Pinkbike Awards: Best Value Product Nominees

Dec 11, 2018
by Mike Kazimer  

Best Value Product Nominees


It's no secret that mountain biking can be an expensive sport, especially if you've got your eyes on a brand new carbon speed machine, an exotic fork, or a set of ultralight wheels. The good news is that today's mid- and entry-level components are better than ever, allowing riders without unlimited funds to enjoy high-end performance without breaking the bank.

The three products nominated here all offer an excellent price vs. performance ratio. SRAM's NX 12-speed gruppo drops the price of a wide range drivetrain even further, the Marzocchi Z1 returns to form with the reliability and simplicity that first put it on the map, and OneUp's dropper post makes it even easier to upgrade to a dropper post with just the right amount of travel.








Why it's nominated:

SRAM's $375 NX Eagle 12-speed drivetrain hit the market less than two years after the top-of-the-line 12-speed XX1 Eagle group debuted with a price tag of over $1,000. That's a pace that doesn't really fit the definition of trickle-down technology – 'pouring-down' would probably be more accurate.

Sure, the NX drivetrain isn't exactly light, but it offers very similar shifting performance to its high-end siblings, with enough gear range to make the hardest hills much more manageable. The 11-50 tooth cassette also fits on a standard 10-speed SRAM or Shimano freehub body, which means there's no need to shell out the extra dough for an XD driver body. The price of the NX drivetrain, and the fact that it's compatible with the other Eagle groups already on the market makes it a very welcome addition to SRAM's flock of drivetrains.

From the review:
bigquotesYes, it's heavier, and maybe a little clunkier than XX1 or X01 Eagle, but you can also buy the entire drivetrain for less than what an XX1 cassette costs. As far as practicality and ease of use, it's exactly what it should be... The NX Eagle drivetrain is going to be the "go-to" for a lot of riders looking for an affordable and reliable 1x set up.  Daniel Sapp








Why it's nominated:

I know, I know, the Z1 isn't a 'real' Marzocchi – it's not coil sprung, there's no open bath damper, and it's not filled with three quarts of oil, but don't let those nostalgic flashbacks take away from what the new Z1 brings to the table. It's stiff, strong, and easy to adjust, which just so happen to be the traits that earned Marzocchi such a loyal fan base back in the day.

The air sprung Z1 uses Fox's GRIP Sweep cartridge damper, a simple and effective design that relies on a spring-backed internal floating piston to compensate for the oil as the fork is compressed. In fact, it works so well that Fox ended up adopting a slightly more adjustable version of it for their highest end forks.

Our test fork handled hours and hours of hard riding without any issues, delivering a smooth and comfortable ride even when blasting through the tallest of brake bumps or dealing with the occasional mis-judged landing. More than anything, it's the Z1's $699 retail price that earned it the 'Best Value' nomination. That's not chump change, but the fact the Z1's performance is on par with forks that cost hundreds of dollars more is what makes it a great value.


From the review:
bigquotesFor hard chargers looking for a sturdy, smooth operating fork with a more reasonable price tag, the Z1 is a highly recommended option. Mike Kazimer








Why it's nominated:

Dropper posts post prices have become much more reasonable over the years, and the level of reliability also seems to be increasing, which is welcome news for anyone in the market for this necessary accessory (ok, there's that one guy who swears dropper posts are just a fad, and that tall-posting is going to come back in fashion, but he's also rocking bar ends and Power Grips, so...).

OneUp don't have any fancy name for their offering – it's simply called the Dropper Post, and it's available with either 150 or 170mm of drop. Pretty standard stuff, but what sets this particular post apart is the fact that the amount of drop is easily adjustable, and it also has one of the lowest, if not the lowest, overall heights of any post on the market. That means that shorter riders and riders whose bikes have taller seat tube heights don't need to settle for a post with less drop than they'd like.

The features and performance are there, and the reasonable price solidifies the post's value - it's $199 USD without a remote, or $248 with the shifter-style remote included.



From the First Ride:
bigquotesIn action, the post has a swift but measured extension rate that can be easily modulated for mid-stroke stops. The carbon-reinforced plastic remote has just-right ergonomics and tucks nicely beneath the left brake lever. Richard Cunningham










171 Comments

  • + 244
 My nominees are for 2 products, zip ties and gorilla tape, the possibilities are endless
  • + 71
 Don't forget beer.
  • + 45
 @italyn12: beer is a necessity, it’s like oxygen
  • + 15
 Dont forget those strap-ons we saw last week.
  • + 51
 How could PB have missed those Enve fat bike rims from this list? Surely they're by far the best value product of 2018.
#envegotrobbed
  • + 5
 @Boardlife69: what strap-ons do you mean?
  • + 6
 Fat Gorilla tape-the only way to reliably set a fat bike up tubeless. Worth the 20 clams.
  • - 6
flag WAKIdesigns (Dec 11, 2018 at 9:17) (Below Threshold)
 @sewer-rat: you win all the internets today hahaha Big Grin
  • + 2
 Nodding over here because I just installed my new DIY winter fender with gorilla tape and zip ties.
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: I really like the guys behind that product.
  • + 1
 New strap-on’s sound good, mine are getting a bit soiled these days. So definately in the market for a new one
  • - 12
flag celedonio (Dec 11, 2018 at 10:24) (Below Threshold)
 Straps on read backwards is No straps
  • - 7
flag celedonio (Dec 11, 2018 at 10:25) (Below Threshold)
 @kazwei:

Read backwards is No Straps
  • + 13
 @celedonio: but it isn't
Facepalm
  • + 14
 @WAKIdesigns: It's becoming more and more obvious that there's people that only come on here to down vote your comments... lol..... keep fighting the good fight brother.
  • + 5
 @celedonio: don't you mean, no sparts? Sounds like a good thing since I'm pretty sure sparting is unpleasant.
  • + 16
 You could get about 130 baguettes for the price of a One-up dropper.

Length of baguette: 18 inches
29*3.14 = 91 inches
91/18 = about 5 (all approximate due to baguette tolerances)
5 baguettes/wheel * 2 wheels = 10 baguettes per bike.
130/10 = 13

Would you rather have one dropper post bike or 13 baguetted bikes?
The choice is clear.
  • + 99
 One Up Droppah! There is not w single Sram drivetrain product that offers some value over Shimano sorry. This is a joke. SLX and XT beat the crap out of Sram. Senslessly
  • + 25
 Indeed wakidesigns. I just bought a replacement XT cassette, chain, and chainring for about the price of an NX cassette. I don't need that extra 1.5 gear inches afforded by a 50t cog.
  • + 25
 Only way I'd buy a SRAM drivetrain is if it came on my bike when I bought it. I'm running XT right now and have just beat it to hell and it continues to operate flawlessly.
  • + 5
 +1 from me. I have to kill myself now Frown
  • + 15
 Yup. NX is sooooo heavy its not really an option for a lot of folks. Staying 11 speed with any of the wide range cassette options out there (E13, Sunrace, etc) is a better budget setup by far.
  • + 6
 @covekid: 10 speed Deore with their 11-42 would be a better setup than NX, lighter and far more durable
  • + 7
 i have a bike with m9000 xtr, shifts feel like shit compared to x01 eagle. i love shimano brakes though
  • - 1
 Agree. Not a fan of SRAM's drivetrains wearing out so quickly and shifting horribly thereafter. Shimano cassettes seem to at least give you some warning for a month or more before they start mis-shifting at all when at the end of their lifespan.
  • + 0
 @senorbanana: I have m9000 xtr and it shifts really well since 2 years. Haven't ridden an "outstanding" 11sp SRAM. XT shifts very well too. I just got myself what I consider the best drivetrain ever. The 10speed Sram X9 type 2. NOS. Will run it with Sunrace 11-42 cassette. 11sp was already too many gears for me. THen I'll be watching out for 10sp X0 DH for my HT.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: have a look at the OneUp 7 speed conversion for the DH bike, you can run them with Shimano derailleurs. I love mine and the whole thing cost me less than a new X01 7 speed cluster.
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: I must say that your feelings of SRAM drivetrains are mine of Shimano. As a comparison, i would break my cable on my Zee drivetrain every other trip to the bikepark vs ever once in 2 years on my GX DH one. I got my first SRAM drivetrain on a Mega I got 3 years ago and feeling the super crisp shifting and lack of maintenance needed made me swap Shimano for SRAM on all 3 bikes. There simply is no comparison in my mind.
  • + 1
 At this time, it is best to not invest in a new drivetrain at all. So Shimano introduced a new cassette interface that allows the use of a 10t sprocket. That implies next year they'll introduce that for XT and Saint, the 2021 for SLX and Zee, 2022 for Deore. NX doesn't get you the 10t sprocket so you're better off waiting another year to get that gear range on XT. If you even need that gear range, that is.

Not sure about durability. I replaced my SLX cassette for XT a few weeks ago and I already have burrs appearing on the smallest sprockets when it occasionally skips. Any idea what I could do about that? I went with XT (11-36 10sp cassette with Zee wide range mech) because the smallest sprockets aren't on a cluster so I can replace them individually. I'm running a 34t oval ring in the front and frame nor chainguide accept anything bigger (bigger than 36t round, that is). I've been told I'm pedaling too hard because I stand up most of the time. So I either put in a few hard stomps in places (or more hard strokes when climbing) and for the rest coast and pump. But you'd think the cassette should be up to that, shouldn't it? That said, apparently SRAM stuff is out of the question for me. Truvativ Ruktion cranks are keeping up just fine though, so SRAM isn't all bad Wink .
  • + 4
 I concur... That NX drivetrain is pretty much a joke, the shifting is eratic at best.
  • - 3
 This statement is the absolutr truth. Sram sucks in every way. If I hear someone saying he needs a better brake than shimano slx/xt and the alternative is branded by sram I can't do anything but laugh.
  • + 1
 @Rubberelli: It's ok, we both heard both side of the story in all possible versions of it. World will keep spinning, no matter what we say and what works for whom Smile Love is the answer
  • + 4
 Exactly why I recently sold the NX drive train that came on a brand new bike and replaced it with Shimano, that NX SRAM stuff is garbage.
  • + 1
 Have to agree. I’m sticking with Shimano over SRAM. Have loved the setup on my Stumpy. Got rid (read: broke) of my original rear mech and threw on a Saint m820 short cage and XT 10-speed rear cassette. Smaller ring up front and I still have the range for climbing, with the smaller gears for whatever flat sections I need to crank. Hard to beat the reliability and price.
  • + 1
 Yeah Shimano stuff is great right up until you have to take your rear wheel off.
  • + 3
 Once a person spends time on a correctly adjusted and installed XO1 12 speed eagle drivetrain, any shimano 11 speed system feels like a joke, except for maybe Di2.

Interested in the 12 speed shimano when it comes out..though it’s gonna take a while to see it in the market.
  • + 4
 I use a full xt m8000 setup and I have found that the gears skip between the 11t-12t sprockets when pedalling hard down bumpy straights. In addition, on my Santa Cruz, the chainstay runs directly forward from the rear axle which means the chain runs very close to it in the smaller sprockets. It's noisy, and it jumps. It is for these reasons that I am wary of going for a 10t or even 9t high gear. On some Horst link bikes the chainstay drops well below the axle level which I think would help to create a bit more clearance. The reasons in 1992 or whatever it was, when shimano followed suntour and went from 12t to 11t and said 11t is the smallest you should go, are still present! Personally I think the 10t thing is an example of fashion and marketing dictating what the engineering department does. Functionally it is perhaps not that good an idea.
  • - 1
 @jaame: slx and xt cassettes are crap. Use sunrace or cash out for XTR or Sram. And nr of teeth is fashion. Like 2019 XTR 10-51 cassette aka “eat your own crap Sram”
  • + 0
 @jaame: With 11-36 in the rear and 34t oval in the front I'm fine on most trails. That is, I have to walk on the steeper rough climbs though I'd rather blame that on skill I'm working on than on components. I might install an expander ring at some point. 11t is heavy enough except on smoother level stuff or when I want to pedal when pointing down. 10t or 9t in the rear for that kind of stuff. Then again, I'm not racing. No point investing in something that allows me to go fast on the smooth stuff. I wouldn't dare to go with a smaller ring in the front to actually be able to pedal these small sprockets over rough terrain. I'd wear them out in a single ride! I'm riding a hardtail though. Not sure whether that is harder or lighter on the drivetrain. I can imagine pedaling through bumpy stuff on a bike with a lot of anti-squat might put more and sudden peak loads on the chain, but I haven't done the math.

Obviously my chainstays run straight too, never noticed them to be particularly noisy. Then again this is my first time riding with a clutch equipped rear mech so maybe it is just relatively quiet compared to the racket I had before Wink .
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I'm pretty sure the xt cassette is identical to xtr save for the materials used.
When I think about it, my xt 11-40 did not skip as badly as the xt 11-46 does, but there was a time when my chain jumped off the bottom and ran between the sprocket and the inner dropout. I had to fix it up with epoxy because a thread was showing. Now I'm reluctant to just wap it into top gear and get on the pedals.
I am planning to try the xt 12 speed next year, but I can't see a 10t sprocket making it any better at holding the chain in place.
  • + 0
 @jaame: it isn't. The whole cassette is SAID to sit closer to the chainline, hard for me to judge whether that is possible or not. Then XTR released 9002 cassette no later than half of a year after the first one and my colleagues at the workshop say it is because of the backpedalling issue. They haven't updated the XT though. The backpedal issue is much less of a problem on XTR 9002 11-40 as compared to XT 11-42 AND I currently have worse chainline on XTR than I had on XT. I had Hope crankset with 46mm offset on XT, now I run SLX with spacer at 48mm. So well, XT really has issues. They will not be noticed by people who climb fireroad primarily but I need to backpedal on climbs often.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: interesting because I used an xt 11-40 for two years, and it could not stay on the 40 when pedalled backwards. Last month I switched to an 11-46 and it does stay on which is kind of counter intuitive. They must have changed something with the tooth profiles.
  • + 0
 @jaame: it is possible. 11-46 came out later. It is impossible that they moved the whole cassette without making the 11t into a lock ring. Funny enough, why wouldn't they do that considering how shitty those big rings work?! They must have changed the tooth profile/ shifting path. Just out of curiosity I checked how it worked with 11-36 on 10sp and if I backpedal a lot the chain also derails down BUT unlike with my 11-42 XT it doesn't happen nearly instantly, before I manage a 1/4th of revolution...
  • + 1
 10s XT shifter, 11s SRAM derailleur and 11-42 SUNRACE 10s cassette here. The best.
  • + 1
 @pancakeflatted: I should have mentioned too that Shimano stuff is great right up until your NDS crank arm comes off mid-descent. Saw this twice at Whistler EWS this year. WW2 technology attaching the NDS crank arm to the crank axle.
  • + 1
 I would never touch any bike with a Sram product attached to it. All 7 of my bikes are all Shimano making them a braking gear changing animal. All I have to add are some Renthal and Chromag bits and Im done.
  • + 1
 @jaame: go to a shop mine work flawlessly on every bike I own and I use the same set up
  • + 0
 @madmon: Sorry, I think that's nonsense. SRAM is just a consortium of different brands and I doubt the Avid department has any influence on what the suspension department does. I've never had any complaints about Truvativ and I wouldn't bother swapping a Hussefelt stem out for something from Pro. I actually currently have two Hussefelt stems and two Ruktion cranks, keeping up just fine.
  • + 1
 @vinay: all my avid crap broke. I have had almost zero issues for 2 decades with Shimano.
  • + 1
 @madmon: Sure, but that's just Avid. It doesn't make all SRAM stuff unreliable. That said, I have no personal experience riding much with Avid brakes. Though what I gather on here is that sure loads of people have issues with Avid, but to some extend that goes for most brakes people discuss over here, even Hope. Only haven't heard complaints about Tektro/TRP. Or complaints about BFO but then again I haven't come across anyone discussing those in the first place.
  • + 2
 @dbarnes6891: not to mention the fact that when they started selling a complete drivetrain fro $400 no one nominated them for an award based on "not ripping your customers off quite as much as you used to"
  • + 2
 @Rubberelli: who shifts gears in the bike park? single speed or preferably chainless!
  • + 1
 @plyawn: Strava will make you shift gears on a flow line
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: honest question, why do you think 10speed Sram X9 type 2 is soo good?
That + x01 shifter and p1030 castte is my current set up, but I think I'll be back on xt when it wears out.
  • + 63
 Gotta be the OneUp. The others are just watered down, pseudo budget/ value items. The OneUp is their top tier product and it came to market at a very competitive price. Almost embarrassing for the other players really.
  • + 10
 The OneUp dropper is definitely legit but I'd have to say the x fusion manic is the best value in the dropper post market right now. It's also significantly cheaper to change out the cartridge on the x fusion.
  • + 6
 I agree, I own two of them, but only it only applies if you're fine with the 150mm drop. If you need more than that, One-up would be the choice.
  • + 1
 @WestwardHo: I second that. I love my manic. Just keeps on taking the abuse.
  • + 3
 @WestwardHo: I do love my manic droppers but X-fusion released them over a year ago. I think OneUp gets it for 2018 value of the year.
  • - 1
 @mammal: X-Fusion offers a 170mm dropper that was on for $155 one day around black Friday. One up is pretty awesome though.
  • + 0
 @woofer2609: Wow. I had no idea. $155 is a crazy price for that much travel and reliability... Edit: I can't find any evidence of that version, even on the X-Fusion site (although I doubt they updated it much).
  • + 2
 @mammal: brand X ascend 170mm dropper can be bought for 150-160 euro normally, for 135euro on black friday sale, shorter versions seem to be reliable and remote is also pretty nice.
  • + 5
 @WestwardHo: x fusion never. relitevely quality products, but unserviceable products whose warranties you void by just looking at them.
  • + 1
 @WestwardHo: My bad, I was thinking Brand -X. Too many X's
  • + 2
 @WestwardHo: the Manic won last year. Smile
  • - 1
 @brianpark: Totally. I wasn't questioning your pick for this year. Just saying I think it's the best value in the dropper post market.
  • + 2
 @WestwardHo: The manic is less expensive. It is also a half pound heavier. I'd take OneUp.
  • + 1
 @Mondbiker: Brand X is not X-Fusion. Not the same, as X-Fusion cartridges can be swapped for cheap, not the case with Brand-X. Let's not get our X's confused.
  • + 37
 One-up is the tits
  • + 19
 Instead of categorizing these as "value products", the same way you guys tried calling Alu bikes a "value option" - you should be honest with your narrative and just call these "products" then start calling ALL the other products in this industry "Luxury priced products" because $10k plastic bikes, $3k rims, $250 biking shorts - should not be the norm.
  • + 19
 OneUp dropper...love it. Paid 160$ for it... Insanely cheap. The key is 170mm drop because many could use it or are juuuust close enough to it...so the shim comes in to play and takes the worry away. Especially when building a bike that you don't have a workable seat measurement for yet. If you aren't buying the one up. You have to spend nearly 400$ for a Bikeyoke revive to get anything better and it's heavier (185mm) and doesn't have adjustable travel.
  • + 18
 OneUp should own the dropper market soon. I’ve got three trouble-free months on mine so far, and it managed to get 150mm of drop into a sized-up frame since it’s short overall. I can’t say it’s more reliable yet than my two Crank Bros Hightowers, which (really) have been flawless for two years. The OneUp is cheaper and fits more drop in the same space though.
  • + 16
 Can Pinkbike itself be nominated? All this amazing content and it's all free! Best value I've ever had. (Also I'd really like to win an advent calendar, so please accept my undisguised flattery)
  • + 1
 Still not worth the price of admission
  • + 14
 The low overall length of the OneUp is why I bought one a couple weeks ago. It's the only inexpensive post that will let me fit 150mm of drop in my frame. Jackpot.
  • + 14
 I believe Manitou mattoc should be on the list, high performance 160mm fork currently less than 400€ ($450) on some online stores...
  • - 6
flag colincolin (Dec 11, 2018 at 9:30) (Below Threshold)
 but it's a backwards fork
  • + 5
 Much better value than fake zocchi for sure! Really looking forward to see the new long travel fork from them too.
  • + 5
 @colincolin: That comment deserves a backwards upvote.
  • + 3
 In my opinion manitou is the only suspension brand that doesnt try to seindle their customers ome way or another. They might not be the best performance products out there but...I think they really are. People that ride aggressively really dont need super complicated dampers with the latest technology. Just effective bottom out tuning, durability and smooth operation at the beggining. Thats all
  • + 3
 @Zeeroone: except their dampers are leagues ahead of all but the top end Fox and Rockshox ones.
I vote for the Mattoc as well.
  • + 2
 I think the nominees are supposed to be new 2018 or even 2019 models. Obviously one would take the Mattoc over a similar or even higher priced model from FoxZocchi or RockShox, but I don't think they released an updated Mattoc this year.

Besides being technically superior, I believe the rear arch looks cool. It shows more stanchion, which make it look like you've got more travel Smile .
  • - 1
 ...but, they dont work long, they came from factory with major problems, etc.
When it works, its one of the best forks out there... but, this forks dont work longer then couple of rides. :/
  • + 2
 @cebe: Mine went strong till I got a 29er and I even prefer it to the fox 34 I have now
  • + 13
 OneUp dropper all the way. It’s on par with products double its price and really expands the number of frames that can take a longer drop.
  • + 15
 NX is junk. That Marz fork is awesome. One Up looks good.
  • + 12
 Z1 would be more popular if everyone didn't think that Kashima and weight matter.
  • + 5
 People buy rockshox though...
  • - 2
 Now if they released a 44 DJ in 34 chassis for 300-350$ making Pike DJ look stupid. If I miss anything from 2003, it is the original Dirtjumper SSVF fork.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: Back when no one cared that a 4 inch travel fork weighed 7 pounds
  • - 2
 @drunknride: hah, I piss on MZ nostalgia, but you cannot be more wrong about 2003 DJ 1 and 2. They didn’t weigh a ton at all. 2,2kg and the damping was superb for dirt jumping
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: there was a 'street' version for 24 inch wheels with steel stanchions that weighted a ton
  • - 2
 @kmoter: I know. the 2004 26" one weighed a ton too. They made the 4X one afterwards which was the light version.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I had the steel stanchioned version. Pinkbike says 6.76lbs
www.pinkbike.com/product/marzocchi-mtb/Dirt-Jumper-2
  • - 1
 @drunknride: the 2003 Dirtjumpers 1, 2 and 3 had alloy stanchions www.pinkbike.com/photo/10077702

What I notice now though, it had 130mm travel. It was basically a modded Z1
  • + 2
 @drunknride: I have 2005 dj3, I'd say they weight even more haha. Steel stanchions and steerer (and super thick one, on the bottom the hole reduces to like 0.5cm-1/5"), one leg hosts rebound while other compression, both non adjustable + open bath and dont forget there are springs on BOTH sides.
  • + 12
 sunrace cassete brand x dropper these are the best value
  • - 1
 One-up is literally the same as brand-x, only better executed
  • + 8
 @ondrejaugustin: and 30-40% more expensive and completelly different in dimensions other than travel, but yeah, they are the same.
  • + 7
 Love my Oneup Dropper. Has been flawless in operation and at a price you can't argue with! Complete revelation having ridden without a dropper until pricing and performance hit a point i could stomach!
  • + 5
 Been on the Z.1 for about a month now, and have been loving it!

I know its "just a 36" but the value - performance ratio is unmatched.

It was cheaper to buy the Z.1 than get a new CSU for my 36 RC2 that was outside of warranty... No Brainer.
  • + 1
 It's also stiffer than a 36....
  • + 1
 @onemanarmy: Personally I couldn't tell the difference between my 36, and Z.1 In terms of stiffness.

No complaints for either stiffness wise, however it being boost likely means stiffer wheels etc.
  • + 4
 Brand X dropper. Cheap and works way better than the market leader. Z1 is dearer than Pike/lyric in the UK so I dont see the value there, as the Lyric (when the debonair my 19 spring is in) is better than the 36.. Sram NX is decent but its similar price to XT really... and as least XT doesnt lose its indexing when you sneeze at it like sram shit does.
  • + 3
 Def the one up dropper! I'm a short person and I've had to swap out the oem dropper on my last two bikes to get the fit right. Having a short length and ability to adjust the drop heigh means I can get it exactly how I want. Brand x dropper doesn't do that.
  • + 7
 Free helmet and Enve wheels seems like a great value.
  • + 4
 The OneUp Dropper Post is the best I’ve ever tried! I love it when you never have to even think about the performance of a part...and just ride!
  • + 2
 I've had really good luck with sram nx. I think it's a great drivetrain. I have xx1 in my other bike, and the nx really does a great job for the price with the exception of the shifter. Ad a gx shifter and it's as good as gx for me (aside from the weight).
  • + 1
 Well said
  • + 6
 OneUp! sublime action on that post.
  • + 5
 As long as that Z1 costs 900 € (1018 $!) in Europe, it does not deserve to be on that list.
  • + 1
 Thought I saw it on Bike24 for under 550 € last week.
  • + 2
 @ninjichor: either that offer is gone or it is only available for americans
  • + 1
 @jzPV: yea, it's no longer there.
  • + 1
 Fully agree, ridiculous. It's more expensive than the lyric, Take it out from the value components and bring Mattoc in!!
  • + 5
 One-up hands do. Quick, yet not ballsbanging, remote feels great and the travel ajudst and low stack can make wonders.
  • + 2
 How about a 27.2 seat post over 100mm that doesn't suck or doesn't cost $450? I know get a bike frame that wasn't new in 2005. Sorry I can't sell a kidney or my anus to pay for a new wonder bike. I'd be ater
  • + 2
 3 quarts of oil is WHY marzocchis are so great! : P

I still see 1990-era Z1 forks that are buttery smooth. I'll take a bit of weight for durability and "smoothness" any day!
  • + 1
 NX may be affordable but it's crap. The derailleur will self destruct internally in about 50 miles. Sure, warranty, have fun not riding your bike during that. GX is a much better value when you weigh happiness into the equation.
  • + 1
 My legs are strong. I still drop my eagle friends with my 10 speed 36 tooth Shimano. That's pushing a big 36 tooth ring upfront also. I use the same gearing climbing up Windrock Bike Park so please tell me how it will not work in the mountains. Nancy boys who still think you need Eagle my wife climbs on the same gearing. Good day to you all eagle Nancy Boyz!
  • + 1
 Do you think Pinkbike would have ever nominated SRAM X5 or X3 components for "value product of the year"? Because that's essentially what the NX group is. Bottom of the barrel crap, that's all.
  • + 1
 Did you miss the 12sp part?
  • + 1
 Voile straps-mountain bikers have discovered them this year (albeit often rebadged and with an extra 100% markup).

Off this list-Z1. A burly, affordable(ish) fork with proven guts-winner in my book.
  • + 2
 I have have upgraded my bike with both the gx & one up dropper, the the dropper is better bang for buck. I sold my used reverb for the cost of my one up. lol.
  • + 2
 SRAM Eagle NX. I almost died when Eagle first came out, then they made it sensible. Can't commend them enough, and was actually thinking of buying one.
  • + 5
 I nominate pool noodles!
  • + 1
 For f*cks sake, why are those under-bb cables almost dragging on the ground!?! Swift kick to the nuts of that bike builder is in order...
  • - 1
 One Up all the way - it is disappointing about the clamping issue but for the price and the fact that they do not force their remote on you makes it a winner!!!!!! The post works perfectly for me once I figured out the seat clamp issue.
  • + 8
 What seat clamp issue?
  • + 1
 @yoondaman: the post (at least the initial run of it, bought mine first wave) is incredibly sensitive to clamping and does not retract fully unless you have quite a bit of it out of the frame (guess around 1 inch?). You can't apply enough clamping force to keep it from moving even

I guess some bought the 170mm version and wanted to run it completely slammed down to the collar.
  • + 1
 @higs: weird.. my 170 is slammed and works perfect, retracts and extends quickly.
  • + 3
 As a happy OneUp owner, It's gotta be the dropper!
  • + 1
 My best value product of the year would be the Octane One Solar Pro rim I picked for £12 or the Magic Mary Evo's I got for £17each
  • + 3
 That Marzochhi fork looks so tempting. I just might have to get one!
  • + 1
 Waki has spoken.............bottom line, Shimano out-performs Sram. Fact. You can go and tell dat!
  • + 5
 @Tcolbert: Waki ain't always right, but the big S releases polished product after a longer test cycle. SRAM let you be the guinea pig like it was 1993 and their parts were 3d violet and machined in someone's garage (or shed in the UK).
  • + 1
 It's a great fork for the money.
  • + 3
 I bought sram drivetrain hy accident - it came with my bike.
  • + 1
 Ky is also a great chain and fork seal lubricant. I like the icy/hot version best.
  • - 1
 The one up dropper doesn't work if you tighten the seat clamp to where the seat won't move. I'm not sure if that's the one my buddy had or all of them. Also sram NX is JUNK
  • + 7
 As does a reverb. Carbon paste is your friend here.
  • + 1
 Same problem here in my transition...
  • + 7
 All droppers bind if you clamp the seattube too tight. You should only use enough torque to keep the seat from slipping. Only use the max torque listed for the seatpost if you have to, and use some assembly paste. Also, if that doesn't do it, I'd suspect an out-of tolerance seattube (and if you've overtorqued a rigid post that can stretch it out of spec). You can use a small square of paper or aluminum can shim (corners rounded on the can shim) to take up the slack if that's the case.

As bikes have gained features and kept weight in check (rigid 3x7 cromo bikes used to weigh 26-30 pounds, like a modern 140-160mm f/s bike with bigger wheels and a dropper) tolerances have gotten tighter. Specs for torque on everything from stems to derailleurs is much narrower than just "get it tight" or "tighten until snug and then go 1/4-1/2 turn more" on new stuff.

If you've done everything right and the seattube is just out of spec, what brand of bike are you on?
  • + 1
 It's a intense tracer. We tired it on my bike ( same year) and it I did it. We had two customers at the shop bring them in with the same problem. My bontrager doesn't do that neither did any other post (reverb doesn't count) @peleton7:
  • + 3
 @freeridejerk888: Good to know. No product is flawless-the interwebs are a great way to get problems out into the open. I'll be curious to see if this becomes a known/public issue.
  • + 0
 @peleton7:

It's not an issue. It's user error in this case..
  • + 1
 @jlawie: lol. It's not user error. I've been working at a shop for years. Just a problem I've had with a few of the 170 ones. They work but only time will tell.
  • + 1
 The award should be just for the NX cassette because everyone just gets the GX stuff for the rest of the drivetrain.
  • + 0
 Saddest nominees for best value ever cause this industry is out of control!
  • + 1
 What about that bottle cage with the tool attached? Name please?
  • + 1
 What's going on with those cable housings under that bottom bracket?
  • + 1
 Z1. I've got one on my Remedy. Things sick.
  • - 3
 I saw three chicken come sailing in on chicken day on Christmas Day, I saw three chicken come sailing in on chicken day in the morning. I get downvoted, I know not why, on Christmas Day, on ChiKeN day, I get downvoted, it makes me sad, yet chicken there in the morning. If someone were to help me out, with language then, on Christmas Day, I might not have to chicken yet, but would because it’s chicken time.
  • + 3
 Anyone else read this to the tune of “I saw three ships”
  • + 1
 @MTBingSpartan: YES. A bit off time though
  • + 2
 All great
  • + 1
 A terrible dentist or doctor too. (Damn cell phone keyboard)
  • + 1
 I don't trust a Z1 that doesn't have leaky seals...
  • + 1
 Brand x dropper is the best value...
  • - 2
 OneUp post.. does anybody have it?
I run into two people on the trails and both had issues with it.

Sram NX is worst than the old X3.

Foxzocchi I can't comment.
  • + 3
 Yes, in use since July, stellar performance so far
  • + 6
 Have the @oneupcomponents dropper. Its amazing!
  • + 2
 Been running the OneUp since last June - sturdier than Julia Childs in the kitchen (or at the Rose Bowl). Proud to report that it has survived a lot of hard riding including an accidental front-flip crash. Works flawlessly. Not the slightest hint of squish. All I do is add a bit of Whistler Fork Boost every so often and she keeps on cookin’.
  • + 1
 Put it on my new gravel bike to maximize travel for the seat rail to seat collar distance. Installed with a PNW lever on the drops. No problems, only positivity, and the price made it a no brainer. Stoked!
  • + 1
 612g cassette? No way!
  • + 0
 Brand x dropper seatpost,great value for money.
  • + 1
 Z1
  • + 0
 Eash. Stupid wrong post button.
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