Photo Epic: Earth Day - A Tribute to the Landscapes We Enjoy on Two Wheels

Apr 22, 2020
by Nathan Hughes  




Earth Day 2020 and things are looking up. The planet now has a small break from our relentless activity and the chance to recuperate just slightly. Where we'll go from here remains to be seen, but surely there's no better time to marvel and feel grateful for a world we hope to soon access once again.

Please enjoy this gallery as a tribute to the many phenomenal landscapes Mother Nature has provided us. As two-wheelers, we have this gigantic playground to call our own and there's hope we can all work hard to respect and protect it. There'll be no tiny riders to complement the scenery in this gallery, just pure nature and a few of the non-human creatures we've encountered whilst shooting bikes; from Cairns to Zermatt and many spots in between.


bigquotesIt seems to me that the natural world is the greatest source of excitement; the greatest source of visual beauty, the greatest source of intellectual interest. It is the greatest source of so much that makes life worth living.Sir David Attenborough

Cotopaxi Ecuador.
Cotopaxi, Ecuador.

The view from the top of the mountain is breathtaking early in the morning.
Derby, Tasmania.

Craigieburn New Zealand
Craigieburn, New Zealand.

Chamonix France.
The land-before-time peaks of Chamonix, France.

Still mornings on Lake Rotorua as the sun begins to peak out through the clouds.
Still mornings on Lake Rotorua as the sun begins to peek out through the clouds.

It takes time for water to create a valley yet unfortunately we are running out of time before our planet gets past the point of no return. Think about steps we can take to care for our planet and practice a little Earth Day in our every day routines. Bikes are a pretty good solution here.
It takes time for water to create a valley, yet unfortunately we are running out of time before our planet gets past the point of no return. Think about steps we can take to care for our planet and practice a little Earth Day in our everyday routines. Bikes are a pretty good solution here.

Damaraland Nambia.
Damaraland, Nambia.

This spawned out salmon has reached the end of its life but it s life cycle has not ended. its offspring are buried in the gravel it will decompose and provide nutrients for the trees and plants that shelter smaller creatures that will eventually become food for it s offspring. Salmon are important to our forests our forests are where we are at home on our bikes. It is all connected. Washington State.
This spawned out salmon has reached the end of its life, but its life cycle has not ended. Its offspring are buried in the gravel, it will decompose, and provide nutrients for the trees and plants, that shelter smaller creatures, that will eventually become food for its offspring. Salmon are important to our forests, our forests are where we are at home on our bikes. It is all connected.

Southern Alps New Zealand
Southern Alps, New Zealand.

The Highlands combining beauty with gnar since 02.
Life and death, Fort William, Scotland, UK.

Zermatt Switzerland.
Zermatt, Switzerland.

Cliffs and waterfalls, Saalbach, Austria.

South Island New Zealand
South Island, New Zealand.

Revelstoke BC Canada.
Shepherd's delight in Retallack, BC, Canada.

It can take thousands of years for water to cut a tiny channel through stone. It s taken far less time for us to push this planet to the brink.
It can take thousands of years for water to cut a tiny channel through stone. It's taken far less time for us to push this planet to the brink.

Cattle grazing between the peaks of the Italian-Swiss border.
Cattle grazing between the peaks of the Italian-Swiss border.

Fort William Scotland.
Live stream, Fort William, Scotland.

Leogang s quintessential view.
Leogang's quintessential view.

Glen Feshie in the Cairngorms National Park Scotland.
Glen Feshie in the Cairngorms National Park, Scotland.

Bormio Italy.
After the storm on the Stelvio Pass, Bormio, Italy.

Sunset
Sunset gold at Stellenbosch, South Africa.

In this time of social distancing the planet is getting a little break from its inhabitants perhaps we can learn to be a little less impactful when we enjoy the outdoors after this time passes. Switzerland.
In this time of social distancing, the planet is getting a little break from its inhabitants, perhaps we can learn to be a little less impactful when we enjoy the outdoors after this time passes. Switzerland.

Lenzerheide Switzerland.
The only way is up. Lenzerheide, Switzerland.

The Andes along the Chile/Argentina border.

Somewhere in Switzerland.
Somewhere in Switzerland.

The inversion broke up just enough to let us peak down into Zermatt from the top of stage 3
Zermatt, Switzerland.

Unbelievable scenery and a summer weather extension here in the north of Wales.
Dinas Mawddy, Wales, UK.

Revelstoke BC Canada.
Crouching Porcupine, Hidden Bear at Retallack, BC, Canada.

Mont Blanc towering over the French mountain range leading into Les Gets.
Mont Blanc towering over the French mountain range leading into Les Gets.

The little things count too. Spring Trillium Washington State.
The little things count too. Spring Trillium, Washington State.

Today is a day to reflect on this little blue marble. Zermatt Switzerland
Today is a day to reflect on this little blue marble. Zermatt, Switzerland

Revelstoke BC Canada.
Quintessential BC trees, Revelstoke, Canada.

The Matterhorn, Switzerland.

Fort William Scotland.
Classic Highlands terrain en route to Fort William, Scotland.

Another beautiful end to a day of riding amazing trails in Les Orres.
Les Orres, France.

Chamonix France.
Mist-shrouded forest, Chamonix, France.

Glen Rosa on the Isle of Arran on the West Coast of Scotland.
Glen Rosa on the Isle of Arran on the West Coast of Scotland.

Somewhere Between France and Italy.

What a place
The Dolomites, Italy.

Queenstown New Zealand
Queenstown, New Zealand.

Fort William Scotland.
Bedraggled young stag, Fort William, Scotland.

A late-afternoon rain shower blanketing La Massana.
A late-afternoon rain shower blanketing La Massana.

It s not uncommon to run into some cloud cover near the top of the mountains in Madeira.
Madeira.

Mont Blanc France.
Mighty Mont Blanc and the Bossons Glacier, France.

The Enduro Wet Series continues with a massive storm overnight in Colombia.
Manizales, Colombia.

Layers of time. There are fossil records in those cliffs of all that came before us. John Day Oregon.
Layers of time. There are fossil records in those cliffs of all that came before us. John Day, Oregon.

The Alps - French/Italian border.

Anytime you can see the summit of Mont Blanc it is a nice day in the Alps. The first day of practice went off in perfect conditions but that might not be the case on race day.
Mont Blanc from the Italian side - La Thuile.

It s a masterpiece one we need to take care of. Looking into Italy from Switzerland.
It's a masterpiece, one we need to take care of. Looking into Italy from Switzerland.

More aspens in Aspen
Aspens in Aspen, USA.

Bald eagle overhead, Squamish, BC, Canada.

Glencoe at sunset just a few miles left before touching down at the legendary Fort.
Sunset in the Glencoe Pass, Scotland, UK.

Leogang, Austria.

Hoh River Olympic National Park Washington.
Hoh River, Olympic National Park, Washington.

Tomorrow it s on.
Marsupial on the loose in Cairns, Australia.

Rain fell on and off all day at times heavy so hopefully the dust will be dampened a bit before a few hundred riders come ripping through these trees.
Bariloche, Argentina.

EWS Round 2
Argentinean Patagonia.

East Burke, Vermont, USA.

Looking across to Caisteal Abhail from Goat Fell on the Isle of Arran Scotland.
Looking across to Caisteal Abhail from Goat Fell on the Isle of Arran, Scotland.

Plenty of clues first thing this morning as to the type of day it was going to be.
Early morning mists in the forested valley of La Bresse, France.

A classic look into the Scottish Highlands.
A classic look into the Scottish Highlands.

This way son
Zebra herd at the wildlife reserve outside Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.

Sauk River Darrington Washington
Sauk River, Darrington, Washington

A dramatic Stelvio Pass.
A dramatic Stelvio Pass.

Olympic Penninsula Washington.
Olympic Penninsula, Washington.

We only have one planet and there is no plan B So let s just take care of the planet we inhabit. Darrington Washington.
Darrington, Washington.

Zermatt Switzerland.
Zermatt, Switzerland.

Storms pass through Maribor leaving behind an epic show of colours.
Storms pass through Maribor leaving behind an epic show of colours.

Just a chunk of driftwood gently floating downstream...
Reptilian friend, Cairns, Australia.

The view from the start of the weekend s final stage is always next level here in Whistler.
Whistler.

Eastern Harvest
Burlington, Vermont, USA.

Receding glaciers are a true measure of how fast our world is warming. Beautiful powerful and slowly disappearing.
Receding glaciers are a true measure of how fast our world is warming. Beautiful, powerful, and slowly disappearing.

Mont Blanc France.
Light show over Mont Blanc, France.

Inverness Scotland.
Inverness, Scotland.

Well done Italy
Val di Sole, Italy.

Utah the land before time.
Virgin, Utah, home to more MTB goodness and history than most.

Whitehorse Scotland.
We only have one planet and there is no plan B, So let’s just take care of the planet we inhabit.



69 Comments

  • 64 4
 Thank you for posting these up and also pushing the message of climate change and our part in trying to help prevent the worst of it. As an American, I am consistently disappointed in our country's current stance on protecting our wild places, so it is refreshing to see a major outlet not afraid to post images and commentary that are helping to raise awareness and initiate better responses.
  • 46 0
 Omg these photos are amazing! Such as life itself Smile
  • 17 0
 Yessssss... every single one of these is my background for like, forever ...
  • 28 14
 Now let’s all jump on airplanes to go see these remote locations, frequently trading a small portion of our wealth / income for fossil-fuel transport to the ends of the earth, and document it all on Instagram while making everyone else want to go too (like Tiger-exploiting “sanctuaries” in Southeast Asia that were all the rage with young “world traveler” Instagramistas in recent years).
  • 22 2
 I agree with your environmentalist stance and maybe it could be framed in a more positive way. Photos allow us to enjoy things we may never see and can inspire us to get out and enjoy our more modest local surroundings.
  • 14 2
 @R-M-R: I’m a bit of a realist when it comes to human behavior and also Instagram =P. But yes, there is bliss in ignoring that reality.

Having worked with Boeing and many corporate multinationals, I’ve realized how much unnecessary travel there is, and likewise, how much people love to flaunt their success and wealth — especially through travel. The consequences aren’t insignificant in many ways, especially international business investment with profit taking priority over human health, well-being, and the environment (China’s local and global pollution and working conditions are a good example).
  • 5 2
 @WRCDH: I agree with you. There's power in positivity to effect change, though. If you want to make your sentiments actionable, maybe you could subtly discourage travel by increasing our satisfaction with what we alreay have through praise of the beauty in all our surroundings, while also framing beautiful photographs as an opportunity to see the world without needing to go there.

As a secondary benefit, this will help you avoid becoming even more of a surly misanthrope Razz
  • 13 3
 @R-M-R: Hmmmph...sorry I possibly ruined your Earth Day vibes with my response to realizing that probably 90% of people who views those pics think “oh man, I can’t wait to go to those places once we’re allowed to...”. I would’ve rather seen a mix of “local landscapes” from the PB community as well as pics of PBers and others making a difference — maybe that should be a follow-up article showing how PBers made a difference locally for Earth Day.

As far as action, most of my work in recent years is in creating sustainably-powered and low-environmental-impact “lean” manufacturing and related sustainable supply chains, domestic (sometimes repatriated) vertical manufacturing capability, lightweighting vehicles / aircraft / sporting goods with composites, and more efficient human mobility, including for the elderly and differently-abled, via a range of materials-based innovation and engineering (like with Nike / Adidas / Brooks and their new ultra-efficient recyclable carbon fiber shoes, Honda, DuPont, a few bike companies, thermo-solar power companies, etc). It’s environmental pragmatism at its core, while providing a better, cleaner future for everyone involved. The pics were nice, but they do more to entice people to travel excessively than inspire change to improve human & environmental health. Anyhow, back to making a difference...
  • 17 11
 I hope you don't follow WC racing, watch the live feeds, view photo epics, cheer for favorite riders, etc... Because all these far off remote places we so irresponsibly shot are either the photographers own back yards or the scenes that surround the World Cup and EWS venues in which we are working... Working to provide content for people to enjoy here... Not sure how your elitist attitude is really called for here? This certainly isn't the time, place, or context for you to be standing on your soapbox and trying to call people out for simply doing their jobs. Cheers
  • 19 2
 @davetrumpore: there's an astroid called climate change racing towards planet earth threatening everything. It's allways time to reflect on our behavior.
Loved the photos though. It's a dilemma...
  • 6 0
 @ottifant: Wise words my friend. You clearly get it.
  • 10 0
 @davetrumpore: It's a tricky one Dave. The article here is making an attempt to reconcile with climate crises, yet the paradox is that it was produced by adversely contributing to it. These are big questions - what works better? Inspiring others to adopt changes through pieces such as this? Or the blunt tool of legislation (enforced under a terrible pandemic) that is currently having a positive effect on the environment but terrible for humanity and families across the world.

Clearly neither is sustainable or attractive.

Perhaps if there was an acknowledgement that WC DH and EWS are bad for the environment (along with lots of others things we do for enjoyment, or work)- but beneficial in terms of social capital (entertainment, participation), economic boosts, trail infrastructure legacy and development it may have been a better balanced piece. Balance is very difficult to achieve.

These are awkward conversations that perhaps the industry is working through but right now hasn't figured out. I also respect that Pinkbike is a bike site and that has a specific role of entertainment, and dipping toes into these topics is always a bumpy ride and attacking guys like you isn't always fair.

The images are beautiful. The locations are stunning - Yet @WRCDH does make valid points, albeit in a confrontational manner.

I am working with universities to help examine changing economies in rural areas that bring in the local population, negative emission and high- welfare food supply, ecological restoration and build resilience that positively enhance or restore the environment, carbon sequester GHGs, increase soil biota all while trying to ensure incomes can be earned (mtb falls into this) and cultures acknowledged. (I actually do this for free while I'm studying Environmental Science and working full time to produce content).

One thing I've quickly learned is that confrontation lengthens the changes process immeasurably.

We all have to work together on this, which will not be easy. The longer we put off change, the more drastic the mitigation will need to be.

As I said beautiful images, love all your guys work, and especially nice to see Glen Feshie in there.

xx
  • 2 7
flag swellhunter (Apr 23, 2020 at 3:26) (Below Threshold)
 @WRCDH C'mon dude - are you serious? Per Capita this does NOTHING!!! People that think airline travel is the bane of Climate Change are just out of touch with reality.

Electricity is the root cause of climate change and the fuels burned to generate the bulk of that electricity globally.

Nat Geo did a study of a single Co-Gen Plant in Illinois over a 24 hour period on a hot August Day. It consumed 100 rail cars full of coal in one day. That is ONE PLANT.

Your stance is not about Climate Change at all - I will agree with you that it's about exploitation and I have a major problem with that myself.

But it is grossly unfair to group responsible photographers, mountain bikers, etc.. that like to travel and capture the world into a category containing unenlightened trust fund kids looking for IG followers.
  • 5 1
 @swellhunter: The likely difference between "IG trust fund kids" and MTB'ers is that MTB'ers will say they genuinely care about the environment and and the impact we are having on this planet. Yet they continue to buy shiny new bike stuff every year that they don't need...go figure.

Earth Day is meant to provoke us to reflect on our individual actions and how they are impacting our planet. Pinkbike puts up an article of pretty pictures for Earth Day and we get this from Dave: "This certainly isn't the time, place, or context for you to be standing on your soapbox and trying to call people out...". News flash: this IS the time, place and context to discuss what we do and it's effects on our environment...it is Earth Day.

If a user wants to question PB flying a photographer around the world to provide race coverage, then give him a proper answer as to why that is justified, environmentally. Not "we are simply doing our job". Can PB utilise locally-based freelancers for example?

If people want to discuss environmental issues on a day dedicated to discussing environmental issues, let them.
  • 6 11
flag davetrumpore Plus (Apr 23, 2020 at 4:38) (Below Threshold)
 @iainmac-1: do you walk/bike to work? Or do you drive? Maybe your employer should hire someone closer?
Do you ever take a vacation? Do you purchase food that comes from various parts of the world v. What's grown only locally on your community? Do you ever use single use plastics? Do you own a bike and buy the riding gear that is all manufactured in the far east? .... Right... So let's not all stand here and decide world cup photographers, etc flying to races and taking pictures is the problem we need to point out fingers at. Point them at yourself first before taking aim here.
  • 3 10
flag RoadStain (Apr 23, 2020 at 4:47) (Below Threshold)
 @iainmac-1: Um, while I ponder your thoughts I will be driving my 4.0 Twin Turbo station wagon to the office getting about 12mpg. Oddly, what I am pondering is if I get a new 2020 version or a 2019 that has a great price on it. All while knowing that my other V6 3.2ltr station wagon has an oil leak that is wasting precious Mobil1 0w-40.

My god, the weight of the world is on my shoulders. I may have to think about this while mulling about in my boat running the dual 7.9ltr diesel engines.Waki would be proud, the boat has Volvo engines.....
  • 10 2
 @davetrumpore: Relax pal. I'm merely suggesting ways we can possibly reduce our impact on the planet as Earth Day wants us to think about, not trying to sentence photographers to destitution or make them out as the sole problem.

I have pointed the finger at myself. I cycle to work, I don't eat meat or consume animal products, I avoid buying clothes unless absolutely necessary, both my mtb's are secondhand and I have reduced my single use plastic intake as much as possible. My vacations are mainly within my own country. Small steps to reduce my own imprint on the environment.

I don't see what issue you are finding in this discussion? Or are you just really fragile?
  • 5 9
flag davetrumpore Plus (Apr 23, 2020 at 5:13) (Below Threshold)
 @iainmac-1: let's locally source the riders for the next wotld cup race too... Then we can all stay home and feel warm and fuzzy about it.

You do you... But don't point fingers at other people because you've decided one thing they do has an environment impact.

Where do all those veggies you eat get shipped into Scotland from? Are they all farmed responsibly, etc etc

You sir are a consumer just like everyone else. And you consume the content on this website daily as well. So coming on a website you enjoy while also trying to make some silly call out about how people who create that content shouldn't be flying around the world blablabla.... The irony and hypocrisy is thick
  • 10 1
 @davetrumpore: I am struggling to understand if you are deliberately missing the point, or just unable to see the point.

@WRCDH made the point about unnecessary travel, not I. I am defending the fact that he is right to pose the question in this article, on Earth Day, which you seemed to have taken issue with.

I am not finger pointing at all, nor have I "decided" it has an environmental impact like it is some sort of choice...however if you want environmental impact it is about 90kg CO2 per person per hour. Wink

Yes I am a consumer...we live in a consuming society. Is it not a positive thing to reduce where possible one's impact? Or before I can criticise anything must I first live off-grid in the wilderness?

You're not really making any decent argument, apart from "you consume stuff so your argument is void". I am sure you are more clever than that.
  • 4 11
flag davetrumpore Plus (Apr 23, 2020 at 5:56) (Below Threshold)
 @iainmac-1: your words "
If a user wants to question PB flying a photographer around the world to provide race coverage, then give him a proper answer as to why that is justified, environmentally. Not "we are simply doing our job". Can PB utilise locally-based freelancers for example?"

You want an environmental justification for how a group of people make a living? While simultaneously enjoying/consuming the content they create while making that living.

*** And in pinkbikes defense they don't fly us around the world. And quite often we can drive from round to round, carpool, etc.

An article was put up about the beauty of the planet we live on. Complete with pictures and words about how we can all do our part to reflect on what we have, not take it for granted, and do our own part.

Yet some how this has triggered a few of you because in doing so we posted pictures from travels. Are you aware of the saying people in glass houses should not throw stones? Apply that here.

Every single person with an iPhone, internet access, a car, a bike, who just generally goes about their day making an honest living has an environmental impact larger than they should... Everyone, every day. So kindly do not try to use other people's livelyhood as a way to call them out while spouting on out all the great things you do for the environment as a way to somehow justify why you are entitled to criticize. You're not. The shoe would easily be in the other foot if your life choices were under review.

You do you... But don't judge others here

At the end of the day I shoot photos of bikes. Hopefully creating images that promote an active and healthy outdoor lifestyle. Sure it promotes consumerism, but at least it promotes it in the outdoor industry where many of the brands/consumers are environmentally conscious and make some small steps to make their own lives a little less impactful. We are all guilty of the same pleasures and exploits, so please leave your sense of entitlement for judgment at the door.
  • 6 2
 @davetrumpore: Agreed this article has beautiful photos of our planet, posted to celebrate Earth Day, a day dedicated to environmental protection. The questioning of the air miles was to probe if maybe more can be done to reduce said air miles, not to put your livelihood on trial. No one is judging anyone here, just asking the question. Discussions about the environment have to be frank, it's an urgent issue.

I haven't spouted anything, only responded to your replies. You asked me what I do after all, in an attempt to nullify the argument by painting me as a hypocrite. The argument would still stand - can more be done? If not, fine, it is only a question. You said PB don't fly you out and you take efforts to car share...could you not have led with that instead? It's a good answer to the question.

I am not triggered at all, it was you that went on the offensive in your reply to WRCDH. Peace.
  • 4 5
 @iainmac-1: no I'm not going to lead in with some line about carsharing etc to appease anyone.

I fly 130,000 miles a year, and if I car share it's because it's faster between some rounds or cheaper... The line about PB not flying folks around is because we are freelancers and foot our own bills always.

And I feel no need to environmentally justify my career choice and it's inherent impact to make you or anyone else feel better. It is what it is. We all have an impact greater than we should... This is mine and I can chose to offset in other ways with other lifestyle choices... However I feel no need to have to justify one with the other or defend any of it.

7+ months a year I'm home. Literally at home.... But you're certainly not going to find me criticizing folks that commute to work in their cars year round. Because that would be the silly kind of hypocritical argument y'all are pushing here.

Cheers... Enjoy the photos, videos, live race coverage, product development, and consumerism that is part and parcel of MTB culture. We could all be a part of something far worse so focus the lifestyle critique elsewhere please.
  • 2 2
 I don’t follow World Cup racing anymore — it’s gotten boring for me since they’ve gone almost exclusively to blue-grooved bike park tracks. And it’s not just me — many riders agree, including youngster Thibaut Dapréla who yearns with misty eyes for technical, steep, raw, natural, gnarly tracks of a decade ago.

I expect an avalanche of tirades about this comment as well, so have fun on your phones and computers. I’m going for a ride =P
  • 3 3
 @WRCDH It's great to see that you are so passionate about conserving the planet, but are you really this cynical about people traveling because they used planes get there? Come on man. Traveling and exploring new trails and regions is one of the most amazing things about mountain biking, and your mocking it because they used some gas to get there? Keep smelling your own farts man.
  • 1 0
 @swellhunter: oops sorry, meant to downvote.
  • 3 4
 Oh, wow! What a bunch of self righteous people! Interesting to learn that a collection of beautiful imagery about nature can trigger some to fabricate themselves neon signs and billboards that point out to the aforementioned self righteousness. My deepest congratulations, what can I say! Wink
  • 1 1
 @cfellows: @cfellows: LOL, it’s about the irony of these pictures on Earth Day — Earth Day was founded to “demonstrate support for environmental protection.” Your one-dimensional interpretation of my post warranted my response. My comments are about the irony of posting pictures not of demonstrating environmental protection, but rather, they posted pictures of sensitive ecosystems which the article described as “a world we hope to soon access once again” and going on to say “As two-wheelers, we have this gigantic playground to call our own.” Keep in mind, many mountain bikers who can travel to these places are quite often relatively affluent with discretionary income that can be used either for good (or relatively innocuous enjoyment of our world), or to exploit sensitive ecosystems for their own destructive enjoyment. If you take offense to that as a mountain biker, it might make more sense to think of hoards of 2-stroke motorcycles tearing up quiet, unpolluted, serene, sensitive ecosystems that are home to endangered or human-contact-sensitive animals. So you have Earth Day, which is intended to DEMONSTRATE support for environmental protection and then you have mountain biker photographers taking about going to those sensitive ecosystems for their own enjoyment — there’s an ironic disconnect in the article relative to the purpose of Earth Day — like I said, I would have preferred to see people “making a difference.”

Fuel consumption on its own isn’t my concern. It fuel consumption to travel 20,000 miles round trip for a mountain biking safari in a sensitive ecosystem accessed via a traffic jam of unregulated diesel British off-road vehicles in an African national park and then posting about it on social media and making other want to go too is just about the antithesis of what Earth Day founders hoped for. This is the irony I’m talking about — not showing people making a difference, but rather, showing places that we can go trample on with our bikes, while showing it off on social media so others can follow in our tracks (per my original post), haha. See, there are more dimensions to my comments that y’all considered in those knee-jerk one-dimensional responses.
  • 1 2
 @davetrumpore: LOL, it’s about the irony of these pictures on Earth Day — Earth Day was founded to “demonstrate support for environmental protection.” Your one-dimensional interpretation of my post warranted my response. My comments are about the irony of posting pictures not of demonstrating environmental protection, but rather, they posted pictures of sensitive ecosystems which the article described as “a world we hope to soon access once again” and going on to say “As two-wheelers, we have this gigantic playground to call our own.” Keep in mind, many mountain bikers who can travel to these places are quite often relatively affluent with discretionary income that can be used either for good (or relatively innocuous enjoyment of our world), or to exploit sensitive ecosystems for their own destructive enjoyment. If you take offense to that as a mountain biker, it might make more sense to think of hoards of 2-stroke motorcycles tearing up quiet, unpolluted, serene, sensitive ecosystems that are home to endangered or human-contact-sensitive animals. So you have Earth Day, which is intended to DEMONSTRATE support for environmental protection and then you have mountain biker photographers talking about going to those sensitive ecosystems for their own enjoyment — there’s an ironic disconnect in the article relative to the purpose of Earth Day — like I said, I would have preferred to see people “making a difference.”

Fuel consumption on its own isn’t my concern. It fuel consumption to travel 20,000 miles round trip for a mountain biking safari in a sensitive ecosystem accessed via a traffic jam of unregulated diesel British off-road vehicles in an African national park and then posting about it on social media and making other want to go too is just about the antithesis of what Earth Day founders hoped for. This is the irony I’m talking about — not showing people making a difference, but rather, showing places that we can go trample on with our bikes, while showing it off on social media so others can follow in our tracks (per my original post), haha. See, there are more dimensions to my comments that y’all considered in those knee-jerk one-dimensional responses.
  • 2 2
 @davetrumpore: Your original comment (well and many others) does make me laugh out loud though. I can just see the steam blowing out of your ears as you misinterpret my posts and probably those of many other people. Chill dude. Seriously, chill.
  • 3 1
 @davetrumpore: By the way, if you’re going to spout off big words like “elitist,” you should know what they mean. Nothing in any of my comments could possibly be construed as elitist — especially not mentioning extensive worldwide air travel by relatively affluent individuals (with respect to Earth Day), nor pointing out the related issue of social media and Instagram’s uncontested role in the rapid growth of commercial exploitation of exotic and endangered animals...as well as travel to, and damage of, sensitive ecosystems by many different groups of people. Social media has been good for “tourism” revenue, related support industries like aerospace, and the massive growth of worldwide leisure travel as emerging economies grow their middle and upper classes — but that huge growth in travel has been bad for biodiversity at certain travel destinations, sensitive ecosystems, and many other things. This isn’t a radical perspective — it’s widely acknowledged data-based scientific and economic fact. But if I’m wrong about any of that, or if it was somehow elitist, please inform me of exactly how, hahaha.

On the other hand, talking about flying 130,000 miles around the world to exclusive resorts towns in the European Alps and other places — while earning a living during those 5 months a year by taking pictures in those exclusive resort areas — is much closer to what one could define as elitist.
  • 1 2
 @WRCDH: I never do wonder why it is that the Libs are so f*cking hypocritical. Plus, this @davetrumpore blocks content from folks he may not agree with. Last time I knew of a world leader who did such things....well, Obama to an extent, but more so Marx and Hitler.
  • 1 2
 @WRCDH: I did notice from his profile he is from Burlington VT...I mean, really? If that place were stricken with a REAL plague we would be better off but for the ferry across Lake Champlain. From there, it was AWESOME to sit, feeding the birds (in front of the Do Not Feed the Birds sign) at the resturant...hearing the local idiot's bitch about the Trump stickers on my $120k gas guzzler. Not 100% certain, but I believe I was the only one not wearing something made of hemp or not wearing deodorant.
  • 14 0
 This post is what I need right now, thank you Pinkbike and awsome photographers.
  • 7 0
 Title was accurate.
  • 6 0
 My favourite is the one with a nice view.
  • 4 0
 I'm surprised there's no picks of moab, or sedona, I love the Scotland picks, one of my favorite places on earth.
  • 3 0
 All amazing...my personal favorite: Sunset in the Glencoe Pass, Scotland, UK--Nathan Hughes. Earth-Sky-Water & layers of light--fantastic job Nathan!
  • 1 0
 It's hard to find a bad view in Glencoe, the place is stunning.
  • 4 0
 Great photo essay! Wish Utah would have made the cut though
  • 6 0
 Very true - big omission! Now added Smile
  • 1 0
 I am so proud of seen in this article my place! The photo is between Italian and Switzerland border in the Alps. I ride in this place every summer! I live in a wonderful place Ossola, my love.
  • 3 0
 Awesome. These were all taken by Pinkbike staffers?!?
  • 8 1
 Yes... Taken from in and around or traveling between the various World Cup and EWS locations over the years. And a few from we each of our own backyards that we call home when not on assignments.
  • 1 0
 Hard not to feel sentimental and grateful of all the awesome places we get to ride. Perfect timing for this article, probably my favourite pb article ever
  • 1 0
 Right click... Save... Download... 45kb. Oh.
Guessing royalties for the high resolution versions? (Understandably). All excellent..
  • 1 0
 I just spent two hours slowly scrolling through these incredible photos. None is better or worse than any other. If pressed though, John Day, Oregon.
  • 1 1
 These are incredibles photos for sure. But I'm surprise that not a single one from Sterling Lorence made it. In my eyes he's one of the best to incorpore the beauty of the earth in his photo.
  • 9 7
 @brianpark - you missed Bicycle day on 19th, just saying...
  • 2 1
 Jaw dropping. I guess we'll all be visiting when this is over. Switzerland & Scotland both amazing.
  • 2 0
 Genuinely amazing gallery
  • 1 0
 Great shots ! Glad I clicked because of that first picture that resembled to a death metal band logo.
  • 5 4
 Much better on a computer screen
  • 2 0
 Breathtaking!
  • 1 0
 So many incredible shots, i'll be coming back to this over and over.
  • 1 0
 These are some awesome desktop wallpaper and Zoom video backgrounds
  • 3 0
 ...also would be cool if there were a link or info to be able to support these photographers via purchasing prints. I'd love to have that "Inverness, Scotland" shot by @rossbellphoto on a canvas print in my home office or the "The Dolomites, Italy" shot by @davetrumpore , maybe printed on metal. That would be sweet.
  • 1 0
 Wonderful photos,....... thanks for that.
  • 3 3
 yay, pretty pictures

p.s. on bald eagle photo caption should be just "murica" even though its in canada
  • 2 2
 Thank god the rumor that Franklin wanted the US National Symbol to be a freaking turkey is false.
  • 1 0
 That milky way picture! And Emyn Muil Switzerland
  • 1 0
 Just mesmerizing. It made me become silent.
  • 2 1
 Too soon.
  • 2 5
 Just today riding (on closed trails) we saw our first living bobcat. Super cool. Fewer people so far more critters. Just hope for less rattle and coral snakes. Maybe a few less would boar too......
  • 1 0
 Swoon
  • 1 0
 Awesome photos!!!
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