clutch. I can't say for shimano but I know that the sram ones tend to come loose over time, you might want to check that out.

Always had a lot of problems with chain guides/tensioners and I'm really glad they're gone. For the record, I've been using a wolftooth ring paired up with X9 derailleurs.

And yes, if you buy a complete drivetrain, might as well pony up the little extra for 11 speed. If you have a 10speed setup that is fine and you just want a little more range, getting a cog is much much cheaper than changing your entire drivetrain.
  • + 1
 Thanks, but I know how to setup and maintain a bike.

I tried everything from 2 links too short, to 2 links too long.

Sram clutches use the t55 to tighten (or large allen trick) and shimano clutches use a small 8ish mm bolt under the clutched cover. New shimano is suppose to be adjustable externally but I've never used one of those.

Once my narrow wide had 300 miles on it, it might have well been just a normal SS chainring for all intents and purposes.
  • + 1
 Maybe your riding conditions eat through your components really fast because I have 3 chainrings with about 150 miles each and they all barely show any wear.
  • + 2
 cool...it seems really weird though that you would drop a chain on rush trail with a narrow wide, proper chain length, chain line and functioning clutch dérailleur. dunno...
  • + 1
 Been running a (OneUp) expanded 1x10 all season on my Pivot Firebird with Zee clutch mech, XT cassette, and Blackspire N/W. It's been literally perfect. Not one dropped chain, and factory perfect shifting. I use the Firebird as my "DH" bike so it's seen everything from 2-3 secs of airtime to boulder gardens at DH speed. Even some trails that turned out to not actually be trails (mis-read the map).

I've said it over and over again, (at least in the case of OneUp's parts) expanded 1x10, if tuned correctly, is as good as factory parts.

That said, I agree with just going to XT 1x11. Had the 11-42 cassette been available ANYWHERE at build time, I would have gone that route no question.
  • + 4
 Is the True Precision's Stealth mountain bike hub boost compatible?
  • + 1
 I like silent rear hubs but at $425 US for the Stealth mtb rear hub I'll keep running my shimano XT ones.
  • + 3
 Well and st Swiss 350s are cheaper and near silent as well.
  • + 1
 Once you try Stealth hubs you will never go back. By far the best hub i've ever owned!!!
  • + 1
 I might get a stealth I had a machine tech hub before, the silent coast is nice
  • + 1
 $425 for a 496g hub. Guess I'll live with a little noise.
  • + 1
 guess so
  • + 1
 Wow that pedal looks identical to shimano trail SPD pedals. Hah
  • + 1
 That kiddimoto is a trap for your trail time.
  • - 1
 just seen the price though. ouch. just a touch out of my price range for one hub!
  • - 1
 That push bike is worthless, your kid will not learn much on it. High seat, no inflatable tyres, no support for feet.
  • - 1
 Nice hub, but I like the ruckus of CK and Hope.

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