Pinkbike Poll: What's Your Ideal Amount of Dropper Post Travel?

Aug 21, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  
Is 210 the new 150? Modern dropper posts are longer than ever.

Four years ago, we were just starting to see bikes show up spec'd with *gasp* 150mm dropper posts. That seemed like plenty of drop for most riders, and at the time the vast majority of participants in a similar poll to this one thought the same thing.

Fast forward to 2020, and 150mm of drop seems to have become the bare minimum, while 170 and 200mm dropper posts have become much more common on larger frame sizes. Seat tube lengths have gotten shorter and shorter, and many companies have modified their frame designs to provide room for fitting a longer post without running into a pivot or kink in the seat tube.


Santa Cruz Bronson
Santa Cruz were early adopters of the shorter seat tube / longer travel dropper post movement.
Transition Sentinel V2
On the new Transition Sentinel, a size medium gets a 180mm post, while large and XL models get 210mm of drop.


What's the reason for this increase in average dropper post length? Did everyone's legs suddenly grow six inches longer? Nope, there wasn't a global growth spurt – it's modern geometry that's the culprit, specifically steeper seat tube angles.

With those steeper seat angles, there's not as much change in the position of the seat in relation to a rider's body between full extension and full compression. The seat now travels in a more vertical path, compared to the more diagonal route it would have followed with a slacker seat angle. Hence, more drop is needed to get the seat fully out of the way for descending.


Sam was on fire today while he and Richie pushed each other to their absolute limits
Amaury Pierron can t control what Loic Bruni does this weekend all he can do is to put himself in the strongest possible position should Bruni have any dramas.
Different bikes and different riders, but a similar saddle position for descending.


Is it possible to have too much drop? Of course, but it would take a seriously long dropper post to reach that point. As it is, many modern droppers have adjustable travel, which allows them to be fine tuned so that the fully compressed position puts the seat exactly where a rider wants. In most cases, that's a couple inches above the kneecap when the pedals are in the 3 and 9 o'clock positions – take a look at photos from World Cup DH or EWS races and you'll see the the similarities in seat heights and descending position.

How much longer will dropper posts get? That's a good question, and one that doesn't have a totally clear answer. We are seeing more and more bikes with 34.9mm seat tube diameters, which allows for posts with more robust internals, and there's no doubt that 200mm dropper posts will become increasingly common over the next couple of years. I could be wrong, but I doubt we'll see posts longer than 250mm any time soon. After all, seat angles can only get so steep, and it's not necessary to have a seat positioned at ankle height to get down a gnarly run. We'll see.

For now, vote below for your ideal dropper post length.

What's your ideal amount of dropper post travel?




212 Comments

  • 236 5
 It’s like, right down to the collar. That’s the ideal amount of travel. Why not have that as an option?
  • 25 1
 Which is also dependent on how tall the seat tube is, on some bikes I might need 250mm on others I might only need 210mm
  • 18 3
 Any seatpost can do that. he question may not be, how low do you want it but instead, how high in the highest setting?
  • 2 0
 totally agree
  • 62 1
 I think there's such a thing as too low, for some people. If I'm in a flat corner with my bike leaned over, I'd rather press the saddle into my thigh than my knee... In steep shit, though, I'd almost remove the whole thing altogether if it didn't bring "trail enema" into the picture.
  • 17 2
 You should be able to go collar deep all the way to the base bro.
  • 5 1
 @scvkurt03: theres definitely a thing as too low. same reason why all pro riders have run saddles where they do their whole careers. that ain't changing because a dropper can go 210mm
  • 3 1
 @vinay: not really, 180mm above the seat tube on my road bike and I could do double duty as a pornstar. 180mm on my enduro bike is a comfortable climbing position
  • 25 2
 @browner: That is true. On a trail ride for example, I would be happy with a 100mm dropper post. On a winch and plummet session 200 might be ideal. For a blast through a jump line, I would prefer the saddle to be so low it's not there. The best amount of drop is therefore right down to the collar, because sometimes I might want that. One can't make a 100mm travel post into a 230. One can stop a 230 at 100 though. One could even buy a RockShox EnduroCollar if one wanted to make it official.

That said, life is not binary. What's right for me is not necesarily right for someone else. I'm not hating on anyone who likes a different drop than me. Celebrate diversity.
  • 1 0
 Yes
  • 1 0
 @toad321: ahh,no
  • 1 0
 @rodeoJ: to the hinge every time
  • 2 0
 I think it should be whatever length allows you to drop it down low just before the seat buzzes the tire when suspension is at full compression, but then also allow full leg extension. This depends on the rider height, bike's rear travel, chainstay length, etc. For my bike, I think about 180mm seat would do this
  • 1 0
 I want as long of dropper as I can get. If I want the seat higher I can not lower it all the way but I can still get it all gone. So far all of my bikes are like that except my Honzo but all the way down to collar is insanely low on that bike.
  • 3 0
 Down to the clamp or just high enough so the tyre doesn't buzz the sadle at full compression.
  • 5 2
 choose your favorite dropper length and be a dick about it!
  • 2 0
 @browner: in some cases there is no such thing as too low.
  • 1 0
 @neilpritchett: yes bit do you really need a dropper on those bikes haha. Dropper on a DJ or trials bike?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: any seatpost can, but not any frame...pivots, bends, and other shenanigans often prohibit seatpost insertion from achieving collar against frame.
  • 1 0
 @jj12jj: but this is all based on how high your frame already sits so what that starting point of your dropper is then dictates how much travel you want on your dropper. My last frame 170mm was perfect but now I've swapped frames, to have it fully slammed I would need a dropper with 350mm travel!
  • 1 1
 I have a great idea of where you should insert your dropper post.
  • 1 1
 This is the only correct answer
  • 2 0
 I just moved frames and went from 125mm to 170mm because 125mm was the most my former frame would allow for my turd-fall in that frame. In my new frame I can fit a 170mm dropper, have it drop to the collar and all the way up, it's perfect for my turd-fall length! It's glorious!
  • 1 0
 Yep totally, the right dropper height is one which goes from full pedal to seat collar.
  • 1 0
 @MrDiamondDave: Pinkbike in a nutshell!
  • 1 0
 I actually spend a not insignificant amount of time with my dropper only half way down, but also can slam it down further.
  • 1 0
 i have a 210mm oneup dropper and it is completely slamed down in the frame and is the perfect hight
  • 1 0
 @browner: nah just some people and some trails just don't need their legs pinching the seat atall
  • 38 0
 While we're all discussing ideals here, I'd like my saddle to pitch from flat or very slightly nose-down at full post extension to pointing nose up like a DJ or BMX at full drop, please.
  • 13 1
 Makes massive sense. Still can't get used to the look of these modern bikes where even with the saddle low, the saddle is still level or even nose down. Specialized has one that does what you're looking for, don't they?
  • 3 0
 Hard to do without adding some overall height to the post. I guess in theory you'd need a little less drop, but everyone I know who's tried that Specialized post hated it. Maybe it was just the execution.
  • 9 0
 @Snfoilhat Specialized Enduro 2 generations back will do that for you ; ).
  • 6 2
 @scvkurt03: I believe it was very clunky and also the actual drop was very low. It was something like 100mm on the main cylinder and 13mm on the secondary, which they said equated to 150 at the rear edge of the saddle. In practice, it wasn't enough drop, I seem to remember. Great idea though. If someone could do it better I would certainly be interested.
  • 5 0
 Specialized Command Post Wu
  • 1 0
 This can't be upvoted enough! Especially now with steeper STA's. Having the nose up effectively renders the saddle null which is perfect for descending, jump trails etc.

@Snfoilhat - when you say "slightly", what do you figure would be a good angle if in a nose-down position?
  • 2 0
 @jaame: well now spec is sitting on the patent preventing others from trying the same idea. Maybe they will make one again in the future because the concept was good.
  • 2 3
 @SickEdit: wow. That surprises me that they would patent it.
  • 3 0
 @scvkurt03: Not everyone hated it. I loved mine! At 5'10" it was plenty of drop for me and when down and seated still allowed reasonable pedaling as it rotated the hips/pelvis back.????
  • 1 1
 @classicmoto: I think the idea is excellent. It would be good to have one with 170+13mm drop.
  • 1 0
 @scvkurt03: I hate mine. It refused to come fully flat in the up position on my last ride. It was absolutely terrible and I’ve only had it for 2 seasons
  • 1 0
 @classicmoto: Yeah, I'm sure it worked for some people. Concept is solid. Just relaying second hand experience.
  • 2 0
 This is a great idea especially given the rise of enduro bikes. Nose down for climbing is basically mandatory but the seat angle sucks on the way back down. Even worse my dropper seat clamp is basically impossible to get back to exactly the same place so I end up leaving it nose down at the bike park too.
  • 1 0
 Saddle design may help too. Most modern saddles are concave. That implies that the most nose down angle is found at the rear of the saddle. So people doing seated climbing actually have to slide to the rear of the saddle for best support. But it is uncomfortable to rest your belly/chest on it when descending steep. My Fizik Zeak saddle is convex. The rear is comfortable for resting your chest on, the front is tilted down again for people sliding towards the nose of the saddle for seated climbing.

Now I already have my saddle tilted up and I rarely rest my chest on it for descending (as it is so low that I'd already be touching the rear wheel before I'd touch the saddle). But yeah, I'd say a convex saddle may be a good idea for many people.
  • 36 0
 I'm 6'2". When I had a 125mm dropper, that felt long enough until I tried 150mm. Then that felt long enough until I tried 170mm. Now I run a OneUp 210mm dropper, and that feels long enough for everyday riding... but if I ride a bike park, or I'm dropping into something long or steep, I still slam my seat post in my frame. Based on how much my dropper sticks out of my frame at normal ride height, I think I could probably run some outlandishly long dropper, to the tune of 280 or 300mm.
  • 5 0
 Same. I could ride 300mm.

I would not need it 95% of the time though, 125mm would do.
  • 5 0
 I’m 6’2 also, I wish there was a 280 mm dropper. That way I can slam my seat all the way down and not have 3-4 inches of post sticking out
  • 3 0
 6’2” here and totally agree. I’m running a OneUp shimmed down to 200 because I reach max insertion depth on my frame at my preferred saddle height, but really I’d be happy with more provided my saddle isn’t scraping the rear wheel at max suspension travel.
  • 4 0
 I'm 6'3" 125mm was never quite enough, 160mm is actually enough but I'll go at least 180mm next time because I see no downsides on an XL frame.
  • 2 0
 Similar experience: first dropper was an 80mm Joplin, after 20 years of high-seating it seemed like a lot. When that broke 125 was normal so that's what I got and it seemed like enough. Then 150. Then 160, which I didn't lower all the way at first. Now I'm on a 210 oneUp which seems like enough but who knows? Every time I thought I had enough drop, my mind changed when I tried something longer. I'm at the point in really steep stuff where my ass hits the tire before the seat so it seems like enough.
I still have a 150 on a hardtail, and don't generally miss the extra travel.

At some point, if posts keep getting longer, it seems like stanchions are going to have to get bigger, and seat tubes with them.
  • 1 0
 Same here. 6'4". I couldn't pass up smokin deal on a Reverb axs which they only make in 170. So I dumbed down from 200. I was a little concerned about it, until I didn't get stuck behind the seat on Trestle DH. But I set it up seat fully forward, so that helped. The 170 is lighter than the 200, too.
  • 22 0
 It all matters on what bike you have. If you are a short person, don't follow industry trends just for the sake of following trends. As a 6'4" rider I find that I generally need a stupid long post.
  • 27 0
 As a 5'5" rider, anything above 125 mm is purely theoretical for me.
  • 6 9
 @nattyd: I'm 5'6'' and run a 200mM on my 2019 Nomad size small and 200mM on my 2020 5010 size small.
  • 2 0
 Me being 5'9" it's a tad hard for me to ride anything over 190mm
  • 2 0
 As a 6’4” rider with short legs, a 150 end up at my preferred dh seat height. At 200 pounds, it doesn’t take long to beat the crap out of my dropper living in a area with tons of rough climbing trails.
  • 4 6
 @abzillah: you a dentist?
  • 4 0
 @kes2903: I wish.
Only frame frame are new, bought at end of the year discount because not many people ride size small, all other parts are carry over from previous build.
I just wanted to give info on the bike frame and size because my height doesn't match a 200mM dropper, but on a size small frame from SC it works.
  • 3 0
 I’m 5’7” and I could easily fit a 200mm on my 2014 process. Bike was ahead of its time in that regard
  • 6 0
 @abzillah: BuTT you wont be using 200 at only 5'6'' if you ride a 29er; that is unless your a Eunuch !
  • 2 0
 @likeittacky: ehahaha someone else on here knows what a eunich is!
  • 2 0
 @abzillah: Santa Cruz straight seat tubes must help. My small Epic will only take a couple of very short 125s.
  • 3 0
 Industry trends? You mean I don't have to strap shit to my frame with a giant rubber band, AND ride with a fanny a fanny pack?
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: I'm 5'5" as well and run 150 on my 2015 Nomad. It's got a ridiculously short seat tube so it works just fine (and I even have the seat raised about an inch above bottoming out).
  • 1 0
 @abzillah: Wow thats all it takes for downvotes these days? You mention you have 2 bikes? Ridiculous...its actually important information as you pointed out different frames have different lengths, based on Seat tube length. Hence why different sizes come with different lengths, obviously 200 is not typical for a size small in any frame but if it works it works.
  • 1 0
 @Davschall: Yeah, it's too bad. He was replying to my comment and it didn't offend me at all. It was good information.
  • 19 0
 As long it matches my fork and shock travel. I can sleep well. 170-170-170 I would say.
  • 11 0
 220-220-220 sounds good to me
  • 30 0
 Yeah and don't forget rotor size and crank arms. 180-180-180-180-180-180 make sense to me.
  • 4 0
 @onlybirdman: I hate 180 cranks. Looks like I'm dropping my suspension to 170.
  • 5 0
 yep,170 170 170,do I need the same size stem?
  • 2 0
 @kiwimattP: nah, you need 170mm wheels. They're the future of enduro racing.
  • 14 0
 It totally depends on the seattube length/angle/geo of the bike that the dropper post is on...

So heres my answer: exactly the right amount of travel to put me in comfortable climbing and descending positions..
  • 1 0
 The first thing I thought was that "It depends" should be one of the options in the poll. Which turns out to be true of oh so many of life's questions.
  • 9 0
 I just want a dropper post that is incompatible with any seat tubes currently on the market. I don't care what the travel is, I just want to know why the new standard is better so I can buy it and then I can tell other people I have it. Even if I don't have a bike for it. A size that ends in .99 would really be ideal.
  • 8 0
 So...@mikekazimer

Nerd alert...

For my 150 dropper...between having a bike with a 74deg STA and a bike with a 77deg STA . At full drop, the seat will be 7mm farther forward and 2mm lower with the 77deg.

I fail to see how having the seat farther forward and lower makes it worse and necessitating the development of the longer dropper..
  • 3 1
 A slacker seat tube will end up with the seat further forward from it's fully extended starting point went slammed. A really steep seat tube will mean the seat stays much closer to the horizontal axis of it's fully extended starting point. I've gone from a 73 degree seat angle to an 80 degree and it is noticeable that the seat stays more between your legs for a given drop.
  • 3 0
 @subwaypanda: You and Ferd could both be right, depending on the bike, because the amount of forward movement depends on the actual STA.
  • 2 0
 I spent a month riding a Trek Slash and I was convinced for almost a week that the dropper was 125mm. It was 150, but the seat was so much more in the way of my legs because it moves further forward than other bikes as you put it down. I now hate bikes that have a slack actual STA even if the effective STA is good.

It's not really worth talking about 74 vs 77 or 73 vs 80 because the actual STA, the forward offset of the tube in front of the bb, and the position you end up putting the seat on the rails all makes a difference. The one thing that matters is that if the seat is further forward when it's dropped, the wide part of the seat is more in the way of your legs.

If we kept the actual seat tube angle really steep (like Pole) then we'd have less of a problem.
  • 2 0
 @AgrAde: Yeah, I ride an Evolink 131 and agree that it's nice for the seat to be basically moving vertically in space- the one thing I don't like is having to use the dropper more on rolling terrain. Because the STA is so steep the seated and standing positions actually put your butt in a very similar location, so standing up but not dropping the post means a lot of prodding- thus having to use the dropper to get it out of the way more frequently. Not a huge deal, and the steep STA makes climbing steep stuff far easier, it's just another quirk to live with when you're riding a bike as peculiar as the Pole.
  • 1 0
 @subwaypanda: Oh Yeah DUH. lol... where's that pesky paper with the calc..?

Ok still 7mm... isn't a whole lot. Wink
  • 8 0
 Why would you not want the most drop you can get? Ideally I'd run a post longer than I need then adjust the travel so that I can run it slammed.
  • 1 7
flag sdurant12 (Aug 21, 2020 at 13:59) (Below Threshold)
 So if you could drop the saddle down by your ankles you would do that?

No? Hmm. So maybe there’s an in between length that is ideal. What do you think that length of drop is for you?
  • 6 1
 Impossible to answer without knowing seat tube length, max insertion, length of post under the collar, stack height and your inseam. Just as important as getting the seat the right height in the pedal position, you don't want the low position to be too low (or too high for that matter). It always seems to be somewhat of a compromise. The companies selling 5 and 10mm shims to fine tune the posts stroke understand this. There is nothing worse than buying a frame only to find out your 200mm post will only go in 2/3's of the way and neither position work.
  • 1 0
 @Caddz the question is how much do you want, not how much fits in your bike. My old Giant Trancewould only have fitted about 140mm even with a very low stack post and that wouldn't have been enough.
  • 2 0
 @PhillipJ: I see your point, I want a post with at least 200mm of drop that works perfectly with my next frame for my body size, I have a 185mm now and I wish I could have gone longer but the frame wouldn’t swallow it.
  • 5 0
 "The seat now travels in a more vertical path, compared to the more diagonal route it would have followed with a slacker seat angle. Hence, more drop is needed to get the seat fully out of the way for descending"

This doesn't make sense. As the seat tube gets steeper, more of the post's drop becomes vertical. So a 150 dropper at 80 degrees moves further vertically downward than the same 150mm at 65 degrees when measured only on the vertical. So by the "steeper seat tube" logic, we would actually need slightly less drop in the post to get the same vertical drop.

Even if you wanted to disregard that, how about the fact that a steeper seat tube is already going to put the seat more forward, soyou would actually need less drop to be able to get behind the seat. And if you have a big rear wheel, eventually you'll pass a point where more drop only allows you to plant your ass-crack even more firmly onto the rear wheel. Where-as the slacker seat tubes might benefit more from the big drop because it moves the seat even further forward, so it's more out of the way even if you're not rubber-buzzing your butt-cheeks.

It is true that droppers made it easier to steepen seat tubes, but massive droppers' real benefit is being able to get pretty close to sitting on the bike with feet flat on the ground. This makes bailing or saving all that much easier. Think about how many times you've seen a slopestyle or BMX rider land with their ass on the seat and both feet skidding down the landing as outriggers. No imagine you could have that same margin of safety on a trail bike, but not absolutely destroy your knees when pedaling.

Hell, saving knees is how I've sold a bunch of people on droppers. Everyone but XC rippers ran our fixed posts at like 3\4 ideal height for trail riding, maybe slamming it for an extended downhill or a big drop and only going full height for an extended climb ("winch & plummet" type stuff). I reminded them they could have the slam, the 3\4, AND the full height for climbing and thus save their knees, with a dropper, and easy sale.
  • 6 4
 It's sort of a tricky concept to put into words. Think about it this way: Imagine you have a totally vertical seat tube. In that case, the seat would be right underneath you at all points in its travel.

Now imagine you have a seat tube that's at an angle. When you lower the seat, it moves forward and away from you. When you're in the standing / descending position, the seat on the bike with the angled seat tube would be less in the way.

It's more about the position of the seat rather than the actual amount of drop.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: I admit I'm having trouble visualizing this, would be an interesting article on it's own. Do you think that increased reaches play a part in needing longer posts? I feel like with the old geo bikes, it was easier to get behind the seat, but the long front centers pull you forward where it's always underneath you so lower is better.
  • 3 1
 @AarontCO: I think you nailed it with this!

Kazimer’s explanation makes no sense and I’ve heard it repeated by a few people with no geometric explanation. It’s all about the long reaches on the current crop of bikes.
  • 1 0
 I think you’re right but I think the real reason we have longer droppers is that seat tubes are shorter. Maybe it’s a chicken and egg thing though. I also think some folks still think dropping the post is just to get back and lower for steeps. A lower seat also allows one to pump better and angular more easily for cornering. That’s what I’ve learned anyway. On my bikes I have 150 posts but I could maybe only fit a 160 max. I may have a 31 inseam but I’m only 5’5” ish. I don’t get hit by my saddle when it’s dropped and I do buzz my shorts on occasion so I don’t think a longer drop would really change my riding but I maybe it would. To me you get the longest drop that will fit your frame and leg length. Pretty simple. No one ever said I wish my seat was closer to my gonads when I’m bouncing around on rough trails.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer:

You've got an odd way of describing something that I've noticed about bikes, and I can't tell if we agree or disagree.

Ignoring STA and considering only fore/aft seat position when it's dropped, do you want a seat to be further forward or further back?

I find that bikes with a very slack actual STA (eg: Trek Slash) are worse because the seat, when dropped, is further forward. The wider part of the seat is more in the way of my legs. A bike with the same raised seat position but a much steeper tube (so actual = effective) means the seat doesn't move forward as much when it's dropped and it isn't as much of a problem for me.

Modern effective seat tube angles mean the seat is more forward. Which IMO is bad when dropped but is worth it for the climb, and can be fixed with more drop anyway. But, if you had a bike that had an effective STA of 76 at your raised seat height, would you prefer an actual angle of 76 or a slack Slash-style seat tube with an actual angle of 66?
  • 1 0
 @bogey: 90d STA, saddle doesn't move forward when dropped. 45d, saddle moves forward as much as down. Whether this really matters depends on seat tube offset at bb, length, insertion depth, saddle position on rails, and rider geometry. STAs on long-reach frames had to get steeper to conserve working toptube lengths at full saddle extension--I don't think it's a dropper travel issue, unless dropper fitment is a problem. Based on comments here regarding hip/thigh steering and overly deep squats, we should be asking 'is it too much?' equally with 'is it enough?'
  • 1 1
 @AgrAde: forward. See Greenland's 2019 Val di Sole run. DH is great cuz you don't have to worry about full extension. Standing room only! For all else, it's far enough forward when fully dropped so it doesn't hit your backside when the rear wheel arcs up, and far enough back when fully extended so that it fits your spine length, given your reach, stack, and stem length selections. Considering offset from bb and segmented/curved seat tubes, ignoring STA is a good idea. Short narrow saddles mitigate paddles.
  • 4 0
 As much as you can fit in the frame. I had a 170 on an XL Sentinel with the collar nearly slammed. I have a large Meta TR with at 210 that cant go any further down and 3" of post still showing. I probably should have gone XL on the Meta but I like how agile the large is.
  • 7 0
 Whatever drop that gets my post slammed to the collar.
  • 2 0
 Aesthetically I 100% agree but the longer the drop the deeper the squat.
  • 3 0
 I thought a 150mm drop was fine for me (5 foot 9 with fairly short legs). My current bike came with a 175 dropper. Immediately I 'learned' how to scrub and squash the bike off jumps better, purely because the seat was more out of the way of my legs. Prior to running that post I didn't really realize the seat was restricting my movement. I'd be interested in trying a longer post, but that said, I do notice 175mm seems a bit lower for those sections of a descent where you sit down and spin the pedals quickly, so too much drop might not be ideal in those scenarios.
  • 4 0
 Depends on wheelsize. No point in more than 170mm on a 29er for me as the wheel buzzes my butt first. I can make use of bigger drop with smaller wheels though.
  • 1 0
 Yup. I’m sort of in the same boat even on an XL 29er I can tire buzz my butt with 175 if I’m not careful. Which leads to my desire to try a mullet bike.
  • 2 0
 That's wrong. Wheel size might matter for the situation you mentioned, but a taller rider will need a higher seat and will also need to lower it correspondingly more, thus needing more travel. So that's what it depends on the most, rider height. And going back to your example, I can buzz my butt on my 29" rear wheel, but I can also hit my balls on the rear of my seat, even with a 210mm travel seatpost. One thing isn't related to the other.
  • 2 0
 Sort of a silly thing to poll unless you separate by height ranges. Maybe 3 polls. people under 5'7", then 5' 8" - 6' and people 6' 1" and up? All I can say is for me at 5' 10" I have 150mm on both bikes and that seems spot-on for all types of varying terrain.
  • 2 0
 I chose 180, but never used a dropped longer than 170.

In reality, for what we’re paying for this crap the seat post should be integrated in the frame and should be adjustable. Max drop, max weight savings, max simplicity, cost????
  • 3 0
 Liteville frames use an integrated post from Eight Pins.
  • 3 0
 it goes a little bit deeper than that. Designing and manufacturing the essencials you need within the frame specs are the real pain. We will see integrated dropper post in the near future. Chris Porter has already said it. The problem today is that the cost of the integrated frame/seatpost is higher than the cost of the post alone. Besides, something goes wrong, it's the frame altogether that is broken.
  • 2 0
 @Notmeatall: this is what I’m referring to. Dropper built into the bike as a functional/ structural element. Sure there are issues, but again, for what we’re paying, this is what we “should” be getting.
  • 3 0
 Is stiffness not a concern with these long dropper lengths? I measured the diameter of my reverb stantion and its a measly 25mm. At some point the industry decided 31.6mm dia is necessary for a rigid post.
  • 1 0
 Yeah Flexy as shit in 180mm
  • 2 0
 I think the steeper the seat tube and the burlier the bike the longer the dropper. There is a downside to longer droppers though and it's that raising out of the dropped seat post takes more energy and muscle and I think that could add up in certain conditions where the dropper is used a lot; think undulating terrain.

I have a 210mm Oneup shimmed to 200mm on my Banshee Titan and it is indeed awesome to have the post so out of the way. It's at 200mm because the Banshee linkage gets in the way otherwise it'd the entire length.
  • 4 2
 I feel like PB gets a considerable amount of unwarranted crap, but this poll is nonsense. The 3 choices should have been...

a) As much as my frame would allow for my body type (85% of the votes placed here no doubt)
b) None. I like having my seat in my chest while going downhill. High post for life. (2% of the votes. No one knows anyone who'd vote this way, but here we are at 2%)
c) I don't want a dropper post - I prefer manually raising and lowering my seat. (13% of the votes. Same 13% also hate e-bikes and insist 26" isn't dead)

Not as interesting a read I'm sure
  • 2 0
 pros dont usually run super low drops, as when you go to put a super low drop down, you have to stand up from a deep ass squat wasting a ton of time before you drop into something, only needs to go so low as to not inhibit you, any lower and your wasting time putting it away. and high as it needs to be............ is high as it needs to be, the difference is the ideal drop. different for everyone. but if youve got short legs, NO you don't need a 200mm drop..........
  • 2 0
 I agree. The new rig came with a 210mm dropper and at 6'1" I might adjust it to 190. I personally don't notice much time difference to get it slammed, but I can feel how much extra energy it takes to get up from the seat after. Seems to start adding up a bit on certain trails where I'm always using the dropper.
  • 3 0
 In the same way that the number of teeth on your largest cassette ring should never be greater than your age, the length of your dropper should not exceed the length of your dick.
  • 4 0
 As much as i can get of course. Why not have the option? At 6'6" i could prolly use a 240....
  • 2 0
 Definitely around 180 on my current bike. I like having a little saddle to push my leg against while cornering, so too much drop is a genuine issue. Too low makes no-handers harder too... not that I land them anyways.
  • 5 0
 You've gotta land it somehow... Friday, maybe?
  • 1 0
 I did the math on this one. An optimal, bottom bracket, to seat distance for myself is 28 inches, for proper leg extension. My optimal frame, seat post length for maneuvering OK (jumping, hopping, etcetera), is 15 inches. So that's 13 inches, or 330.2 millimeters, unfortunately, of seat post drop. Which is probably unrealistic.
  • 1 0
 My current setup is a 12 inch seat tube, with a 5 inch dropper post. So LOLOLLOLOPTIMAL I'd say.
  • 1 0
 I’m a heavy guy and I wouldn’t mind a longer dropper post but I figure the bushings just has an easier life on a 150 mm drop post. I’d like “all” the drop but I think we need larger diameter posts to do this feasibly.
  • 1 0
 I would think that a percentage of the distance from your BB to your saddle at pedaling height would be the logical measurement. The limiting factor would be the seat tube length on some bikes but at least you would know what your ideal length is.
  • 1 0
 the most drop possible within reason, whatever is needed for the seat to hit under the knee cap at the upper fatty calf area. I've got the Bronson 2 pictured. 150mm is not enough. I wouldn't waste my time or money on a modern trail bike that can't fit at least a 180mm post in a size M
  • 1 0
 "With those steeper seat angles, there's not as much change in the position of the seat in relation to a rider's body between full extension and full compression. The seat now travels in a more vertical path, compared to the more diagonal route it would have followed with a slacker seat angle. Hence, more drop is needed to get the seat fully out of the way for descending."

Umm not according to pythagoras theorem.
  • 1 0
 At 6’4” more than 220mm is the answer for sure lol. On my patrol with a 150mm ks lev integra, I do the same amount of up and down pulling of the seat as I did with my old bike before droppers. Up high for pedalling reguires pulling the dropper out of the seat tube a bunch, but if I hit a steep rough section or want clearance I need to open the clamp and push it in again. Having the dropper in ideal position for pedalling sticks out of the frame way too much for dh riding Frown
  • 1 0
 Surely, your ‘ideal’ dropper length is totally dependent on a number of factors....rider height, inside leg measurement, size of the bike you’re riding, seat tube length etc.
I’m 5’3”, ride a medium Transition Patrol and run a 120mm dropper post, which when slammed into the seat tube and with the post fully extended, sets the saddle at just right height for pedalling.
  • 1 0
 Out there in the greater bicycle planet droppers are becoming a thing. Commuters like putting feet on the ground at lights. Gravel and tourists like a short drop to take the edge off without messing with pedaling. DT just came out with a short upside down dropper that fits narrow seat posts for $$ but there is the trend coming.
  • 1 0
 I hate when bike manufacturers put small travel post to the S sized bikes. Why do they do this? Sometimes the difference between the S and M bikes is 50mm of travel in the post. And yet the rider height difference is 20mm between frame size S and M size. And this is covered by the frame. We the shorter riders are humans as well and we want long stroke posts! 100mm post is terrible for us! We want 150mm as the others!
  • 1 0
 Odd question for me. My current bike works perfectly with a 170mm dropper that at full extension is right where I want it climbing wise and and can still be fully slammed. Depends on the bike for me, my old Commencal worked with 150mm great.
  • 1 0
 I can see myself managing to squeeze my bum down between the wheels just over the crank, knees over my ears, trying to avoid scraping elbows on the front wheel while tilting my head 90 deg to see under the handlebars.

With seemingly no end to how low people want that seat tube, and the amount of dropper drop, we will need a cheap post that lowers itself not by ass-load, saw one on here recently?

Srsly, if you want to do squats, you can do it without a bike. Get a kettle bell thing and a yoga mat.
  • 2 0
 Length of post goes per frame design really, we all want a slammed dropper post collar to the frame AND perfect pedaling position. You just choose the longest that fits.
  • 2 0
 Maximum that will fit in the frame with posted extended to my ideal pedaling height the post head bottomed out on the seat clamp.
  • 1 1
 When I built a new bike recently, it just happened that a oneup 180mm post was the perfect length fully slammed,but I've always said you might as well have as much drop as possible. If I could fit a 210 I would, if I could fit a 300 i would. I want the saddle as far out of the way as possible, and even then if I do want to just put it down a bit, I can because almost all droppers are infinite adjust now. I guess it could be a weight issue, but I think the benefit is worth the weight. there is definitely a practical limit on how much drop you could have tho, I get that
  • 1 0
 I used to have my saddle just under my knee on bmx bikes, that won't happen on mountainbikes, but the lower the better. I just want it somewhere around the height of my rear wheel
  • 1 0
 Why would you have your seat that high on a Bmx? I have very short legs for my height and my seat sits around the middle of my shins on my bmx
  • 1 0
 I replaced the 150mm dropper on my 2017 Jeffsy 29 with a 170mm one, and it feels like a massive difference. Now the post is slammed to the collar, and when I drop the seat it’s completely out of the way.
  • 1 0
 Im 180 CM and had a bike running a 130 I think and it was actually almost perfect. But a bit more would be even safer bet for whips maybe? But dude 140 could be enough for any Dh rider
  • 2 1
 I'm 6'4", ride an S5 Enduro and have a 200mm 9point8. The post still has over 2" sticking out of the seat tube. So yeah 250mm would be sweet.
  • 1 0
 I'm 185cm and I can easily accomodate a 210mm dropper on my XL jeffsy. I'm pretty sure actual long people (> 195cm) can have more. Big Grin
  • 1 0
 I have 330mm between seat rails and seat clamp. Give me the biggest post you can, please.

Patiently waiting for SRAM to release a 200mm Reverb AXS.. *taps fingers*
  • 1 0
 Given that most bikes for my size have a seat tube of 460-520, I could rock seatposts between 160 and 220mm. 180 seems like a good compromise to me.
  • 1 0
 I've never ridden with one that has more than 160 mm of travel. Maybe longer is better, but it seems expensive just to try a longer post, and I'm happy with my current one.
  • 1 0
 Because of limits on insertion depth, I haven't been able to try a post with more than 160mm. But my ideal is definitely more than that.
  • 2 0
 Can you put a 150mm travel on a S bike, and a 80mm on a XXL bike?? Sarcastic poll...
  • 1 0
 Tall enough that I can pedal efficiently enough on long flats and climbs. Short enough that the boys don't get destroyed on the way down the trail.
  • 1 0
 Coming from BMX I prefer to have my saddle at shin height when I'm descending, it's easier to flick the bike around and I'm not chasing KOMs so more travel the better.
  • 1 0
 Whatever drop the marketing geniuses tell me I need to be riding in order to have a good time or be recognized as legit by the legit kids.
  • 4 0
 About tree fiddy
  • 1 0
 That's my new stock answer. "The More You Know"
  • 1 0
 At 6'4" and on a bike with a short seat tube I love having 210mm of drop but I could easily fit a onother 20 or 30mm. Come on Oneup, when is the 240mm dropper coming out?
  • 2 0
 The 210 one up post is literally at its collar up against my seat tube at the exact height i need. Really lucked out
  • 1 0
 I have pretty huge legs, and I just got my 210mm oneup to replace my 175 reverb. I can still fit about 50mm more drop but it still feels pretty great.
  • 1 0
 I’m 6’2, and on my size L Nukeproof Mega 275c with a 170mm reverb, I have to slam the post to get a perfect fit. Dodged a bullet which was surprising to me!
  • 1 0
 Forget making them longer - they're good on that for most of us. How about making a dropper I don't have to push down? Please?
  • 1 0
 125 seat slapped my balls often enough to consider it short (or high?). 150 didn't anymore apart from dirtjumps. 170 never and the 150 on the hardtail now feels short.
  • 1 0
 Actually depends on the geo. If your seat tube angle is steeper and your seat tube is lower, you can run all that drop!!
  • 3 1
 I went from a 150 to a 170 recently and it was a game changer
  • 2 0
 Running a 210mm One Up - still have room for more drop!
  • 1 0
 I've got a 210mm dropper and the post is still a good 65mm above the collar. Give me enough travel to slam that seat!
  • 2 0
 As much as I can get should be an option.
  • 2 0
 I heard the next gen Reverb is 209.998
  • 1 0
 It should go down all the way. Why no option for that? I have no idea how long mine is, never measured.
  • 1 0
 I have a 180mm OneUp dropper in my 2018 Slayer and I'm so happy I can slam it
  • 2 0
 When are we going to get the "what's your inseam" poll?
  • 1 0
 Im all femur at 6'1.5". Large yt jeff -one up 210 is out 2.5".
Yt has very low stand over/short seat tube so works great
  • 1 0
 180 is ideal for me do to a good weight factor and I could easily run a 250 on my L frame with my long legs.
  • 1 0
 Rase black mamba, over 10 years old and still the longest drop at 228mm. It was the best setup ever on a 4x hardtail.
  • 1 0
 Weight x skill x terrain + balls ÷ beers and post ride tacos + relationship status = ideal height.
  • 1 0
 Who are the 57 people who voted "I prefer to manually raise and lower my seat" and why did they choose that?!
  • 1 0
 Whatever works best with my seatube length? Because that's what most people do...
  • 1 0
 If I could get 300mm drop on a bike I would do it. Its not too low until the seat touches the tire.
  • 1 0
 I love how there's not even an option for seat always down for DH, DJ, street etc. Oh, times have changed on Pinkbike.
  • 1 0
 Whatever length that prevents play or wobbles for the lifetime of the seatpost
  • 1 0
 I can go as low as I want with my quick release seat post clamp. No dropper bs required. Works every time.
  • 1 0
 The longest travel dropper that will fit in my frame while still having the ideal height for climbing
  • 1 0
 Sounds like we need more 34.9mm frames based on this pull. Manufacturers, GET ON IT!
  • 1 0
 Why is there no option for "I don't have a dropper, I don't move my seat because I don't ride XC/enduro"
  • 1 0
 What a strange poll. Doesn't just depend on the bike and what ever gets the seat out of the way?
  • 1 0
 Pretty soon we will have rebound circuits on the droppers with more travel then our forks
  • 1 0
 i have a 210mm oneup dropper and it is completely slamed down in the frame and is the perfect hight
  • 1 0
 OverLong dropper posts are for grinders who dont have trailbike specific trails.
  • 1 0
 I'm 6'7" so there is only one option on this list.
  • 1 0
 No dropper obviously
  • 1 0
 Pinkbike Poll, we’ve run out of stuff to write about... Vote , Yes or No
  • 4 0
 Pb poll: do you enjoy being polled? Vote y/n. Comment on anything & be sure to leave a reply for those who comment on your comment. & don't forget to pos/negprop if you have a feeling. We're also available on IG, YT, FB, Twit. Be sure to check out our sister site, Trailforks, for all yr snowmobile trailfinding needs, and our other sister site, Cycling Tips. Is Radek laughing all the way to the bank? Vote y/n

Ideally, I live near a park that's open all year thanks to global warming, and don't need a dropper.
  • 1 0
 I'm 5'11 with a short inseam, and have only been able to fit 125mm so far.
  • 1 0
 80mm For when the drop off the curb might wrinkle your khakis
  • 1 0
 Why isn't 213mm an option?????
  • 1 0
 I just ride my trials bike. No pesky seat to deal with.
  • 1 0
 I have no idea, I would really rather just go ride.
  • 1 0
 Never felt the need for any more than 125mm drop
  • 1 0
 My 2014 nomad came with a 150mm dropper! You off a couple of years.
  • 1 0
 EightPins is the correct answer.
  • 1 0
 150mm is the most popular? A lot of short dudes riding I guess.
  • 1 0
 I run 150mm because i’m 5’6 and ride a specialized enduro 29 size L so 150mm is the max i can ride Frown
  • 1 0
 the voting results are a histogram of how tall pinkbike riders are
  • 1 0
 Im 6'4" with most of that in my legs, give me all the drop you got!
  • 1 0
 Lots of short people responded to this poll.
  • 1 0
 My ideal is between 100 -150 USD. Anything above this is too much for me.
  • 1 0
 I’m a tall ducker so the longer the better
  • 1 0
 6'7 the answer is simply 230 and more... I have legs like a stork..
  • 1 0
 Low enough I can grip it/push it with my knees
  • 1 2
 I run the saddle low and haven't quite felt the need to raise it, let alone do so on the fly.
  • 1 0
 When you start getting knee pain on rides, thats your bodies hint that you should have raised your seat already.
  • 1 1
 @arphia: Why would anyone get knee pain from a low saddle? It is not like I sit on it when I pedal.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: you’ll be fine then. When you do a longer ride, please raise it up. I’ve made the mistake of slamming it and pedalling up hills with it, and it was fine until I had knee pain so bad that I had to be off the bike for a month. It’s not worth it.
  • 1 0
 @GilesSTurner: Yeah, I just don't do longer rides. I rarely don't go on full day riders and I may ride thirty to fourtyfive minutes in a single go (between short stops/chills). I do a lot of explosive fifteen minute sections (both up- and downhill) and a complete ride is typically between one and two hours. So for that I don't need to sit, I just go all out. I feel the bike comes to life when you stand up and dulls down when you sit down. I only ride for fun so I ride it how it feels most fun. The seatpost is actually a full 400mm long (inside a 400mm seattube, I'm about 6ft tall) and I do have a qr so I could raise it up to XC height, I just never find myself doing that. If I would ever find myself wanting to raise the saddle more often, of course I would consider a dropper seatpost. But yeah, as it is now I just never find myself wanting to raise the saddle so then of course the investment in a dropper is a bit steep even for the cheapest option.
  • 1 0
 175mm?
  • 3 3
 Doesnt matter just ride the damn bike
  • 1 0
 !80 mm for my leg length
  • 1 0
 420mm????????
  • 1 0
 More!
  • 1 0
 Ram it down
  • 1 1
 What's a dropper post

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