The Pinkbike Podcast: Episode 10 - Getting Nerdy About Bike Setup

Jun 3, 2020
by Mike Levy  
Art by Taj Mihelich


I have a good friend who, despite being normal as far as I know, insists on having the nose of his seat down at what must be a 30-degree angle. Another long-time riding buddy of mine points his brake levers at the ground, literally; my wrists are at a right-angle when I get on his bike and try to stop. He also zip-ties a pump to the side of his fork, and locals know him as 2-Poo Stu, but those are stories for another time. Point is, a lot of us have some, er, unconventional setup preferences that probably look more than a bit strange to everyone else. Sometimes we just don't know any better, like when we all wanted the handlebars on our downhill bikes to be as low as possible. Ugh. But sometimes it's for a very good reason; 2-Poo Stu's wrists are inexplicably straight when he's on the brakes, despite the levers aiming straight down, and my other buddy swears that's the most comfortable seat position for him. Can't argue with that.

In our tenth episode, we get down and dorky with bike setup, including those "unconventional" preferences that a lot of us seem to have. Kaz and I go over our tastes on suspension, cockpit, tires and pressures, pedals, and anything else on a bike that he could be wrong about, and we also choose a full-suspension design to ride for the rest of our lives.

Available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, or wherever else you get your podcasts.



THE PINKBIKE PODCAST // EPISODE 10 - GETTING NERDY ABOUT BIKE SETUP
May 27th, 2020

Whose setup still includes bar-ends?

Hosted by Mike Levy and featuring a rotating cast of the editorial team and other guests, the Pinkbike Podcast is a weekly update on all the latest stories from around the world of mountain biking, as well as some frank discussion about tech, racing, and everything in between.

Previous Pinkbike Podcasts
Episode 1 - Why Are Bikes So Expensive?
Episode 2 - Where the Hell is the Grim Donut?
Episode 3 - Pond Beaver Tech
Episode 4 - Why is Every Bike a Trail Bike?
Episode 5 - Can You Trust Bike Reviews?
Episode 6 - Over Biked Or Under Biked?
Episode 7 - Wild Project Bikes
Episode 8 - Do We Need an Even Larger Wheel Size?
Episode 9 - Why Are We Doing a Cross-Country Field Test?

Hit us in the comments with your suggestions: What do you want to hear us talk about? Would you be into watching a video version, or are our dulcet voices enough for you?


111 Comments

  • 43 0
 Topic suggestion: Is technical climbing dead? Most popular trail destinations (in BC at least) have created machine built climbing trails to the top that are pretty much mini roads with designed grades and switchbacks. Don't get me wrong, they are great when they replace an exposed road climb but more and more I'm seeing these trails replace good classic technical climbs. I for one love the challenge of not putting a foot down on a tech climb but it seems this aspect of the sport is getting removed by manufactured climbing trails.
  • 15 0
 Love this topic. I wonder if its the industry driving it...the Enduro climbs AMAZING right?!!? well on a fire road not on a single track.
  • 8 0
 @kookseverywhere, definitely a good topic. We'll add it to the list. And @MikeyMT, I'm 100% certain that there's no industry conspiracy to remove technical climbs.
  • 4 1
 Can you really talk about technical climbing for an hour?
  • 13 0
 @Three6ty, @mikelevy probably could, but it'd more than likely be part of a larger discussion about trail styles, building, etc...
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: Everything is a conspiracy! 26.99 or whatever you're supposed to say!
  • 14 0
 People that enjoy climbing can talk your ear off about it for way longer than an hour
  • 4 0
 I thought there was something of a resurgence with technical climbs to access technical trails where you don't want to have a lot of traffic. Also might keep the e-bike punters off. Really showcases the capabilities of modern bikes.
  • 1 2
 @Three6ty: ya, this isn’t really a “topic.” It’s a yes or no question. Maybe five minutes?
  • 1 1
 Down here in the south of France, people loves fire road to climb. Part of it is historical. Our trails are impossible to climb because they are way too steep.
The forest is criss crossed with fire road too help the firefighters putting off forest fires, so almost any hill has a fireroad on it. It's a perfect way to go up, never too steep, it goes where we want to go. So in term of social riding it's perfect because it's easy to talk with your buddies when you pedal a large and 6ù grade fire road. It's not hard on your leg and it's very quick to climb in term of D+ per hour.
Basically, 90% of teh riders here literraly hate technical climbing single tracks.
  • 4 0
 I'll take a technical climb over a fire road any day of the week... At least with a good techy type of climb, it allows you to focus on something other than the climb...
  • 7 0
 @mikelevy - You are wrong about the gearing range being way easier these days. Back when you had a 26" bike with a 44-32-22 triple running a nine speed with the 34 tooth big cog your easiest gear gave you a 17.4 inch roll out. On a 29er with 30x50 you get 17.5 inches. (Yes I may have a spreadsheet that I consulted
  • 1 0
 Put a 28t ring on...
  • 5 0
 I wanna know how Levy is running 20ish PSI on a trail bike. I always thought I was a pretty smooth rider, but I have to run around 27 psi in the rear to avoid smashing rims. I doubt I'm that much faster than Levy (probably slower, really) so I wanna know what magic his is working with.
  • 5 0
 with cushcore Im running 18/20 with cabon wheels (ROVAL), I'm 185lbs - not a single issue in 2 years and the traction is mind blowing.
  • 4 1
 How much do you weigh and where do you ride?
  • 3 0
 @brianpark: I weigh about 170 with my riding gear. I live and ride mostly around the front range of Colorado. I run 27.5 psi in the rear and 22-23 psi in the front, both with cushcore, on my hardtail and my FS trail bike. Before cushcore I went through my rear rim in 1-1.5 seasons. I would like to run lower in the rear if I can, but I can't afford to wreck rims.
  • 8 0
 @bikeracer28, our trails out here are a little softer than what you'll get on the Front Range; think more loam and less kitty litter, which makes it possible to run lower pressures. 27 psi with Cushcore is on the higher side, but everyone's riding style is different - you may be putting a lot of weight on that rear wheel and need the extra support.
  • 10 0
 Are you using a reliable gauge to get that pressure? If you're just using what is on your pump you could easily be off 5+psi. I always thought I was a 30psi in my minions guy until I got a digital gauge - turns out to actually be 25psi.
  • 2 1
 I weight 225 and run 17lbs in my front tire on my local enduro tracks. 29" 2.6 Rekon front. Carbon rims with Cushcore.
  • 3 0
 @Zaeius: Agree 100%. Get a good gauge dont trust the pump
  • 1 0
 @Zaeius: I use a separate gage which I trust as much as any other aftermarket gage. My pump's gage is broken anyway so I have no other option. Maybe if I get rims with a lifetime warranty I'll get a bit more ambitious with my experimenting. I do notice that on my hardtail, which has longer chainstays, I feel the rear wheel hit less (maybe it's because I'm extra light given it's lack of squish). I've been slowly dropping it but I'm nervous about ruining my I9 rims, so I haven't gone below 27 psi in the rear yet.
  • 5 0
 @bikeracer28: I live front rang too. Expert rider, ex semi-pro DH /BMX guy, few enduro races /year. Anything near 18/20psi even with inserts and I would roll my tires off the rims in areas like Floyd Hill. Maybe Apex type straight up/down without many real turns or somewhere like Green Mountain it would be ok. That said, way too squirmy that low unless maybe DH casings. I run 25 front, 27 rear on my DH bike with DH casings at Trestle for comaprison
  • 4 0
 @bman33: it’s good to hear that I’m not the only one. I run closer to 30psi rear and 25psi front when I’m in the bike park, but that’s with a DD rear and exo+ front casings, so slightly higher would be expected compared to the DH casings, plus I’m only in a pivot switchblade so less travel than a DH rig. I raced XC for a while, and collegiate DH for a couple years. Not semi-pro, but from my strava results I’m not slow. Glad to know I’m not the only one who feels like running lower pressure would be difficult, even if I’m not the fastest.
  • 1 0
 In addition to gauge variation, insert/no-insert, etc. don't forget to consider sidewall construction of tires as well.
  • 2 0
 @Zaeius:

30 psi in my min....... oh nevermind.
  • 1 0
 @Zaeius: excellent point.
  • 1 0
 @Zaeius: read somewhere that you don't really need your gauge to be accurate. You do need it to be precise/give reproducible readings. You can always correlate the level of tractions and puncture resistance for a given pressure stated by a precise particular gauge as long as you always use the same precise particular gauge. Granted, you'll need test runs for each different combination of casing/tread pattern/size/compound/rim/insert/riding style/terrain condition. But hey, we get to nerd it out. Empirical data FTW!!

I weigh 71-74kg/157-163lbs and used to run:
FT 17.5 psi / Maxxis / Minion DHF / 29x2.5 / EXO / 3C Maxxterra / tubed-less / Entity hookless bead 30mm rim
RT 21.5 psi / Schwalbe / Nobby Nic / 29x2.6 / APX / Addix Speedgrip / tubed-less / DT Swiss EX511
And never had a puncture or tire roll using those setting on my local trails.
www.trailforks.com/region/puncak
  • 1 0
 CUSHCORE!! I run 18 front and 20 rear and shred hard in the PNW
  • 1 0
 @melodymaker: here in Colorado the ground is too hard and rocky to ride aggressively with that low of pressure, even with inserts. PNW has much better soil. Sounds like it may work there. Not here
  • 1 0
 @bman33: have you tried Cushcores? Ill never ride without em again. No more tire movement and all the grip. I get it though; hard edge rocks everywhere youll likley need a bit more PSI
  • 1 0
 @melodymaker: I have, that said, It's either Cush Core and EXO or DD for most of my trails and style. EXO sidewalls are too thin around here. They get sliced too easily.
  • 6 0
 @brianpark @mikekazimer @mikelevy

Do you think people are 'berming out' the trails for Strava times?

Curious your take on Strava Leaderbords in general especially with the changes to Strava lately?
  • 1 0
 with eBikes Strava times are worthless imo, i have no hate against eBikes, a few friends have made the switch and i probably will in a few years, but yeah why would I train myself so hard to reach a KOM if the next day a guy with an eBike will trash it. For personal improvement, yeah i still use strava, but there is no need to cut berms if it is just me.
  • 1 0
 @Narro2: Nobody cares about the uphill KOM though... Wink
  • 3 0
 Was it Levy blowing out of Shimano pedals?? Me too. Cured pedal rebuilding and blowout woes by going back to Time. Riding the aluminum Speciales for two years. Absolutely love them. Good for the knees too-the brass cleat wears into your natural foot position.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy I get this one my Shimano 520 but not on my 647. I think it relates to the extra cage around the pedal.
  • 1 0
 What cleats are you using? If I use the multi release, I can't stay in... But, I use the single release cleat and full tension on the pedals, I almost never pop out...
  • 1 0
 @lumpy873: I'm on the standard cleats. I may as well be on flats if I were to use multi release. I'm about mid tension. I like to be able to get out quick for corners.
  • 6 0
 @mikelevy - "I had a mini tool in my SWAT pocket"
Lulz - that's what she said?
  • 3 0
 Here is question for next week.

For the past 5 years the whole mtb industry has been obsessed with getting oir seats lower. Dropper posts probably being the best mtb invention ever. But then why is it that at the top level (world cup dh) does everyone seem to have the posts jacked to the top? Lol wouldnt you think i f anyone benefited from no seat in the way it would be them. Yet even bruni who isnt a tall guy rides with his seat level with the stem??? Wierd no?
  • 3 0
 dh bikes the back wheel moves a lot, if the seat is too low it will buzz the wheel.
  • 4 0
 @WhiteonaWhyte: But the important question there is does the saddle buzz the wheel or does the wheel buzz the saddle?
  • 1 0
 @WhiteonaWhyte: just move the saddle forwards. Not like your sitting on it. Do they even need one??
  • 3 0
 @brianpark @mikekazimer @mikelevy

Topic idea: Do a show on the range of advocacy and trail access issues related to mountain biking -

What responsibility does the media have to promote responsible trail use? Are trails getting dumbed down? What role do/should bike companies play in eMTB access issues? Is there less appreciate for trail building/maintenance with the younger generation? Is trail building portrayed enough in the media?

There are a lot of interesting topics about trail access that myself and many Pinkbike folks would love to hear your opinions on, especially issues related to what role bike companies and the media play in creating and solving trail access issues.
  • 5 0
 Has anyone else noticed that @brianpark has a bonafied gold NPR voice? Tell us Brian what's the secret sauce for epic radio voice?
  • 1 0
 My XC bike still has bar ends sometimes. I switch between Ergon GS2 (with the small bar ends) and GA3 grips depending on how technical the course I'm racing is. The GS2s tend to stay on over the winter for base miles. Hand positions are good.
  • 1 0
 I loved i-Drive and AOS iteration; soooo supple on big hits and square edges. I'm on a horst now(on a nukeproof reactor) and while it is good, unexpectedly good actually, it is still not in the same league as the high-pivot with full-floater BB.
  • 1 0
 Anti-coagulants are like the opposite of tubeless tire sealant. Tire sealant is meant to coagulate and stop the loss of pressure (air volume).
On the other hand anti-coagulants prevent coagulation which would cause excessive loss of pressure (blood volume).
  • 3 0
 Yeah, I misspoke. I'm better at writing than speaking.
  • 2 1
 Great point about this manual skill. Quite painful but 100% true, cannot bunnyhop, manual, do a double on pump track - you cannot ride mtb properly. Period. I still cannot manual, but learning it through the very light winter gave me so much strength and confidence. Was like 10% faster overall. And I am still like half the way.
  • 8 0
 Riding a mtb "properly" is extremely subjective. I can climb a trail and descend at 95 percentile speeds, but can't manual or bunny hop in a significantly meaningful way. You rarely need to bunnyhop anything on a trail, manualing looks cool and is functional in some instances, but doesn't really improve you lap time in enduro or trail riding.

If someone wants to waste $250 on a manual machine by all means do what you want with your money, but lets not pretend that it's an intelligent investment in mountain bike skills. Take that $250 and go to a qualified coach for a couple of lessons. Also if you can't learn how to build a manual machine I think that learning how to manual is way out of your skill potential.
  • 1 0
 @lokbot: I know people are pretty gifted motorcycle racers, but couldn't work on a motorcycle to save themselves.

I don't think there is any connection to mechanical skill (building a manual machine) and your riding skills (being able to manual).

Additionally, if you can't manual or bunnyhop, you probably can't speak to how important they are on the trails. Those are skills I use ALL the time.
  • 2 0
 I can`t see why it makes any sense to talk suspension unless it is properly tested on the Grim Donut. Like talking to a Zeppelin engineer when we already know that the airplane was invented.
  • 1 0
 Topic Suggestion/Question: Is it more sensible to upgrade my alloy frame to a carbon version, or sell the full alloy bike and buy a carbon bike? / What upgrades are most sensible on a more baseline bike first to shave weight?

I have an alloy process 153, cost under $3K USD, I love the bike but definitely want it to be lighter and don’t plan on getting any other model. Having a spare frame of the same bike seems a bit odd but it’s fun to build up a bike at the same time.
  • 1 0
 How much weight will it save? Is it worth the money to save that weight?

How much do you weigh? Can you lose the equal amount of weight?

My main reason to go to a carbon frame on my E29 was to get the SWAT box. Fully stocked up, the bike weighs about 40 pounds. Carbon on my XC bike is to be light, of course. But I weigh 142 pounds today at 5'8", and consider myself "out of race fitness", so the pound I lose on the bike actually matters to me as getting sub 138 is really damn hard.

I did keep my aluminum E29, I know it isn't worth anything (I ride my bikes HARD).

On the other hand, if you want carbon...why do you need to justify it? Just go get it if that's what you want.
  • 1 0
 wouldnt it be good time for Pinkbike to eliminate the flags on the comment section? and the profiles too, i understand back in 1999 and early 2000s when the page started being able to interact with riders from all over the world was atractive and something new, but now is turning very political, there is alwasy talk about race, the world vs americans, china, etc...
  • 1 0
 I've been watching you guys, Bible of Bikes, and other reviews. I can't help feeling that there is some cognitive/ affective prejudice when you know the make / model / components of a bike. Perhaps you should do a set of tests where the bike branding, color, and component labels are hidden from the reviewers. That would be very interesting versus reviewers knowing what they are reviewing. What do you guys think?
  • 1 0
 Question/comment: typically i don't break things on my bike. Went 5 years only getting two flats. However this last month has been quite the struggle. I broke my shifter cable ( somehow). Destroyed two wheels. Destroyed a rear mech( in a wheel). Cracked my swing arm. torn two sidewalls open. none of these were crash related. So just wondering if yall have had weird and wild slumps, where you just start breaking shit, like none stop. Its pretty annoying I must say. Looking forward toward paying off this Karma debt and getting back in the good graces of the Great Bike in the Sky...... you know the one with 39.6 inch wheels.
  • 2 0
 you could try making a statue or shrine from all the broken parts as a peace offering, i made a dog named "scrappy" for that very reason long ago. If that doesnt work ,dont be tempted to give in and chill out, stand your ground and actually shred harder
  • 2 0
 Maybe...you have a 5 year string of good luck?

Your last month sounds like my average 6-12 months.
  • 1 0
 After all of these years searching and listening to very average cycling podcasts - along comes this one... you guys are the real deal. Just awesome to listen to both level of experience and non-commercial discussions. You seem to have a bit of immunity to the industry. ie., Talking about why Press camps are a bit 'light' on real new product experience. Plus you are actual MTB'ers...
Only concern - at the current rate...a few episodes from now, Levy is going to have what.... 6 or 7 bosses?? Not sure how those other fellas get to call themselves Levy's boss - not yet heard anywhere where they are more knowledgeable, etc... :->
  • 1 0
 Topic suggestion: GPS options for MTB. What is better than a cellphone's GPS? Is a computer or a watch worth it? Do we really need barometer for precise altitude reading? It is difficult to find information regarding trail riding with GPS, compatibility with Trailforks, footage or picture of map...
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy you didn’t go geeky enough and mention the compound on your Hans Dampf. Schwalbe’s different durometer ratings - blue Speedgrip, Orange Softgrip etc. - also play crucial roles based on my personal experience with their different offerings.
  • 1 0
 Hey @mikelevy, I’m sure a hundred people have already said this but, in regards to your troubles with Shimano pedals do you know which cleats you are using? There are a multi-direction and single-direction release models but they look almost identical. I know people who have had similar issues and this is why.
  • 1 0
 Yup, definitely not the early release cleats Smile
  • 1 0
 I'd be interested to hear your takes on frame materials. Having ridden a lot of bikes do you think it is "worth it" for the average weekend-warrior bro to spend their (limited) money on a carbon frame?
  • 1 1
 I enjoyed the banter about pedals. @mikelevy You poked fun at flat pedals a few times, (something about how “mature” riders use clipless) so I’d like to challenge you to sell me on trying it. (I’m not trying to be snarky here). Here’s my background: I’ve been riding avidly for 25 years; XC, downhill, dirt jump, and especially all mountain (or Enduro as its now called), all over Utah, Wyoming, Arizona, Oregon, etc. Never been into racing and I’m nothing special but I climb a lot of vert, hit sizable features, and hold a respectable pace on the way down. Most of my buddies ride clipless and I don’t ever notice an advantage over me on my flats, but in those 25 years I’ve never even so much as put on a clipless shoe, so I honestly can’t even talk any smack about them. Can you guys persuade me to give it a go?
  • 1 0
 Would you be happier if you clipped in? If the answer is "no", then don't waste your time. Just ride happy.

I have a mix of flat and clip in systems (I race road, triathlon, XC, and enduro). I do prefer flats for trail/enduro, but I will on occasion clip into my enduro and notice a small improvement in my times...but it doesn't make me happier so I rarely do.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer Are you on the MaxxTerra Assegai or MaxxGrip? We can only get MT in Exo / Exo+ in the UK at the moment. I've just put a DH MG up front - super grippy but heavy.
  • 1 0
 Always feel a little bit sorry for @jamessmurthwaite its like he’s the little brother in these. No one really listening to what he says unless he says something that they can take the piss out of Big Grin
  • 3 0
 Excessively phallic microphone, that may or may not be vibrating.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark Are you still on pushon grips - what is your fav. I'm on Rental Ultratacky - super grippy, super thin. Are you wiring / gluing or both?
  • 1 0
 Tall guy body armor - I'm using the 7idp flex suit for riding in the park. It's better than nothing, but certainly not full coverage! I'm 6'4" and pretty skinny.
  • 1 0
 What do you think of time atac pedals, in addition to spd and crank bros? Is i unfair to think of eggbeaters as an inferior modification of the atac idea?
  • 2 0
 Good Morning Chat... Thanks Guys
  • 1 0
 PB crew, you need to try out Vittoria tires. The 2.6 Martello up front combined with a 2.35 Agarro is phenomenal.
  • 1 0
 I've considered the same but 940g for the rear and 1100g for the front? Seems like a weird combination, not the tread pattern, just the weights. The Martello must be proper 2.6 and it does have tons of side knobs, maybe that adds to the weight.

It's common to have a heavier (or at least equal) tire out back because of the additional weight over the rear wheel. I'd be afraid the Agarro out back would get shredded. That combo looks good though.
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: Run an insert in the rear. The front is the rare non DH tire that doesn't need an insert and I promise you it rolls MUCH lighter than the scale says it is.

Weight prevented me from trying Vittoria tires for years, turns out that was a huge mistake on my part.
  • 1 0
 @SunsPSD:

I do (huck norris) but an insert is a stop gap for a tire that's not supportive or durable enough. I run one because my rear wheel takes a beating even with a proper tire and psi. 1000g is my general sweet spot.

My experience with the 2.35 martello (960g) was pretty good but definitely pushing the lightweight limit of what works for me, my terrain, and riding style. I ran it on the front for a couple months then moved it to the back.

Anyway, I'll still consider this combo but also looking at the 2.6 DHR2 as a front once my e13 wears out. It's 1035g in EXO+ casing but who knows, maybe the 2.6 martello still rolls better. The 2.35 was fast on the front. And would match the 2.6 DHR2 to a 980g 2.5 Aggressor on the rear (which I already have laying around).

Or i could go with the 2.6 Agarro out back once the snow comes back.
  • 1 0
 I have/had on my bikes the following:
corsa 28, corsa control 28, terreno zero(650b) 47, terreno dry 33, terreno mix 33, mezcals in all sizes and widths(27.5 2.25, 2.35, 2.1 and 2.25 on 29" wheels, barzo in 2.25 as a front tire for my xc bike when not in full summer/dry conditions, morsa on 26" and diff. combos of morsa, martello and mota on 27.5 wheels.

then I switched to assegai front and dhf back and discovered grip!, I suggest to try the same combo. You will be amazed at the cornering grip and, especially, at the stopping distance; I had to relearn some tracks as my breaking points were suddenly in other places. these days I'm running dhf-dhf and I'm still very happy; on anything other than a shuttle/park bike, I feel that assegai is too much of a drag.

bottom line is, I am fully recommending vittoria tires but, me personally, I would stop using them on anything 'higher' than a full suspension XC bike. the road ones are crazy(read unbelievable) fast, the gravel ones are fantastic and the xc ones have the perfect blend of grip and speed(even though mezcal in front can be a little wahsy; not the barzo though) but for serious trail riding and mountain-biking, the difference is sooo great you wouldn't believe!

happy riding, cheers!
  • 1 0
 I've run a bunch of different Vittoria tires and have been a fan of them.
  • 2 0
 @eugenux: I would agree. Having run 2.35 martellos I was pretty disappointed with their grip on anything other than hard trail surfaces or rock. They rolled fast to their credit.

Side knobs are also pretty weak, tore more than a few which left me high and dry on some big loops.
  • 1 0
 @iainmac-1:

Yes, that was exactly my experience with martello and mota. Good rolling for the size, not so much grip, not very resistant. From the bunch, Morsa, Martello and Mota, Martello was the best IMO.
  • 2 0
 @iainmac-1: It appears based on various comments here and in other locations, that the Martello 2.35 has closer spaced knobs and doesn't perform that well when the ground gets a lot of 'shake' loose pebbles and what not. The 2.6 while not quite as good as the Assagai in those particular conditions, is far superior in all others as a front tire imo. I.e. hardpack traction, stability without an insert, rolling resistance, loam, etc.
Tires are all compromises and even your particular bike makes a huge difference in what tires work well for you so your experience may vary. I don't see the fascination with the Assagai as far me it slows me down so much anywhere besides pointed straight down hill that the slowness alone is a major factor in it's high grip. If I could go as fast on it as I can on other tires, it wouldn't grip as well, imo.
  • 1 0
 @SunsPSD:

I agree with you about the assegai. I even mentioned that I am not using it anymore do to it having a very high rolling resistance.

But man, Martellos does not even is at the same lvl with DHF or a MM; and trust me, I tried multiple combo; almost 1 year I had morsa front to back, then Martello front, Morsa back for a couple of months. Then Martello front to back for 1 year and, before I switch to Maxxis, I had the Mota front-Martello in the back from April to July(last year). Morsas were 2.3 but the Martellos and the Mota were 2.5 DH casting. They aren't even close to DHFs and MMs, and hell no close to Assegai.
They do have one thing I appreciated, beside the good rolling, and that thing was the predictibility. It is like my hands were on the tires, that is how good I knew where I am with them and how much I can push them....aaand, it was sort of funny drifting pretty much everywhere but, once I made the switch to DHF and Assegai, I started to realize what grip really is and how much I can push a bike/tire.

If you use them on a trail bike...for small to epic rides, then they could be pretty good. If you want to smash 'the downs', look somewhere else.

I maintain my opinion, they are some of the best tires on the planet but, only from road to xc. Above xc, there are other brands/models that work so much better.
  • 2 0
 @eugenux: Eh, I've had different experiences and I too have tried all of those tires. Maybe it's just different conditions that lead us to vastly different results?
Either way, good luck!
  • 1 0
 could not agree more with the comments about not changing old trails/ trying to 'fix' difficult sections
  • 2 1
 Yaaaas Queen! Thanks for this one, boys.
  • 7 6
 ***Front Brake, RIGHT SIDE, Rear Brake, LEFT SIDE***
  • 6 0
 The correct side, stops my sword from fouling as i step off my bike.
  • 1 0
 @pbuser2299: I only mount my horse from the right so as not to confuse him!
  • 2 2
 Has anyone ever mentioned that the microphone by Levy's @mikelevy head looks like a dong... Asking for a friend
  • 1 0
 Ideea for another episode..., tires!
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy where’s the hey pinkers??????????
  • 1 0
 They won't let me say it Frown
  • 1 0
 Where's the real Grim Donut Part 2?
  • 1 0
 I have a manual trainer that i built
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