Pinkbike Poll: Center Lock or 6-Bolt Brake Rotor Mounting?

Apr 5, 2024
by Matt Beer  
photo

The mountain bike industry is full of standards, and thankfully they've been pared down from years ago when the hacksaw had to come out in order to fit a brake caliper or chain guide, but for decades now, there have been two mounting methods to fix a rotor to a hub.

Before you get too up in arms about the 200 and 203mm rotors size difference (even though that's a very valid reason for frustration), let's just take a minute to remember there used to be more than just two rotor mount options. Brands like Cannondale and Hope made hubs in the late 90s that featured four bolt hub and rotors, and then, when Shimano introduced Center Lock, the original Saint hubs used an oversize hub 47mm spline for the matching rotor to sit on, larger than the 35mm Center Lock size that the rest of the models used.

At least today, there are just the two options; 6-bolt and the 35mm Center Lock systems. But why still have both? I've heard and understood arguments for both.

Chris King decided to limit manufacturing to just Center Lock hubs during the pandemic due to production capacity constraints. They've since returned to producing both options after receiving massive demand for the 6-bolt option.

In a cross-country race scenario, where a rotor may need to be changed on the fly, then Center Lock may be faster to change. The required tool isn't the most convenient item to pack in a day bag and you certainly won't find one at your local hardware store.

I've also run into issues with the Center Lock ring coming loose and causing the hub bearings to bind when torqued to the recommended setting. On the other hand, removing stripped T25 bolts can be annoying and time-consuming.

Weight wise, they aren't lighter either, at least in the 220mm size. SRAM's HS2 rotors weigh 305.5g for the Center Lock 
version and 271.6g for the 6-bolt, both fastener types included.

Sea Otter 2023
Project 321's 6-Lock hubs allows for either mounting method using just one hub shell. It is an extremely clever design, but should we even need two standards? You can catch more on the highlights of the Project 321 6-Lock hub from Sea Otter 2023 here. Maybe they should rebrand the company to Project 241.

If you just one one brake rotor mounting style, what would it be?

What rotor mounting standard do you prefer?



Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
375 articles

392 Comments
  • 319 50
 If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Centre lock is a solution to a problem that doesn't exist.
  • 75 21
 Okay the best use of centerlock rotors, in my opinion is if you have to swap wheels between bikes. I realize that's super niche but it is insanely useful in that application.
  • 46 23
 @jorennmt: how often do you swap rotors? I maybe pull mine off a few times a year and I can zip 6-bolts on and off in only a few extra seconds
  • 20 3
 @jorennmt: Agree, I have two wheelsets and it's a lot quicker to swap centerlock rotors between them. Not important enough for me to be a make or break decision when buying something though.
  • 24 1
 @Portland-maine: I feel like you missed an opportunity for a good pun.
  • 115 38
 @jorennmt: That’s no excuse for the constant knocking and rocking on the splines and constantly coming loose and then having to put 50 nm of torque through a shitty 3mm aluminium lock ring. 6 bolt is so much better and if it comes loose on a ride you can fix it with a multi tool, you don’t have to write off a rotor riding it back loose because you didn’t have a bottom bracket tool.
  • 54 5
 @topherdagopher: When you have to put on rotors for an entire team, 6 bolts are tedious (even with a driver). A whole rotor can be swapped with centerlock in the time it would take to undo two bolts. I'm not saying I like one more than the other but they both have purpose.
  • 68 37
 @thenotoriousmic: this doesn’t happen.
  • 12 10
 6 bolt > Centerlock from a reliability point of view, BUT centerlock is nice for changing wheelsets. I have a light wheelset/tires for big pedal days, and a heavy wheelset/tires for general use. Or in the winter for swapping between screw tires and dirt tires. Centerlocks make it easy for quick rotor swaps.... That's what I use to think anyways. Then I realized a drill makes changing 6 bolts faster. So TLDR, 6 bolt all the way.
  • 4 3
 @thenotoriousmic: This! However when your bike is clapped out, centerlock just adds to the music.
  • 3 10
flag thenotoriousmic (Apr 5, 2024 at 17:53) (Below Threshold)
 @brightfff: turn the sound up and enjoy the slam. Haha.

www.instagram.com/tv/CNx4GUDhiOE/?igsh=MWh0bG5sZzVzMW1vbg=
  • 3 6
 @tylerbernardd: lucky my bike is that clapped out now that I’m down to my last few threads. It won’t handle another retightening and I’ll get to replace it with a new bike that definitely has 6 bolt.
  • 69 7
 @thenotoriousmic: In all my years of riding, I've never had a CL come loose. Like, ever.
  • 15 5
 @thenotoriousmic: On a trail you can use a stick and a rock to tighten a centre lock.
  • 66 1
 @jorennmt: That solution of swapping rotors between wheels has never entered my mind. I’m glad my unevolved brain just installed rotors on all my wheels.
  • 5 0
 @kingbike2: if you use a big enough rock when you install them, maybe they won't come loose
  • 11 23
flag southoftheborder (Apr 5, 2024 at 18:18) (Below Threshold)
 I get you're British, but it's CENTER LOCK,it isn't a "trail centre", it's a patented standard!!!
  • 8 3
 @rhamej: lots of entry level rotors develop play at the rivets mating the disc to the alloy carrier.
  • 10 8
 I would argue that it's even worse than that, that centerlock is a problem for a solution that did exist. I miss 20mm axles and it's centerlock that caused them to disappear.
  • 1 18
flag renatofrdh (Apr 5, 2024 at 18:46) (Below Threshold)
 @font style="vertical-align: inherit;">font style="vertical-align: inherit;">Topherdagopher /font>/font>:

Minha GT Sanction tem roda para treino e roda para corrida, DT swiss 240 e Shimano zee, ambos center Lock com rotor icetech Freeza 203mm

Eu tenho somente um disco de freio e compartilho ele em ambas as rodas, é 1/6 do tempo de troca comparado com o 6 parafusos
  • 1 0
 @jason069: that makes total sense if you’ve got a fleet of bikes.
  • 5 1
 you mean like electronic shifting, electronic droppers, "tougher hanger standards" or cables through the headset?
  • 3 1
 @jorennmt: but only if you want to take your discs? Otherwise you swap wheels and each wheelset has it's own discs (they're not that expensive) so it becomes even more niche in that case (i.e. want to take discs across as well).
  • 1 0
 @brightfff: it did early on.
  • 7 6
 @rhamej: same. dont understand this. How... even if it happened once, use a little locktight, or elbow grease, and stop being a pussy
  • 21 9
 We should definitely use 6 bolts to attach our cassettes too, right?
  • 7 3
 @rhamej: I had one that was properly torqued come loose on a 1000' descent. It was toast by the time I got down. It does happen.
  • 1 0
 Well its not that its just different way on mounting and quite good one.
  • 13 8
 @topfuel564: obviously not tightened correctly then was it?? maybe it was, but did you check it that ride. Before you say, no i dont check everything every ride, maybe you should be in more tune with your bike. It just doesnt come loose right away.. it takes time. guess whats even better, a 6 bolt rotor CAN also come loose
  • 18 20
 This survey is one of those where the results are absolute BS. The vocal minority and OGs shout the loudest about ancient bolt rotors when it’s technologically obvious that direct mount systems are superior in every way.
  • 7 2
 @blackthorne: And give me my quill stem back! Stupid inferior stem bolts
  • 11 15
flag gforcedh (Apr 5, 2024 at 22:04) (Below Threshold)
 Centre lock is literally better , 1 bolt that will not strip , makes it much faster to work with, Les wight and if it comes lose it will still work not like the 6 bolts that just drops for its working place . You got no clue of what you mean!!!
  • 4 3
 @topherdagopher: the bolt can strip and cross thread
  • 4 4
 @Portland-maine: Wen you save 150g on the set of wheels I think it's nicer
  • 2 3
 @rhamej: it's the best option
  • 3 0
 No, no, if it ain't broke, fix it until it is...
  • 13 1
 @jorennmt: I disagree. The best use case for center lock is traveling. I’ve been putting my bikes in Evoc travel bags a lot recently and prefer to take the rotors off.
Using a park tool BB wrench both rotors are off in seconds versus the slow process of 6 bolts twice.
The armament HS2s are stupid heavy so I use DT Swiss adapters and 6 bolt rotors.
Crazy talk but it’s faster, lighter, and versatile
  • 1 2
 @renatofrdh: renato gets it
  • 21 2
 @Portland-maine: having 2 sets of wheels but beeing to cheep to buy a second set of rotors… that irony Smile
  • 2 0
 @therealmrbo: Puzzles my mind that this is even a discussion.
  • 3 0
 I have only ever had six bolt but in theory centrelock is going to be lighter right?
  • 6 0
 @jorennmt: wasnt it invented for rapid assembly on production lines , nothing to do with swapping wheels or rotors quickly
  • 5 2
 @southoftheborder: two things. 1, I can type centre, but it autocorrects to centre because my keyboard is set to British English, not American English. And 2, entry level rotors don't have an alloy carrier, they're flat laser cut steel, unless your talking about some knock off Ali express rotors, in which case, what do you expect? Either keep it simple or spend the money on proper ones...
  • 4 2
 @FuTAnT: yeah... I'm not getting the logic behind two wheelers and 1 set of rotors. They are cheap in comparison.

Good wheels are like 1000$. Good rotors are like 200. I don't get why anyone would go through the aggravation of aligning rotors to change wheels. Install em set em up so they are ready to swap. Then your wheel changes take 5 minutes not 45 minutes of flashlights and caliper aligning
  • 2 0
 @Cheddar420: that only works if you have 2 of the same wheel set, or same hubs at least, otherwise you'll probably need to re align callipers anyway (I had two wheel sets because I got a second one dirt cheap (the tyres, cassette and rotors cost the same as the wheels) and always had to loosen the callipers off and do a slight re-align when swapping wheel sets, but they were different brand hubs.
  • 7 4
 If you are a racer traveling (flying) a lot, center lock is the easiest to remove and mount before flight and after.
as your own mechanic it the quickest too.
the only time you are lost is changing rotor in a middle of a ride - but hows going to do that any way.

the only reason to use 6 hole is an exposure of old fashion stubbornness or lack of manufacturing technology.

same applies to chainrings on cranks

generally modern technology is a progress concluding previous mistakes or simple improvement.

same as we don't get stuck on 26" wheeled solid bike or V brakes or mechanical shifting or Nokia 5010 we should progress to progress in all levels.
  • 4 3
 @jorennmt: I swap wheels on the same bike (soft terrain tyres with inserts vs dry and hardpack tyres with inserts) and have 6 bolts discs for each set. No need to change discs.
  • 2 1
 @thenotoriousmic: Yeah that's super annoying. I'll be sticking to 6 bolts forever
  • 1 1
 @brightfff: Happens all the time
  • 1 2
 @tylerbernardd: Just buy two more rotors...
  • 1 3
 @renatofrdh: compra mais dois discos e vais deixar de perder tempo ponto final
  • 5 0
 As my father used to say "There are more ways of killing a cat than choking it with butter!"?
  • 1 0
 @tylerbernardd: i feel like i would just use the light wheel set bc cant be bothered and feels too good
  • 3 3
 @jorennmt: I'd have to disagree. I have multiple wheelsets that I swap between bikes and I've used disc spacers so it's there's no brake caliper adjustment necessary between the bikes. Also I've had center lock rotors work loose and it's never happened on a 6 bolt rotor/ hub. They really are a solution to a problem no one had. There also heavier
  • 2 0
 @southoftheborder: most entry level rotors are single piece of steel without rivets.
  • 3 0
 @robw515: yep got to have new standards there always better. If someone can explain how 15mm axles are better than 20mm or better yet how boost 148mm is better than the old 150mm DH width
  • 4 1
 @rzicc: Yes but with a six bolt at least 4 bolts would have to loosen out before you got into real trouble. The world cup dh guys used to run 3 of 6 bolts on there bikes. There's a lot more redundant safety built into a 6 bolt design then the center lock
  • 2 2
 Hey, one fittings potentially coming loose isn't enough, let's have 6! Centerlock for me.
  • 4 1
 @Portland-maine: if you have two wheelsets, why not just have two sets of rotors!?
  • 4 1
 Also, you can't do a full bike bolt check with centre lock before a race without taking the wheels out. 6 bolt, no problem
  • 2 0
 @gforcedh:

Don't let hacks touch your bike?
  • 5 0
 @mountainsofsussex: you can check very easily with open end center lock spanner.
  • 3 1
 @briain: 148 isn't 2mm different to 150, it's 9mm, because you have 3.5mm deep recesses in your dropouts with boost but not 150, the comparable dh standard is 157mm. 135, there's a 141qr (boost qr basically) 150, or 142, 148, 157, these are the comparable standards, don't mix them together. And any of the +7mm standards are infinitely better because you're not trying to line the hub up with the axle holes while fighting chain tension.
  • 2 0
 Not really. I always take my rotors off when I’m packing the bike for an event overseas. Centrelock is much easier and you can get an aluminium spanner from Ali express for a couple of quid.
  • 5 1
 @renatofrdh: I think you should begin to write in English as 99% of the people here won't understand what you write in Brazilian Portuguese. I can find the context speaking Spanish, but this is a English written website. Your point is moot and nobody can understand
  • 3 0
 @blackthorne: direct mounts not always perform better than simple mounting standards
  • 2 0
 Came here to say the same. It takes a minute to take 6 bolt on and off and basically never comes loose on its own. There is nothing wrong with it.
  • 4 3
 You know MTB is dead when people consider saving a few seconds changing rotors a few times a year worth it for a less reliable system that costs more to machine. We're basically roadies now.
  • 4 0
 I use both and haven’t ever had a problem with either. I can’t say I’d care if one or the other went away though. If we want to standardize some stuff to simplify our bikes there are better places to do it. Headsets, Bottom Brackets, and Cranksets I’m looking at you.
  • 1 0
 @tylerbernardd: Inhave six-bolts but just have a rotor for every wheel. Done. Rotors ain't that expensive, just score five 220s for $100, shipped. Seems like all the switching around of parts is time consuming vs dropping 20-30$ on a new rotor (?)... honest question / comment
  • 2 1
 @Hayek: Boom. This.
  • 2 0
 @Hayek: Right?!?! So, you have an extra set of wheels, presumably with tires, and you don’t spend an extra $100 for rotors for that extra wheelset?!
  • 2 1
 @WeaselSqueezer: Also. This. Adding rotors to a wheelset is what, 5-10% of the wheel or wheelset cost? Endless sales right now. It's like buying a new car & but not getting AC - or insurance.
  • 3 0
 @gforcedh: More like a 20g difference.....
  • 2 0
 I would imagine the main reason for center lock was to reduce time spent for shop mechanics. For home mechanics 6 bolt seems easier but in a properly set up shop CL should be easier and faster. Overall (not in the PB comment section) I would imagine more people have their bikes serviced by a shop.
  • 1 0
 @jorennmt: I agree with wheel swap, because I have a race set, I swap every other week, and I like to keep braking consistent so I carry over my rotors. 6-bolt in this case is a pain and prone to stripping the bolts
  • 3 0
 @gforcedh: you didn't read the article, did you? The 6-bolt solution is lighter...
  • 1 1
 @jostaudt: the main reason for centrelock was for Shimano to lock you into their standard.
  • 1 0
 @brightfff: it does in their world, go figure different people have different experiences
  • 1 0
 Centerlock rotors are heavier IME, plus I feel like the specified torque is more important versus just using “tech tight” for the 6x rotor screws.

Also, if there is a thread issue, inserts are an option (if the hub has enough meat for repair) for the traditional version
  • 1 0
 @locaroka: Statistics would suggest 6x rotor bolts are the way to go then…
  • 1 0
 @gforcedh: this is true for any bolt on your bike. Luckily on a hub stripping or cross threading is a simple fix. You either run 5 bolts or throw a helicoil in. Either will be fine. I’d say taking care to not cross thread or strip is probably the easiest answer.
  • 1 0
 @jorennmt: It's just as quick if you have a mini electric screwdriver.....then 6 bolt is super quick change
  • 2 0
 @southoftheborder: centerlock still rocks fore/aft on the splines a touch....
  • 1 0
 Not when any of those 6 bolts coming loose will damage the frame.
  • 2 0
 @locaroka: there's loose, and then there's falling out because there's no loctite on them. User error will damage your frame in many other ways.
  • 2 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: point taken on the autocorrect, and (no pun intended) I stand corrected. As for the entry level rotors, I was specifically referring to the below freeza level, not Chinese knockoffs.
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: the width of the axle difference is 2mm. Trust me when I say they do fit. Infinitely better is a bit of an exaggeration. But to say we have 9mm,10mm, 12mm, 15mm and 20mm axle standards and there some how better particularly when we Standard with 9mm qr and went to 20mm axles to go back to 15mm and now gravel and road bikes are using 10mm and 12mm axles. How this is an improvement is completely beyond me 9mm to 20mm but the rest is a mystery to me
  • 2 1
 @briain: just cos it fits doesn't mean it's right, and again, 157 is infinitely better than 150, just like 142x12 is infinitely better than 135x12. The smaller ones with flush dropouts are a pain and need a stronger axle technically (pure sheer load on the axle vs it being captive in a recess which will take a lot of the force). And again, boost is in the same class of axle standards where it's meant to go in 3.5mm deep recesses in each dropout.
  • 1 0
 @Hayek: I was gonna say the same thing you bought more wheels buy more rotors
  • 2 0
 @kingbike2: I don’t doubt this but I would love to see it. Is it a specific rock and stick set that you carry?
  • 1 1
 @jorennmt: What? Power tools with 6 bolts take zero time.
  • 1 0
 @jason069: Oh no, not having to occasionally swap out rotors on wheels.
It's not like someone gives you 40 wheels and rotors at once.
  • 1 0
 @gforcedh: And the other can't wear out? Give me a break.
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: I don't doubt superboost has benefits but I'm going to avoid it like the plague. The issue I have which maybe wasn't that clear in my rants is something that's plagued MTB for 20-plus years is the amount of "standards" we have. These while for different use cases might be incrementally better but are a nightmare if you have to replace components or buy parts. So while I accept that UDH has it's flaws I will specifically discount any bike that doesn't have it in the future. Same way al my bikes including my Gravel/ commuter are boost front and back because if I need to borrow a wheel I can. Handlebars are all 31.8mm etc
  • 1 0
 @briain: I'm not talking about super boost,.I'm talking about 157 dh, it existed before boost, and it's the same as 150x12 but with the little 3.5mm recesses in the dropouts to help with wheel alignment. Super boost is the same axle, but the hub flanges are much wider apart for extra wheel strength/stiffness.
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: Sorry for my mistake, too many standards the same way there's a 20x110 non boost as well. There is obviously a gap in my knowledge from when I had my last DH bike circa 2010 to getting back on trail bikes around 2017 that a 157 width came in
  • 1 0
 @briain: yeah, in effect, there's 3 generations of hub standards:

Old: 135x10qr, 135x12, 150x12, with 100x9 or 110x20 front.
Mid: 135x10qr, 142x12, 157x12 with 100x15 added in on the front.
Current: 141qr boost, 148 boost, 157 super boost, 157dh, with 110x20 boost added on the front.

Yeah it's confusing, I'm a complete bike nerd (in case you couldn't tell haha) and I only just grasp it all and the differences between them all, the bottom line is, each jump has been a significant improvement (the 3.5mm recesses were a big step forward, and were usually convertible with different end caps, and boost has made wheels (especially 29ers) a lot more durable because of the wider flanges. To some degree the fault is in the old standards being still available and used in some capacity, and the fact it was incremental changes not a big jump forwards (ironically, that's what super boost was supposed to be, basically the logical end point instead of a stepping stone). What I usually say to people is, don't worry too much, just get boost and remember that so if you need wheels you just go for boost wheels, which are pretty much the most common standard these days, have to search around a bit for a 142 or 150dh wheel set these days.
  • 1 0
 If you find yourself removing discs for air travel often, CenterLock is a better solution.
  • 1 0
 @jorennmt: Or. And hear me out. TWO rotors.
  • 1 2
 @jorennmt: >Okay the best use of centerlock rotors, in my opinion is if you have to swap wheels between bikes. I realize that's super niche but it is insanely useful in that application.

Okay. This is literally the reason why Centerlock is the worst. If you're swapping wheels, nothing every lines up just right. There are microshims you can run behind 6 bolt rotors to make sure your rotors set up exactly the same at the caliper regardless of which hub/wheel you're running.

Centerlock has no such adjustment.
  • 1 0
 If you need to swap out wheels frequently- wouldn't it be easier to just mount brake rotors on each? Considering the cost of a rotor vs the cost of a wheel, it's not that much of an add.
  • 2 1
 when you're traveling, putting your bike in and out of a bike bag/box several times, centerlock it's pretty helpful
  • 1 1
 @jorennmt:

I just use 3-bolts triangulated. Best of both worlds, way lighter too!
  • 2 1
 @rzicc: CL has mechanical precession working against it. This is almost impossible to overcome with proper torque. Shimano f’ed up by not making CL reverse threaded.
  • 104 8
 You need an "I don't care" option on that poll.

Each standard has equal advantages and disadvantages - I think they come out even. I wouldn't (and haven't) avoided a wheelset because it meant I would have to change rotor standards. I also haven't had the opportunity to choose between JUST rotor standards for otherwise identical wheelsets.

For a road bike, Centerlock looks cleaner, especially with the smaller rotors. So if only one standard had to survive, for all disc brake bikes, it would be Centerlock. But functionally, there's no clear winner.
  • 18 65
flag thenotoriousmic (Apr 5, 2024 at 16:50) (Below Threshold)
 That’s absolutely mental. There’s a laundry list of issues and problems with centre lock rotors, can’t think of a single one with a 6 bolt so how exactly is there no clear winner? Honestly centre lock needs banning, it’s just bad design.
  • 13 1
 My hubs go up to 7.
  • 36 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I've put my hands on thousands of bikes. I've had bad lockrings snap, and I've had bad bolts snap. I've had cheap lockrings round off or strip, and I've had cheap bolts round off or strip. 6-bolt has redundancy, but that redundancy makes swapping wheelsets more laborious. Centerlock requires tighter tolerances that agree with each other, but I feel that's more about quality parts and adherence to standards, not bad design. I've never seen either one back out on the trail and I've never had an issue with Centerlock rotor play, though I realize others have. To me, there's always the question mark of proper setup, like with pressfit BBs.

For what it's worth, my mountain bikes are all 6-bolt, and I chose 6-bolt in the poll. I like the simplicity, like you, and I don't swap wheels these days. But I don't think it's bad to have both options in the market. As far as I know, Centerlock isn't killing people.
  • 7 41
flag thenotoriousmic (Apr 5, 2024 at 18:02) (Below Threshold)
 @Bluefire: Like I said nobody ever had an issue with 6 bolt where the exact opposite can be said about centrelock and I’m currently running centre lock. They do come loose, they do knock on the spine, you can’t tighten them on the trail and they’re harder to manufacture which is why they’re rarely ever straight out of the box. I could honestly go on all day yet nobody ever had an issue with 6 bolt. OP was clearly incorrect when he said there was no obvious difference.
  • 16 2
 @thenotoriousmic: I'm sorry you've had issues with Centerlock, and I know many others have too. But I still think there's no obvious winner, and I think there's room in the market for both options.

You're right that Centerlock CAN have all of those issues, and that 6-bolt doesn't. But Centerlock has things people might want, that 6-bolt can't provide: quicker, easier swaps, universal compatibility, and yes, cleaner looks (at least with the internal spline lockrings for road bikes). And in reality, most people don't and won't have an issue with Centerlock. There should be a follow-up poll to see what % of people have.

I wonder why Pinkbike is running this poll in the first place. They tend to pose a question like this right before a relevant new product comes out.
  • 15 2
 @Bluefire You're posting this on pinkbike what is this sensible take that doesn't include any hatespeach or anti cabletoursim propaganda. Obviously its 6 bolt because my bike has 6 boilt and centerlock sucks because the new 14000 dollar ebike has centerlock and im to core for stupid motors.
  • 4 0
 I think you are missing the point of the PinkBike Comments Section!...
  • 7 0
 @Bluefire: 100% agree with you. I too have worked on many, many bikes and in our region, have seen more rotor bolts come in stripped because those trail side tools that people use are generally garbage and tend to round torx heads out super efficiently. I've also had to drill out seized bolts - more on commuters that have been run through salty midwest winters. And then there's the occasional home install that leads to damaged threads on the hub shells. All of these issues are centered around the fact that there are WAAAY more 6 bolt bikes out there and probably for a reason. The worst I've seen on centerlock is the occasional lock ring with damaged threads or people not tightening them down enough. But that said, if you have to tighten a rotor bolt on the side of the trail the same torque mistake was made. Installed correctly, both are perfectly adequate. voted for V-BRAKES though BECAUSE I'M RAW AF.
  • 1 0
 They have a V-brake option, isn't that the same thing?
  • 2 0
 @scrawnydog: "super efficiently" - thanks for the laugh.

The way a v-brake locks a wheel is brutal, indifferent, and viscerally satisfying. Trickstuff could never.
  • 2 0
 There's a pretty clear advantage in that you don't need an additional tool for 6 lock.
  • 4 0
 @Bunabe: Agree but I've never had a "properly tightened" rotor come loose. 6 bolt or CL. I guess it's crappy to say "shame on you (or your mechanic) for not installing your stuff right" but understand why that would make one preferred over the other.

V BRAKES 4 LYFE
  • 3 1
 @Bunabe: If your Centerlock lockring uses the same tool you use for your bottom bracket, and nothing on your bike uses a Torx T25 tool (not an uncommon scenario), then your "additional tool" calculus is backwards. I have very few bike parts (aside from brake rotors) that use T25, and several Hollowtech II BB's that use the same tool as a CL lockring.
  • 2 2
 @barp: Yes that would be an incredibly rare scenario you just cooked up that someone has a center lock tool rather than a common hex which every house on the planet has or a torx which also comes with every multitool. Your calculus is backwards not mine.
  • 4 0
 @Bunabe: A hex wrench for rotor bolts? What year is this, 2004?
  • 2 0
 @barp: It's still a slightly flawed comparison. Even if you're carrying a Park BBT-type tool for the lockring without an extension (because you think you can hand tighten the lockring enough), that tool by itself is more awkward to pack than an entire multitool with a 5mm hex or T25. And you're still only carrying the BBT tool for the lockring, because no one is fixing their bb trailside.

As I mentioned elsewhere, I don't mind either standard but the fastener types leave a bit to be desired. I've also never had a CL lockring come loose after proper install.
  • 3 0
 @barp: you don’t have to use an torx head you could just use regular allen bolts. That being said I’ve had a t25 on ever multi tool I ever bought over the last ten years not that it matters because 6 bolt doesn’t come loose and I’ve never needed to use it.
  • 1 1
 @iammarkstewart @thenotoriousmic : Sure, if we're only talking about trailside repairs, the point @Bunabe was making is valid--that wasn't the only context of this thread, as far as I could tell. But I've never needed to tighten or remove a rotor trailside anyway, so that's not my priority, personally.
  • 2 1
 @barp: No. People have torx screws or hexes at home. No one just has a BB tool at home. I have a tool head set I bought over 10 years ago that has all the torx heads. And obviously all the hex heads. The point was you need to buy a separate tool for CL where as for 6lock everyone already owns the tool for it.
  • 2 1
 @Bunabe: "No one just has a BB tool at home." - What are you even talking about?! I have **two** of them at home, and anybody who's serious about working on their own bike(s) has one (or more) too. At the bike shop where I work, we sell that tool to a customer at least once a week.

You're entitled to your own opinion, but you can't just make up your own facts.
  • 2 1
 @barp: How dense can you actually be? Remarkable.

No person just has a BB tool at home. Everyone has a set of hexes and torxes at home regardless if they are a serious hobbyist bicyclist or not.

It's an additional tool you have to be buy. For 6 lock you don't have to buy additional tools.

If you can't understand this you must have brain damage.
  • 1 1
 @Bunabe: Who's being dense, now? This is the second time you've said "No person just has a BB tool at home" and it doesn't make any more sense the more you say it. So you're a bad communicator, and now very rude as well?

I can also assure you that LOTS of average people (my customers) DON'T own Torx wrenches, and some even don't own hex keys either. I know this because they ask for my help in doing the simplest of tasks that require them (e.g., tightening a saddle clamp).
  • 1 2
 @barp: You have and are being dense. Even after explaining a concept that you should understand without any explaining you still don't get it. Truly incredible.

This is one of the lowest IQ conversations I've had in my life.

Practically everyone has a screw head set. Practically everyone has a multitool with all the hexes and usually include that torx for rotors.

However no one just has a BB tool. Which I have because I had to buy a separate tool for CL rotors...

None of my friends I know have a BB tool. Out of dozens of people. But every single one of them have hex heads and torx heads...

Just take a step back and just look at how stupid the things you are saying here. Yes people have standard hex and torx heads. No people don't have a specialized tool that you need for a specialized job...

It's remarkable how stupid people are capable of being.

EDIT: Oh just realized another stupid thing you have done here. When talking of a general population you made that to mean the customers you sell a BB tool to... You are dense as a neutron star dude.
  • 1 1
 @Bunabe: Maybe you and your friends are below average. You yourself are obviously below average in communication skill!

I have now, finally, deciphered that what you've been *trying* (and still failing) to say all along is, "nobody has JUST a BB tool" (has a BB tool and no other tools). This is not the same thing as what you actually keep writing, "nobody JUST has a BB tool" (simply has a BB tool). I try to be gracious about non-native users of English, but now that you've tried to impugn my intellect, I have no qualms about telling you you're being an ignorant jackass. "I just educated you" means "I provided you education and that's all I did". Whereas "I educated just you" means "I educated you and nobody else".

But even now that I've unscrambled what you're trying to get across, it still doesn't make any damn sense in context. Sure, nobody has a BB tool and no other tools. But nobody was asserting that, and it's a ridiculous, straw man position to argue against. A half-decent collection of tools to work on a bike includes a BB tool. If your only tools came with your IKEA furniture, no, you don't have any bike-specific tools... and you probably shouldn't try fixing any bikes with them, either.

People who like to work on their own bikes own lots of bike-specific tools. People who don't want to, don't own them. I have both kinds of customers at work and only 1% of them are as arrogant as you, thank the gods.

Keep on being proud of your shitty tool collection (nothing to be ashamed of, per se) and lack of mechanical experience (also nothing to be ashamed of, per se) while somehow thinking that you're qualified to give wrenching advice. This ridiculous overconfidence is what's shameful.

Having wasted all this time trying to expand your narrow mind, I'd love to see an intelligent response and continue our repartee. But if it's just more verbal diarrhea, you are welcome to spew it as the "last word"; I won't bother responding to any more nonsense. Life's too short.
  • 1 1
 @barp: My english is better than yours so again you are making yourself look like an absolute idiot out here. It's pretty clear what just means in this context. This is again you failing to understand a very simple concept that shouldn't need to be explained.

To use just to indicate that in general people simply don't have something is a common phrase. That's you failing to understand basic english. And with the context I really can't even understand how you came to this conclusion. It's not like I used within a single sentence where it could be confused. I used with clear context every time. How are you a functioning person?

And no you still didn't get it. That's not at all what it means. You are one of the densest people I've ever seen.

What it means is people in general don't randomly possess a BB tool. People however do randomly own hexes and torxes...

It has nothing to do with someone owning only a BB tool.

You must be functionally retarded to still not understand what is being said being explained so many times.

You basically got butthurt you said something stupid and now you are flying off the handle. Trying to insult my tool collection? This is exactly why you are dense. You care about your tool collection. That would be an insulting thing to say to yourself. But I don't care. And it's further a dumb insult to make as I said I do have a BB tool. So it doesn't even make sense. You just keep looking dumber and dumber the more you reply. Truly astounding.

This is one of the dumbest conversations I've ever had on the internet. You deserve some sort of a medal to indicate your mental deficiency so people understand they are not talking to someone playing with a full deck.

After all this and you still can't understand a simple concept of people having common tools and not randomly owning specialized tools. You can't be serious at this point that you still don't understand this.

I gotta take thake pictures of this conversation to save it. Incredible.
  • 4 1
 @Bunabe: Is all of this necessary in a PB comment section?
  • 3 0
 Seriously guys, get a room
  • 1 3
 @Grady-Harris: Why would it matter if it's a PB comment section? If you think about what you are implying it doesn't make any sense.

And you shouldn't be asking me ask the other guy. He made a dumb statement or failed to understand a simple concept and is now refusing to own up to it.
  • 45 2
 The past year I've been wrenching on bikes professionally I have come to appreciate centerlock. All my own bikes are 6 bolt but my next wheelset will be CL. Issues I have seen with 6bolt (including some issues I've experienced): bolts backing out, missing bolts, snapped bolts, seized bolts, stripped bolt holes, weight weenie owners with 3 Ti bolts, rounded out bolt heads, rotor eccentricity, rotor flange runout. Issues with CL I have seen: 1 cross threaded lock ring. Amazingly I haven't come across a single under-tightened lock ring

Granted, most of the CL rotors I see are on road bikes.
  • 12 6
 I'm confident it happens. But how lame is it to look to "cut weight" by eliminating rotor bolts? Especially given how safety-critical brake function is.

I would bet serious cash that no one in the history of the sport has won an event because they removed 30 grams from their setup.
  • 5 0
 Seems that wrenching would be one of the main drivers of this tech. I can imagine it is nice for a pro mech to be able to quickly swap rotors on a bashed wheel so there isn't a need to have to rebed new rotors in a crunch.
  • 10 1
 Rotor eccentricity is a big one! Wonder why your rotors are pulsing? Hmm... Wouldn't be with centerlock...
  • 6 0
 @KJP1230: not saying this is “why” he won, but Steve Peat’s world champs winning bike.
  • 3 0
 @KJP1230: actually Steve Oeat one his WC after he took three rotor bolts out of each wheel before his race. Won by 0.1ish of a second. Lol
  • 2 0
 @devlincc: I'm not saying people don't do it. I'm saying I doubt that literally 20-30 grams (assuming they are already using Ti bolts) makes the difference.
  • 1 0
 @devlincc: or maybe he would've gone faster with those bolts. More weight = more speed downhill. It's called gravity for a reason!
  • 1 0
 If I'm not mistaken CL is the only "Shimano invention" that sram uses.
  • 6 0
 I think if you spend any time working as a professional mechanic you come to appreciate centerlock pretty quickly
  • 2 4
 Cross threaded CL rotor? Whole new hub.

Stripped 6 bolt? Chuck a helicoil in and forget it ever bothered you.
  • 4 0
 @L0rdTom: The thread pitch is big enough that it's hard to cross thread. Even if you were a few beers deep in the garage.
  • 1 0
 @jason069: I've never managed to cross thread one, but I've been brought cross threaded ones before.
  • 3 1
 @L0rdTom: show me a fool-proof product and I'll show you a bigger fool.
  • 30 1
 I don't really care but if anything, centrelock hubs are more versatile because they can take 6-bolt rotors with an adaptor.
  • 29 3
 Having worked with a few cyclocross teams that fly to europe to race, it is a royal pain in the ass installing a bunch of 6 bolt rotors. Centerlock makes it quick when 40-60 rotors all need to be installed at once. On my own bikes I use 6 bolt because I can tighten them on a ride with a multi tool and don't swap them or take them off frequently. They both serve a purpose.
  • 8 20
flag bishopsmike (Apr 5, 2024 at 17:11) (Below Threshold)
 Super niche reason. Lots of things on bikes take a long time to do 40-60 sets. We don't have centre lock crank arms or stem plates for a reason.
  • 18 0
 @bishopsmike: CL saves a nontrivial amount of time at the factory. Replacing 12 torquing actions with 2 is great when it applies to tens of thousands of bikes being assembled.

For riders i don't think there is enough of a difference to matter.
  • 4 0
 This is what i remeber from the taiwan meetings when it was suggested , doing thousands x1 is faster than doing thousands x 6
  • 2 5
 @Compositepro: did you not know that before the meetings?
  • 2 0
 I'm amazed that was considered beneficial compared to the extra cost of needing to single cut internal bottomed and external threads, and forge 2 spline faces, compared 6 very quick and standard machine taps.
  • 6 3
 @bishopsmike: Honestly for brake rotors, splines (centerlock) make way more sense than shear force on an M5 bolt. Think about chainrings, there's a reason they're going to direct mount (splined), it dissipates the force better. Not sure what point you're trying to make with face plates or crank arms as there's no feasible way these items could be "center lock". At the end of the day, no one is forcing you do buy centerlock. It's ok for your to like 6 bolt better but, that doesn't mean one is invalid.
  • 6 0
 @jason069: The rotational force in a 6 bolt is not transferred through shear in the bolts, it's transferred through the face contact from the rotor to the hub, the bolts are in almost pure tension. This is why it works so well.
  • 5 0
 Thanks for your input
  • 2 1
 @jason069: To build on your point, even a traditional chainring isn't shearing directly on a 5 mm bolt; it's shearing on a chainring nut (10 mm, if I recall correctly) which then contains a bolt (8 mm?).

@L0rdTom: The extent to which the braking force is transferred to the face of the hub's rotor flange, is determined by how much static friction the rotor can apply to the hub because of bolt tension. I'm sure it's not nothing, but I doubt that it's 100% of the torque either. I guess for science somebody should enlarge the holes in a 6-bolt rotor, install it with the holes centered over the hub holes, properly torque the bolts, then do some hard braking and see if it moves!
  • 1 0
 @bishopsmike: to be fair, it’s a more valid reason to run under 6 bolts than weight is
  • 3 1
 @jason069: just saying the only positive you mentioned to centrelock was assembly time at larger volumes. That makes some sense for the manufacturer, but does nothing for 98% of riders, including yourself as you mention. So if you compare that to the benefits of 6-bolt that others list on this page, I think that's a crappy reason to create another "standard" that manufacturers, bike shops and riders need to think about.
  • 2 1
 >it is a royal pain in the ass installing a bunch of 6 bolt rotors

I've said it before and I'll say it again, but I still don't get why bike mechanics are so opposed to power tools. Little 12V impact driver would make that such a short job.
  • 21 1
 Don't care. Have both. I don't travel without my van. I don't swap wheel sets between bikes. I've never had a problem with either system.
  • 4 0
 Livin' the dream
  • 1 0
 Likewise, if the 6 bolt standard got away from Torx head bolts then I would be siding with that. Centerlock is fine, never had any issues with it coming loose over time.
  • 7 1
 @nickkozak: are you saying you would want something other than torx heads? What would you suggest? Torx are the hardest to round out...
  • 5 1
 @inked-up-metalhead: On paper absolutely. In practice I’ve seen way too many people jam whatever size that they’re sure it is and crank away. The design itself is better but humans are far more likely to damage torx hardware vs most anything else. Seen it on bikes cars and helicopters. Doesn’t seem to matter lol
  • 3 0
 @Kiowa008: I think the issue with torx is that it is much easier to insert the tool at an angle vs an allen head. And when you’re holding the tool at an angle and applying twisting force, that’s when heads get stripped. This problem is amplified when using a multi tool, as it’s much easier to hold the tool crooked without even realizing it.
  • 3 2
 @Kiowa008: so user error? I've seen far more stripped out hex bolts than torx. What would you suggest instead?
  • 3 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: I argue user error the vast majority of the time. Either mounting option is fine although if going center lock then I prefer stainless lock rings so you can add just a few extra NM’s. Noticed that helps on Shimano 12s cassettes as well-I put 42Nm on them now and zero issues (no threadlocker). Mistakes happen at the factory from time to time-can’t discount that. Got a new bag of hardware from Airbus once for mating the gearbox to the fuselage of a helicopter that were just a tick too thick. You absolutely cannot tap the bolts in so we had to measure the shank diameter in multiple spots show the rep and they got us sorted but it took an additional 10 business days and all that. Crap hardware and tools aside, if you go nice and slow you’ll absolutely feel the tool or fastener (if poor quality or over-torqed, corroded, ect.) start to deform and have a good chance to save it. Use heat if locktite’d and/or penetrating oil if necessary but always take it easy. Most problems arise from moving too fast.

TLBig Grin R I recommend using your brain and understand the cost of what a mistake Could cost and adjust your strategy and timetable accordingly. You don’t need tool truck brand tools but don’t buy cheap and be actively engaged in the task, if it doesn’t feel right it isn’t right. Applies to many, many areas but hopefully this helps someone. Happy wrenching
  • 15 1
 I use 6bolt discs, but my main wheel happens to be centerlock. I really appreciate how quick it is to swap discs onto it (even with a dt swiss converter).

However, I once had a centerlock disc come lose during a ride and it was a major bummer. If there was a better tightening system I would happily go centerlock. As it is I usually leave some knuckle skin on my spokes everytime I try to loosen my overtight rotor with a centerlock tool.
  • 10 0
 Can you tighten a centerlock rotor without removing the wheel?

Centerlock does seem "easier", if you're installing/removing your rotors all the time (like if you travel by air/put your bike in a travel bag frequently).

But the downside of "I can't fix it with a multi-tool on the side of the trail" is something that bothers me more. Also, I can check/fix 6 bolt rotor tightness problems while the wheel is on the bike.

All said, I prefer 6 bolt, but its not a huge deal. Just if I'm buying wheels or hubs, its going to be 6 bolt. But if a bike came with centerlock, or I was given centerlock wheels for free, I'd keep them.
  • 12 0
 Yes, you can tighten a CL lockring without removing the wheel, if you have a Shimano TL-FC32 (or similar from other brands) available to you. Probably too big of a tool to be carrying on a ride, though.
  • 4 0
 @barp: Great tool to defend yourself from anything in the woods lol
  • 11 0
 I’ve spent more time this week reading comments about Center Lock vs 6 bolt rotors that I will spend in the garage dealing with brake rotors in the next decade. This is the epitome on pick a _____ and be a d about it.
  • 23 9
 Sometimes the masses get it wrong - Centerlock better in everyway
  • 7 4
 Yep, but this is perfect example of a better solution that languishes because the legacy system is ubiquitous.
  • 3 4
 @Mlloyd550: yep, I suspect that this poll will do little to move the needle, Centerlock isn't going anywhere as it is better, and 6-bolt will remain everywhere because it is cheaper to manufacture - \m/
  • 7 1
 thats user error, installed houndreds of CL and never had an issue.
  • 1 0
 It could be a better solution. I've avoided centre lock so far because of potential rocking/play issues (means replacing the hub I assume?), but if it was guaranteed to work without issue I'd switch.
  • 3 3
 Can't tighten on the trail in a worst case scenario, more specialized tools required, doesn't actually do anything better for me.

I'm lost at how it is even better?

Am I missing something?

Literally does the same job...
  • 1 4
 @HeatedRotor: or maybe people genuinely have different experiences to you?

You might not actually just be an elite human that never has problems in life and other people genuinely have problems with products that you've not? Haha!
  • 2 0
 @sampo18: You're almost there, just say "yes, User error"
  • 1 0
 @recycledmountainracing-com: CL is cheaper for OEs to mount. That is the main benefit- to OE’s. For the end consumer there is little benefit/drawback.
  • 19 6
 6 bolt is easy. Therefore it will do for me.
  • 13 14
 There's nothing to it, just screw/unscrew the centerlock lockring with a cassette lockring tool. That's all, no other tools needed.
  • 19 3
 @DavidGuerra:but if I'm on a ride I can't fix a loose rotor with a multitool if it's centrelock
  • 3 11
flag DavidGuerra (Apr 5, 2024 at 16:12) (Below Threshold)
 @Jamesthemtb-er: Just check if it's tight from time to time, no need to carry lockring too. But yeah, that's the weakness of centerlock, the attachment is not as reliable. Nobody worries about 6-bolt rotors becoming loose.
  • 23 4
 @Jamesthemtb-er: A properly installed and torqued centrelock isn't coming loose any time soon.
  • 3 6
 @boozed: I've torqued and checked and still had center lock come loose.
And after a while the splines were knackered!

More disposable parts in an industry already obsessed with throw away parts.
  • 3 1
 @boozed: if you have ever taco'd a rotor 10km from the parking lot, you will appreciate being able to remove one on the trail with a multi tool. Its not easy to walk out of the woods pushing your bike when one of the wheels won't turn. Also, I suck a skinnies.
  • 1 1
 @Zezzy612: Is this a made up problem, or did you genuinely not think to about unbolting the brake caliper instead, which can easily be done with any multi-tool?
  • 1 0
 @dsut4392: no, I did it by unbolting the 6 bolts on my rotor. If I did have a CL, removing the caliper wouldn't have stopped the bent rotor from contacting the fork.
  • 1 0
 @Zezzy612: How the hell did you do that? A rotor can conceivably be bent from hitting something or getting hit by something, but the bend is towards the wheel. Anything else must be considered a very unlikely (and to me, unimaginable) event.
I must also say that a lot of multi-tools have a rotor-straightening slot (simply a rotor-wide slot) or come with pliers.
  • 1 1
 @Zezzy612: and let me guess, you don’t have any hands, so you couldn’t have possibly bent the rotor back away from the fork?
  • 11 0
 Damn must be a slow day in mountain bike news!
  • 9 0
 203mm rotors are secretly imperial 8” rotors.

Just like 31.8 bars are 1 1/4”, 35mm are 1 3/8”, and the part for your grips is 7/8”
  • 6 3
 140, 160, 180, 203, 220. The most sensible and logical way!
  • 6 0
 I have to maintain a relatively large fleet of bikes for me and my kids, so spare parts interchangeably is important to me.

I don’t really prefer 6 bolt, but all my bikes have come with 6 bolt wheels so that’s the standard I’m sticking with. I did purchase a set of center lock wheels once because they were on sale really cheap. But then I used 6 bolt adapters rather than buying center lock rotors.
  • 8 0
 You can get center lock rings in a variety of bejazzled colors! That's the real reason to get center lock rotors, for the bejazzles!
  • 4 0
 I was about to say I prefer 6-bolt because you can get the bolts in a variety of colors. Now that I know you can get colored centerlock rings, I don't care anymore. I have bikes with both.
  • 11 2
 Centerlock makes swapping out rotors so easy.
  • 15 7
 Ok, how often are you changing brake rotors?

I can’t remember when I changed one out.
  • 3 1
 @Stinky-Dee: I have a road wheel set that I use on my gravel bike and I swap the front rotor from my gravel wheel set to the road one. No matter how much i try to align the front brake on both wheel sets, one will rub the brake pad and its noticeable so I just swap out the front rotor which I tend to do weekly.
  • 4 0
 @Stinky-Dee: If you're lucky enough to get to fly with your bike often?
  • 5 0
 @Stinky-Dee:

It is relatively common to have a spare (rear) wheel or wheelset for a specific type of riding, e.g. I have some old heavy bombproof wheels for the 2-3 times I go to the bike park in summer, others might have some light wheels for XC/marathon events.

If you only swap out a few times a year, it's not really worth having another pair of discs or cassette. Also the fact that we have 200, 203, 220 and 223mm as viable alternatives, with different widths.

You can also have idiots like myself who buy 4 galfer 223 discs to mount on main and spare wheelset, and then decided he didn't like them.
  • 6 0
 This. I fly with my bike typically 3-4 times per year and Centerlock makes that so much easier
  • 2 5
 @chrisclifford: Hell yeah dude you save 1-2 minutes EVERY YEAR! Absolutely worth the extra manufacturing cost.
  • 5 0
 Centerlock. Not only are the so much better to deal with than 6 bolts when swapping rotors, you also can use any rotor you find. Just pack a centerlock to 6 bolt rotor adaptor in your tool kit when you travel and you are good to go. This has saved my bacon (and bike trips) more than a few times.
  • 5 0
 Not a hill I will die on. I've been running centerlock for 12 years on multiple bikes and have had zero issues.... ever. I have also been running 6 bolt forerunner and on bikes concurently with bikes using center lock and I have also never had an issue. I am also really retentive about bike maintenance and bolt tightening across the board. Luck, being retentive, shrug, who knows. Like anything else, ride on what you like and don't be a d*&^ about it. ;^)
  • 6 0
 Centerlok all the way. One (non proprietary!) tool, one bolt, one job. Have moved to centerlok on all my bikes. Have better things to do than messing with 12 tiny torx bolts. Cleaner look is cherry on the cake
  • 5 0
 If you having issues with centre lock coming loose probably hasn't been done up right, as likely as a cassette to come loose and if it does you won't loose your bolts like can with 6 bolt. Centre lock super reliable and way less hassle than 6 bolt. For those saying if it aint broke don't fix it, same could be said about axles etc that have made bikes better
  • 6 1
 This article is bullshit due to its bias.
- zero mention of the fact that center lock hubs are lighter
- intentionally points out that 6 bolt rotors are lighter but cherry picks the heaviest possible design for the center lock rotor (taking a 6-bolt and effectively just adding an adapter.

A DT 240 center lock hubs is 17g lighter than the exact same 6 bolt hub.
Pick a rotor where they actually put an ounce of design effort into the center lock version (example - centerline X) and it's a 17g difference.

So no, 6 bolt isn't heavier unless you're cherry picking parts to feed your bias.
  • 4 0
 This. Technically, CL is better because lighter with no downsides. If you really need to reduce those 50g it's another story, but in fact it is one of the only places where it's even possible to save weight without harming performance.
Only acceptable discussion is the one bolt vs 6 when changing rotors and can/cannot repair with a multitool, but both systems work well enough 99,99% of the time, that trailside repairs are an absolute non-issue with both if used correctly.
  • 4 0
 In case any one wants yet another opinion from a home and shop mechanic with not nearly as much time in as some of our comrades in the Comments:

- Both work well enough. Individual use cases drive the preference in most cases.
- My biggest beef with either is the fastener. Despite what some say about torx heads, it's amazing how easy you can blow out a rotor bolt if you're not paying enough attention. A deeper and/or socket head or a hex bolt would be better imo. With CL, unless you have a 12mm axle and the internal spline lockring using the cassette tool, the external spline lockring can have tool engagement issues. Akin to T47 bb with so little material to engage. In both cases the quality of your tools can make things better, but neither set up is perfect.
- I have both on personal bikes, and the only problem I've had is blowing out a torx head rotor bolt. Luckily I was able to mandhandle it out by abusing some tools. But that can happen to any bolt on your bike if not enough care is taken or the wrong tool is in play, I don't blame it on the rotor attachment style. As I said, they should move to better fasteners.
  • 4 0
 Really don't care, I have bikes with both. Have I seen people with loose CL rotors on the trail - yes. Have I seen people with loose 6-bolt rotors on the trail - also yes. Has either ever happened to me - no, I use the right tools and apply the right torque and threadlock. CL is marginally quicker, less so because I always have to rummage for the tool at the bottom of my toolbox.
  • 6 0
 Id prefer center lock if it came with a lock ring tool light enough for riding with.
  • 6 0
 6 bolt, but I strip one and drop a couple on the ground so it becomes 3 bolt.
  • 1 0
 Like a Renault LeCar with 3 lug nuts...
  • 3 0
 It's interesting that the current 6 bolt interface was designed around 160mm rotors and somehow we're mounting 223 and up to 246mm on the same 6 bolts. It does seem like CLoffera more surface area for the torque. That said if the rivets loosen, the. It's an inferior product. If it's all equal CL is likely a better designed interface that we got dealt with when no one asked for it, and the design was mediocre (rotor rivet issues) but now, it's likely better but if there isn't a huge reason to choose then ut doesn't really matter and we just have two standards because... again. I suppose at least it's only two.
  • 3 0
 Six bolt is just easier to deal with. Everybody who rides bikes probably has a couple multi-tools with a T25, and a small collection of T25 wrenches or sockets in a toolbox at home. If I'm on a trip and have to swap a rotor for some reason I'll always have a T25, I may or may not have whichever bottom bracket tool or cassette tool a particular Center lock rotor takes. It also doesn't matter how tight you get Center lock rotors, they always have that little bit of rock back and forth that feels like a loose headset and drives me nuts
  • 6 3
 Day late, but Googled it......

Centerlock rotors exist because Shimano was cautious about the physics of rotor bolts loosening in the six-bolt design. Centerlock rotors use a spline mount and a lock ring to make installation easier and faster.

Centerlock rotors have several advantages over six-bolt rotors, including:
Less risk of loosening
Less risk of damaging the hub
Lighter
Less prone to bending
Takes up less hub space
Easier to center
Easier to remove
However, centerlock rotors are generally more expensive than six-bolt rotors, which can be manufactured anywhere in the world. A pair of Shimano centerlock rotors can cost between $40 and $90, while a top centerlock rotor can cost between $35 and $200
  • 7 1
 Why have six things to tighten when you can have one?
  • 3 1
 Because if one of the six fails, you are still good to go.
  • 5 0
 @imbiker: you mean good to stop
  • 1 0
 @lukesky: Oh stop it ..
  • 6 1
 @imbiker: If a centerlock rotor becomes loose, it can't go anywhere because the splines and caliper hold it in place and you can still brake. If a 6 bolt rotor were to come loose, it will drop down until the ID hits the hub, and your caliper will have nothing to grab.
  • 4 0
 @imbiker: if you’re a competent mechanic you should never have a rotor loosen, CL or 6 bolt
  • 1 1
 @MTBLegend92: There are advantages to both, but the one thing that keeps me on the six bolt system is if you bend your rotor beyond the point of being useful, you can remove it trail side with your T25, where the lock ring requires a much larger tool that most don't carry on their rides.
  • 4 1
 @imbiker: 1. If you've bent the rotor that bad, you also probably crashed very hard and are possibly not riding out of there anyway.

2. Nobody is carrying a spare rotor on rides, so you are down a brake even if you can remove it. Just take the brake off with your multitool instead of the rotor and you are in effectively the same position.
  • 3 0
 Why have full suspension when you can have none?
  • 2 0
 Echoing a lot of people here: If you fly with your bike, most of the time you will mess up your rotors. CL makes it much easier to take them off and keep them true and save some weight as well.

Performance/convenience wise I see no difference, but when traveling it is much easier to take off a CL than a 6B
  • 7 1
 Whichever standard eBikers prefer, that's the one we should hate on.
  • 3 1
 I just get centerlock hubs if I can. It's easy enough to get a 6-bolt adapter for a centerlock hub. If you have a 6-bolt hub to start with, you're stuck with using a 6-bolt pattern disc. Let's stay if SRAM or Trek decided they don't want 6-bolt patterns and want to stray off the standards like aftermarket car rims where there are so many different PCD patterns. They make 4, 5, 7, etc bolt patterns to market their disc brakes. Then, for all those who're stuck with 6-bolt disc hubs - they're fucked! The centerlock hub will adapter to any bolt patterns.
  • 4 2
 Worked in bike shop for quite some time, I have to give props to centerlock, not one issue throughout this entire time except one stripped thread, and one where someone put chain lube as grease and it unscrewed. Whilst on 6 bolt I’ve seen about everything, stripped, rusted, filed down, drilled through, ripped threads, 2 bolt 4 bolt 3 bolt roadies, over torqued under torqued, loose all of them, and the pain to my fingers when the chinesium bolts round off because someone over tightened it, unforgivable.

From an engineers standpoint as I’m also a Design Engineer, tolerances have to be much tighter and it has to be torqued properly, once that is done it can sustain higher loads due to interlocking of the sequencing pins.
  • 3 1
 I had centerlock rotors. They were ok until the lock ring would slowly get loose over time. I tightened them down to spec and it would happen again. 6 bolt rotors take longer to mount and swap but I've had no issues with bolts coming loose.
  • 2 0
 From reading the article and the comments it seems that centerlock saves a small amount of time for anyone changing rotors regularly. I have always used 6 bolt. One time ever did I notice that the bolts had come loose. Seems that this is a very rare occurance whereas of the few people I know with centerlock are always checking because it has happened to them a lot. The poll could do with a second question about how many users of each have had unexpected loose rotors. I will always use 6 bolt because I see absolutely no advantage to centerlock for my application. I only change rotors when they are bent, contaminated, or if I manage to not bend or contaminate them for long enough, worn. In the even that a rotor does come loose on a ride, I will have the right tool to tighten the 6 bolts. Also I have gold bolts on black Galfer rotors and it looks sick.
  • 1 0
 If they do a poll on "have your rotors come loose?", then I demand that they include follow-up questions:

2. Did you install them with a torque wrench?

3. If so, how long since it was calibrated?

I've never had a rotor that I installed (hundreds at least, since it's my job) come loose. I use a beam torque wrench, which is calibrated every time I use it (you just look at the gauge and make sure it's at zero under no load).

I guess even with correct torque, CL does stand a chance of loosening if the tolerances between the hub and rotor are poor, AND the rider does a lot of fakie (backwards) braking. Quality parts will prevent this issue--the amount of play between a good CL rotor and a good hub is negligible.
  • 2 0
 Centrelock just looks neater, is easier and i've never seen one come loose so it should be the easy winner but the back and forth play i've experienced on some bikes is really unnerving, even though it's not coming loose thanks to the lockring and it's probably just looser tolerances one some parts, it's just mentally really offputting which is less than ideal for an important safety component.
  • 7 2
 Will this poll brake the internet?
  • 5 0
 Should be a "I don't care" option.
  • 5 0
 centerlock is so good for traveling, swapping 12 bolts sucks haha
  • 5 2
 6 bolt is way better I think, easier to tighten on the trail and I'd imagine more disc options, although that's just a guess.
  • 3 0
 Centerlock is objectively a better performer but having to carry around the massive tool to tighten the lockring is too much of a pain when compared to a simple T25
  • 2 0
 Terske makes a compact tool that uses an axle as a handle, but even that is a pita to use compared to t25.
  • 2 0
 I don't care, but I like having the option to run both with center lock. It means I can try out rotors that offer only one of the two, and future-protects me against the eventual Shimano world domination.
  • 3 0
 Not as easy to add titanium bling to centerlock. I definitely avoid buying anything centerlock because I only want one standard in my garage.
  • 2 1
 i haven't had a 6 bolt rotor in maybe 8 years, mostly due to the bikes i've purchased had center lock. i like Shimano brakes more than others so it seems to be how shimano built bikes are spec'd. overall i'd much rather 6 bolt as a standard
  • 1 0
 6 bolt is much easier to pick up parts for as it seems more manufacturers support it and therefore allows for more cross-compatibility but if centrelock was the universally accepted standard, I wouldn't mind, it's certainly faster and easier to fit!
  • 1 0
 Maybe centre lock should be used in racing like a F1 style fitting only applied to race cars. Faster for teams to prep bike and switch stuff etc. personally I just use whatever my chosen wheelset has. I have had loads of bikes with 6 bolt and a view with CL. Only drama I had is when I chanced to a different wheelset and then had to also factor new rotors into the bill on top. Does it really make a difference to the average rider? Does the few grams difference matter? 6 bolt is more commonly available imo so tends to be what I lean towards plus if a lose a cleat bolt I can trail side fix with a 6 bolt and get me home.
  • 2 0
 bike mechanic here, centerlocks are slightly quicker to change but im all in on 6-bolt. ive seen a fair few center lock rotors loosen up or completely unscrew but never 6-bolt.
  • 2 0
 Centerlock is kinda like straight pull spokes. It realistically works fine but it doesn’t do anything better on the trail. If we were going to get a new standard it should be 8 bolts in a larger circle pattern
  • 4 0
 Center Lock is a big advantage for mass production. 1 vs. 6 bolts, nothing else.
  • 1 0
 The only time I found a centrelock to be an advantage, was when I did bike trip with a few buddies. We had time for one shuttle run before sunset after picking everyone up from the airport. last person to assemble their bike was going to drive that shuttle, the others would ride. It came down to who would get their rotor on first since we'd taken them off for the flight. centrelock ftw! but that scenario has never repeated itself. I've been riding mountain bikes for over 30 years fwiw.
  • 2 0
 I was 6 bolt all the way and then I got center lock on a gravel bike, have to say it was super quick to work with but do agree that its not really a big problem for yet another bike standard.
  • 4 0
 Lighter, faster to service, less chance of seizing/stripping a terrible torx bolt. CENTERLOCK FOR THE WIN.
  • 1 0
 If you go to weightweenies, it is universally accepted that 6-bolt can be much lighter than CL. Stock shimano-to-shimano, yes CL is about 15g lighter a wheel...but if you trick it out with lighter 6B rotors, ti bolts, etc...6B is the weight weenies defacto standard.
  • 1 0
 Most of my bikes are 6-bolt but that's mainly because I have a lot of pre-built Industry 9 wheelsets and while they offer normal spoke hubs with centerlock, their aluminum spoke wheels appear to be only built with 6 bolt hubs. That said, the few times I've swapped rotors on the centerlock wheels, I'll admit it's much easier/faster.
  • 1 0
 I'm sorry - I tried centrelock for 6 months and couldn't get on board with it. No matter how I fit them, torqued them, there was always the tiniest amount of play in rotation. This likely had no effect on them, but it irked me, 6 bolt is a no-brainer. Its simple, allows a greater range if axles and psychologically feels stronger to me. All my wheels are now 6 bolts.
  • 2 1
 Sounds like the hub or rotor machining on the splines was out of spec. But realistically unless they are incredibly sloppy it only affects the parking lot 'rock your bike forwards an backwards' test, and makes no difference at all on the trail. Unless you routinely ride your bike backwards as well as forwards of course.
  • 1 0
 If bolts were a better option than a splined connection for high shear interfaces then crank spindles would be smooth and arms would attach via through-bolts, and cassettes would also mount to the freehub body with bolts.

If bolts were better, splines wouldn’t exist.
  • 2 0
 Both work fine-so while some features are make or break for me (looking at you cable tourism!!) rotor mounting type is a non issue.
  • 1 1
 I see no reason someone couldn’t make a CL tool that fits on a multitool.

Anyone who’s done home electrical work knows that tightening a box to conduit connector is possible with a flat head screwdriver and hammer, but just today I saw a tiny tool that does it better. And that same design could easily be made into a bike multitool. I shoii yo I’d start working on that actually.
  • 3 1
 All my MTBs are center lock because they all use Shimano hubs, which are the best price to performance ratio in my opinion, and they are center lock only.
  • 2 4
 except they often dont like super hard riding, the cup n cone can loosen and eventually snap the hub axle. I've pretty much destroyed every shimano hub - couple now come with cartridge bearings and a bushing so can withstand a bit more load.
  • 2 2
 I have a Ridgid impact that does about 4Nm with a couple clicks on the lowest setting. I use it to zip 6-bolt rotors off/on for wheel swaps. Before that 6-bolt swaps def felt more tedious. I can also find my impact quicker than a BB tool in my bike bag (yes that's a me problem), so that helps. 6-bolt rotors are also cheaper to upsize or downsize. Zero interest in going back to centerlock.
  • 3 0
 My Makita DTD154 is about 4 Nm on the lowest of its three settings, and between 6-8 on the middle.
  • 1 0
 I've also never stripped a thread, nor lost a bolt with this method. It's fast and oddly satisfying.
  • 4 0
 V-Brakes 4 lyfe yo!!! Seriously. 6 bolt any day.
  • 1 0
 Center lock all the way. If you travel with your bike you “should” remove your rotors when flying. Center lock makes it easy. There’s no need for 6 bolt when we have center lock.
  • 4 0
 1. Pick a rotor attachment style ✅
2. Be a dick about it ✅
  • 3 0
 Done and done
  • 2 1
 There should be 2 standards, center lock for those that can afford to ride mountain bikes and 6 bolt for the broke dicks that constantly whine about the cost of everything in mountain biking.
  • 3 0
 Center Lock is so much simple, what a pain those 6 torx bolts that sometimes I had on past
  • 3 0
 don't care, I am a marketplace scrounger and my 2 bikes both have one of each
  • 4 0
 I have both standards on different bikes. I like CL more
  • 1 1
 6 Bolt, definitely uses a Higher Hub Flange, means most of the time Shorter Spokes, more of a Rigid Wheel.
We can go more specific, on not just what we like more on boyth standards, there is a bit more behind.
Center Lock : Low Hub Flange.
  • 1 0
 No mention of my favourite combination - CL hubs, adapter and 6-bolt rotors Big Grin - it is the lightest setup, saves some grams compared to full 6-bolt or CL. I always go for this combo for each of my bikes (MTB, gravel, road)
  • 1 0
 Why is everything so tribal? My mtbs are 6B, my road bike is centerlock; both systems work well and have their own pros & cons. 2 different standard isn't crazy and getting a new rotor is never a bad idea
  • 2 0
 If you ever get into a pinch on the trail and need to remove a rotor, 6 bolt is the clear winner...unless you carry the tools to remove a CL in your trail pack.
  • 1 0
 FWIW : been on CL on all my wheels (cept for my trusty 20yrs Hadley rear) since 2012r and never had a rotor come loose.1st ride after reading this article and front rotor comes loose(200mm xt on DT350).....
  • 1 0
 2 MTB wheelsets and my road bike have CL, but my DJ has 6 bolt.
Personally I could give a damn, as long as the rivets don't come loose on the Shimano aluminum spider, that's annoying as F*ck
  • 4 2
 My wheels are mismatched, so I have both! I think I prefer the simplicity of centerlock.
  • 1 0
 Fighting or quarreling. Where's the mtb or emtb poll? I have 6-bolt because it was on sale, tho prefer CL for simplicity

@wobblegoblin: WT packwrench is light and has 8mm hex option for pedals
  • 3 1
 I swap wheelsets between frames and have different rotors for each. 6 bolt is a pain, center lock is king
  • 1 0
 Are there any centerlock rotors that are a single piece of laser-cut steel? They all seem to be riveted to (or floating on) a carrier.
  • 2 0
 I wasn’t even aware centerlock existed until I read this post. What a world.
  • 2 0
 CL rotors may not weigh less than 6 bolt ones, but IME, CL hubs are considerably lighter.
  • 1 0
 Never used center lock, so don't know any advantages or disadvantages of it. 6-bolt can be tedious, but I don't remove and install rotors much.
  • 4 0
 Pepsi
  • 1 0
 6 chances for success VS 1 chance for success

I have had a few bolts come loose on 6-bolt and I didn’t even notice until next service.
  • 2 0
 Option 5: I don't care, as long as all brands and components use the same standard!
  • 3 0
 …thank you
  • 2 0
 my bikes have both. don't care either way. centre lock tend to have nicer designs though.
  • 5 3
 6 bolt, external cables, threaded BB.... These questions are 100% settled.
  • 2 4
 Press fit is better actually
  • 3 0
 @maybemarcusking: Except when it isn't Smile I've personally had bikes with press fit BB, and never had any issues with them even on the MTB I had for 8 years. But on a sloppily toleranced frame (out of round, too big too small non-concentric bearing seats not parallel) people can have problems. Of course external threaded BBs still have press-fit bearings, and can still suffer problems if the threads on each side of the frame are non-concentric or not parallel, but avoid the issue of the bearing seats being too big or small or out of round, so the bearing itself doesn't tend to come loose and trash the frame.
  • 1 0
 @dsut4392: you're right, the tolerances on the frame must be dialed. I also am only referring to carbon frames, of course on a metal frame it makes perfect sense to tap some threads in the BB and use threaded.
  • 1 0
 CL is easier and faster imo. Especially when needing to swap wheels. Never had any performance issue. I have stripped a rotor bolt though. Total nightmare. . .
  • 3 0
 Centerlock looks clean and I haven't had any issues.
  • 1 0
 Some pay hundreds of $ for swapping all the bolts to Ti ones, just to save a few grams, while using CenterLock rotors saves you the same amount of weight, with 0 expense.
  • 1 0
 Shouldn’t we be talking about something that gets swapped out a little more often like tires?
… and is an actual pain in the ass to deal with
  • 3 0
 Well done, PinkBait. Well. Done.
  • 1 1
 Virtually every kind of motorbikes have 6 bolt brakes and if it's good for a motogp or a dirtbike it's definitely good for a bicycle. In the last 10 years bike industry has rely more on marketing than real engineering
  • 1 1
 Yeah, that's why the latest, greatest Maven brake uses DOT fluid just like a motor vehicle. Oh, wait...
  • 1 0
 6 bolt for me, I love redundancy in safety critical items and I just don't unmount or mount rotors often enough to give that up.
  • 1 0
 6 Bolt allowed me to add a spacer when converting my Hope hub to Boost, unsure if this is an option with Centre lock, for the most part I'm a 6 bolter.
  • 1 0
 MotoGP is using 3 bolts on 6 hole discs They need to change discs very often So 6 bolts, and use only 3 if you need to change often
  • 1 0
 Tend to use 6 bolt but not really bothered it just whatever comes on the bike. As for people swapping rotors between wheel sets. Buy some more rotors, simples.
  • 2 0
 Centrelock looks neater to me. Only got it on 1 of my current 7 bikes but it is my preference
  • 1 0
 Centrelock for sure, especially if you are switching rotors/wheels.

Just dealt with stripped 6 bolt rotors on a recent bike purchase and it was a complete PITA.
  • 7 6
 Centrelock is probably better but not better enough so it should die just like 15mm axles.
  • 4 2
 6 bolt, but centerlock rotors definitely look cooler.
  • 3 1
 I prefer both , bikes are awesome, and so are bike parts that work!
  • 2 0
 Coke vs. Pepsi would be more interesting.
  • 2 1
 Road bike (also gravel) = centerlock.
Mountain bike (and gravel with fork) = 6-bolt.
  • 2 0
 6 bolt is so simple. Simple works for me.
  • 1 0
 6 bolts when you have multi tools with you at trail. Center lock....depends if you carry backpack and add weight at trail.
  • 4 2
 Why would so many people waste time on something so meaningless?
  • 1 1
 Always have problems with centerlock rotors developing play. 6 bolt, one piece, 2.8mm+ rotors all the way. Also alot less likely to warp under heat.
  • 1 0
 I voted 6 bolt. But, honestly-I don't care. I have bikes with both and will run either one with no problem.
  • 1 1
 Good luck using your center lock rotors to fix a missing cleat bolt. Also the solution to quick rotor swaps between wheeels for 6 bolt is a cordless drill
  • 2 1
 Center lock are easier if you remove them for travel and the wrench weight is minimal
  • 2 1
 6-bolt because I hate proprietary gimmicks that only exist to lock your investment into a specific brand.
  • 1 0
 If you get centerlock then you can get an adapter for 6 bolt so it doesn't really matter.
  • 2 0
 Where is the option to answer “I don’t care”?
  • 1 0
 I absolutely love center-lock during assembly and wheel swaps. But all my current builds are 6 bolt. Go figure lol
  • 2 0
 Formula 1 uses a splined rotor bell like Centerlock.
  • 1 0
 True. I'm using a splined rotor on my F1 car and six bolts to fix my bicycle brake rotor.
  • 2 1
 6 bolt, no questions asked. Always the way to go. Centerlock is bullshit.
  • 2 0
 6 bolt because nobody carries a lock ring tool
  • 1 0
 What a bunch of newbs! I weld my rotors on and toss the wheels when the rotors are worn out.
  • 1 0
 As an engineer - never really understood center lock. As a bike mechanic - it's pretty tight.
  • 1 1
 Establish the standard that works better through hard data, not a forum, dump the other one.
We don’t need two.
  • 2 2
 Can't shim CL rotors to fine tune, and if they ever do come loose in the middle of nowhere your multi tool ain't gonna help.
  • 2 1
 these 'cheap engagement' polls are becoming all too common
  • 2 0
 They should do a poll on what we think of them.
  • 2 0
 BOTH!
  • 1 0
 Oh yes, screwing in 6 individual bolts is way superior than one lock ring.
  • 1 0
 Is the issue with the play on cl resolved?
  • 1 0
 Big tool and quick release VS small tool and slow release
  • 1 0
 That's what she said!
  • 1 0
 Is it really that deep tho?
  • 1 0
 6 bolt is like IS brake mount.
  • 5 4
 I prefer quick release
  • 2 3
 I poured a bunch of red loctite into my freehub bearings. Who needs breaks when you are riding an endure fixie!
  • 2 1
 I prefer no brakes.
  • 1 2
 Oh Lord come on. This is just useless clickbait. Who cares, there's no difference between them
  • 1 2
 Centerlock is the best in practice. Acquiring centerlock tools is the worst.
  • 1 1
 Centerlock disc must be use Shimano steel lockring
  • 2 2
 Center lock always has a little slop in it that drives me nuts
  • 1 0
 Tighter ( that's what she said )
  • 1 3
 i have 2 weelsets and yes on all if them a disc! i prefer 6 bolts, because of no need to have additional tools! CL is a crap, and unessescary its my opinion
  • 1 1
 Who the hell has two sets of wheels? Bloody dentists?!!
  • 1 1
 Center Lock stupid system
  • 4 5
 Anyone that says 6 bolt hasn't had center lock. Facts.
  • 2 4
 If it requires a custom tool you cannot use for anything else, it is not the answer.
  • 5 0
 CL uses a BB tool....................
  • 2 3
 @HeatedRotor: but not the one for the BB on my bike...
  • 3 0
 @Genewich: Think about it from shimano's point, If you run full shimano... you have the tool.
  • 1 2
 ....X6 bolt 100% for the win
  • 1 3
 CL is the mimost useless thing, like straight pull. no reason other than cheaper bike building
  • 2 4
 I'm a simple man. Bolts. Because bolts don't need a stupid tool that does 1 thing.
  • 1 4
 One only has to look at the motorcycling world to see how ineffective a solution centerlock style rotors are.....(it never happened)
  • 2 3
 666 \m/
  • 4 6
 Centerlock was invented by a dude who’d never heard of an impact driver
  • 3 3
 THAT was my next point! I have a cheap cordless impact. Makes playing with 6 tiny screws almost painless!
  • 5 0
 If y'all need an impact driver to install m5 bolts you are doing something extremely wrong.

A drill set to low torque setting and tightening by hand makes sense. An impact? We installing car wheels or bike wheels?
  • 3 4
 @Cheddar420:
Dude, you seriously think I’m talking about a 500FtLb impact tool?
Let me spoon feed it to you- looks like a 1/4” drill, holds the same 1/4” tool bits like you’d see as a Philips tip for a cheap tool set.
It spins fast but with low torque. Low enough not to do damage.
But go ahead and do the final torque with your drill “slip” clutches. I’m doing the final tightening with my inch/Lb wrench.
Any questions?
  • 2 0
 @Untgrad: Agreed. My Makita DTD154 is about 4 Nm on the lowest of its three settings, and between 6-8 on the middle.
  • 5 0
 @Untgrad: he called it an impact. An impact driver is not a drill it's an impact driver. It's a completely different tool with a completely different use case.

Learn names of things before throwing the snark around. Especially when you repeat my comment basically.

I use a 12v drill to do my rotors. I use tools every single day. Don't get all pissy when you don't even bother to read the next line.
  • 2 2
 @Cheddar420:
You need to learn names of tools, start by reading the tool! My impact says “impact” right on it!!
It takes a tiny battery pack, and would have trouble driving a screw deep into a piece of wood.
Snark is immediately assuming someone is stupid enough to use a tool for driving lug nuts over 100FtLbs for 6 tiny fasteners into a hub.
  • 3 1
 @Untgrad: it's pink bike...

You start throwing stuff like this around and some 13 year old grabs an impact driver and immediately takes the heads off the bolts.

Adjustable torque on an impact doesn't exist, as far as I know. The very nature of the tool is to max out its torque and then act akin to a hammer drill just in a smaller package. An anvil hits the chuck and creates the patented ugga ugga creating more torque.

A Milwaukee 18v is rated to 750ftlbs and 1100ftlbs removal, other brands are similar, that was just the first Google result. The only time that's useful on a bicycle is removing pedals or cranks after hex keys failed and before you get the breaker bar.

Also take a breath, this is no way to behave. Your mother would be embarrassed. Did she buy you your Fischer price "impact" drill and that's why you're getting so worked up?
  • 2 2
 @Cheddar420:
“Untgrad, what about the children!?!?!”
..this conversation is over
  • 2 0
 @Cheddar420 is talking about an impact WRENCH (a.k.a. rattle gun). Good for taking the lugs off wheel studs on a car. These are the things we see in the pits during motor races.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_wrench

@Untgrad and @Blownoutrides and myself are talking about an impact DRIVER. Good for driving screws into timber/drywall and small bolts that you'd find, say, holding on the brake rotor of a bike.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_driver
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: hmmm is this a UK/NA thing?

An impact wrench is called an impact driver here.
  • 2 0
 @Cheddar420: Okay. So the discussion above was caused by regional differences in naming. Well hopefully we all know what's going on now.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: It's possible, but both those dudes got American flags, so I don't know... sometimes those yanks aren't the brightest. You gotta treat them with kid gloves. Gotta think for 'em so they don't hurt themselves.

Either way, it wasn't anything to get worked up about. I hope @Untgrad took his heart meds dude's too old to be getting worked up by such trivialities.

I thought a PSA was important given the audience Smile
  • 1 3
 3724 of you are wrong.
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