Photo Epic: Dual Slalom - Crankworx Rotorua 2020

Mar 5, 2020
by Trevor Lyden  

2020 brought clear skies, warm weather, and a brand new course for the 100% Dual Slalom. We saw some incredibly tight racing with very close times and a few upsets along the way. The new course featured the usual berms and rollers, but had the addition of a large scrub jump about halfway down the track. Racers could definitely make up time on the scrub, but it was the flat corners that followed which proved to be the most challenging part of the course.

On the women's side of things, we had many dual slalom regulars like Jill Kintner, Anneke Beerten, Kialani Hines and Vaea Verbeeck. Casey Brown, who isn't necessarily known as a dual racer made an impressive finish and battled Jill in the final heat. In the end, Jill remained dominant with Casey grabbing the silver and Vaea rounding out the podium in third. For the men, we had Kyle Strait finishing up top despite breaking multiple chains throughout the night. Bas Van Steenbergen was looking impressive on course knocking out most of his opponents, save Kyle. Local Matt Walker and US-based Colin Hudson battled it out for third place with Matt narrowly taking the win.


































36 Comments

  • 9 0
 Does anybody put more body english into the bike than Cody Kelly? Also, Kyle Strait's calf 'bout to break out of his knee pad in photo 3. Breaking chains? Seems about right...
  • 4 5
 Ratboy used to...
  • 9 0
 Shock Horror! pinkbike post pictures of Evil bikes.
  • 2 2
 What’s the deal with chains breaking lately?! Kyle and I both broke chains within 5 minutes of each other at Crankworx Whistler 2019. And I have a spinal cord injury, so my calves are about the size of my relatively skinny forearms. It was a new SRAM 991 (less than 60 minutes of riding and perfectly clean and lubed), and I’ve broken 4 other perfect-condition, clean, lubed chains (I meticulously properly care for them). 3 times it was the quick-links exploding, 2 times regular links. I suppose I did learn my slalom-corner-exit squated power-wheelie technique from Chris Kovarik back around 2000, but it just doesn’t make sense to me to be breaking so many chains with 70% of the torque I used to put out as a pro.
  • 2 0
 It's honestly more surprising chains dont break more often. They have what... 10x the moving parts than the rest of an entire bicycle? Each link is 4 parts, times that by 114 links on a SRAM 11spd chain, so many points of failure. Include possibility for manufacturing defects & metal quality & it's shocking they stay together at all I feel like.
  • 1 0
 @rewob: Totally! Also, I wonder if the super-fine silty grit at Crankworx Whistler where I broke a chain (and it appear also in NZ) gets into the rollers, chain friction surfaces, and interfaces, and results in wear and friction that results in breakage. Or maybe brand-new chains like the one I broke (and surely Kyle’s) might have a burr or a too-tight interface that results in breakage before they can “break in” and wear down those defects.

The X01 and XX1 and similar chains have VERY tight tolerances (and as a result marginally more friction drag than some cheaper chains), but super fine silt might cause those top-end models to seize up in a way — ever so slightly, but enough to cause a problem for torque-monster racers. I’ve seen Whistler silt do weird stuff to my chains and certain other moving parts and bearings.

Whistler silt will cause almost any freshly-rebuilt fork of mine to spew fork oil — the silt is so fine that it gets into the wipers and seals and then seems to wear them, ejecting silty dirty oil in the process. Only happens to me at Whistler, nowhere else yet...but any silty riding spot might have that effect. Considering my experience with nano-scale diamond for grinding and polishing, I bet Rotorua’s silty-looking dirt has something to do with those broken chains. That and possibly the combo of silt and side-loading from shifting under power, and/or chainline, or just silt + massive power.
  • 2 2
 Maybe older SRAM 8 speed chains and 8 speed cassettes are the ticket for DS and DH — wide and beefy, never broke those like I have 9 and 10 speed chains. Should be relatively easy to sell a wider pulley kit with longer cage bolts, and then run beefy 8 speed chains and NOS 8 speed cassettes (like older Dura Ace, Ultegra, XT or XTR, or newer SRAM replacement cassettes). With how narrow the chains are now, every part of the chain is slimmed down, possibly leading to failures from massive torque and/or sideloading (from shifting or imperfect chainline) under massive torque.
  • 1 0
 Gwin breaking a chain, neko at world champs. Sometimes bad shit happens.
  • 2 1
 Technically the newer, narrower chains are stronger than the older wider chains. Agree when it comes to the longevity of the drivetrain, but strength has only increased with modern stuff.
  • 1 0
 @BrantHavro: I wonder how they quantify it — static lab test? Modern chainrings wear faster in some cases (partially due to the tension of the clutch and resultant wear as the suspension cycles), and narrower / thinner is often a recipe for failure...at least after wear, or excessive strain from chain torque, starts to take its toll on tolerances — tight tolerances which are required for these newer thinner chains. Materials have been similar for 15 years, manufacturing has likely improved marginally too...but I expect most strength claims are minimal increases in ideal lab conditions. I wonder what chain Kyle was running. Bad publicity for sure, haha.
  • 1 0
 @BrantHavro: agreed. According to the recent CycleTips chain test, newer chains are stronger and more efficient.

www.pinkbike.com/news/4-key-facts-from-the-cycling-tips-ultimate-chain-test.html
  • 3 0
 I’d be shitting it sat in the gate next to Kyle Strait, mans an absolute monster!! Calves like boiled hams!!
  • 2 0
 My favorite part was Strait destroying that chain
  • 2 0
 That Cody Kelley face though! Also, hell yes Kyle Strait!!!!
  • 1 0
 Matt Walker! 3rd favorite rider of all time...
  • 1 0
 ..
  • 1 0
 Whip off highlights/photo epic??? Smile
  • 1 0
 Great pics, always fun to see some slalom.
  • 1 1
 I know this is off topic, but apparently “100%” is a hate symbol
  • 2 2
 Yeah, I learned about that when trying to dissuade a friend from getting a tattoo that she didn’t know looked like certain specific gang tattoos. So I showed her the FBI & US Customs tattoo guide I found online years ago. Fascinating to see how certain unique styles of tattoos, specific to some horrifying groups of people, have become popular in pop culture as a sort of status symbol — and that most of those people getting those tattoos have no clue about the origin and inspiration for those styles (or what might happen to them if they travel to parts of Brazil with the wrong tattoo!). 100% tattoos are white supremacist tattoos that signify 100% white. Common in white supremacist circles and jail gangs according to that FBI / Customs document. So yeah, for years I’ve cringed when seeing 100% signs at MTB and motorcross events...especially when it’s pretty much all white guys and maybe one guy racing of African descent. But let’s just hope that wasn’t the 100% brand’s inspiration =P
  • 1 1
 @WRCDH: yeah, I don’t think I should say my political beliefs, but I used to have a 100% sticker on my bike, and then took it off when I realized that I might be offending people.
  • 2 0
 @JacobyDH: I hear ya! Someone might not know the brand and their marketing related to 100% effort and speed. 110% might have been a safer bet, ha! But at least we can be speak frankly about what the symbol means in certain different circles, and how it might be differently interpreted by others, without getting into political persuasions and any related sensitivities =)
  • 2 0
 @JacobyDH: Related to that, I was on Fox’s Factory team with Travis Pastrana in 1999. But then in 2000, I was sponsored by Shift, their sister company. Within a few years, Shift’s “=“ logo had become the symbol of various LGBT movements, and sales within the motorcross and MTB community tanked and I think they folded the brand. Interesting to see how different logos and symbols get adopted and how their context and meaning can change in society over a relatively short period of time. And nowadays, how there’s seemingly little tolerance for differing definitions and perspectives.
  • 1 0
 @JacobyDH: Oh, they’re still around! Or got revived(?). www.shiftmx.com/3lack-label-gi-fro/24141018_GS.html
  • 3 0
 I just don’t want to offend anyone, or anyone’s political beliefs. If you believe one thing, then that’s great, and I have no business in that, however in doing so the only way I can stay out of these complications is by not using the sticker. Does that make sense, or am I just talking nonsense?
  • 1 3
 OK Karen
  • 1 0
 @loamyhomie: I am a memer, and so I understand this reference. Just stop!
  • 1 0
 @JacobyDH: The most awkward embodiment of the 100% logo, IMO, is if/when it’s kind of across the knuckles and back of the hand on a glove — how 100% tattoos are sometimes inked — as the 100% tattoo can be used to punch people of races that those white supremacists view as inferior.

Likewise, I wouldn’t wear attire that directly resembles Yakuza tattoos (and I’ve inadvertently befriended and hung out with tattooed Yakuza — an assistant to a Yamaguchi-gumi head boss — in Tokyo numerous nights in 2017 at a bar by my AirBnB...they insisted I come back to meet their hot girlfriends the next night, LOL, and the unruly banter thus continued for several nights thereafter), the tattoos on a 6’8” 300 pound Bandito member I met when he mentioned he liked my RHD Honda Type R, Russian jail tattoos on some random spooky dudes here in Seattle, or other logos or symbols that could be confused with nefarious or hateful activities or groups. The one thing I’ve learned is that there are a lot of unsavory people and groups RIGHT below the polished surface in our society and world!
  • 2 0
 @WRCDH: yeah, whatever it is, if you have a hate symbol on you, many people will automatically judge you (wether you think thats right, or wrong). A tattoo will tend to stay on someone permanently, so It is complicated, especially for those who were part of a hate group, and are trying to leave it.
  • 1 0
 @WRCDH: now it feels awkward to scroll up, and see all those giant white, and black 100% flags in the photos!
  • 1 0
 @JacobyDH: Hahaha, I hear ya! Been feeling like that at times for years! Fortunately I don’t have a moral dilemma about wearing 100% gear — having been sponsored by Fox and Dainese back in the day, I’m 100% partial to those two brands =P. I’m a Fox-Dainese supremacist =)
  • 1 0
 @JacobyDH: Oh totally about the tattoos. Likewise, the Yakuza guys I met hinted at that they’d semi left their respective groups, due to crackdowns and revenue drying up (despite the groups not being illegal, but some of their conduct can be). They still had all the tattoos though which are frowned upon in Japanese society. As for their Yakuza participation, many often want to make a difference and are seeking respect and significance, and now are cast out of their Yakuza group AND society in a way — in part due to their full-body tattoos (and a missing pinky the guy I talked to cut off and presented to his boss to atone for his “sins!”). Several Yakuza groups are rebranding as humanitarian organizations, steering away from illegal conduct. Hoping that works out for them and that they do make a positive impact on their communities...and that they can help eradicate some of the human trafficking that’s on the rise as foreign loosely-knit gangs, and local unorganized youth gangs, take up the void that the Yakuza used to occupy...which includes keeping crime and other gangs out of their former territories.
  • 1 0
 @WRCDH: yeah, me too, but I run 100% goggles, so yeah! No body has commented, and I live in a very left wing, and democratic area, so let’s hope nobody takes to offense!
  • 1 0
 @WRCDH: your Yakuza stories are very amazing! Many of us never get to tell such stories! Also I’m a complete Shimano Supremest.
  • 1 0
 Oh, and then there’s the uncomfortable “supreme” brand, with its signature white hoodies!

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