Performance to Close All Remaining Stores, Over 95 ASE Employees Laid Off

Feb 8, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  


States where Performance Bicycle stores are located.

All of Performance Bicycle's brick-and-mortar stores are expected to close over the course of the next few weeks, the result of the Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings involving Advanced Sports Enterprises (ASE). ASE was the owner of Performance and Bike Nashbar, and was also the parent company of Fuji, Kestrel, SE, Breezer Bikes and Tuesday Cycle. Performance was the largest bicycle retailer in the United States, with over 100 locations spread across the country.

According to Bicycle Retailer, the store closings were also accompanied by at least 95 layoffs at ASE's office in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ASE's assets were purchased in early February by a group of four companies called the Tiger Group for a reported $23 million.

BikeCo, which is the name given to the company created by Adcanced Holdings Co, a private equity group from Hong Kong, and Tiger Capital Group, a high-profile business liquidator, are in the process of purchasing ASE's wholesale business, along with the Fuji, Kester, Breezer, and SE trademarks.

Amain.com Inc purchased the Performance and Nashbar trademarks and web domains for $1.245 million, and is planning to continue operating the online portion of those businesses.

K&B Investment Corporation, the fourth company in the Tiger Group, is a real estate investment firm that has ties to J&B Importers, the Miami-based bike and component distributor.


136 Comments

  • + 117
 The LBS will be a repair shop. A superior mechanic will always be in demand.
  • + 97
 I don't know that I would consider performance an LBS, they sold bikes that were a step up from Target or Wallmart and had teenagers as Sr. mechanics. I think this is good for the cycling community. People who would have normally shopped at a place like this will be forced to do some research and go to a real LBS in their city.
  • + 34
 Well... In may last year I was kicked from the store where I worked 10 years, and replaced by a venezuelan guy who don't know how to lacing a wheel... So the "superior mechanic who will always be on demand" built his own workshop on his home's livingroom...
  • + 5
 @Fenrisvarg: bingo, more money to himself that the shops will pay him hourly.
  • - 125
flag MrDiamondDave (Feb 8, 2019 at 13:16) (Below Threshold)
 @Fenrisvarg: I bet his grammar is better though.......
  • + 18
 @Fenrisvarg: Perfect, sounds like you are on the right track! My favorite shop in town started out similar to you although he was in a garage in a back alley. He was everyone's favorite mechanic at the local "bro" shop in town and now he has his own thriving business with a very loyal customer base. We have many options in town and I will only bring my bikes to one of them, Alley Cat is the sh*t!
  • + 105
 @MrDiamondDave: The dude is from Chile... how your Spanish grammar?!
  • - 61
flag ElVenezuelan (Feb 8, 2019 at 15:46) (Below Threshold)
 @Fenrisvarg: Well!!! Nobody get's kicked from their job, maybe fired!!! After 10 years working for a shop and the Chilean guy get's fired from his job for "nothing" Huh? You most be one hell of a worker to be replace by a venezuelan that don't know "how to lacing a wheel".

I find it funny that you make a point to call where the guy that replace you comes from being an immigrant yourself. If you don't like being replace by people from another country maybe you should go back to Chile bro!
  • - 51
flag MrDiamondDave (Feb 8, 2019 at 15:50) (Below Threshold)
 @millsr4: LMFAO
  • + 51
 @MrDiamondDave: I say this as a proud American, English speaking, anti-liberal white male... you are an absolute ass hat amigo.
  • - 4
flag streetkvnt-kvlt (Feb 8, 2019 at 15:56) (Below Threshold)
 @ElVenezuelan: He is in Chile. But hey I can empathize with you on that one.
  • - 7
flag ElVenezuelan (Feb 8, 2019 at 16:08) (Below Threshold)
 @streetkvnt-kvlt: Ahh I get it now!! I didn't realize he "was" in Chile. I understand why the Xenophobia now, Unfortunately more than 3 million venezuelan's have migrated in the last 5 years due to the insane situation there.
  • + 9
 @jgreermalkin: Don't throw too much judgement just based on age. I wanted to be a bike mechanic in HS so I began in 8th grade by shadowing the guys in the shop a few hours each week, building new bikes, for no pay. Worked there all through high school and by the time I was 17 or 18 I was the senior mechanic. I had 4+ years of wrenching experience. I laced wheels, rebuilt shocks, replaced fork seals, bled brakes, blah blah blah. Granted that was a long time ago and I doubt I could lace a wheel these days.
  • + 24
 @Fenrisvarg: THEY TOOK ER JERBS!!!
  • + 2
 @jgreermalkin: I def see that but would throw this out there - I’ll take the mechanic that just plain does the job and is humble about learning. I’ve had high schoolers jack up my bike but also seen plenty of ‘seasoned’ mechanics that are just plain wrong.
In basic training the drill sergeants used to tell us that women often make better shooters. Why? Because all the men that came through ‘knew how to shoot.’ The women knew they didn’t and therefore took instruction. (Ft Jackson - POG, I know, I know...)
  • + 2
 @Fenrisvarg: not everyone wants a carbon steed to crush the KOM. Id say the vast majority of bike sales are in performance bikes target demo. mid somethings tired of being tired and want to start riding. Their second bike, if they make it that far would be from a real LBS. Its sad to see the brick and mortors going away in all retail industries..
People that shopped here will most likely go to wally and target now
  • - 10
flag MrDiamondDave (Feb 8, 2019 at 19:23) (Below Threshold)
 @dtm1: so serious!
  • + 1
 @jgreermalkin:

Really? The ones I have been in had some low end bikes, but also had $3000-$5000 bikes, Zipp wheels, other carbon wheels and high end parts.
  • + 1
 Some will never need a repair shop and prefer to not go thru a middle man. The business model is changing and the industry needs to change with it. The rise of direct brands is proof regardless of how some want otherwise.
  • + 3
 It would be tough for anything more than a one-man-operation to make it as a service only shop.
  • + 5
 A superior mechanic can dodge a wrench
  • + 3
 @jgreermalkin: Agreed. If bikes shops have to close I'd rather it be the big chains before any LBS that plays a role in the local community. Hopefully everyone who got laid off finds new work soon.
  • + 1
 @lccomz: Tough but not impossible, the shop I mentioned is now up to three employees. Wink
  • + 1
 @mca896: Did bikes have disc brakes a long time ago?
  • + 1
 @tomerb: I ain't that old brother! Yes, they had disc brakes! Lots of Hope Mono series and orange calipered Hayes! Stinkys, Stabs, and Big Hits were the bikes to have.
  • + 3
 R.I.P Performance Bike. May you join the fabled Pricepoint.com in Shred Heaven. All the homies are waiting. Kelly McGarry, Steve Smith. May you be greeted with stoke aplenty, and the warm smiles of both the souls and stores who have passed. We thank you for your service in contribution to allowing us this sacred gift of Shred that is self-expression through bikes. Pouring one out today for this one.
  • + 1
 @jgreermalkin: Wow, that's a very large generalization there. I've been to local bike shops that had great mechanics, and I've been to shops that had idiots for mechanics. I've been to REI's that had bad bike mechanics and REI's that won my business for many years because their shop lead mechanic was so awesome.

I agree with you, Performance is a franchise, not a local bike shop. I shopped at Performance mostly for more down to earth prices on accessory type stuff like clothes, brake pads, tires, tools. A step up from Target or Walmart? You've never really been in a Performance store I'm guessing. They carried different brands like GT. They weren't partially owned by Specialized like Bike Source and I never experienced the arrogance that I've repeatedly experienced at Bike Source and some other "cool" shops. Paying ridiculously high prices just to be with in the "in" crowd has always baffled me. But you go ahead on brother. I got some great deals at Performance. Their demise will increase prices in the areas they had stores. Guaranteed. A $100 for a $10 shirt that has a trendy name on it isn't any better than a shirt made of the same material without that trendy name on it. I'm sorry to see Performance go. There's a big void in the market now where the 200% and more markup on bike stuff isn't going to fill.
  • + 0
 @TalusRider: Yes, it was a subjective comment. I consider GT bikes a step up form target. You made a lot of conclusions from a few lines, a very smart guy. Try taking a few deep breaths and don't waste so much time writing to complete strangers, you will have less stress and live longer.
  • + 1
 @TalusRider: “I got some great deals at Performance. Their demise will increase prices in the areas they had stores. Guaranteed” the demise happened because they sold stuff to cheap, maybe the stores you will now pay more in might still be there in 5 years
  • + 61
 Anyone else miss Price Point and Supergo?
  • + 12
 Pricepoint, where price was never the point, terrible customer service was.
  • + 4
 @topfuel564: I bought Supergo's full suspension frame back in 93 - 2.5" on a 1" stroke with a Noleen shock (kept the shock for posterity) The XC guys use to tell me I had a DH bike! The swing arm kept cracking, but they replaced it each time. I do miss Price Point - their tubes were cheap and held up well.
  • + 46
 The year was 2002. My favorite drink was jaegerbombs. Lots of beer too. Oceans of it. The morning after a long night of drinking, looking at a supergo catalog on the shitter while my butthole exploded was like a safe buffer zone between my hangover and the real world outside. Instead of trying to piece together what the hell happened the night before i could just read and re-read prices and specs of the latest weyless bikes and assorted bits on offer. Thank you supergo.
  • + 1
 @topfuel564: pricepoint was in the hood in hawthorne, i'm surprised by the customer service complaint.
  • + 8
 No. PricePoint was not good. Jenson USA has been very good to deal with. No surprise the latter is still in business.
  • + 1
 @mrgonzo: and that catalog was relevant for months, not minutes.
  • + 0
 Yes, I remember them. I thought they had good prices, at least from what I remember...Now JensonUSA rocks my world!!
  • + 7
 @mrgonzo:
i love you man
  • + 2
 Price Point's final days coincided with my re entering cycling and a couple bike builds, it was glorious timing, demise of PP notwithstanding, RIP PP.l....
  • + 2
 I bought a schwinn homegrown factory limited from supergo for $199. Sold the bike 3 years ago on here for $1400
and what about chainlove? I know they are under a bigger umbrella but damn they had some sweet shit that kept me glued waiting for the next deal
  • + 1
 The last time I used PricePoint I had forgotten my password and username the password reset link. It emailed me my actual password in cleartext. I sent them a message, changed my password and never used them again.
  • + 2
 Aw man iv bought alot of cycling equipment off PricePoint, super lame they dissolved within the saturated online industry
  • + 4
 @mrgonzo: not enough props so far, this is too funny!
  • + 1
 @P-I-Engineer:
Compton
I got turned on to Jenson when the Mavic shoes I bought at PricePoint took a shit and while PP wouldn't warranty 'em, Jenson DID
  • + 2
 I scored some incredible deals from Price Point. But yeah, the customer service either really sucked or didn't exist at all. It got really ugly when they were doing their going out of business sales. Shit was being liquidated dirt cheap but they were charging full-on shipping. I ordered three sets of wheels that were steeply marked down. They only sent the one that was in in stock and charged me for shipping for all three wheels. Obviously they didn't give a shit at that point because when I tried to get a refund for the shipping portion that they had overcharged, it didn't happen. It was a fun site though because they had a lot of esoteric parts and pieces listed. Caveat emptor to the customer though because just because it was listed on the web site didn't actually mean it was in stock. Always a bit sketchy, but that really was part of the experience. I suggest Blue Sky Cycling or Cambria Bike if you miss and still want to feel that sketchy experience.
  • + 4
 Who remembers the Access frames that Supergo sold in the mid 90's that were designed by Peter Denk? Had no idea at the time who that was. Turns out he's had a long legacy in mountain bike. denk-engineering.de/history
  • + 1
 @topfuel564: I get the point
  • + 36
 I dunno about this. I liked paying 10-40% markup to someone else becuase I got to say things like “support my community” on the internet.
  • + 23
 I'm sorry you don't live somewhere with a vibrant cycling community.
  • + 24
 I get where you’re coming from. LBS are cool, they really are. But when you’re on limited funds having a super cheap place to order things is cool too. I’d always go to a lbs for tubes and stuff like that but I do my own work and buy where I can when it can save significant money.
  • - 34
flag b1k35c13nt15t (Feb 8, 2019 at 12:33) (Below Threshold)
 @cwatt c twat.
  • + 3
 @cougar797: you still purchase tubes?
  • - 13
flag sam264 (Feb 9, 2019 at 7:12) (Below Threshold)
 @cougar797:
If you can't afford to buy things in an ethical manner, don't buy them. Nobody is forcing you to buy XT over SLX dude.
  • + 11
 @sam264: how internet strangers spend their money is their business.
  • - 1
 @cuban-b:
It's politics, it's everyone's business.

Too many people complain about things like the price of inner tubes in your LBS. When it's the only thing some people will buy from you, then you have to make your money where you can. Don't complain about the price of tubes when it's only convenient to buy them from your LBS but do all your other shopping online. (this isn't necessarily directed at cougar797, more at the industry/consumers as a whole). You are not entitled to cheap bikes and parts.
  • + 26
 I have worked at the Performance in Boise, id for the past 8 months and it has been a super fun job. It's been a bit hard to see our great shop full of bikes and equipment to bike racks 95% empty and the store half empty. Performance filled a gap that most LBS have a hard time filling with the big brand prices, that was perfect for beginner cyclist.
  • + 12
 I loved taking new cyclists to that store. There are too many snobs at the local stores trying to talk new riders into spending thousands of dollars.
  • + 5
 I liked Performance for stuff like tubes, water bottles, lubes, degreaser, gels and nutritionals, an occasional tool. I have two MTBs and two road bikes, and do all my own work, so never needed them for service or bikes.
  • + 11
 I hate to see the ground troops at these stores lose their jobs but Performance's demise was a slow train wreck.

They were too big to adapt to the changing market. Too many stores to overhaul. Too much turnover with staff. Pen and paper work orders (no Ascend) and highly inefficient parts ordering processes. Service area at my local shop was a joke with barely enough tools to do even basic services. The service area didn't even have a cpu workstation at the service check in and the shop had to use paperback catalogs for Hawley and QBP. The point of sales system was antiquated to put it nicely. Management was awful and treated their staff terribly.

NO shocker here. I wish all the staff good fortune finding a new job. All the admin and management though can suck a bag-of-D's!
  • + 11
 I will miss the local Performance store - they are the only shop that carries a decent inventory of clothing. That's the only thing I ever bought there though. Hm, maybe I should visit now and find some deals !
  • + 8
 The PB store in Salt Lake City was great. The 3 managers who ran the place while it was here were great people who bent over backwards for me. Some of the best customer service I have ever received. I was totally bummed out about hearing of the closure & wandered in there last month. I told the current manager I appreciated their help over the years & was bummed about the employees losing their jobs. They found out right after X-Mas.
I never did have PB work on my bikes but I did buy a few completes for my kids & it was my goto for nutrition & parts.
It might of been different in other States, but our store had great staff & good prices, sad to see them go.
  • + 6
 Ya know it's funny, despite Performance being the largest retailer nationwide, no shop I've ever worked at has had to compete with them in any way. Neither sales nor service. Just saying.
  • + 3
 seraph: that’s a pretty pompous statement which is the big problem with most lbs. The best thing about performance was that the staff wouldn’t look at you like a piece of human shit for being exited by a 1200$ bike. If you think you weren’t competing with them you probably have no low end/middle market so you were losing out on a lot of customers. They just weren’t customers you wanted or respected.
  • + 6
 I should add that the best thing about them was their house brand stuff. Their saddles, sunglasses and clothing were good bang for the buck type items when purchased on their always substantial sale prices.
  • + 4
 Before you feel too bad about the state of LBS and Performance remember they were also a huge online retailer. No doubt some stores were better thanks to the individuals in them. That said, I have been in several across multiple states and can attest that they were run like a chain of friggin Chili's. Anyone look at their bankruptcy filing. They owed millions to GoPro, Cliff, and others. WTF? I have no point, I just kind of thought PB was a joke.
  • + 4
 The cycling industry is rife with competition. Competition drives innovation and drives down prices. This is good for the consumer, not the company.

I know it sucks to hear when a shop full of cool people shuts down, things can be tough. But it's a sign of how great things have gotten for us riders. You can bleed Shimano brakes in 5 minutes, and have a new derailleur shipped to you overnight for like 60$. Bike repairs are getting simple, and that's awesome for us riders.
  • + 7
 @ClaytonMarkin I have a BB shell I need to face and chase. Can I please borrow your tool?
  • + 1
 Overpriced bikes or cheap cheap was all I ever saw there. Once the local one had a Fuji fully for $3500. Garbge spec for the money and weighed a ton.

They did start to carry the Marin Hawk Hill at the end at the correct retail price but it was too late by then.

I did uae them for some spares and even bought my latest pair of shoes there, right before the bankruptcy announcement.
  • + 2
 @lccomz: A tool one should really never need unless you just finished welding your own frame...
  • + 8
 No wonder they faultered with a brand lineup of "Fudgey, Kiester, Breezer"
  • + 4
 Honesty - I think bike manufacturers have gone to far from Fox Live valve to Sram Apex or whatever that electric 2k upgrade is for your 10k carbon toy. We need to go back to bikes $800-2000 range with good geometry. Geo matters way more than components build. Heck there market for what performance offered if they could just deliver bikes with good geometry.
  • + 3
 Supergo was the shit. I came to the US in the 90's and couldn't believe how f*cking cheap they were compared to the extortionate prices every bike shop in NZ charged for a half decent mtb part. I mean NZD$99 for a set of Onza bar ends. NOT GOOD!!!
  • + 2
 Yeah I've noticed that you all down in NZ and Aus pay a shit ton of money for bikes! Frown
  • + 2
 Supergo used to get Euro customers who would fly in, buy a high end bike, ride it for a few days, and then bring it home as "used". The cost savings paid for the flight. Seems like it is somewhat reversed now where stuff from CRC or Merlin is less than Jensen.
  • + 3
 I'm guessing by the sounds of things, it's an American equivalent of Halfords? Not Walmart (Tesco in UK), but far from a premium retailer. From someone who has worked in the bike industry too long that I care to admit! Sometimes a culling from an often oversaturated market (Bike industry isn't high on that list but I'd consider it to be there) is a good thing. The LBS who is sometimes dwarfed by large chains is given it's chance to shine and stand out. It's a terrible shame for the hardworking and dedicated staff who worked there but the bike industry is a small world and most will get picked up by other shops.
  • + 2
 While I know they haven't been this in many years, in the early 90s, Performance was the real bike shop in my region. We'd go out of the way to get a mechanic who knew what they were doing and to ogle the newest Klein, or the RS-1, or buy Onza Porcupine tires. All the locals were small strip mall shops selling BMX and cruiser bikes.
  • + 2
 I've had good and bad experiences at performance shops. Mechanics have gone above and beyond at times, and at other times they and the salesperson had no idea what they were doing. But compared to other local shops they usually had what I needed in stock, at a competitive price, with friendly staff.
  • + 2
 The only Performance stores I dealt with had limited sales that did not interest me. Their discount section was decent, depending on what you needed. I found a 4 bike rack there once for a steal! But, im not surprised as their inventory was always large (on the stores I went into), much larger than the other LBSs. And it didn't seem like their inventory moved much.
  • + 3
 Ive never owned a bike from them but my parents did they were decent bikes. I will miss being able to go there and get cycling gear like clothes and gloves because they had a great selection with out having to order online
  • + 3
 End of an era.

Pretty sad really, but it does illustrate that if a retailer cannot adapt to meet quickly changing trends then they are done for, especially when overhead is high (lots of locations= high operating costs.)
  • + 1
 I was there in Carrboro when they first got started and I was there when they opened the first store in Chapel Hill. They all got lost along the way and starting selling 3rd rate products. Completely surprised they hung in there this long....
  • + 1
 I bought one of their mountain bikes in 1992 in Sacramento. Was my first. The store had just recently opened. Was an incredible sale price at the time for I believe the 1991 model. Was a so-so metal frame but had top components at the time. Had the second generation Rock Shox fork and the high end Suntour group-with grease ports for the hubs. Also remember taking it on my very first official downhill by riding up the gondola at Squaw Valley in Lake Tahoe. Not a pleasant experience. The only other guy in the gondola besides me and my friend had the very first Rock Shox release fork. The bike actually got stolen fairly soon after. Was only in a Performance store a handful of times since. Goodbye Performance.
  • + 5
 Good riddance, terrible chain store.
  • + 1
 They were nothing special good for if you needed a tube, or a gel pack other than that they did not carry small parts or have good deals that could not be found on the internet. Their house brand clothes were a great value if you did not need to be seen in name brand apparel. They were the Costco of bike stores buy their membership and get 10% of your purchase back.
  • + 1
 The bike business is tough. LBS can’t compete on component pricing with often times their cost is higher than what they could buy off the net for. Twice last year I wanted to buy a bike and 3 well known ( not top) manufacturers websites weren’t synced with dealer systems. I bought the bikes really not knowing exactly what was coming. All I knew is the shops would take care of me. One bike I bought the first dealer couldn’t buy it because they needed a minimum 15k order since. They were new to the brand, so I went to a LBS that did a established volume. Then how does a shop deal with all the models, colors and sizes... that is a math problem that the answer is low margin, or losses.

There is now a big hole in the entry level bike biz. Will be interesting to see who fills it.

For the rest of the shops I think there is going to be a big change in how they have to do business. I really value the LBS and hope they figure a way to make $$$.
  • + 1
 With the rise of internet shopping and direct to consumer bike brands this doesn't surprise me at all.

My only hope is that this HELPS your local LBS because they will become a more focused and more necessary commodity. The entry/mid level stuff and maintenance can shift to them and the super cheapo folks can go shop at Target or buy online.

Even a 5-10% increase to your local LBS can help them stay in business and that's good.
  • + 1
 R.I.P Performance Bike. May you join the fabled Pricepoint.com in Shred Heaven. All the homies are waiting. Kelly McGarry, Steve Smith. May you be greeted with stoke aplenty, and the warm smiles of both the souls and stores who have passed. We thank you for your service in contribution to allowing us this sacred gift of Shred that is self-expression through bikes. Pouring one out today for this one.
  • + 2
 It's nice to see these Mobil bike repair vans opening up. Good mechanics working for themselves...not s bad idea and they come to you.
  • + 0
 I never understood why LBS' tend to cram their showrooms with as many bikes as they can possibly fit in there. It's a terrible aesthetic. How about a few choice models in low/mid/high price ranges for mountain and road, and then standalone touchscreen kiosks that allow customers to view the range of brands and models they carry? I'd much rather shop in that environment than one with kids bikes and comfort bikes taking up every square inch of space.
  • + 2
 have You ever worked in a bike shop before your comment shows a lack common sense. Sounds like a pie in the sky dream from a hardcore level enthusiast. The problem is that bike shops aren’t meant for people like that they are meant for beginners and enthusiast level people. They are also meant for people who want to buy a bike today which low stock of a few models is not going to help the last thing you want to tell a customer is okay let’s order that in your size.
  • - 1
 @loganflores: Yes, yes I have, for 5+ years. I witnessed many many bikes on the showroom floor that never moved and never sold. They were eventually discounted and sold for little or no profit or turned into rental fleet bikes. If 'long lead time' is an issue, then fine, stock bikes in storage and sell them with a 2-hour turnaround window for pickup. And I am not in any way a hardcore level enthusiast. I would consider myself a beginner and only moderately enthused. I am trying to look at the LBS business model in a way that allows them to adapt to the changing marketplace - lower overhead, better 'shopping experience' which seems to be what many consumers desire in this age. What worked well 20 years ago won't stay sustainable forever, not with direct sales and large online distributors taking such a large market share.
  • + 2
 @mca896: come on you worked in a Shop for five years and you consider yourself a beginner? The problem with your 2 hour turnaround is that it would completely screw builders you would have to have a bunch of part time mechanics that call in to see if there is work for them or not. Most shops use downtime between customers to build stock bikes allowing mechanics to work full shifts and get bikes built.
  • + 1
 @loganflores: Beginner mechanic? Not in the least. Beginner rider? Yes absolutely, I rode a lot up through high school but hadn't ridden for over a decade prior to getting another bike this past January. You seem awful worked up over my hypothesizing on theoretical ways for LBS' to gain more market share. You do realize we're both advocating for the same thing, right?
  • + 1
 @mca896: sorry to get worked up. I grew up working in shops and have watched them sadly shoot themselves in the foot for the last decade. I really think that pompous additudes of shop workers has played a major role in the fall of bike shops. I see the merit to your idea I just see it effecting shop workers in a negative way and really mechanics have gotten the short end of the stick for years. The shop you describe sounds like a perfect shop for someone who would never go to a shop. Or goes in twice a year for emergencies and gets annoyed that there’s tons of kid bikes and comfort bikes.
  • + 1
 @loganflores: I feel you, I'm somewhat lucky to live in a microeconomy where small business thrive far more than most geographical areas, and municipal regulations prohibit a lot of chain and franchise businesses. Maybe the kids bikes and comfort bikes are a necessary evil when trying to maintain some level of also being a 'core' shop - they keep the lights on; a cool shop is a cool place to hang out but friends hanging out buying small parts here and there doesn't pay the bills.
  • + 1
 @mca896: I’m glad we can meet some common ground. I have always been a mountain biker but I have also been heavy into trials dh fr and park and dj as well as. Bmx and the shop you described was always a dream for freeriders however I could see th financial downfalls from a young age. I hope shops can find their place.
  • + 4
 Where the he'll am I going to 28oz water bottles now???
  • + 1
 millenials value quality and intimate experience more than ever over volume and quantity. no surprise here.

setting foot in a PB bike store makes me depressed. why would i spend money there unless i absolutely have to?
  • + 4
 Bring back the original Supergo. They were legit. Performance, blah
  • + 2
 Supergo turned into Price Point (where price is the point) which died as well. There are quite a few good online bike shops now (Jenson USA, Worldwide, Universal).
  • + 1
 Fanatik for online b good.
  • + 2
 I remember Supergo built a custom bike for Shaq and sold one to Elton John.
  • + 3
 How can anyone be cool with the words bikes and bankruptcy in same sentence. Its beat.
  • + 2
 Sad since they carried a better variety of stuff than a typical LBS, but they had been circling the drain for a while. Now REI is the closest thing to Performance.
  • + 1
 I worked at a performance bike for a year or so, in sales mind you. The mechanics at our shop knew what they were doing. As for the bikes.... Eclectic is a good enough word to describe them.
  • + 3
 Hey, Im looking for a bike assembler in Seattle, if any Performance execs need a job...
  • + 1
 Man what is going to happen to the traditional sales model? How are people going to get their bikes fixed if all the LBS disappear?
  • + 16
 By themselves using YouTube ;-)
  • + 2
 @Stokedonthis: this!

Have learned how to do so much stuff from YouTube.
  • + 18
 My guess is VERY few, if any, Pinkbike readers use Performance shops. It's a corp, bland model. Nothing against the folks who worked there, but Performance going under is a result of their own business model.
  • + 21
 I would hardly consider a nation wide chain of stores owned by a large conglomerate company, that also owns and distributes multiple brands of equipment and cycles, a "LBS". My LBS is owned by two rad dudes that love turning wrenches and sharing the stoke. All the talk of international private equity groups and business liquidators etc. in here just feels gross. Not what bikes are about for me. I'd much rather support an actual LBS than these guys.

Not attacking you or your comment, just my two cents.
  • + 2
 @bman33: I've bought two bikes from Performance because yes, they're the polar opposite of a LBS. Too many LBSes either have huge wait times for service unless you're their favorite, or show they don't want you business. I wanted a Marin Pine Mountain 2, and the only other Marin dealer in the Dallas area never responded to my questions. The Performance in Southlake always does service right then and there, no waiting days and having to come back.
  • + 0
 @vitesse: Hence my comment "Very few". Glad you are happy. That said, I would be several paychecks that you are in a very small minority of Pinkbike readers who have purchased full bikes from Performance.
  • + 2
 @bman33: I call bs on that. They were great for reasonably priced cycling clothing. Almost all my cold weather stuff was from there, as well as 2 chamois shorts from my roadie days that were bought in the 90s and still are wearable today, even though they've been washed many hundreds of times. The last 2 years or so they've changed product quality, and it was noticeable. They seemed to have gotten stuck in the competing with Amazon phase instead of focusing on what got them where they were to begin with. Same problem most shops have these days really...
  • - 1
 @yzedf: Call BS if you like. The brands they carry aren't 'cool' brands according to most readers on this site. I am not saying all those bikes weren't good deals/bargains. And like you just said it....'back in the 90's'. Bought sums it up
  • + 2
 I reckon it will come full circle, with independent contractors filling the needs. Apps like Velotooler might become more popular, or shared community spaces in urban areas. Keep in mind this is mostly an American issue. Go to the Netherlands, Japan, China or most anywhere in the world where cycling is popular, and wages and services aren't so unbalanced, and you'll find traditional shops and services alive and well.
  • + 2
 This is sad. Seems like every few months another large company goes belly up Frown
  • + 2
 Does anyone remember when people cried that Performance was killing all of the local bike shops? Adapt or die...
  • + 2
 This is good news for real bike shops.
  • + 2
 Well I hope the CEO got his bonus for running it into the ground.
  • + 1
 Its surprises me how many people trust other people to touch thier bikes because I don't lol
  • + 1
 So Amain bikes is one of my local shops. Really hope this doesn't kill bike sales even more for my other local shops.
  • + 1
 good riddance. worst, most cutthroat- f*ck your employees business ive ever seen/experienced.
  • + 2
 Went to one in Seattle once, it was not pleasant.
  • + 1
 They have to offer more than just point of sale these days.
  • + 1
 You mean like all the direct sales bike company’s
  • + 1
 But I'm glad to see Nashbar will continue.
  • + 1
 Maybe these laid off workers can go apply for the Trump coal jobs!
  • + 1
 #MAGA
  • + 1
 Pooformance.
  • + 0
 Sad when a sporting business bites the dust...
  • + 0
 Thanks carbanz
  • - 1
 I never purchased anything from them. Way overpriced .
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