Pinkbike Poll: How Much Sag Do You Run?

Sep 17, 2021
by Seb Stott  
Nukeproof Mega 275C

Sag is probably the most fundamental and important aspect of setting up your suspension. In case you didn't know, sag is the amount the suspension compresses under the rider's static weight, usually expressed as a percentage of the total travel. The brilliant thing about sag is that it's transferable between riders of any weight and bikes with any amount of travel. Running 30% sag will give a roughly comparable ride feel for a 120kg rider as it would for a 60kg rider, even though the heavier rider will need roughly double the spring rate (spring stiffness or air pressure) to achieve the same sag. Similarly, if you have twice as much travel you'll generally want to run about twice as much sag (half the spring rate), which means the same percentage sag.

But when it comes to dialling in your particular bike, it's worth being precise with sag measurements because a small change can have a big effect. If you go from 30% to 27% sag, that may sound like a pretty trivial difference but the amount of sag has actually changed not by 3%, but by 10% (3/30). So, the spring is 10% stiffer with 27% sag as it is with 30%; that's a very noticeable change.

ZEP Mountain Bike Camps
Measuring sag when in the attack position is ideal, but measuring it sat in the saddle is much easier and usually close enough for a starting point.

There are two ways to measure sag - either seated or in the attack position. Measuring sag in the attack position (standing on the pedals with elbows bent) is more representative of how you actually ride, but it can be hard to measure sag like this on your own without pushing the O-ring past the sag position as you get on your bike. Measuring sag seated is much easier - just slowly sit your weight onto the saddle, lift your feet in the air briefly, then without bouncing, put your feet back on the ground and dismount, then check the O-ring position. If measuring sag seated, you'll typically measure a little more sag than when standing, but so long as you measure it the same way every time, it's a good reference point.

Another caveat is that with a progressive suspension linkage, 30% sag on the shock correlates to slightly more than 30% of the wheel travel. This is because, with a progressive linkage, the wheel moves further for every millimetre of shock stroke early in the travel than it does later in the travel. It's not worth getting too hung up about this though because, for a moderately progressive bike, the discrepancy between shock sag and wheel sag is only around 2% (30% shock sag correlates to about 32% wheel sag). Also, if you have a more progressive linkage, you might want to run a bit more wheel sag than with a linear one, so setting them up with the same shock sag isn't a terrible starting point.

Something which is more significant but more rarely discussed is friction. When you apply your weight to the bike, the suspension compresses until the force from the spring plus the friction in the shock and linkage is enough to hold up your weight. So if there's more friction, you'll measure a smaller amount of sag with the same spring rate. You can test this by measuring sag in the normal way, then have someone push down on you to compress the suspension beyond the sag point, then have them slowly release that downward force so the suspension extends until the downward force is removed. You'll find that you measure more sag when the shock extends than when it compresses - sometimes a lot more. The difference is due to friction, so this test can be a useful way to compare friction between bikes or identify sticky shock bushes or seals. Friction is even more significant in the fork, which makes measuring fork sag almost useless in my view.

Traditionally, it was often said that you should run about 25% sag for cross-country and about 30% for everything else. But modern bikes generally have more progressive linkages and radically better air shocks with volume spacers to control bottom-out. On the other hand, people are riding shorter-travel bikes much harder than they used to. So, are these basic guidelines still in the right ballpark, or are they way off?

How much rear shock sag do you run for XC riding?



How much rear shock sag do you run for trail riding?



How much rear shock sag do you run for enduro riding?



How much rear shock sag do you run for downhill riding?




271 Comments

  • 357 3
 I like my shorts/pants to be just above my butt crack, I feel that to be the appropriate amount of sag.
  • 48 1
 Having it at your knees will give you faster cadence and you can take little steps and run like a leprechaun.
  • 5 1
 you also need the cloth belt that dangles like a bad karate achievement too
  • 45 1
 At 46, I predict my nuts to sag 25% in the next 6-8 years.
  • 6 2
 @jason475: Never worn undies until now that I'm 45 for dh. Too much danga lang now. Finish dizzy
  • 9 2
 I haven't seen my penis in years...100 percent sag!!
  • 5 1
 @jason475: I'm 54 and can confirm your prediction via my own nut sag.
  • 4 0
 I've accidentally hit the arrow down. Very sorry for that. I was still laughing because of you
  • 2 0
 Run zero sag with Boxxer briefs
  • 1 0
 @jason475: At 55, I'd have to say your prediction is accurate!
  • 2 0
 @jason475: Set your suspension so your nuts are just clear of any rocks on the course and you will be smiling instead of grimacing at the end of a ride.
  • 161 1
 No fucking clue I run coil
  • 2 1
 @spencerbrawn: indeed, lol
  • 1 23
flag shami (Sep 17, 2021 at 13:19) (Below Threshold)
 Serious? Is there a joke here I'm not privy to?
  • 4 24
flag TotalAmateur (Sep 17, 2021 at 13:21) (Below Threshold)
 @shami: coil shocks don't show sag
  • 28 2
 @TotalAmateur: they do, it is just not as stupidly easy to figure out since you need a ruler and person to help you. But it is as important as any other suspension.
  • 51 1
 @Balgaroth: or spit on the shaft
  • 29 6
 @Balgaroth: but who cares on a coil, you run a spring that's just heavy enough so you just don't bottom out..
  • 7 0
 @Balgaroth: Ive got a bike with a pretty tight shock tunnel, and measuring sag is so insanely ridiculously hard. considering drawing some marks around my pain pivot so i can measure it there, scott spark style.
  • 5 1
 @Balgaroth: Can't you just wrap a zip tie around the push rod that goes into the shock, so the rod under the coil? Or is there a reason why that wouldn't work.

I ride my hardtail most of the time so I don't really care. But my full suspension bike is a Cannondale Prophet with a Magura MX shock. Which is air sprung and air damped. And you can't measure sag (unless someone else looks at how far the rolling lobe rolls over the cone but it still wouldn't be sufficiently precise for this poll).
  • 15 0
 @Balgaroth: it’s exactly the same just use the bottom out bumper instead.
  • 4 0
 @TotalAmateur: Ah, so he's joking he can't use a tape measure.
  • 5 0
 @thenotoriousmic: or measure center to center on you shock bolts at sag and at full extension.
  • 6 0
 @shami: you need someone to measure it for you though. You can do the bottom out bumper solo and nobody wants to measure your shock 15 times while you dial it in. Haha
  • 1 0
 @shami: ya I should have said 'it's not easy to see'
  • 2 0
 @TotalAmateur: don’t you just use the bottom out bumper instead of an O ring? Do coil shocks even still have the little bumper on the end of the shaft? I haven’t had a new coil shock since my CCBD
  • 5 0
 @BenPea: are you still talking about suspension set up?
  • 4 0
 Doesn't the rubber bottom out bumper allow you to move it up to show sag, like an oring on an air shock?
  • 2 0
 @BenPea: well that came out of left field
  • 2 0
 @TotalAmateur: Rockshox coil shocks do...
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: that’s what he said
  • 1 1
 @edummann: proper f***** up lol
  • 1 0
 @Darwin66: Bronson? Lol
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Fair point. I just make my kids do it, they owe me for all the bikes and parts I've bought them. Smile
  • 1 0
 @Ashe14: Specialized enduro. Before that it was a megatower with an equally tight shock tunnel. So good to have a low slung shock, but so impractical.
  • 1 0
 I set up my suspension purely by feel, and it actually seems to work.
Run coil in the back, but it's too damn finicky to measure on my own, and with the huge increments between spring rates, I simply use the one that feels best.
I did measure it and ran 30% when I used an air shock, and with my mystery number sag coil set up it feels better, and I ride faster according to the clock.
  • 1 0
 @Losvar: I measure speed by feel too. If it feels scary, it is fast enough Wink .
  • 1 0
 @vinay: if it feels scary your suspension is shit/setup bad and/or bottoming out.

hardtails are what feels scary.
  • 1 0
 @baca262: Nearly all my mtb riding is on my hardtail (and I'm keeping the old bmx for the pumptrack exclusively). I do have a full suspension bike (Cannondale Prophet) and it indeed feels easier straightlining the rough rubble or to maintain traction on a rough climb. But for everything else and especially when cornering, the hardtail feels easier for me. But don't you always reach a speed where things do get scary or are you always comfortable going faster and faster?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: with a proper suspension you should be snakebiting your tires and destroying rims before it gets scary like on a hardtail.

i have an issue with a too thin oil in the shock on the dh bike, high speed rebound is what makes it scary. once i've sorted that out the bike should really monstertruck, the only part that will make it scary is my lack of skill on undulating terrain
  • 1 0
 @vinay: and this lack of skill could be covered partially by stiffer springs and more hsc damping, it would be really uncomfortable to ride then but still, suspension can be made to eat everything
  • 1 0
 @CustardCountry: tbh I juuust got a bike with a coil, I'm super ignorant to the ins and outs.
  • 1 0
 @baca262: Yeah, I think it could be done. But as I mentioned, my rear suspension rebounds particularly hard after a hard bottom out, but not if I don't bottom out completely. So that is a scary region to experiment with. To try a full bottom out and see if it bucks me off. the other thing is that I think I'm not good as quickly adapting to a different geometry. My previous hardtail was a DMR Switchback (so that was Trailstar geometry but a bit lighter) so that was a short and steep bike. I already had trouble getting enough traction out of the rear end (which was kinda fun drifting but hard to maintain speed) because of the weight balance but I could just about hold it. My current hardtail (BTR Ranger, 26" large geometry but with a lower top tube) is more balanced for me. But when I jumped on the Prophet again, it felt nearly impossible to keep the rear end in check (because of the 2007 geometry). I just can't adapt quickly enough I guess. Obviously a full susser with comparable (sagged) geometry would sort that but I'm not sure whether I want to invest in that. It isn't like it would make me ride more, would it? I sometimes find myself looking at fancy full suspension bikes but this is what always puts me off. If I splash a lot of money on a new bike but I'm not getting more riding time in, what's the point? I need my hardtail to be strong enough and to allow for enough body movement (hence the low top tube) and if I then find myself unable to ride something (at speed, confidently or at all): great, I've found something for me to work on. So yeah, maybe I've shifted the discussion slightly. I think it is good to be presented with challenges and not have these solved by your gear. But it really depends on where you ride. If your local trails are so rough that it is impossible to even generate speed, rear suspension is what you need.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: yup. on the bottoming, when you bottom out the tire takes the rest and tire has no rebound damping so i'd say that's what bucks you.

like i said, if it's scary you're bottoming out Smile
  • 1 0
 @bat-fastard: little rubber disc ftw
  • 118 17
 No more free consumer data for the Outside overlords from me....
  • 81 13
 Its not that deep bro.
  • 78 0
 @nskerb: I mean about ~30% deep
  • 48 0
 I prefer to answer opposite of what I do. Corrupt the data!
  • 7 0
 @porkchopsandwich: Random clicks FTW!
  • 19 82
flag likeittacky (Sep 17, 2021 at 13:31) (Below Threshold)
 @porkchopsandwich: You should work for Bidens corrupt Govt. and sit next to Fauci.
  • 19 33
flag jaame (Sep 17, 2021 at 13:37) (Below Threshold)
 @likeittacky: I liked Trump, but I like Biden even more. I hope Trump does not come back. Biden is a standup guy.
  • 12 0
 Balls deep
  • 2 0
 @MrDiamondDave: balls to the walll
  • 83 2
 Shouldn't this be frame specific? Would it be more meaningful to ask "do you run more or less sag than the frame mfg. recommends?"
  • 8 0
 Came here to say that.
  • 4 0
 yeah this is what I was thinking.
  • 3 0
 +1 My first thought as well!
  • 1 0
 What spencerbrawn said...
  • 1 0
 this.

also depends on the shock (tune), right?
  • 72 4
 When I met the Mrs she ran zero sag , now it’s at least 50% & the rebound is so slow too .
  • 10 0
 big oof
  • 29 1
 That's a lot. I recommend to try and increase your stiffness first. Other adjustments come later.
  • 54 1
 @vinay: Yep, clearly there's just not enough pressure. I'd suggest purchasing a pump to stiffen things up a bit, then the issues with sag and rebound will be resolved. When I go riding with the Mrs I fully service everything first, that way neither of us get half way through the ride and feel dissatisfied with the performance of our equipment or have the ride cut short because of equipment failure. . Although, the Mrs has been complaining she wouldn't mind getting a dropper with more than 150mm of travel, personally I feel that she simply needs to work on her riding technique a bit because more than 150mm is just unnecessary in my opinion.
  • 6 5
 She probably says the same about your balls
  • 5 0
 @CustardCountry: my balls have always been hitting my knees .
  • 3 0
 @nzandyb: At the beginning of each ride, before she's warmed up, my wife often feels underdamped. But the damping generally gets plusher as the ride progresses.

Most importantly, though, she's running a coil.
  • 35 0
 69.420% sag
  • 11 0
 Nice
  • 29 0
 Sag equation = 100%- (age - (((years riding * rides per week) + beers per week)*100%)) = 30%
  • 9 0
 30%/10% is 3 - guess what also has a set number of3? Yes a triangle. Outside Illuminati confirmed.
  • 5 0
 Ok, so I got 3881%. Not sure if I did anything wrong, or if I should be running huge sag.
  • 5 0
 I get a negative number
  • 14 0
 @taprider: Hardtail it is for you Sir
  • 4 0
 I got stuck at years spent riding

Like when i started riding a bike? When I thought this was the sport for me? When I thought this was how I wanted to structure my whole entire life? or when I first sacrificed the blood of a virgin to the forest and mountain presence?
  • 3 0
 Ok so I got 400%. I suppose I just fold my bike in half every time I ride it then.
  • 19 2
 This poll might as well ask how you like your toast.

Is your suspension linear, straight progressive, progressive/linear/progressive, digressive/progressive, progressive/digressive? How progressive/digressive is it and in which part of the travel? Do you over pressure to prevent bottom out? Do you run a lot or a little little fork sag that you have to balance by adjusting the rear? Do you run really heady or really light damping? Are you boosting big jumps on smooth trails or staying on the ground on rough trails?

Do you get my point? Every bike and rider is different. 30% is often a good starting point for tuning, but a specific sag percentage rule is a little silly. Do some back to back runs and figure out what works best then write down your PSI.
  • 31 0
 Ok, but how do you like your toast?
  • 9 0
 Careful, you're dangerously close to being sensible on PB.
  • 1 1
 I would have liked to see fork sag on this poll. For me it's about balancing out sag between front and rear. Too many times I've been too front heavy.
  • 1 1
 @zephxiii: But it's not about sag, it's about finding the right pressure front and rear. What sag that happens to be is completely irrelevant.
  • 1 0
 @redrook: what about ride heght and dynamic geo? I think that counts for alot. Too much front sag and too little rear sag and you don't have confidence on the steeps.
  • 1 0
 @ashmtb85: Yes exactly, and you figure that out by look/feel and then changing the pressure. What sag % that is doesn't matter.
  • 15 0
 This might sound ridiculous, but I just use whatever coil spring Craig from avalanche tells me to use.
  • 1 0
 he sent me my shock with a 450, i tried it, but it was undersprung for me, if i was only racing it would of been fine but i do alot of freeride so it was too soft.
  • 9 0
 I shoot for 30% but that's +/- a few %. If it feels right, then that's all that matters. We care too much about numbers lol I had a convo with someone the other day worrying about geo numbers of their 1 year old bike. If you like how the bike feels when you ride it, does it matter if it's 5mm shorter than what you consider "progressive?"
  • 1 0
 Yep, 30ish here too.
  • 3 0
 Same thing- I start around 25% and then add or remove pressure till it feels right. I know the psi but why look at sag again?
  • 1 0
 Still should know the numbers once it feels good so you can get it back after maintenance or repair.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: so glad i only have to remember what spring i had in there.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: yup, numbers written in Sharpie on an old bike box in the garage. Figured it's big enough I won't lose it like I would a piece of paper...
  • 2 0
 I started off with 30%, messed around with pressures and tokens and damping but couldn't really get what I wanted. Then added a megneg so I could mess around with pressures and tokens and damping and rubber bands and it's kind of where I like it. As for what sag I'm actually running now, I've no idea
  • 1 0
 @toaster29: so glad I know my shock is close to 100% dialed to me, my bike, my riding, not relying on whatever some marketing guy determined to be a good tune for the average rider.

I'm not in the window of "average rider" (100 kg and I ride heavy: I'll plow at speed thru a janky section in order to keep the bike loaded up to then pop over the even jankier section that follows. Wheels and shocks hate me.) that most base tunes are made to fit. So just popping X spring onto a shock with out some damper tuning is just going to end with parts flying everywhere.
  • 7 1
 It is absolutely pointless knowing this without knowing the fork/shock model and rider weight too. It's a pretty meaningless metric without knowing this. You should set the pressure which feels right for you and the riding you're doing, what sag that happens to be is neither here nor there.
  • 16 0
 you dont go to pinkbike dot com to find out usefull facts! you go to pinkbike to argue with strangers that your number is better than theirs
  • 2 0
 @mtbida: Lol, you're right, what am I thinking!
  • 4 0
 @mtbida: yeah, but, umm, like, my number is, like, kinda pretty much the f*cking best number.
  • 4 0
 This is a dumb survey. Different bikes do better at different levels of sag. Really progressive rear ends do fine set up soft, especially on longer travel bikes. Linear bikes tend to ride better set up higher in the stroke.

You’d need to poll people to see what frame they’re on, what shock they’re running, and other setup parameters (spring stiffness, shock tune, tokens in air shock etc. ) for this to be meaningful.

Im lucky enough to weigh pretty close to what Kazimer and Levy weigh, so their setups are usually pretty close to what I end up running.
  • 1 0
 You only ride bikes that they've reviewed?
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: I think that's the point, it's impossible to gather the info needed to make this even slightly informative.
  • 7 0
 i need an alternative for bragging about riding a hardtail
  • 2 0
 I went with "I have no idea". Surely if a steel hardtail is "springy" then there must be sag too. No idea how to measure it. As for the tires, I think I have about 1cm sag but as I run an insert (procore at about 5bar or so) I can't say full travel is when the tire hits the rim. Anyway, I think "I have no idea" is always the best answer for these polls.
  • 4 0
 Mine is 175psi. I’ve no idea what % that is, but that’s where I’ve found it feels best. Started at manufacturers recommended and then went plus or minus from there (I forget which). But 175psi.
  • 6 0
 My hardtail saw this article and told me: "let's make some pancakes and have a beer Buddy".
  • 3 0
 Set front to 20% or so, set rear to manufacturer recommendation or 30%. Ignore sag from there and tune the bike in. I don't know or care what my sag is, I just know that my rear is about 10psi higher than whatever gave 30% sag and I never used sag on the front of my XC bike.
  • 3 0
 I've always been told 33% for aggressive enduro/DH and dutifully obeyed...until this year. Bought some different coil weights and actually experimented a bit and found I prefer a much stiffer set up than recommended. Settled on about 26% sag vs the recommended 30-35% for my bike; cost me a few hundred buck to try the different set ups but glad I did it tbh....maybe worth a try for other peeps as well.
  • 3 1
 I think that’s pretty outdated these days. I’m not certain but I think most pro’s don’t run that much sag anymore. Im at 20% at the front and 25% at the rear also. I prefer a lively, responsive ride instead of sticking to the ground like a slug.
  • 1 2
 @thenotoriousmic: or sticking to the ground like a big cat, loading up on energy waiting to blast it off the end of the next corner. Everyone is different.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: i think 30%+ makes sense only on the old v10 in the 10" setting
  • 3 0
 2019 Trek slash owner here. For hard braking and corners, there is a very noticeable difference between running 30% sag and something like 33% sag. It's crazy how much better that 5-10 psi less makes that bike feel.
  • 4 0
 I measure my sag with a laser, then weight the result to compensate for humidity altitude and temperature.... then I have a beer and just ride
  • 2 0
 sag is kinda incorrect in saying its important, no what's important is motion ride height. you can have whatever sag you like while standing in your garage or parking lot but where the bike rebounds to while moving and how high/low the bike stays, this is why they tell you to undial compression etc, its a pure starting point for new people.
When i ride XC and mashing pedals, i want my ride height to be 25% and hold there.
  • 2 0
 Dont know,near 55,8972% in winter conditions, and 44,12345% in summer.
Got to say, that, I just upgrade my DH full sus unycicle with front and rear discs breaks, 190 AXS dropper for steeper STA, rear light and 13 speed automatic gearbox, almost forgot a Big S sticker on down tub.
  • 2 0
 The position you measure from matters way less than being consistent in that position. As long as you're not hanging off the back or leaning all on the fork, any position is fine, and seated is way more repeatable than any standing position.
  • 2 0
 Seated with elbows bent is around the same as 'attack position' as long as you are centered. Dont understand why people mess around with trying to stand and set sag
  • 3 1
 I dont know, I have a coil with a sprindex and sometimes I run with a rucksack and sometimes only the small bottle. Set it once around 30 but I if I take a shit this will vary too.
  • 1 0
 about 24ish on my nukeproof mega(2020 275) since the standard shock tune is pretty shit in terms of mid stroke and low speed compression if your around 90kg. Its a blunt instrument but until i dump the shock for something better air pressure is all ive got in terms of adjustment.
  • 5 0
 If you have got an RS Superdeluxe i would recommend trying out the megneg, makes a huge difference in midstoke support. (throw all spacers out of the positive chamber)
  • 1 0
 That bike is inherently f*cked up to make a shock feel good. You're either running way too little sag to get good midstroke or running correct sag and blowing through travel until you hit a wall. Ask @skerby
  • 2 0
 @nskerb: Ive never had particularly harsh bottom outs at 30% sag but i do find it uses up way to much of travel on the face of bigger jumps which results in the bike losing most of its pop and feeling pretty dead. On smaller jumps its fine being fairly lively and poppy but as things get bigger and time spent on the takeoff of the jump gets longer the worse it gets.

Probably going to get a custom tuned Fox X2 or something of similar ilk with a resonable amount of adjustability so it can be dialed into my liking
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: 100%. Difference is night and day.
  • 2 1
 Fork makers recommend 15-20% front sag, and the general rule of thumb from editors is 30% rear (shock) sag, so actually 32-34% wheel sag, depending on how progressive the suspension. This is for flat ground, of course. Once you're on a steep trail and on your brakes, your weight shifts forward considerably. This increases front sag and decreases rear sag until you are even at... 25% wheel sag F&R! So all these "rules of thumb" and recommendations are really trying to fudge-factor their way into giving you balanced suspension when you need it the most.
  • 2 1
 The standing rider in that position, is that what they'd call "attack position"? I'd go with a deeper hip hinge. Not necessarily "elbows out" or any of that, but definitely a deeper hip hinge. What we see here is more of a "turn the other cheek" position.
  • 2 0
 It takes waaaay too much pressure to get the sag less than 30% in my RS Monarch. Almost like it auto sags at 30%. Either way, the bike feels best at 30% rear and 15% or so on the fork.
  • 1 0
 I dont pay attention to sag at all. I start with the base PSI setting recommended by the frame manufacturer based on my weight. And then I tweak the psi until I find an all around sweet spot. Run it stiffer or softer based on terrain and conditions.
  • 1 0
 being in Ontario Canada the stiffer then suspension the better to keep your speed and flow going but I also like to ride my suspension stiff but I do find way to many people now a days run their suspension way to soft where they use all the travel on the smallest features
  • 1 0
 No idea how much sag I run as I never set my suspension up that way. I might use it to get a ballpark estimate when setting up something new, but I just go by ride feel and memorize the air pressure instead of the sag value which is gonna change depending on your position while measuring anyways.
  • 1 0
 Many of my customers have no idea how compression or rebound damping works and aren't even sure which control does what. For those folks, I just set 'em at around 20-25% so they don't bottom out no matter what they do or what the compression damping happens to be set at and they seem pretty happy. It's kind of a bummer doing that with $4-5k bikes that are capable of so much more, but frankly, the average rider isn't that into suspension tweaking. They just want to feel some squish and to not bottom out.
  • 1 0
 LMAO at anyone who thinks they can reliably measure sag to the nearest +/- 1%.[precision, accuracy]. ROFL at PB editors if they think that one rider's 23% is the same as another rider's 23% [observer bias]. Rolleyes at everyone who thinks that whatever value is given is informative without controlling for suspension design, riding style etc [uncontrolled variables, confounding factors].
  • 1 1
 Totally agree on fork sag is useless infact it will now than likely confuse you in fork set up i like to set up based on frequency of the air spring first then bring any hsc lsc last. Rear sag is a definite value to consider.
  • 2 0
 I like air shocks because getting special springs made to get the right sag was getting expensive. Would have been cheaper, and healthier to loose weight I suppose.
  • 4 0
 Missing option for 'frame manufacturers recommendation'
  • 2 1
 Nah it’s there. Just click on 30%.
  • 3 1
 20-25% sag on rear 20% on front. Always. And 29-30 psi in front tire and 30-35 psi for rear. There are no right answers just right for the rider.
  • 6 0
 Damn you must be hucking big. Or you are a big boy.
  • 1 0
 yeah same, 15-25% forks depending on travel and just all of the tokens
  • 2 0
 Temperature dependent. On a cold day, zero sag. Also garment dependent. On a bicycle, the Lycra also keeps that sag to zero.
  • 1 0
 Rather than percentages, you should be asking something like…

Less than recommended
Exactly as recommended
More than recommended
I just add air when my pedals start digging new trail.
  • 1 0
 Exactly! When my front end wanders on climbs I put more air in the shock.
  • 1 0
 To be fair I would like to say that I actually change my sag depending what I ride but I don’t. Think it run about 28% and that is how it stays until my bike dies and I get a new one.
  • 2 0
 I can't believe I wasn't fast enough to get in the first shorts/pants joke... I must need more sag.
  • 1 0
 I'm very heavy and only have air shocks, and with riding gear, my weight and the weight of the bike itself I tend to run 30% ish as getting much below that is tricky.
  • 2 3
 Who knows? I run a coil that didn't even come with the frame. I ride it until the spring starts rattling then give the collar 3-15 turns and keep riding. I rarely check the fork until it gets close to bottoming and then I squint to read the little label on the inner leg and pump it back up to my weight setting. I carry a shock pump on every ride but only use it about 3 times a year. The only thing I care about is having rebound set to medium slow (avid FF watcher).
  • 2 0
 I run coils too and have no idea. They just work.
  • 1 1
 You're awfully proud of that apathy and laziness.
  • 2 1
 @justinfoil: I'm a rider not a nerd. It works fine for me.
  • 1 0
 @suspended-flesh: they're not mutually exclusive. You imply a nerd cannot be a rider, which is wrong.

If "works fine" is all you care to give yourself as a rider, that's too bad.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: OK fine. I'm old and still race but I'm not looking to eek performance out of my bike. I just ride it. I'm happy with the way it works. Nerds can be great riders. I'm just a rider.
  • 3 0
 'Some' should be an option...
  • 1 0
 start at 30% rear then adjust accordingly. Personally I find my bike wallows a bit with more than 30% sag, but it's all subjective.
  • 1 0
 I’m 240lbs fully kitted, anything more than 25% sag and I’m bottoming the shock regardless of what kind of riding I’m doing.
  • 1 0
 230 riding weight here; you gotta stuff that thing full of volume reducers. DPX2 (Spesh's OEM 29er tune: low compression air can, 2.5mm less stroke than 27er) on a '19 Stumpy 27, biggest reducer and 305ish psi and I've not yet bottomed it noticably, but always use a good 95% of travel.
  • 1 0
 Oh yeah, it's like 30%-ish sag, maybe a couple mm more
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: I pump my dpx2 to 350 (max psi) and hope I don't lose much taking the pump off...
  • 1 0
 @Beaconbike: you don't lose any taking the pump off. This myth is old and dead. To prove it, next time you take a pump off, when you hear the hiss, stop and wait for your shock to empty out. Except it won't, unless your pump head is no good, because that hiss is just the air in the hose. The shock's valve is closed many turns before that point.

And the reason it reads lower the next time you attach is because the hose has to fill again. Only the pressure reading right before you detach is accurate.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: my shock pump must be messed up then. Because mine will start to empty the shock. It will lose 25+psi if I don't take it off super fast... time for a new shock pump I guess
  • 1 0
 @Beaconbike: that really could just be the hose refilling when you reattach to check it, especially if you've got a lot of pressure in there. To confirm pump goodness, seriously try letting it go when it hisses and seems to start to "lose pressure": it'll go a for a second then stop when the hose is empty
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: I second this. The reduced pressure from removing and reattaching the hose is most likely the air filling the hose upon attachment, not what comes out upon removal.
  • 1 2
 20 up. 30 down. Tire pressure change also. Pedal strikes on tech climbs are BS. i also measure seated not "attack position" half the joy of FS bike is ploppin ass down on seat when tired but an hour out from the truck. I run my forks stiff too. Tire pressure is my neg for small bump. Not a fan of forks goin mushy under braking downhill. Maybe if I had a wonderbike, or climb switch, or a 1000 buck fork with every dial in the world it would be a different story.
  • 1 0
 “ Similarly, if you have twice as much travel you'll generally want to run about twice as much sag (half the spring rate), which means the same percentage sag.”

Why?
  • 1 0
 It's just a slightly unclear, redundant explanation. Really just needs to say "30% of your shocks specific shaft travel", which means longer stroke shocks will have a longer sag when measured in mm.
  • 1 0
 @subwaypanda:

I get what it is. But if 25mm of sag is sufficient for the suspension to absorb small bumps etc,, on my 100mm Trail
Bike, why am I giving up another 25mm on my DH bike in order to achieve 50mm?
  • 2 0
 @Cord1: I'd say that the leverage ratio of most longer travel bikes would mean the spring rate for the rest of the travel would be too firm. You would likely have poor performance from the rest of the travel. I also find that the negative travel of the sag is equally important to the eating up of bumps and finding of grip. You could make a 160mm travel bike feel like a 100mm travel bike but it would likely be so both up and down hill with compromises in other areas as well.
  • 1 0
 Most new bikes have sag recommendations specific to the frame. I run 23% on my supreme and around 27% on my specialized enduro
  • 1 0
 I only have a hardtail and i use it for every type of riding, so i just answered below 22% sag for everything. your welcome for the info PB
  • 1 0
 I only have one bike (Aether 7 by bird) which has 130mm travel, I run about 21% sag on the rear and 25% front at all times and it’s an absolute ripper.
  • 1 0
 I would like to run more sag but I keep bottoming out if I run any less then 20% I have tried volume spacers but still bottom out to much
SENDIT
  • 1 0
 has anyone on a monarch plus hv ever get less that 35%?
i could never get it any less no matter what pressure or bands in the pos and neg chambers
  • 1 0
 Unlike most PB commenters, I have confidence that manufactures know more than I do about the bike's setup. I start there and adjust using Shockwiz, etc.
  • 2 0
 Unfortunately, the older one gets, they tend to have more sag.
  • 3 0
 are we still talking bikes ?
  • 4 0
 USA Old Man pants:

East Coast: they get pulled up higher as the years pass
West Coast: they ride lower and lower as the years pass
  • 2 0
 I like mine equivalent to my older brothers JNCO's
  • 2 0
 42.0% keeps me in the green zone.
  • 1 0
 I'd say about mid thigh, but the older I get, the closer to my knees it gets...
  • 1 0
 The leverage ratio of my bike means 25% is the best all around. So that’s where I put it and it works the best.
  • 1 0
 Curve, I should say.
  • 1 0
 I only ride park, having coil both sides my sag fluke around 30% +- depending gear, food, etc

Basically set and forget
  • 3 0
 sweet spot at 28.99%
  • 2 0
 At my age, everything sags +30%
  • 4 1
 Whooooo fucking cares!
  • 1 0
 My debonair won't sag less than 30% no matter the pressure, so I roll with it.
  • 1 0
 None. If I spend 15k on a silly e bike, take me to the hospital because Ive clearly had a stroke
  • 2 0
 Hardtail. F your sag. You slag.
  • 2 0
 At my age, 63, everything sags I’m afraid.
  • 1 0
 Haven't suspension experts already shown that getting fork sag is difficult and unreliable due to the geometry of the bike?
  • 1 0
 Set sag to 30, then slightly adjust to make the bike feel sweet and call er a day
  • 1 0
 Have no clue, I just know the pressure for type of trails, how much sag translates that to, no idea.
  • 1 0
 I've never understood why we, mountain bike riders, must sacrifice spring rate for ride height.
  • 2 0
 I'm 43. My left is 35% and my right 29%
  • 1 0
 Why do we measure sag at the rear shock and not at the reat wheel travel, wouldn't that make a bit more sense?
  • 1 0
 The method to do that would be more complicated.
  • 1 0
 Somewhere around 30%, but I'm more interested in the travel from that point to 100%.
  • 1 0
 I wonder if there is a small market for suspension setup specialists similar to the way roadies have bike fit experts.
  • 1 0
 30% Rear sag and 22% front sag. Ideal for Enduro for me (150mm rear and 170mm front)
  • 1 0
 Coil fork and shock, just use whichever spring feels the best and I don't bottom out lol
  • 7 7
 I honestly cannot understand how can people "ride dh" and have no idea how much sag they use/have...
  • 18 1
 Run what ya brung
  • 24 1
 grip it and rip it baby no time for numbers
  • 3 0
 rental bikes, or just that actually measuring coil shocks is a hassle and a half
  • 2 7
flag pablo-b (Sep 17, 2021 at 12:24) (Below Threshold)
 @mtbida: if you dont own a dh bike you shouldnt really answer this question. renting a dh bike once in a while isnt riding dh...
  • 3 9
flag pablo-b (Sep 17, 2021 at 12:25) (Below Threshold)
 @ridealltheb1kes: i dont think you can rip with a bike that is not set up properly
  • 11 2
 People who don’t know there set up usally rip hard
  • 6 4
 @pablo-b probably those that realise sag is meaningless
  • 9 1
 If it moves and doesn't bottom out too much,she's good to go!
  • 2 4
 @mtb-scotland: Im not saying there is an ideal sag value, Im saying not knowing the values is crazy...
  • 3 0
 @freeridejerk888: this is sooo true - the most impressive things I have seen in person on with guys that have no clue how their bike is set up....the opposite is very true also
  • 2 0
 It's all relative. You should be able to sit on any bike and know if it's reasonably sprung for your weight. Talking about a couple percentage points of difference in sag is at least a little bit silly since drinking half of your water bottle will shift it. Do people change their settings at the beginning of every single ride? I sure don't.
  • 5 1
 @pablo-b: why is it crazy. What information is sag giving you?
  • 2 0
 @pablo-b: i do own one, a lot of people dont though, it absolutely is still riding dh. but i havent measured because i dont need to know, i know that it works well for me, and i go by feel when adjusting, not by number.
  • 1 0
 @nozes: so 25-30% than
  • 1 0
 @mtb-scotland: yip pointless, you get spring depending on your weight so it just about bottoms out. That's the important bit. Whatever sag that gives is what you ride..
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: Fastest old man I know thought you where supposed to run the bike so it didn't sag at all under your weight.
  • 1 2
 @bat-fastard: No always true.....what kind of trail do you set sag on? I ride a wide range of trails, I don't even come close to bottoming out on some flowy tracks while I do much more often on others....the reality is the ~30% suggestions is a good all around setup....
  • 2 2
 @RadBartTaylor: you get the spring weight to take the biggest hit of landing jumps basically. A trail without jumps is not a trail but just a pointless path to me.
  • 3 1
 @bat-fastard: lol - you think most enduro stages have a bunch of jumps? Have you ever ridden some of the epic high alpine descents in Whistler or the Alps that are NOT littered with jumps like A-line?

Ok - so set up your bike to hit jumps and it's going to work good everywhere else....got it.
  • 1 2
 @RadBartTaylor: actually some of biggest hits aren't jumps but Huck to flats or bombholes. As for enduro that's for those who can't ride DH which this comment is about. Spent manys a week in the Alps, got 2 weeks in morzine this year and the tecky roughness of pleney black or canyon in Les gets is spot on for me.
  • 3 0
 But sag simply doesn't matter. The way it feels and the spring and damper tune to get it there is what matters. Sag can be a starting point, but it just doesn't mean anything beyond that.
  • 1 0
 I have a Stumpjumper evo so 90% lol
  • 1 0
 i've got a horse buried out back. wanna go beat on it?
  • 2 0
 Balls deep in sag.
  • 1 0
 There should be an "I have a hardtail" option
  • 2 0
 I only ride park
  • 1 0
 I'm 30 but wear 34...I leave no sag to anyone
  • 1 0
 Ah yes I know down to the exact percentage what sag I run
  • 2 0
 About mid-thigh
  • 2 0
 @rickybobby18:
I hear ya man. I'm pushing' 70 here, I gotta say I'm saggin' way more than my bike.............
  • 1 0
 My weight plus 30. Idk the % on that. On a delta link
  • 2 1
 This is super interesting in all but......who the fuck cares.
  • 1 0
 No sag here, I am twight as a smoke and a pancake!
  • 1 0
 Me running 17% sag on my shock.
  • 1 0
 I start sag at 30 PSI and drop pressure until she really starts to squirm.
  • 1 0
 Whatever it said on the box.
  • 1 0
 The older I get, the lower the sag.....
  • 2 1
 Just the tip, just for a second...
  • 1 0
 More than you can afford, pal.
  • 1 0
 I go for the minus 69% sag: 31%.
  • 1 0
 Who can consistently measure their sag to the nearest 1%?!
  • 1 0
 30 percennt sag works great if you are slow
  • 1 0
 I just use the Evil gauge that basically always says the same thing.
  • 1 0
 Hardtail crew here. No sag
  • 1 0
 Ahh full rigid. Curly bars too?
  • 1 0
 25-27% trail riding
30-35% dh/bike park
  • 1 0
 28% ish sag on my Bronson V3
  • 1 0
 how Many losers are lying about sag under 22%.
  • 1 0
 I have under 22% sag for everything. Its because I only ride a hardtail.
  • 1 0
 I disagree with the premise of the question.
  • 1 0
 Fuck pedal strikes Definitely under sagged
  • 2 0
 28.99%
  • 1 0
 Is he riding a 26 wheel bike or is he 2 meters tall? The bike looks tiny
  • 1 0
 I run 0% because I'm a f###in savage
  • 1 0
 *Stares in hardtail……
  • 1 0
 Why isn't all the sag and option
  • 1 0
 Wait where is the "I ride a hardtail" option?
This poll is biased
  • 1 0
 Can't run rear shock sag if you don't have a rear shock
  • 1 0
 Sag is just a relative number which means nothing by its own.
  • 1 0
 All of it.
  • 1 3
 I can sit on my bike carefully and not have the fork move at all. Therefore if I was to use sag as a measure I'd need almost zero psi. Sag is useless.
  • 2 0
 Try it with that "0 psi", or more realistically half or quarter of your normal pressure. The fork will move.

If yours doesn't it probably means you have too much pressure. I've got my 2020 Factory 36 dialed to use 95% travel most days, never bottomed unless I almost died, and still super plush of the top: it moves if I just push straight down on only the seat. Sure, I could get on the seat and not move the fork, but it's the most convoluted movement and so far from a normal riding position to be silly to even think about.

Your argument is as useless as using sag as the one number and being done. It's a starting point, that's all, and it can be better than the psi numbers on the fork (also just a starting point) because those numbers don't take into account differing head 5ube angles
  • 1 1
 Lot of people running way to soft suspension.
  • 1 0
 Pants or shock?
  • 1 1
 Sag is a nonsense measurement
  • 1 2
 Ask your mom...
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