Pinkbike Product Picks

Oct 21, 2011
by Mike Levy  
SRAM XO Rear Derailleur

Ten speed is here to stay and SRAM has a drivetrain to suit nearly every rider's budget, from those who want the no holds barred XX kit, all the way down to the newly updated X5 range. XO sits one level down from the top step, but is intended to be the go-to group for dedicated riders who are hard on their gear, no matter if that includes mounting the parts on everything from a downhill rig, to a cross-country race bike. Versatility is the key word with XO, including the group's ten speed specific rear derailleur that we test here. Available in three cage lengths: short for DH or single ring use, and medium or long for dual and triple ring compatibility, with all three cages consisting of a carbon outer element and aluminum inner, means that there is a model for all types of riding. SRAM's employs their Exact Actuation 1:1 cable pull ratio that is said to be more tolerant of cable stretch and contamination than what the competition uses, but keep in mind that this means that it must be paired up with one of SRAM's ten speed shifters, although it doesn't have to be the XO model. Sealed bearing pulley wheels come stock, a nice touch for those who ride year round in bad weather, and it is compatible with SRAM's wide range cassettes that are fitted with a large 36 tooth cog. The 203 gram XO rear derailleur retails for $234 USD. www.sram.com


Product Picks
SRAM's 203 gram XO rear derailleur is a proven winner in our books.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesHanging down for the roots, rocks and sticks to do their best to ruin your ride, a bike's rear derailleur is arguably its most vulnerable component, but our XO units have shrugged it all off with only a few cosmetic wounds. And I'm not just talking about the XO Silver model pictured above, but every one of the four different derailleurs currently on our ever expanding test fleet of bikes - impressive considering that we are not known for being kind to any bike that we spend time on. SRAM's positive feeling shifting has been top notch, requiring only the rarest of cable adjustments, and the derailleur's limit screws haven't creeped out over time, holding their place after countless miles of hard use, including everything from Winter shuttle runs, to 70 kilometer cross-country races. While the XO's performance over the long haul impressed us, it's track record isn't 100% squeaky clean, with one unit suffering from a stiff main pivot that hampered shifting. Keeping in mind that this particular derailleur had been in rotation for nearly a full season of use, often getting the pressure washer spray down without any thought to how it would hold up (isn't this how all tests should be?), we're still satisfied with XO's longterm performance. Their $234 USD asking price isn't exactly pocket change, especially when you consider that the X9 model weighs roughly the same and also makes use of the carbon and aluminum cage. Choose wisely, but we're betting that you'll be happy with how both perform. - Mike Levy



Thrones seat

Thrones is a relatively new seat company out of Australia that is producing some unique looking saddles that stand out from the more standard all black offerings out there. At this point they only offer a single seat shape, one that may look familiar to some out there, although it is available with seven different tops, including "The Old Boy" version tested here. While the graphics certainly have a road bike leaning to them, Thrones also offers a custom program that lets you design your own artwork. The catch? A minimum order of twenty, but we can see some teams and bike shops wanting a saddle all their own. All seven Thrones' seats use the same carbon injected Nylon base that measures 293mm long in total length and 130mm at its widest point. The seat's mid section - the place that bears most of your body weight - is 83mm wide. All this, including the saddle's hollow titanium rails, weighs in at a respectable 215 grams. Suggested retail price is $159.99 USD. www.bikethrones.com


Product Picks
While The Old Boy has a bit of road bike flavour to its graphics, most mountain bikers loved the look. More importantly, we found it to be quite comfortable.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesI installed The Old Boy atop my Reverb dropper post and immediately headed out on a four hour cross-country ride in the rain, the very thing that you shouldn't do as a first ride with a new seat under you. While part of me was expecting some chaffing and forced out of the saddle riding during this initial getting to know each other suffer fest, I was pleasantly surprised by how invisible it seemed to be under me. A seat that you don't think about is a comfortable seat. I was also reasonably sure that the graphics, especially the white front section, would quickly look worn and tired after a few rides in the mud and rain, but that hasn't been the case, with The Old Boy still looking nearly new after a lot of use. If the road graphics have you worried that the seat won't be up to some abuse on the mountain bike, you needn't worry - the hollow titanium rails have stood their ground quite well, brushing off more abuse than they were likely intended to see. My only words of warning regarding the Throne seat would be its use of relatively thin and hard foam. Those who ride a lot will likely be fine with the solid feel, but riders with less seasoned behinds may want a more forgiving seat. Everyone is shaped a bit differently down there, and it's for this reason that you need to take all seat reviews with a grain of salt - if possible, always try before you buy. - Mike Levy



Dakine Ventilator glove

Dakine's reworked 2012 Ventilator glove has been designed, as you would guess by its name, to let as much air flow through as possible. Four way stretch mesh has been used on the top, along with a seamless and ventilated palm that is about as thin as you could ever hope for. Whereas most minimalistic gloves forgo incorporating any sort of palm padding, the new Ventilator makes use of 3mm thick gel cushions at the base and top of the palm. A small Velcro enclosure at the wrist facilitates pulling them on and off. Besides all of the usual glove tech, the Ventilator also features touch screen friendly tips on the middle and pointer fingers, allowing you to take a photo or change songs on your iPhone, iPod Touch or iWhatever without having to pull a glove off to do it. While bringing phones and iPods onto the trail is always a point of contention, the Ventilator's touch screen compatibility makes sense to us. They retail for $35 USD. www.dakine.com


Product Picks
Super breathable, touch screen compatible and with nearly invisible palm protection, the Ventilators have become an office favorite.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWhile I feel naked when riding without gloves, I'm always looking for the thinnest and lightest duty ones that I can find. With the exception of the 3mm palm padding, the Ventilator is about as minimalist as you could hope for. Not only are both the top and bottom made from a single layer, the fingers also feature mesh sides to further enhance venting. As you'd expect, this all adds up to a glove that feels as if it isn't even there, but still provides much more protection than riding bare palmed. Speaking of protection, the Ventilator's 3mm padding, specifically placed at the heel and top of the palm to leave the center section open, feels invisible when gripping the bars. This came as a surprise considering how thick the padding actually is, but Dakine's careful placement means that it goes unnoticed until you really need it. They have been my go-to gloves for any riding that I've been doing, and while the top seems to stain easily, the seams and fabric have held up well to both washing and wear and tear. If you've ever tried to answer a call or take a photo with your touch screen phone while wearing gloves you'll know that it is nearly impossible, but the Ventilators work as advertised, allowing you to use your phone just like you aren't wearing gloves at all. Even without this last feature, the Ventilator glove is a winner in our books, but once you've used your phone without needing to remove your gloves you'll likely never go back. - Mike Levy



GU Brew Electrolyte Drink tablet

GU offers a number of different supplements depending on what you are looking for, but their Brew tablets are designed to replenish electrolytes (potassium, sodium and chloride) that your body loses during exercise. Why are these electrolytes important? Because they carry electrical impulses responsible for muscle contractions, and after exercising for over an hour you'll need to both hydrate your body and replace the electrolytes in order for your muscles to work at their best. Simply drop the GU Brew tablet into your 16oz bottle and let it dissolve in the water, no stirring or shaking required. One tablet contains just ten calories, 320mg of sodium, a sigle gram of carbs and zero protein. GU Brew tablets are available in lemon lime, orange, blueberry pomegranate and raspberry, as well as in powder format. A box of 16 electrolyte tablets retails for $25.60 USD. www.guenergy.com


Product Picks
GU Brew tabs are small enough to keep in your bag incase you are having a rough day on the trails.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesI'm a big believer in anything that can help me pedal for longer or go faster, especially when it's as easy as dropping a tablet into my water bottle before I head out. I won't claim to have felt a "kick" or set new personal best times on my local loops, but I will say that I'm confident that the GU tablets work as advertised. Half of the battle is actually remembering to take a drink in the first place, and the lemon lime flavour of our Brew tabs added just enough taste to the water that I found myself actually wanting to take a sip more often - that can't be a bad thing. That taste wasn't universally liked though, with a few others complaining that it seemed a bit too bitter for their liking. Bottom line: we spend more money on gadgets that don't actually help us than what a few tabs of GU Brew costs, and while it didn't transform me into an elite athlete, I also didn't cramp once while drinking GU Brew infused water during a ride. No, it may not have the same effect as a well timed EPO program, but it sure is a hell of a lot cheaper - Mike Levy





Have you used any of the products featured in Pinkbike's Picks? Share your impressions below.


96 Comments

  • 18 1
 I love how SRAM doesn't have any DH/FR specific derailleurs (okay, except the DH X0, but that's new stuff), but almost every of their models is suitable for some rougher use!
  • 11 0
 much agreed i have broken 1 sram derailleur over the past 4 years that i have been doing DH riding
  • 4 0
 My Sram X0 has no writing on it anymore (XO on the main body) due to it being scraped off by rocks and causing sparks in the process i was later told by a mate and it is still shifting seamlessly. only thing that has came off was a C-clip after 2 years of being pounded Smile
  • 4 3
 My first my ever at highland, I hit a rock up into my x9 long story short and its not even recognizable anymore
  • 7 0
 I really like those Dakine gloves!
  • 2 1
 I'd buy the X0 rear derailleur in Redwin Red....not sure if they're doing all that bling stuff in 10 speed ?
  • 1 0
 i bought my Sram X0 back in 2008..and its still rocking!
  • 9 0
 when i rode sram xo's replacing dérailleurs was an every month sorta thing. I had a box of cannibalized xo's
Took me a year to kill a saint shadow. And the second saint and its running well. It really depends where you ride. Lots of my local trails are super tight with lots of chunder and roots sticking out in weird places. I think shadow is almost a necessity
  • 1 0
 My X9 mid cage has survived what 2 derailleur hangers could not! Still works perfect. (knock on wood)
  • 6 0
 I've wrecked multiple X-9s.
  • 5 0
 blown through x-9's x-7's and an x-0. threw a saint on and its hard to look back now
  • 1 0
 @Lehel, totally agree. I run x0 on my all mountain rig but i'm confident that it'd be light enough for xc, and durable enough for the roughest dh abuse. That in my opinion is what makes it a superior derailleur.
  • 3 0
 Always been a massive fan of Sram over Shimano their shifters just make more sence and the shift it's self is seemless... but I just refuse to pay that much for the X0 it maybe the dog's danglies but it's nearly double the price of Saint!!
Just wondering what other peeps prefer Shimano or Sram??
  • 10 0
 I think these types of discussions - for obvious reasons - should be ... banned.

This is just simply flamebait: yet another Shimano vs SRAM topic (no doubt with a rebuttal that goes like this: "But I mentioned the price of the SRAM, so it's not just Shimano vs SRAM!").
  • 2 0
 idk i kinda like these types of discussions i always learn something cool about both companies
  • 5 0
 like em both, they both make great products, so the bargain wins!
  • 2 0
 I've just made the switch from XTR to X0 (9 speed), but only because I wanted Gripshift so that there's nothing to bash my knees against on the bars. I obviously had to change the RD at the same time and got an X9 quite cheap. I reckon the cable routing is better as there's less sticking out (I think Shimano have gone this way too now). I like the open design of the parallelogram links, but again, I think Shimano's Shadow stuff is now like that. I think, say, 3 years ago SRAM had the edge, but Shimano have possibly caught up again now. But it was Gripshift that sold it for me. I'm not sure why SRAM haven't released 10 speed Gripshift though, I probably would have gone for that - now I'm stuck with 9 speed for many more years (2x9 is enough for me though).
  • 6 0
 Although I dont like the SRAMVSSHIMANO debate.........Shadow mechs.....best thing since sliced bread.
  • 1 0
 I am a grip shift fanatic and so I was always pro SRAM for years and I loved it, but when the new 10 speed Shimano came out I had to try it on my next bike and I will say that I feel like the 10 speed shimano stuff is the smoothest shifting stuff out.. I still do miss my Gripshift thought..
I think that on a XC/ trail bike the smooth shifting of the Shimano stuff is better but for AM/FR/DH stuff.. I love the durability of the SRAM stuff better..
  • 1 0
 @swan3609 - Stay tuned for the 10spd SRAM Gripshift coming out in the future..
  • 1 0
 I know its coming.. I dont have a bike with 10 speed SRAM currently.. If I could get some 10 speed shimano Gripshift that didnt involve some small euro company that charges as much as cost on a set of triggers.. You can never beat $25 for a X0 gripshift that will last forever..
  • 1 0
 this is exactly what im talking about!! hahaa
  • 1 0
 @swan3609 $25 for a X.0 gripshift? you're talking about the rear only right? if not where can I get a set for 25? they're usually around $65 maybe $50 if you look harder and longer.
btw I still have 9.0 SL rear der (the white one) on my XC hardtail and I love it
  • 1 0
 I work at a shop.. I guess I shouldnt have blabbed my mouth.. I never talk about cost on stuff.. But yes its 25-30 for a single shifter.. Even cheaper if one of the Distributer reps has a set in his car that he is looking to get rid of.. haha
  • 1 0
 Is no one going to mention the perfection that IS XTR yumea?
  • 1 0
 SRAM.
I ve used Sram X5 - X7 - X9 - X0.
All worked well.
1 time i had used a grip shift but knew in quick time it's bad..
Further i had only '1' X7 cage broken, after a crash.

The only good Shimano i ve used was a XTR 9speed 2 weeks ago on a test bike from Giant.
But i dont like the fact you need your finger to shift up/ down ( in the opposite way of Sram ) and have to leave it from the brake leaver...
Further i dont like it at all.. doesn't work as good as Sram.
( Just my opinion )

I do have respect for the fact: Shimano was the first brand who came with decent gears for Cycles. Salute
  • 1 0
 @GiantXTC-0.. The Yumea kit is like $1000 and you shave like less then 1/4 of a pound off of your bike.. Its build for the guy who has waay to much money and wants to show it off.. Especially since the XX Groupo is lie 200 Grams lighter.. haha

@nielsdewit I have broken more SRAM stuff then Shimano stuff.. Given I was pretty exclusive to SRAM for a while.. I have gone though 2 x9 trigger shifters, a x7 shifter, a x7 derailer, and x9 derailer.. they are not bombproof.. just they will go alot linger before they blow up.. And Grip shift is one of those things that is better to just keep simple because it works better and is simpler than any trigger out there..

and the new Shimano you can shift with your thumb like SRAM or with your index finger.. And the new 10 speed shimano has the 10 speed SRAM stuff beat on how smooth the shifting is.. Shimano is butter smooth..
  • 1 0
 I have LX Shimano shifter that is ten years old. I still run it on my trail-bike. I took it apart and cleaned/greased it once in those ten years it still works flawlessly. Wish it would die so I could buy another Saint like I run on my DH bike.
  • 6 0
 It has *Electrolytes*, what the plants and your body need...
  • 6 0
 It's what plants crave
  • 4 0
 Brought to you by Carl's Jr.
  • 1 0
 Not sure!
  • 8 6
 RE: Thrones saddle.
Quoting: 'I installed The Old Boy atop my Reverb dropper post and immediately headed out on a four hour cross-country ride...' - of course we all agree, these days you NEED a dropper post for XC riding.
Who paid for writing that bulls*it?
  • 7 1
 In a world with droppers............Ill reserve standard posts for DH and jumping. XC is an area where they shine for sure.
  • 2 2
 ?!? Many of the XC bikes/riders do not even use a QR seatclamps. All Mountain bikes is the area you have missed.
  • 7 0
 My point was ..........an xc ride, can, and is often done on an "all-mountain" bike. Dropper posts are one of the components that make this possible. XC race bike? Sure, fix that seat way up. But for most folks, droppers kill it.
So..........his comment in the article is not asinine, as you indicate.
  • 2 1
 Quite frankly XC and enduro racing with varied stages is where dropper post makes most if not the only sense. Everywhere where terrain goes up down often it's great to have. in AM people usualy climb for long time, and then take a breather to regenerate before downhill - such ppl don't need one, as well as those riding XC in not too moderate terrain - but well we're not gonna shoot them if they buy one, right? Big Grin

If someone wants a cheap way to improve their descending on XC trails without bying expensive dropper then get the finger out of your performance ass and lower your seat by 3-5cm comparing to your usual pedalling position. Minimal loss on seated pedalling efficiency/ endurance - huge difference on descents or when rolling over obstacles. It also makes standing pedalling easier.

Still location location location - on my trails roadie perfect height is not efficient because you are unable to unweigh your ass when going into obstacles, your stiff extended legs make you lose on obstacles all you gain on pedalling.
  • 6 0
 Location is the key here. Many trails you can find a "happy medium" for seat height. Personally, here in New England- my "xc" rides are often steep ups and downs, dropper post makes sense. Also, while I do sometimes rest before a long bomber run- at which point Ill lower my post.........I often dont like getting out of my saddle. I will stay on my pedals sometimes the whole ride- which can be hours........I pride in it. It peeves me when I have to stop to raise my post for a climb. So it really does depend on the terrain, if the trails I rode were rolling and less dynamic - a fixed height would be fine.
  • 2 1
 I actualy find the race for dropper posts travel increase being as stupid as looking for moar and moar megapixels in cameras. Most pros ride with seat high, if you look at top DHers, their seats are almost as high as those of XC guys. I thought that there has to be something in it, and started riding FR with higher seat as well (in sane range ofk) It's actualy a good lesson to move on the bike, after some time you find seat not being in the way at any moment, plus you can use it to control the rear end. So at the moment I actualy use 5cm, max 8cm on my Reverb, even on steepst sht. I dare to say that really low seats should be left to dirt jumpers
  • 1 0
 Trails where it is annoying to ride without a dropper post are rare (trails that have super steep descents punctuated with lots of climbs). Either it is just one long descent, or not technical enough to warrant dropping the post.

Point is, I'm not racing on super technical trails (I would consider a dropper post for something like BCBR though), so I don't really have an issue with stopping to drop or lift my seat. And sometimes I like taking descents with the seat up as that is how I have to do them when I race. Dropper posts are still getting better, so I don't mind waiting...
  • 1 0
 Good points. Although, again It depends on terrain. If the DH course has jumps and drops and lots of "mid air tuck" type scenarios, a lower seat height is no doubt ideal. Really insane steep stuff calls for low post setting as well. That being said, when I race I indeed run my seat as high as I feel comfortable because It helps for the pedal sections and when you are racing you pedal as much as you can. The seat is also used to control the bike, especially is mud and wet - that goes for trail and "free-ride" too. As far as really slammed seats? Yeah, dirt jumping only, I agreeSmile
  • 8 0
 @kovaldesign - No one ever said the you "NEED" a dropper post for cross-country riding, but if you rode on my trails xc trails with me you'd likely WANT one. Yeah, I ride with some XC diehards who won't ever use one and they shred without it, but I sure like to use one, as do the large majority of riders here. Where do I say that you need a dropper? No where, so take the "Who paid for writing that bulls*it?" comments elsewhere. The dropper post vs. standard post argument is so old.. it all depends on where you ride, how you ride and if you want it or not.
  • 2 0
 Ricky keeps his seat up even on gap jumps but personally I like my balls where they are and don't have his ability to recover from dynamic testicular dislocation so yeah - I'm with Mike on dropping the seat for the downhills on his local "xc" (emphasis on the quotes) trails
  • 1 0
 Just to clarify for Kovaldesign. Mike's XC rides consist of a ton of climbing (seat up) with descents that would be considered my your average rider as DH terrain(seat down). The local terrain can be ridden with the seat up, but gap jumps, drops and steep shoots are best ridden with the seat in the down position. I used a dropper for the BC Bike race this year which is considered to be an XC race. Needless to say my post went up and down that week more than Ron Jerremy's in a year.
  • 4 0
 Is there anyone who actually owns a dropper who wants to say they aren't the best new part they've put on in ten years? Or is it only people who don't have them that try to downplay their usefulness?

Maybe it's courses for horses, but it drives me nuts when I ride a trail bike without one now. Pretty much everyone I know has one too, because we all agree that they are pretty much a 'necessity' like disc brakes around here. Of course, necessity is a relative term.

I can ride down steep gnarly shit, or get around a corner with a seat jacked, but why would I want to do that?

And as far as the pro DHer's riding with their seat up, my guess is you're looking at the guys who are giants as there are many of them on the circuit. Their relative seat hight is probably lower than you think, and a mile away from being full XC height. I've got a friend who's DH seat height is about as high as my XC height, but his XC seat comes up to my nipples; pretty much the five inches higher the dropper post allows.
  • 2 0
 Nailed it kramster. Dropper post is the best money I have spent on anything.....ever. One ride with it and I would never go back.
  • 1 0
 Well I never said they are bad. I do own a dropper and I do keep on saying It's not all good. For some locations and applications they are useless, I also do believe some people for the sake of excelling in their skills should not buy one too early. Riding with seat too far down makes you less likely to learn to move around on your bike. I personally feel that after buying a dropper to my 6" bike, and riding trails with it, I absolutely MUST ride the same stuff with a xc hardtail with 100mm fork to keep my skills and body mobile. These days it is just too easy to run away with bad technique. I think dropper post is a great thing, a real revolution, but I rode without it for years and if my one goes to sht again, I won't buy another one, because it is a complicated, expensive luxury that I can live without. Another thing that can keep you from riding for weeks when it fails.

And I think my trails in terms of difficulty are not far from what you guys ride in BC. We don't have big built jumps, and our hills are max 150m high, but the level of rocks, roots, mud and steep sketchy descents can be devastating for anyone who imagines cross-country riding only as something looking like 99% of XC racing tracks in the world.
  • 2 0
 one guy I ride with was on the ball when choosing the build for his bike. He swapped the X0 rear derailleur from the build kit for an x9, then upgraded his x9 cranks to x0. Similar price difference, but the X0 cranks are way better!

On a side note, it pisses me off how bike manufacturers/suppliers spec expensive rear derailleurs on bikes almost always instead of spec'ing good cranks or wheels! I guess some people are like "OMG an X0 rear mech! I don't even notice the x7 cranks anymore!"
  • 1 1
 Are you talking about cranksets, or shifters. Because it sounds like you're talking about shifters, and there's no such thing as X7 cranks, but you keep using the "cranks".
  • 3 0
 Look again Stever, there is an X7 crankset. Has been for a year.
  • 1 1
 www.sram.com/truvativ/category/8

I see XX and XO, and, with a second look, I now see X9. Still not seeing any X7, but, whatever.
  • 4 0
 @ stever Here's your non-existent cranks that seem to be impossible to find for you.

www.sram.com/sram/mountain/products/sram-x7-2x10-crank

X7 would be a SRAM labeled product, not TRUVATIV.

There's a 3x10 available as well...
  • 1 0
 I've been trough an x9 already this season, the pivots just didn't hold up. I've heard of another two riders with the same problem. I find Sram parts to almost be disposable.
  • 1 0
 Yep, gone through two X9 derailleurs in two seasons because the rivots have worn out. Trying an X0 now as they don't use rivets
  • 2 0
 Mike, is the Gu tablet effervescent? I'm more than happy to carry tablets, but when you mix them in the middle of a race then you are burping up the fizzyness.

A bit of magnesium wouldn't go astray.
  • 2 0
 They are a bit fizzy, but only slightly. It didn't seem to bother me but I could see some not being down with that. Good point.
  • 1 0
 My '12 XO 10spd RD has issues with chain drop. Seems to be an issue a lot of people with it have. On the bike equipped with it, if you simply pick the rear wheel up about 2 ft and let it drop, the chain will fall off the front chain ring at least half the time. Never experienced a RD that let the chain drop off that easily. '10/'11 9spd XO RD doesn't suffer from this issue. Might want to watch out for this if you get one, since it's a big enough of a problem that there's a thread with over 100 posts about it on mtbr that shows that a good # may have come out of the factory faulty.
  • 2 0
 Would you say a fault or too much chain slack - too many links from factory in these cases?
  • 1 0
 Poor tension at the cage (the pivot where the cage meets the parallelogram). More tension = more drivetrain wear and noisier shift, but it seems too loose. Chain can be too short and in gear combo with good chainline and it'll still help.
  • 1 0
 on the whole seat dropper subject every rider ive seen on canock chase with one has said its the best thing they've bought for their bike, i want one but do not have one because theres allways somthing more important to spend my money on. Maybe santa will drop me one off at christmas.
  • 3 0
 I've had a saint for the past year and in that time my riding buddy has gone through two X9's and 1 X7. Saint is still running strong!
  • 1 0
 The flame war between shimano and sram is dumb. All you sram haters, google shimano failures and you will get all kinds of people saying this: "I bought this XTR derallieur, paid a ton of money, and it broke the second time I used it". Same story the other way around. Bottom line, stuff breaks, buy what you think looks cool. It has a warranty, so stop being dumb. For the record I have had top end shimano and sram forever, and both have given me all kinds of problems. Why? Because stuff breaks. Deal with it.
  • 1 0
 bad times i bought and xtr derallieur at the start of this year and it still works, its been buried a few times after ive bailed and the bike has dug its self into the ground, its hit rocks, trees, and many other things due to my balls being bigger than my skill. I guess ive been lucky with this one and my next outing could be its last.
  • 2 1
 I have a X0 rear and shifter on my all mountain/downhill bike and I just could not recommend it. The price is insane from my experience sram materials are sub standard to shimano. Nice and quite through the bumps though.
  • 1 0
 The price is insane, and the Sram rear der. isn't half as durable as Shimano. I have seen so many broken Sram's this year, at least a dozen just in the group of people I ride with. They just keep buying them over and over again, meanwhile my 9 yr old XT is still shifting just fine. Part of the problem is the long carbon cage will snap at the smallest stick in there, which there are a lot of on trails here in PA. I want to like Sram, I really really do, I love their industry and IMBA support, but I just can't afford to replace 3 derailleurs a season.
  • 1 0
 In 2007 i had an accident because the cable on my x9 got caught on a branch. The problem has not been fixed and the cable sticks out too much even on 2011 models. I have shimano swadow rear der. now.
  • 1 0
 Sticks out where?
  • 1 0
 It sticks out on its side where it engages on the mounting.
  • 1 0
 What am I paying for when I buy X0 if ``Their $234 USD asking price isn't exactly pocket change, especially when you consider that the X9 model weighs roughly the same and also makes use of the carbon and aluminum cage.`` ?
  • 2 0
 having it say XO instead of X9 is just that much cooler...... duh
  • 1 0
 I meant what would sram say the difference is, but yeah, at this point it seems like you`re right.
  • 1 0
 probably shifts cleaner...... but only a tiny difference not easy to notice, probably like sram force and sram red (god i have to stop riding road)
  • 1 0
 Maybe. It just seems like there's got to be something more than that given how expensive the X0 is.
  • 1 0
 what im wondering is where the f*ck is my electronic shifting?
  • 1 0
 BROKE my XO in half at the parallelogram after 3 rides, and the ten speed XO der. shifts like crap. The GU brew is awesome though, and its great after a night out of drinking!
  • 3 0
 they need to recommend products that people can actually buy cos not all of us are loaded!
  • 1 0
 Good call mate! A shimano technician told me that if you take a SLX rear der. and just replace the upper pulley, you can have the same performance of an XT for half of the price.
  • 1 0
 replace the upper pully with what?
  • 2 0
 That Thrones saddle looks almost exactly like a Fizik...and is probably just as uncomfortable!
  • 1 0
 Besides that they are ugly... with which bike they would make a match (colors)?
  • 1 0
 they make other colours, but I'm not really a fan of any of them to be honest. Rather just have my I fly.
  • 1 0
 omg that wc paint scheme is hideous, I expect sam hill to be grasping furiously at that wc striped thrones saddle as he loses to danny hart, still a fan of that wtb silverado with the syndicate scheme, now i just have to get a v10
  • 1 0
 I quite like the paint job actually... the front caliper on the other hand doesn't look like its gonna be doing much stopping! Razz
  • 1 0
 gotta admit it'd be cool if you were gee atherton riding in a rainbow jersey, both calipers dont look too good but they're saint so they must be good
  • 2 0
 he wasnt meaning what brake they are, more the fact that the front caliper looks like its got the wrong size mount and isnt actually over the braking surface
  • 1 1
 yeah i know they're mounted wrong but they probs still get enough power
  • 1 0
 I highly doubt that the front brake gets any power at all since the pads wouldn't be contacting the rotor at all. Facepalm
  • 1 0
 yeah, maybe 5 mm contact? itd be like dragging a foot lol
  • 1 0
 LOL kk i admit im wrong
  • 1 0
 If you want some sick gloves look at the deft family gloves, the best gloves ever. www.deftfamily.com/products/gloves-1.html
  • 1 0
 Not supposed to advertise like that, but those do look really sick.
  • 1 0
 i broke my saint and wanted an X0 but we lost signal before i could ask when i phoned and now still have a saint and still want an X0. Frown
  • 2 0
 Sram is solid. 4 years without tuning and it's still running like a champ!
  • 2 0
 I freakin love GU, I drink it all the time, on the bike and off.

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