The Pinkbike Podcast: Episode 6 - Over Biked Or Under Biked?

May 6, 2020
by Mike Levy  
Art by Taj Mihelich


If you're in the market for a new mountain bike, one of the first things you need to figure out is how much bike you nee... Want. Are you the type who sees no downsides to pedaling a relatively long-travel, heavier machine around all day, even if it's "too much bike" for the terrain? Or are you the opposite, preferring a relatively light-duty machine that might be more exciting to ride, even if you're going slower down the sketchy stuff? It's the old under-biked versus over-biked argument for episode six, with Kazimer and myself looking at the situation from completely different angles. Of course.

If we're really just talking about travel, RC's recent poll on the topic shows that opinions are nearly split down the middle, with 5,751 of you saying that your next bike will probably have more suspension and slacker geometry, and 6,410 likely to end up on something with less travel but still good geo. The top two comments sum things up pretty well. Pinkbike user @gooutsidetoday said, "I like to be 'under-biked'... When you ride faster than your buddies, you can rub it in... And when they drop you on a descent, you have an excuse.'' While @Mattntp takes the opposite approach, saying, "Over-biked makes up for me being underskilled."

Available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, or wherever else you get your podcasts.



THE PINKBIKE PODCAST // EPISODE 6 - UNDER-BIKED OR OVER-BIKED?
April 29th, 2020

Is there even such a thing as too much bike?


Hosted by Mike Levy and featuring a rotating cast of the editorial team and other guests, the Pinkbike Podcast is a weekly update on all the latest stories from around the world of mountain biking, as well as some frank discussion about tech, racing, and everything in between.

Previous Pinkbike Podcasts
Episode 1 - Why Are Bikes So Expensive?
Episode 2 - Where the Hell is the Grim Donut?
Episode 3 - Pond Beaver Tech
Episode 4 - Why is Every Bike a Trail Bike?
Episode 5 - Can You Trust Bike Reviews?

Hit us in the comments with your suggestions: What do you want to hear us talk about? Would you be into watching a video version, or are our dulcet voices enough for you?


254 Comments

  • 84 0
 Overbiked. I can afford only one bike and I want to take it everywhere. 160 up front 150 in the rear. If I'm worried about weight I can drink less beer and stop being a fat piece of shit.
  • 12 0
 That's where I'm at right now too (160/170). We'll see how it works out this year and maybe I'll go back to being goldilocks-biked next year.
  • 13 0
 Agreed. The "overbiked" option works well. I can just take one do-everything bike to my local trails, the park, etc. I'd rather work for the climbs a bit more and really enjoy the DH stuff more too.
  • 12 1
 @FuriousGeorge - stopping being a fat piece of sht takes lots of time. Norco Optic will no longer be cool by the time I drop 10lbs.
  • 4 0
 Every time i've underbiked it's ended poorly. Hard bottom outs and swearing whilst riding through rock gardens, "why the f didn't i get more travel!".

For those of us with one bike and mountainous terrain you can get some quite fetching 150/160 bikes these days that do it all well.

I'd love to be able to virtue signal and beat endurobros up and down on a 120 bike... but fact is my bros on 150/160 bikes will still probably outclimb me and no way in hell I'd catch them on the dh.

Obviously the solution is n+1.
  • 4 0
 @brianpark: weight or travel?
  • 4 0
 150/160 is the sweet spot I'm shooting for. I drool over the big enduro bikes but most of the time I'm earning my turns so it's not worth it. Plus I figure a little bit less bike will force me to improve my skills.
  • 7 0
 @NiloB: yes.
  • 3 0
 @FuriousGeorge Fat gets you home.
  • 2 0
 If you can only go one bike i get that. How bout: daily driver buy new, less frequent option bike buy used, cheaper and upgrade over time.
  • 1 0
 thats what I got too, bronson V3 and thinking of downgrading to the Transition Scout. 150 140
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: If it’s that Madonna V2 you’re talking about it’s gonna work out juuuuust fine.
  • 1 0
 This is how I feel about it to. But at 192cm and 110kg, "over biked" means "stronger framed", which I'll take anyday.
  • 66 1
 I ride in Saskatchewan and I still ride a Santa Cruz Hightower. Don’t you travel shame me Levy!
  • 43 0
 "travel shame" hahah
  • 6 2
 @mikelevy: and there you go, another downcountry term oh boy, oh boy, oh boy...
  • 3 0
 Yikes, it doesn't get much flatter than Saskatchewan. Where do you go biking there, Lumsden?
  • 20 0
 @Ian713: in the potholes
  • 3 0
 @Ian713: Saskatchewan maybe lacking in elevation but there are still spots throughout the province that are fun places to ride. Wascana Trails near Lumsden is one spot that is great. Blackstrap Lake, Little Red near Prince Albert and Buffalo Pound are a few other spots that have some good trail networks.
  • 4 0
 @Ian713: not "much flatter", but still indeed flatter Manitoba cries a single tear ;(

...I'll get travel-shamed into moving to BC one day...
  • 2 0
 @justbuildit: do it! Best decision ever.
  • 5 14
flag will54869 (May 6, 2020 at 16:36) (Below Threshold)
 If a Pinkbike reviewer says "you don't need a downhill bike" they should be exiled to a road bike publication. You need whatever entertains and excites you. plus jumping/ steeps / tech/ rough is so much more forgiving and easy to learn compared to those darn single crown bikes.
  • 15 3
 @will54869, no one needs a downhill bike. Are they fun? Hell yes, which is exactly what I said in the podcast.
  • 4 2
 @mikekazimer: isn't Pinkbike originally a downhill website? ya of course your right, in terms of functionality. and I agree, the new enduro bikes are very impressive.
  • 10 0
 @mikekazimer: but does anyone really need a mountain bike?
  • 6 2
 @BornOnTwo: thats what he said in the podcast.Like you people are english and dont get it ?!?! Im romanian got here on a plane and had to pick up the third language in order to get by .... jesus
  • 7 1
 @BornOnTwo, touché, even though I'd argue I need one to stay sane. We're obviously debating luxury items here - all of us are lucky to even have the time to go goof off in the woods on big kid's toys.
  • 2 0
 @BornOnTwo: thought you said dh bike , im such an idiot ! .... So Im an idiot i didnt read it properly
  • 2 0
 @justbuildit: Manitoba’s got asessippi though and that’s pretty fun. I’m a sasker but an hour from asessippi so I’ll take it.
  • 3 0
 @justbuildit: I'm Saskie that moved to Calgary 22yrs ago (closer to the mountains) then BC 13yrs ago. Pull the pin dude. My 2 mtb bros from the praries (1 from MB and 1 from SK) followed (families in tow) ZERO regrets. If I still lived in SK (Gravel/ ST trail bike/ Fatbike for the perfect quiver)
  • 2 0
 @FrsknSld: True! you're right, and tbh Manitoba definitely has more diversity of trails than people would first expect- coming out of Winnipeg Asessippi is 4 hrs so unfortunately a bit of a trek, but definitely thankful it's available. Just feeling a bit grass is greener during this time (but let's be real, BC is objectively "greener" haha), but I'm still down to dance with the one that brung ya in the meantime Smile
  • 1 0
 @jethromtbr: Getting more tempting every day dude!
Thank you for the positive encouragement tho, almost certain I'll do it in the next 3 yrs and now might be as good a time as any to plan it out.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: Exactly, some may need a DH bike to stay sane. Ya we are all lucky!! Some of us are super lucky to have a DH bike and a trail bike and a fat bike.
  • 2 0
 @justbuildit: go ride the East Gate trails in Riding Mountain National Park or the Selo Ukraina ones but Dauphin. Some of the best of MB imo.
  • 36 1
 Under biked with good tires n brakes is the way
  • 26 1
 Yes, so much this. Big tires on a short-travel bike.
  • 9 0
 For sure. Short travel, light-weight 29er with 2.4WT Minions , 4-piston brakes FTW.
  • 9 0
 @tunnel-vision: I used to love my old 120mm Ripley with 2.4" tires on it - perfect for where I used to live.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: Absolutely love my Ripley LS for nearly everything in my area. There's only a few drops I won't hit, but that's mostly because of my worn out old joints, not the bike. Just built up an Ibis DV9 with a Trust Message and 2.6's to further downbike. It's unreal how this bike rips!. SC Jackal for the local DJ place!
  • 1 0
 Yup! all plastic Trek Fuel EX, light wheels, 4 piston brakes and 2.4 tires. 25ish lbs . . . love it, But . . .shopping for a park bike!
  • 1 1
 Yes, I just built up a new Marin rift zone with hunt trail wides and minion 2.4s. It climbs so well and is a blast doing everything else. That being said, I’m pretty much riding all blue trails with very little black ones. So I think I’ve bikes myself perfectly for my use.
  • 6 0
 @mikelevy: 120mm travel, 120mm reach.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: No one knew any better, so it was awesome.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: Where did you " used to " live ?
  • 4 0
 Under biked and over tired is the true path of the righteous.
  • 2 0
 @barbarosza: In Chilliwack, about an hour east of Vancouver. Much smoother, faster terrain than here in Squamish.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: I'm riding 27.5x3.0s on a hardtail with 120mm and 4 piston codes f/r. Am I doing this right?
  • 6 0
 @sjma: Everyone is doing it right Smile
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: Thank you! (Riding a 26x2.4" hardtail with 120mm and MY2006 Louise f/r)
  • 17 0
 You're always going to be at least slightly over or under biked. It's similar to setting up a bike for a DH race run, the setup has to be compromised between the rock garden, the big step-up and the pedally sections. The goal should be to try and not be way over biked or under biked very often.
  • 18 1
 did anyone else jump from 26 to 29 inch and just skiped the 27.5 craze? i did it cuz I am poor, didnt have enough surplus for 7 years to purchase a new bike, probably somebody else was or is in a similiar situation...
  • 7 0
 Run what ya brung! Probably got a few years of nicely cheap 26" parts too.
  • 7 0
 currently have a 26", 27.5 and 29er I ride, wouldn't have it any other way
  • 17 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: so.many.tires.
  • 21 0
 I went from 26 straight to 29, then to a 27.5/26 mullet, and currently on 27.5. For me, the 29er was a little better at almost everything, but 27.5 is a lot more fun.
  • 7 0
 I did, bought a used 26 at the beginning of 27.5 hype, now 29er. Funny thing, wheel size does not matter. What matters is your fitness and skills. And,good suspension too, geometry, then brakes & tyres. Wheel size is like on the 5th place.
  • 9 0
 You are not supposed to bypass any industry "innovation". Need to buy everything.
  • 2 0
 After riding 26" for 15+ years, I got 29" and skipped the 27.5". My test rides on 29" felt a huge difference compared to 26", but 27.5" was no different than 26". So why have a third option when it's not better than 26" or 29"? I still ride my 26" if I want to pop around and goof off.
  • 2 1
 I went from 26 to 27.5, eight years apart. Wish I had gone 29.
  • 6 0
 @lkubica: agree - and curious how a 26" bike with current geo tread and the better suspension kinematics of today would feel.
  • 1 0
 @pargolf8: you don't even know the half of it....tires galore. I also tend to keep my bikes, not of of these to sell after a season or 2.
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: should be like fifth wheel, right? Wink
  • 4 0
 I still am on 26”. Frown About to go from a 2010 nomad carbon to a 2020 trance 29 alum though. Will my mind be blown?
  • 1 0
 I had a 26.b bike for a while - 650b front wheel (and fork) and a 26" rear.
  • 8 0
 A friend of mine has as 26". 2012 180mm Intense Uzzi. I have a 2018 E29. We swapped rides one night for fun (we are both the same size), and we both enjoyed the bikes. In the end, he is not upgrading, and I don't blame him. Also, I still love my bike too.

So, ride what you have and don't worry about it. People get too worked up over numbers. Worse yet, how few miles people ride and still complain about the bike.
  • 3 1
 @artistformlyknowasdan: I used to have a Knolly Chilco not that outdated geo, but too short for me in L (and I am only 180cm). It road damn well, took about 3 months to match it speed on a 29er! Better axle path than a 29er, it was soo good at moderate chunk, the rear wheel would never hang on square sh*t. Eventually I discovered that my new Lyrik was badly assembled with neg chamber half full of grease (PB censored my comment about that on live chat with RS Wink ). After that, a new spring for the rear (stupid choice, coil dampers suck, I needed a 375lb spring) and another month of learning to bunnyhop again (BB relatively lower on a 29er) and I matched times on a 26 Knolly Wink Now I ride faster, but I simply got stronger through the winter (was very mild and lots of riding). So if someone says that moving to a 29er changed his world immediately ... this only means he had a bad/much too small bike before.
  • 1 0
 @shredddr: how does that mullet feel? if specialized keeps wining on that 29/27.5 mullet Demo, they will most likely move the desing to production Demos and then trickle down to the Enduro and the Stumpy and then the whole bike industry will follow... I am curios if it works.

ps:i dont care if some other ccompanies have done it b4 or at the same time as specialized, it was just an example, to put the point across
  • 1 0
 @Narro2: My bike was hopelessly dated and I only did that to squeeze another year or two out of it while "standards" were changing so much. Upforking the travel 10mm plus going to a 650b front wheel made the handling a bit janky. I can see the draw for some of a 650b rear wheel for possibly quicker cornering, but I'll take a 29er for the rollover speed.
  • 5 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: I have a 26 still. It’s not as long but slack as a lot of current 6” rigs so I just ride a large frame for reach. I’m about to slacken it out with an angle set some because enduro. But anyway I don’t feel it holds me back at all. Tire choices are the only con. Killing 26 was all marketing. Geo and suspension are soooo much more important.
  • 1 0
 I started on 26" back in the days. Added a 20" I still have and use to this day. Went straight to 26" after the first one and got me another 26" to keep it company. Broke the other 26" and replaced it with a 26" bike, but also got myself something stronger with 24" in the rear. And 26" in the front. Eventually two years ago I took the leap and replaced one 26" bike with a new bike with 26" wheels.

Loving the wheelsize talk, keep it up!
  • 1 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: probably like a modern 27.5"
  • 1 0
 @cougar797: I’ve spent hours tracking down my last few 26” WTB Vigilante Tough/HighGrip.
  • 2 0
 Yep, went from a 2012 Giant Reign 0 to a 2020 Norco Sight 29. Loved the Reign. Love the Sight.
  • 3 0
 @Tuzza: you again.

The question of did you skip 650b is funny to me because I only got into MTB 5 years ago in my late 20s. I started on 27.5 and don't really want to ride anything else. ❤️
  • 1 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: ya, someone should make a modern 26er and compare. maybe a grim donut ver26er?
  • 1 0
 @kilazilla: BTR makes their bikes in different wheelsizes and they adapt the geometry for the different wheelsizes. Their most popular model, the Ranger is available for various wheelsizes so those agonizing over geometries might like to study that. As for their full suspension bike, the Pinner, it is currently only available in 26" and 27.5" so no 29" for those interested in that. From what I understand, the Grim Donut is the bike from the future so there is no point bothering about that now.
  • 3 0
 I jumped from 26 to 29, and then to 27.5.
  • 1 0
 @GBeard: Yes. yes yes yes.
  • 18 3
 It all comes down to consequences. The consequence of being overbiked means the climb sucks and going slower is less fun. The consequences of being underbiked is crashing and hurting yourself or worse breaking your bike... easy decision for me.
  • 12 6
 If you race, yes. But if you ride for fun, I see overbiked as taking some fun out of it. It makes it too easy. You go faster but it does not always translate to more fun. I can take a modern dual suspension or a rigid from the 90's in the same trails. Both are fun. It is like riding two different trails.
  • 2 0
 Honestly depending on what you are riding and the bike, most people are "over biked" with modern long trail or enduro bikes. That 150/160mm travel is more than most people need. Maybe not most pink bikers but most people.

The thing is, they climb pretty darn well these days. If you get the right bike, sure you aren't setting records because of weight but on techy climbs some of these newer bikes climbs as well if not better than a trail bike from 3 or 4 years ago even.

The thing is, this bike is still fun on the easy trails around me and I can go to the bike park with it.
  • 4 0
 Having extra travel makes doing long descents with my dad fitness fun.
  • 6 0
 @jordanaustino: I can say that having 160mm of travel has saved my unskilled ass multiple times. Multiple drops I would have been over the bars. I’m perfectly willing to have a little less fun on the more boring trails for that.
  • 5 0
 This: I'm overbiked because when I was underbiked, I broke a frame and my shock/fork would really make me suffer when it got hairy. It got to the point where I had so many gravity oriented parts on a 120mm trail bike that I just started to run out of travel.

Now I just suffer slightly more on the climbs :/
  • 2 0
 @RedRedRe: Agreed. I can see the underbiking being a problem but only if you're not adjusting your riding style to fit the bike. Different tool = different approach = different ride, even on the same trail
  • 1 0
 I personally feel less suspension is easier to adapt to. There are no nasty surprises. Whatever happens, you know it is yours to solve so you're always prepared.
  • 3 0
 Being overbiked is nearly always referred to amount of rear wheel travel that the bike has and at best the tire casing. Almost nobody talks about being overgeometried or overknobbed and if I was to be petty: overcassetted, overbraked, overbarwidthed. And that makes for some awkward setups, both in terms of what riders tweak and what some companies release. Geometry is currently a saint cow and the trend dictates near DH geo on a bloody 120 bike while Enduro bikes are supposed to run full on DH geo but as soon as you put DH casings on them or 180 fork - you are overbiked. As soon as I mention that I am fine climbing DH tires I am called “playing a tough guy”. But surprisingly Norco Optic on Minions and Fox 36 makes perfect sense, and in current climate if they made it even longer and even slacker it would be more than fine. So basically we are not talking about Being overbiked, we are talking about being overtraveled in the rear.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: This would maybe have been true five or ten years ago, probably even longer. Bikes for marathon and endurance type racing (not to be confused with the current enduro discipline) got more travel and grew into (and beyond) the 5" zone that until then had been the freeride domain. But at the time you also got loads of hard hitting hardtails, a hardtail field for DH racing (and also a MUni DH field at events like the Salzkammergut, but technically these aren't bicycles of course). And hard hitting short travel bikes too. Remember the original 2003 Specialized Enduro SX that Matt Hunter rode in The Collective and Anneke Beerten raced to second place at the Lissabon Urban DH race (right after ACC)? Later iterations of the SX (it eventually split from their Enduro branch) got more travel but this original had 80mm. The Transition Bottle Rocket, YT Play, loads of fun little short travel bikes intended for harder hits. And if you brought a Bottle Rocket strictly for XC riding, you could certainly claim to be overbiked in some department.
  • 1 0
 @jambarbeast: For sure, it just depends on the trails around you and what you ride I think. There is a point at which too much bike stops being fun, safety cushion is fine and frankly might not really be "over biked", it's the right bike for your skill and your trails.

At a certain point it's just gate keeping and skill shaming.

What I'm talking about is more people who ride green trails near me exclusively and buy an enduro bike for it. I can guarantee you they aren't having as much fun as they would on an XC bike which would offer just as much cushion, in fact, the bike they are on might make those trails worse not better.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: you're overtraveled in the rear Big Grin (you made it too easy for me)
  • 17 0
 Nutterbutters aren't crackers! They're cookies.
  • 17 0
 I tell myself they're crackers so they seem healthier.
  • 1 0
 This!! Had me rolling. @mikekazimer:
  • 16 0
 Super duper podcast guys! Keep up the good work✌????
  • 10 1
 HTA & STA aside, I don't get all the overbike/underbike talk when the lockouts or even just climb assist positions in modern suspension are so effective. It's yet another testament to bike reviewers being oversaturated with options that they'd even have the conversation.

Bikes are really, really good now but as always the cutting edge of MTB is incredibly expensive. But with modern parts what that means is you can buy a single expensive bike for all of your riding, whether you opt to go all mountain or enduro. There is a reason XC and DH are at the niche ends of the sport, they are niche. The reality is 99% of riders could run a modern, high end 150mm front n rear bike on every trail they ride. XC/gravel ride? Lock the shock out and throw different tires on. Bike park laps? Open up the suspension and throw aggressive tires with inserts in.

The pro riders prove it by riding Whistler on hardtail or rigid bikes, people overbike to "compensate" for a lack of skill. And those people are getting hurt all the time because basically the bike ends up writing checks they cant cash. Coming from BMX I got into MTBing to have a safer but still rad experience, and it bums me out to see so many people riding above their limits on ~5k bikes, and getting hurt.
  • 1 0
 I’ve never rode bmx, so bmx is more dangerous than mtb?
  • 3 0
 @kingbike2: There are various reasons for this to be true. Firstly, you're expected to do tricks on a BMX. Some MTBers will go to the grave having never done a gap jump or taken a hand or foot off the bike in the air. Modern BMX bikes are typically run with no brakes, you are expected to have perfect bike control (considering how controllable a 20 inch design is). Also, BMX is more frequently done on concrete and wood, or any other hard surface. Hard pack dirt hurts as well, no doubt, but I see so many MTBers have relatively bad crashes in loam or softer dirt and get up laughing. This rarely happens in BMX lol
  • 12 0
 Overbike and call everyone an "XC weenie" or underbike and call everyone a "bro"?
  • 2 0
 Yes
  • 2 0
 the true pinkbike way. this is the type of human behavior i am accustomed to.
  • 1 0
 Nice
  • 7 0
 After years of being undebiked, now I'm just enough biked. I think.
But I'm getting old, slow, insecure and lame so I'm pretty much sure that with my next bike I'll do whatever it takes to buy myself all the travel out there.
180 mm forks? Yes please.. Come to daddy!
  • 1 0
 I'm with you. I don't feel like I'm either underbiked or overbiked. I have exactly what I need to ride around here. I don't think I'd want more, I don't think I'd want less.
  • 1 1
 @pakleni - I noticed that having 2 sets of wheels with different tires makes a big difference for a 140-160 bike. I run one light and fast rolling set for local trails. Decrease SAG a bit, add some lsc without changing rebound. Makes for a livlier ride. Then when leaving to big mountains I put the heavy, knobby meat on, increase fork travel to 180 and make it all plusher.
  • 7 1
 I enjoy both options! I have a lot of fun on my Knolly Warden. I rarely reach the limits of that bike, but it gives me confidence to push my limits and sometimes saves my bacon. And I also have a blast on my rigid fixed-gear, attempting many of the same trails as on my Warden
  • 3 0
 Ditto on my full bouncey Murmur and Rigid Singlespeed Krampus.
  • 1 0
 My Warden does pretty much everything I need/want it to do.
But some of my local trails are so tame it's quite boring to ride.
Hardtail on the horizon I think...
  • 6 0
 I under-bike for my local trails for one reason: I want to do big, long epic rides with lots of climbs. A slacked out 34 pound enduro sled just doesn't make that as possible, for me. ~120/120, 29er is all I need and its makes the gnar that much more 'interesting'.
  • 14 6
 It’s also fun passing spandex dudes on climbs with big tires and baggy shorts.
  • 29 0
 Every time a baggy wearer passes a lycra wearer, an enduro trail dog gets its wings
  • 3 0
 It is pretty fun passing people on climbs with the big bike.
  • 25 0
 I see plenty of people on xc hardtails passing guys on 140 bikes going down... it is the rider, not the bike.
  • 3 0
 Why were you down voted? That is totally fun.
  • 2 0
 @Monsterman156: because that happens most often within the confines of the brain, rather than on the trails
  • 3 0
 It sure is! It's also fun passing baggy dudes wearing full faces on a short travel bike with spandex on.
  • 3 0
 @nonk: Passing anyone, while riding anything, regardless of who's wearing what is just plain ole` fun....Smile
  • 5 0
 I had a 160mm commencal AM meta and while it was so nice on the descents just took a little fun out of the down and made for a tougher up and I was over biked for what I ride 98% of the time. Sure it was super nice at windrock but to much everywhere else for me. Got the 2020 Norco Optic in November and that’s perfect amount of suspension for what I need for me. Slack geo so not sketchy on the downs and pretty dang good on the ups!
  • 9 0
 Why not just have 2,3,4, or 5 bikes?
  • 1 0
 If you can afford it, go for it.. Not everyone has that option unfortunately.
  • 2 2
 Not everyone is a Dentist!
  • 8 1
 Both! I alternate between a Process 111 and 153CR. Love and appreciate them both.
  • 6 0
 Good combo!
  • 3 0
 Like I think Kazimer said in a recent episode, If someone rides flatter less gnarly trails but still likes feeling confident on their bike, why shame them for it? Another reason I disagree with the widespread sentiment that people are overbiked is that many people do 3-5 bike park days a year. Having a longer travel bike that works well enough for trail rides and lets you enjoy the bike park a few days a year and maybe hop in an enduro if they so desire makes a lot of sense.
  • 4 0
 There ain't no shaming Smile
  • 1 1
 @mikelevy: Full disclosure I have not listened to the episode yet due to finals/ saving it for driving, I am mostly talking about people I know who participate in that kind of paternalistic thought.
  • 3 0
 Overbiked, but underbiked on the rear tire, I think that makes it more fun at lower speeds.

Ideas for next podcasts that come to mind:
+ Electrical components such as SRAM AXS, Fox Valve, etc.: Who needs this or the next big thing?
+ 26, 27.5, 29: Why stop here? If 29 is much better than 27.5, imagine a 31.5 bike!
+ Cannondale Lefty: Dog with three legs or engineering at the highest level?
  • 2 0
 This is some good questions right here! They’ve already touched on AXS on a previous podcast but I like the idea of the whole electronic components talked about.
  • 1 0
 @MillerReid: Thanks, good point. The Magura Vyron eLECT is probably a better example for the the group.
  • 3 0
 Middle Aged Man, 40 lbs overweight, cannot touch toes, 11 year out drops/jumps better than me, if I wore lycra it would look like 10 lbs of S#$t in a 5 lb sack, have a bike rack on the wife's car, kids hate uphill, sooner ride with a cush core lever where everyone thinks Levy wants it than enter an XC race...... etc...... OVERBIKE by a landslide victory.

If I lose 40 lbs lets talk about this again.........
  • 2 0
 Rough trails, being 210ish, strong enough to hold onto stuff and budget means I am not underbiked. I think a 130r/150f 650b bike (spity v3 im lookin at you, could even bolt up my 142 gold Hadley!!) with fairly slack geo would be a hoot. But as I break enough 150-160mm frames...
  • 1 0
 looking at this frame too to keep my nice, perfectly functioning non-boost wheels!
  • 1 0
 @mikenettleton: so I'm not the only one? My 27.5 NOBL wheels aren't ready to be re-tired....
  • 2 0
 For me, over-biked requires a higher standard of fitness. I need to be fit enough to push the bike's limits.
More plush -> higher limits -> higher fitness.

If I'm not at the fitness level then the bike feels too much.
If I could get any bike at the moment it would be lighter, shorter travel, more poppy.

That said...I love my lead-weight Banshee Rune of a sled.
  • 2 0
 That chonky Rune will make you stronger!
  • 2 0
 In an ideal world, i would want to be underbiked but with slightly beefed up suspension/wheels for rowdier riding. Something along the lines of a Stumpjumper with a piggyback air shock, 36/Lyrik and some solid wheels. But in the real world i ride an Enduro and suck it up for epic days in the saddle where i wish i had got something smaller. Until i point the Enduro downhill, then i forget about everything i just said. 10/10 would do it again.
  • 2 0
 I'm torn. I currently ride a 2012 Uzzi. I'm thinking of getting the new Hightower. I think the bigger wheels and shorter travel will make my home trails a little more fun and should still be fine for my park days. I mostly ride blue jump trails and some of the techy stuff when at the park. Is jumping from what is basically and old school Enduro sled to a modern trail bike a huge difference?
  • 1 0
 I modern trail bike is probably more capable than a enduro from 2012 especially the Hightower. I think slack trail bikes of today are the absolute sweet spot for a huge portion of the world!
  • 1 0
 Get a bronson on buysell..or a nomad from 2015+ if youre hittin bike park stuff on the reg
  • 2 0
 I’m surprised no one said they would choose a DJ bike.

Do any of you road bike? I personally love road biking, the only turn off to me is the drivers. Where I live bike lanes are not super popular and people still act like a-holes to road bikers. To me a road bike and DJ/street/play bike are a must have. I also own a XC race bike and often wonder if I’d be happier on a light trail bike. I like to dirt crit and XC race so I worry the light trail bike may slow me down...
  • 2 0
 For sure, road and gravel. No dirt jumper anymore, though. I should probably get back on that horse one day.
  • 1 0
 I'm with you... 1: road bike 2: fat bike/mullet+ rigid 3: overbuilt trail bike (150f/140r)

And yeah, roads scare me more than mountain biking, but I'm learning which ones are safer than others.
  • 2 0
 @JasonALap: I love road biking because it’s so simple and easy. Open garage roll out and I’m on my ride. I wish it was more popular and accepted by motorists. I love dirt jumping for the bang for your buck factor. Pedal up to the roll in, pump, jump, nice airtime and you feel great. Almost 100% fun factor. Mountain biking is more like my vacation at home time. Takes a little more to get out on the trails but it’s all great and the most enjoyable. Cycling = zen time / family time / friend time / date days with my wife / fitness.
  • 1 0
 same. i got a road bike, DJ, and a patrol. kinda want to get into the gravel thing but hella new standards too!!!
  • 2 0
 Redbull came out to the Angel Fire Bike Park and built a custom course for the Redbull BMX Dreamline youtu.be/ba36JAqTyZw

No suspension on the bikes and that made us feel pretty "overbiked" with our full dh rigs for the normal mortal jumps in the park.

When I think "overbiked" I think, yeah we are overbiked:

a) Son has DJ, xc hardtail race, 130mm trail bike, and a DH rig
b) Me trail bike and DH rig
c) Spouse trail and DH rig

That's 8 bikes, so I think were "overbiked", not to mention a bunch of other outgrown/outdated bikes still hanging around the garage....
  • 2 0
 My latest bike (Knolly Fugitive) has less travel than my previous one (Knolly Warden), but has better geometry. I would say that I am optimally biked for most of the trails I ride.
  • 1 0
 I've been looking at the Fugitive lately. It seems really nice and looks like a good climber and great for the descents. How do you lile it?
  • 3 0
 @SimbaandHiggins: I have to first of all say that I am bit of a Knolly fan boy, so maybe a tiny bit biased. I have had 4 Knolly bikes so far. I am having a lot of fun on the Fugitive. It's my first 29-er and I was worried that it wouldn't be very agile on tight trails. I am totally blown away by how well it handles them though. Super agile bike that is very easy to change direction any time you want, or hold a straight line if you prefer. It's a much longer reach/front center than my previous bikes, which is good and bad. Super stable and confidence inspiring on the steeps, but I sometimes struggle to get enough weight on the back wheel without hanging off the back. I often end up going down very steep rock rolls on my front wheel only. I am right at the bottom end of the size recommendations for a medium though, so that is part of it. If I manage to get my weight low and back it's not much of a problem. As fun as the Fugitive is, I think the Warden is a better bike for seriously steep and gnarly trails. The Fugitive pedals more efficiently and climbs well, but it's no speed demon on fire road climbs. It has more traction on steep technical climbs than most other bikes do. Hope that helps!
  • 1 0
 @Skooks: Thanks man Smile
  • 3 0
 I have to agree with Levy, I race enduro on a 130mm travel bike and it is an absolute blast even if it's "not enough bike" for some of the stages
  • 1 0
 Someone higher in this thread said it correctly, you are always one or the other on any given ride. I ride a 150 rear 160 front bike that might be a bit of a pig on the ups and some of the XC trails on my way to, or from the more challenging tracks on the hill that I like to smash as fast as I can. So I am not sure if in total I am over or under biked. I kind of feel like I have the right compromise for what I ride most (Bellingham, WA).
  • 2 0
 I am with Mike on the issue of under/over biked. I am not worried at being the fastest to the top, but I wanna be able to smash the downs.
BTW guys I am really enjoying the pod cast! Keep up the good work
  • 1 0
 The most fun bike I've ridden in recent years would probably have to be my friends 2019 Giant Trance 29 Advanced Pro. Its crazy light weight, has ridiculously poppy suspension and it just wants to go all the time. So easy to manual and bounce it up into the air over the smallest of lips. For me personally that bike is the definition of short-travel trail bike fun. Compared to that my own Commencal Meta TR 29er feels about as nimble and playful as a tank. A shame that they are so expensive...
  • 2 0
 As someone who just bought a 160mm rear travel bike, I'm totally over biked for my area. However, I'm trying to hit bigger jumps and I am 36 yrs old and not getting any younger.
  • 1 0
 Over biked, over shocked, over tyred, under wheeled ???? mk 1 geometron with 650 b, a coil and did tyres. Still punched a hole in one on the rangers path at snowdon and will take the slog with weight and long travel for the get out of jail free card. Interested in trying a29 up front though and at least the geo allows it
  • 3 0
 Man, you guys didn't even touch on single speed mountain bikes. Under biked and under geared is super fun. It shouldn't be, but it is.
  • 1 0
 I used to think being under biked was the way to go, but I recently switched from my fully rigid 29+ stache to a full stache and it completely transformed my local trails. Being in Minnesota it seemed that any double bouncer was overkill, but now everything is a jump. Leb is now a totally different trail for me, features that were super sketch are now way more fun...I'm ashamed to say over biked now makes sense.
  • 1 0
 I built my do-it all bike up reasonably light at 31 pounds but rode everything..... and broke everything and had to replace things. Now I am on a 180/160 carbon Enduro bike weighing 35 pounds with DH casing tires.... it sucks a little on the big climbs but its really the only option for my less than smooth riding style (and no, that isn't going to change). Overbiked fo life!
  • 3 0
 Can you imagine if you bought a new bike and total strangers didn't judge your decision because its really none of their damn business? Me neither.
  • 3 0
 No one's judging. We're just bike dorks talking about bike dork things Wink
  • 1 0
 Being overbiked or underbiked can also depend on where you live and ride most often. Moving from a prairie town to an interior BC town can definitely change what type of bike you decide to go with. If (God forbid), I had to move to a City or town in the prairies, I would downgrade my bike from a freeride to a light XC bike or probably a gravel grinder.
If Whistler was at my doorstep, I would own a full DH rig just for park laps. Living in the interior, it is conducive to own a freeride/enduro bike, the rest is up to experience level and risk tolerance when you're out there.

Question: Do you think the bikes that are being produced today are a direct result of the maturation of the mountain bike industry as a whole? ie: we've outgrown our "teenage" years of being a fringe sport and moved away from DH rigs and smashing beers at the top of the trail, to more versatile Enduro bikes that can handle almost everything because we're older and wiser now Smile
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy @brianpark @mikekazimer did I get too late at the party ? So as a one quiver considering you guys would still apreciate the smaller wheels (27.5 ) would the Bronson V3 be an option ?

Mike Kazimer said he liked it,Brian liked it as well ( although after a 3 years hiatus its hard to find a bad bikes in 2019) while Mike Levy said it would be his 5th option out of the trail bikes test last year in Whis.

The thing is Im 1.75m tall and I just sold my Transition hard tail and all Im left with is the Bronson V3 however custom built.Not that I would have put more miles into the single speed hard tail but I literally only have one bike.My question is,if there was only one bike for you guys and there was no 29er option ( nor the Grimmer Ripper D. ) would even Mr. Lee-Vee be okay with Bronsons ( not as Trek s ) climbing capabilities ? Its the only fault I find with it,doesnt climb as good as a Remedy I previously owned nor as the Mega ( nukeproof ).

Thank you.
  • 1 0
 I like to be underbiked for trail days and on the right bike for the big days. I'm perfectly happy on a hardtail or even a rigid for mildish trails. Even if it means slowing down in some places and picking the right line. I've bike parked on the rigid and it was a ton of fun even it meant taking some go arounds. Nothing like a 4 ft drop to flat on a rigid to see if you still got young man ankles.

That said nothing beats a true DH bike for the park or an enduro/fr bike if you need something pedalable. But being overbiked on all but the gnarliest trails is pretty lame.

Having owned a really solid 135 mm bike for a couple years now it was a poor purchase in hindsight. The trails it's best on I'd have more fun with less travel and while it can handle days at the bike park or super gnarly trails the shortcomings becomes apparent really quick. Really doubt I'd ever buy a true trail bike again.
  • 1 0
 Here is a topic. Does East coast vs West coast exist (or Rockies, Sierras vs Midwest and Apps). I find most bike reviews happen in big gnarly mountains, which is not the same as my rooty New England trails, contributing to over biking.
  • 1 0
 I’m torn with what direction to take my alloy stumpy evo; I bought it because I wanted an aggressive trail bike, but as the suspension needs servicing I’m fantasizing over coil rear + smashpot front which would bump the weight into porky enduro territory. ...at least I found a ~1650gr 29 wheelset here on the pinkbike classifieds....
  • 1 0
 Check out matt wraggs evo build
  • 1 0
 Under biked for sure! Makes for a more fun and challenging ride which is then more satisfying when you stomp a feature you've been building up to. I love finding features in trails that you don't hit straight away. You maybe need to stop and scope with your buddy, session something first or go away and think about it for a couple of rides and come back to it. That blood pumping rush of then stomping what you set out to do cannot be beaten for me....and with an "over capable" bike, that feeling wouldn't come around as often. Bikes are so good now, I cant help but feel that big enduro bikes are only required if you want to be competitive at enduro races.

Love this format of Podcast fellas, keep up the good work!
  • 1 0
 Personally I think 100mm bikes are the way to go anytime I try some with more travel I just end up going slower. I’m really eyeing a Supercaliber for my next ride. I do however live in Wisconsin, so we don’t exactly have any gnarly downhills. Just very pedally xc courses.
  • 2 0
 Brian said it for me. I can only afford one super nice bike, so I need to make sure it can cover everything I ride! That is everything from fun flowy, blue trails to lift access bike parks.
  • 1 0
 Pedal friendly mid travel 29er - All Mountain / Enduro.
Swap out tyres for what is required.
Going from a Hardtail XC bike to a 150mm travel full squish, I can ride tech ups and have a hoot bombing what downs I find. Take it to the bike park and travel OS with it and ride DH tracks. A good all in one.
  • 1 0
 I live in the French Alps and ride semi tech trails in the Chamonix valley. I have a HT. Am just about to buy a FS for the first time after 30 yrs or riding!! Reason: can't keep up with my flippin nippers. Pretty sure I am going to be over biked in the slack, long AND squish departments, but can't help myself. Going 170mm front and rear! You can all say "told you so" after my first climb!!!!
  • 1 0
 Back when I was bike shopping, I knew I was going to be limited to 1 bike...I picked a bike that would be the most fun for bike park trips and still be manageable locally and fit the budget limits.. Ended up with a Trek Slash 8. Put it in the high mode, it rides like a big Fuel . Put it in the low mode and it can plow...

A few months later, my boss offers to get me a long term demo bike.. Went immediately to something better suited for the local trails. Got a Giant Trance Advanced Pro 1. Some taller bars and lighter faster rolling tires and the bike is dialed for me. This bike may find its way to Skypark if they can open anytime soon...

3 bike stable? Look at my two bikes above.. If I can get away without counting the gravel bike, I would like to maybe add a Trek Stache to the group.. If the gravel bike counts, I would get a new gravel bike to replace my old CX bike.. Would really like some better brakes..

1 bike stable... My Slash was that.. If I could make the numbers work, something like a Hightower or Niner RIP9 I think could be amazing do it all bikes... Or even the Giant Reign 29...
  • 1 0
 As some other people have said, it's a compromise that you're never going to get perfect. I think the idea of being underbiked is more appealing if you have a bigger bike available to you for when you want to ride gnarlier stuff. Ideally you find your goldilocks bike that does it all, but I think for most riders with one bike, it's more practical to be overbiked than underbiked. You CAN ride flat XC trails and most climbs with a bigger bike even though it won't be ideal, but there are plenty of trails and features that you CAN'T ride an XC or lighter trail bike down. Ultimately it's a balancing act that will be different for every rider. That said, I'm hoping my new Guerrilla Gravity Shred Dogg will be that Goldilocks for me, and if I find myself underbiked too often, there's always a Smash or Gnarvana seatstay kit for a whole lot less than another bike...
  • 1 0
 @brianpark & @mikekazimer you guys should make @mikelevy test his mettle. Make him pick one bike the he will ride exclusively for a couple months and see what he picks. Could even be a cool article series where he checks in every week with what trails he hit and how he's liking (or regretting) his choice.
  • 2 0
 I don't hate the idea
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy likes this idea because it would mean him not having to do his job for 2 months.
  • 1 0
 Awesome thread going on here, definitely enjoying the podcast! I'm 'newish' to mountain biking, I came from motocross and off-road type riding (B-class). With that said, I used to live in OR and frequented lift access terrain. I had a full on DH One Ghost Industries Musashi for a bit it was an awesome bike for the task at hand 'lift access'. Once I moved to VA (where I currently reside) I have definitely noticed a trend in being over forked! Personally I have 'little to no-fear' sending it downhill around this area. Now there are some resort style trails (Bryce, Massanutten, etc..) however, I ditched the Musashi and scooped up a Marin Hawk Hill - man, what a joy around here I can climb, descend and cruise! I have recently discovered a love for even lower forked bikes. I purchased a 2020 Trek Roscoe 7 frame and am currently building it with a Sr Suntour AION fork, MT400's, Vee Tire Crown GEM 27.5x2.8, and NX drivetrain. I see this bike being a serious contender for the blue collar rider. All in all its not being overbiked or underbiked, it's riding what you're comfortable on. I'm 6'2 and love my large when the book says I need an XL. Buy the bike that suits the terrain you're comfortable riding nearest you. You'll be able to grow your skills and confidence to upgrade and continue ripping! However, if you're in the market for a vehicle and want to get out feeling sore and sweaty - BUY A JEEP not a MINI lol. Happy trails!
  • 1 0
 Truth is IMO every serious rider not wearing spandex should have 2 bikes. An enduro bike and a 120 to 130mm hard tail like a Kona Honzo. Getting a trail bike and calling it a do all bike is just kidding yourself. When you want to hammer single track and do epics the Honzo will get it done all day. Rest of the time why not just have yourself a shred machine.
  • 1 0
 Next podcast topic :

Whos the mullet bikes intended for ? How should people measure their inseam and top in order to best choose the right bike considering you already know what your terrain is....like lets say you re in between sizes a 5.9 tall guy with long ass hands but short legs ( 30 " )

Mullet
29 er
27.5 ?

Of course percentage of time riding mellow trails and bikepark has an impact perhaps so each to be exemplified would be an interesting topic.

Thanks
  • 1 0
 @brianpark I have a question I've been curious about for a while. You kind of touched on this an episode ago. Is there a divergence happening between top of the line bikes and pro bikes? Maybe I’m being naive but I’ve always imagined the most expensive bikes in a lineup to be the ones that are closest to what the pros ride. With the design trend to make bikes more and more capable for more people I wonder if that is not a different goal than what a pro might want? Don’t take that the wrong way, I’m all for it! The more people who can get out and enjoy riding the better. And if a bike can be designed so that it is safer for most people I approve!

It is likely I’m just being a dinosaur here but my experience with long and slack bikes is that they do feel stable at speed but sacrifice a lot of agility. On most bikes I tend to enjoy a frame size too small just so the bike feels more nimble (even put an angleset on my new frame to steepen the HT a degree). Anyway, does a bike designed so that a weekend warrior can confidently ride difficult terrain equate to an even faster and more confident bike at pro levels? Or does that added stability (that a pro likely didn’t really need) come at a cost to some other performance marker?
  • 1 0
 Question- is it ok to buy a $2100 bike and then buy $2000 xc wheels or spend a lot of money on an upgrade or just slowly upgrade everything like gog for a gx eagle the to an xo1. or go to a revelation it a pike ultimate. so do i save all the cash and buy a few very nice parts or slowly upgrade when i can.
  • 1 0
 Question for a future podcast? Thoughts on loading the frame of your bike up with gear? Is it better to load your bike or your hip/backpack? Where is the sweet spot? Is it worth putting all of your extra weight on the bike or split it up between bike and pack? Follow-up, every unprotected tube I've seen pulled off of a frame has holes in it when the rider needs it to fix a flat. I am riding in a dry environment with pretty course dirt, have you seen anything similar? Tell Kaz that the Gunnison Valley says hi!
  • 1 0
 I think putting the gear on you bike can make for a more enjoyable ride I hate riding with a pack. I don’t notice the weight on my bike as much as the weight on myself. But if you ride a super light Xcode bike then you might notice.
  • 1 0
 How can you guys talk so positively about being under-biked and then bash on hardtails so much? Take some more time to adapt to one and you might change your tune. Arguably, modern geometry and components have done more to increase the capability of a hardtail than they have for full suspension. After building up a hardtail a couple of years ago I thought I had made a mistake and wasted $, and now am loving it for the 'under biked' experience it provides.
  • 2 0
 Mostly because we're just joking around. We've all spent tons of time on hardtails Smile
  • 1 0
 Until now, over-biked. From now, starting with my gravel(that replaces my full xc bike) and continue with my freeride-ish enduro which will be replaced with a trail-ish enduro bike, under-biked! ????????
  • 1 1
 I’m constantly switching between being under or over biked. A long travel trail/ enduro bike vs 7 year old twitchy xc race bike. There is fun to both, but I reach for the bigger bike more. But it’s nice to pull out the xc bike for days that border on gravel bike days or when I just want to feel a two wheel drift at the edge of control on easier trails.
  • 4 0
 Nutter Butters are cookies
  • 1 0
 Came to the comments for this. Crackers?!
  • 3 0
 Transition Sentinel and Kona Honzo Steel. Seems to cover most grounds for me.
  • 1 0
 For my riding I love my new Ripley with 2.5 tires and a 140 mm fork out front. For XC I just throw on some light rubber and a 120mm step-cast and I have a very light efficient race bike. Best of both worlds.
  • 3 0
 Seriously... Canada does not have nutter butters??? How does a silly line on the map stop the spread of nutter butters?
  • 4 0
 Maybe under mountained or over mountained?
  • 1 0
 I like this take.
  • 1 0
 I ride park and shuttle laps most days. Can't afford more than one bike so I would be very "overbike" shamed if you see me on one of the few cross country rides I do on my new Slayer.
  • 1 0
 Any thoughts as to the idea that suspension travel should increase at the same ration as bike size?

In other words, does a 6'5" rider need more suspension travel than a 5'5" rider?
  • 1 0
 Think im probably way overbiked atm riding a tranny patrol with big sticky tyres on old railway lines & gravel paths!! Keep telling myself its good training
  • 1 0
 I'm using my patrol as an XC bike these days too. Just put a bunch of extra air in the shock and the fork and it's fine.
  • 2 0
 If you had to have 1 bike PERIOD, what would it be?

EX: 120mm hardtail, 160/150 slack af, rigid fatbike
  • 3 1
 Depends where you live. Where I live a 120mm travel bike is faster almost everywhere including the descents. If I lived where there was chunk, then 160. I had this discussion with someone the other day who is a low intermediate at best. He wants a Ripmo, I suggested a Ripley because it would be more fun- around here. He wasn't buying it. We then talked about the trails he rides, and none of them has a bump bigger than about 3" on them. 120 would be better for him but he just really wants the coolness of a big bike. A riding clinic would be better money spent for him.
  • 2 0
 A modern, full suspension, 120-130mm, "trail" bike will do absolutely everything you need at a reasonably high level. It's not gonna win you any XC races or DH races but there won't be many trails that you can't ride it on or rides where it'll prevent you from keeping up with a group.

I recently got a 5010 and I honestly can't imagine a scenario outside of suddenly deciding to race XC or DH that would have me regretting choosing it for a ride. It's slack enough and forgiving enough to hold it's own in the rough and it's agile and efficient enough to hold its own on a long pedal fest while still being playful enough to jib around and do urban stair drops or whatever you're feeling. Similar bikes in that category are just ridiculously versatile these days.
  • 1 0
 Have my Bronson decked with all shit I always dreamed off and now im frustrated and want either the Transition Scout either the Transition Sentinel either this new Mullet trend. Im 1.75 m tall and have longer hands....similar to a monkey if you will...
  • 2 0
 One 26" jump bike DMR 898 a 27.5" Chromag Wide angle and a 29" Chromag Root down think that covers all bases
  • 1 0
 Thanks for answering my question! The Slayer is still on my wishlist for my next big bike, but after seeing two of them breaking in reviews I'm not 100% sure.
  • 3 0
 Mitch on the sales team here has one and has had zero issues. And apparently Vanderham, Carson, Remi etc. haven't been breaking theirs... sometimes there's such a thing as shitty luck? Either way, it's a strange one.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Yeah I've seen their ad for the bike, a great video called Oscillation. Storch goes absolutely huge on a Slayer fitted with a dual crown fork, doing flips, enormous drops and all kinds of crazy stuff.

So I guess you're right, maybe the one breaking in your review was really just a case of bad luck.
Either way, thanks again!
  • 2 0
 i just got one. i'm going to give you the predictable comment here; it's far and away the best bike i've owned and is generally totally awesome. you would say i'm overbiked on 50% of the trails i ride, but i don't care, it climbs and rides like a (big) trail bike and better than any of the trail bikes i've had prior so what the hell. and on the way down, well it's got your back and then some. friendly monster bike.
  • 1 0
 I bought a 27.5 C90 even after seeing the review. It’s an unbelievable bike. I did put a OneUp rear axle in it just to be safe!
  • 2 0
 Sometimes over biked, sometimes under biked , but it’s always the right bike when you’re out riding.
  • 1 0
 I would rather be over biked.. One bike to rule all trails.If the trails are of the tamer variety just don't put it to full squish settings...
  • 1 0
 I'm kinda lame. I have a 27.5 160/150 and a 29er with 160/145. I think I enjoy the 27.5 bike more, but that's possibly due to it having a real water bottle mount.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy What's your opinion on single speeds? I don't know what your opinion's gonna be, but I feel like it'll be passionate.
  • 2 0
 I love the idea, whether it's just for simplicity's sake or for training. The hills are too steep where I live and/or I don't do enough squats and lunges.
  • 1 0
 150mm hardtail with stupid slack head angle and DH-focused build. Overbiked at the front, underbiked at the back. Feels wild but rides safe.
  • 1 0
 Underbiked since 70% of my trail/enduro riding is spent climbing and it's a lot more fun to blow past guys on their downhill rigs on the up and the down.
  • 2 0
 You should have invited Paul Aston back to guest star in this episode and talk about the merits of a 200mm trail bike
  • 2 0
 Totally, I heard they're good at everything.
  • 1 0
 overbooked is better. The weight savings achieved from going from a 160 bike to a 130 aren't substantial enough. going from 160 to a real XC race bike would be.
  • 1 0
 5lbs difference going from my 160 to 130 bike. It's not just the weight but the pedal platform and geo that make a difference. That said, if I only had one bike it would probably be on the overbiked end of the spectrum.
  • 1 0
 Isn't the answer a Scott Ransom? You'll only be overbiked on a World Cup XC course and you'll only be underbiked on a World Cup DH course...
  • 2 0
 I just bought me the ONE bike. It is an allmountain EBIKE! If you are looking for the most fun bike, it must be an ebike!
  • 3 0
 How'd you sneak in here?
  • 2 0
 It's ok to try not to like ebikes. I was the same and mtbs are still fun.
But, it's practically impossible to not love it when you are riding an ebike.
Think about it at your next climb to the trailhead. Or when you ask yourself if you can do one more run, but you are exhausted and its already late...
My average speed is about 50% faster on the ebike. So instead of two runs I can now put in three.
Apart from fun, progress of the riding skills is faster and you explore more. No regrets if the downhill wasnt worth the climb.
  • 1 0
 As part of the biking demographic that can only afford one bike, I'd rather carry a little extra on the way up to have fun on the down.
  • 1 0
 150/130 seems like the sweet spot - big fork for the park and heavy gnar, but 130 is perfect for trails, and you can throw a spacer in for big stuff
  • 1 0
 good podcast! haha i lost it, when you guys were talking about the guy smoking a cigar and eating a hamburger at the start line of a race
  • 4 1
 Under all the way
  • 1 0
 I just alternate between my transition scout, stumpy evo and road bike. No point in having 3 bikes if I don't use them.
  • 3 0
 A Pound of spotted Dick.
  • 1 0
 Wow! Lots of comments! Underbiking is the way to go if you enjoy long, epic rides.
  • 1 0
 Forget the 3 bikes question... What would you pick if you could only have 1 bike?
  • 1 0
 I know you can be 'over-biked', and you can be 'under-biked', but can you every be just 'Biked'?
  • 1 0
 I mean it usually comes down to the rider skill anyways...
  • 2 0
 Perfectly biked.
  • 1 1
 A wise man once said, "I'd rather go fast on a slow bike than slow on a fast bike."
  • 1 0
 I have 3 bikes, so I'm under/perfect/over biked depending on the day...
  • 1 0
 I am biked good enough for me
  • 1 1
 Sick of the “ you want 27.5 wheels cause your short”. I’m 6’5 and I prefer 27.5 over 29 any day
  • 2 0
 I am perfectly biked.
  • 1 0
 Same rules apply. Pick a travel size and be a dick about it.
  • 1 0
 i ride a downhill bike everywhere because freeride
  • 2 0
 My only bike used to be an Orange 224 (and a 222 and 223) because of the full-length seat tube. Spent way too much money getting it down to around 35lb, and I'd ride it everywhere with a big cassette on the back.
  • 1 0
 Hope the 7th episode would be out tomorrow !!!!!
  • 1 0
 Dick and gas
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