Pinkbike Poll: Who Should Win the European Bike Challenge?

Dec 30, 2020
by James Smurthwaite  
All photos: Kilian Reil

This is what happens when four bike maniacs set out to build bikes that are completely made in Europe.

Overview

After showcasing the diversity of locally made bike parts on the Instagram account The European Bike Project for approximately a year, Alex decided to build a locally made enduro bike. After doing a little more research, it soon became clear that it would be possible to build a bike with parts that all carry a made in Europe label. After mentioning these plans on his Instagram channel, Ralf from Huhn Cycles, photographer Kilian Reil and trials rider Gian Hupert got in touch with him because they had similar plans. Within a very short time it was apparent that chatting about local bike manufacturers was not enough – there had to be a challenge and a winner. The European Bike Challenge was born.

Half a year later, all bikes are ready for the showdown. Each contestant was absolutely free to pick and buy (at their own expense) the parts they thought were best suited for a winning bike. The result is four bikes that differ in many ways, but also share some similarities:

- All popular frame materials found their way into the challenge: steel, aluminum, carbon, titanium.
- Four completely different drivetrains: A Pinion gearbox, a prototype Ingrid derailleur, a hydraulic Rotor 1x13 drivetrain and a SRAM/Garbaruk mix.
- Suspension duties are managed by Intend BC and EXT – two of the most well-known European suspension brands. However it’s worth noting that there are other excellent choices too.
- All contestants chose a Vecnum dropper post and also carbon parts by Beast Components were a very popular choice.
- Three out of four bikes are stopped by Trickstuff brakes, Alex’ Magura MT7 being the exception.

Parts Lists



Part
Frame
Fork
Shock
Derailleur
Crank
Brakes
Rotors
Pedals
Dropper
Saddle
Stem
Bar
Hubs
Rims
Tires
Ralf/ Huhn Cycles
Huhn 129 Ti
Intend Hero
Intend Hover
Ingrid
Ingrid
Trickstuff
Tirckstuff
Cardertech
Vecnum
Beast
Intend
Kingdom
Extralite
Truebc.de
Hutchinson
Origin
Germany
Germany
Germany
Italy
Italy
Germany
Taiwan
UK
Germany
Germany
Germany
Asia
Italy
Germany
France
Alex/TEBP
Crosswrox Dash 29
Intend Ebonite
EXT Storia
Rotor
Rotor
Magura MT7
Glafer
Unite
Vecnum
Selle Italia
Intend
Beast
Hope/ Erase
Truebc.de
Hutchinson
Origin
Germany
Germany
Italy
Spain
Spain
Germany
Spain
UK
Germany
Italy
Germany
Germany
UK/Belgium
Germany
France

Part
Frame
Fork
Shock
Derailleur
Crank
Brakes
Rotors
Pedals
Dropper
Saddle
Stem
Bar
Hubs
Rims
Tires
Kilian
Project 12 Vertigo
Intend Hero
EXT Storia
Pinoin
Pinion
Trickstuff
Trickstuff
Pembree
Vecnum
Berk
Beast
Beast
Tune
Rad 15
Continental
Origin
Netherlands
Germany
Italy
Germany
Germany
Germany
Taiwan
UK
Germany
Slovenia
Gemany
Gemany
Gemany
Netherlands
Germany
Gian
Antidote Carbonjack 29
EXT Era
EXT Storia
SRAM
Hope
Trickstuff
Trickstuff
Cardertech
Vecnum
Beast
Hope
Beast
Extralite
Beast
Continental
Origin
Poland
Italy
Italy
Taiwan
UK
Germany
Taiwan
UK
Germany
Germany
UK
Germany
Italy
Germany
Germany




While Alex from TEBP really went the extra mile and made sure that even small details like the motofoam on his Crossworx Dash 29 are made in Europe, the other contestants decided to use parts that are made in Asia in some cases: Discs from Taiwan (Ralf, Kilian, Gian), Ti handlebar (Ralf), derailleur and trigger (Gian). Apart from that, all major parts are eligible to carry a made in [European country] tag because they were completely or mostly manufactured and assembled in a European country. When comparing the overall MSRP of each bike with the MSRP of the parts which are not made in Europe, the four bikes are 97.5% to ~100% made in Europe.

Let's take a look at the four builds and you can vote for the winner at the bottom of the page.


Alex's 100% European Crossworx Dash

Crossworx Dash 29

Alex is the rider behind the European Bike Project and the man who laid down the European bike Challenge. While his fellow competitors have slipped up on parts like drivetrains or cable housing, his build is the only one that is 100% made in Europe, down to the lube, grease and motofoam.

The basis of the bike is the Crossworx Dash 29 aluminum frame that is equipped with parts from Intend, EXT, Magura, Galfer and more.

Crossworx Dash 29
Crossworx Dash 29

Crossworx Dash 29
There's very little carbon on this bike but Alex made an exception for these TrueBC wheels.
Crossworx Dash 29
CNC'd Unite pedals from Wales.
Crossworx Dash 29
Magura are one of just a few big brands that still manufacture in Europe

Crossworx Dash 29

Favourite Part:

bigquotesIt’s a difficult decision, but in the end the Intend Ebonite fork must be the most special part. I got serial number 1 and helping Intend with the launch of their first right-side-up fork was a special honour. Also, the fork works like a dream.Alex




Ralf Holleis' 3-D Printed Titanium Moorhuhn


Ralf is the only competitor to make his own frame and he created both this titanium version and a matching steel version of his Moorhuhn 29 using additive manufacturing. Besides the frame, the star of the show on this build is the currently unreleased Ingrid drivetrain, the only fully European, cable-actuated drivetrain.

Ralf's subtle anodized feather details stand out from the sandblasted finish





Favourite Part:

bigquotesI’m super stoked that I got my hands on one of those very rare Ingrid derailleurs. It’s a stunning piece of Italian engineering. Also I’m proud to be the only contestant with a selfmade frame. Additive manufacturing gave me a lot of freedom when creating this frame and I love the result.Ralf



Gian Humpert's Antidote Carbonjack

Antidote Carbonjack 29

Trials rider and Trickstuff tester, Gian Humpert, turned to Poland and Antidote for his frame. This is the new Carbonjack 29 that uses carbon fiber as well as aramid fibers like Kevlar and Vectran in the layup. The 150mm travel frame was updated this year to take 29" wheels and also some updates to suspension and geometry.

Gian focussed on performance primarily for his build, which explains some of the non-European parts, but it's still 97.5% European on an MRSP basis.

Antidote Carbonjack 29
Antidote Carbonjack 29
The Antidote Carbonjack must surely be one of the best looking enduro bikes on the market at the moment.

Antidote Carbonjack 29
Beast also supplies the 25mm riser bars.

Antidote Carbonjack 29

Antidote Carbonjack 29
Antidote Carbonjack 29
As Gian tests components for Trickstuff, they were an obvious choice for brakes. He uses the Maxima model and used Trickstuff's own pads and rotors for performance reasons even though they are made in Taiwan.

Favourite Part:

bigquotesIf you want to go fast, you also need powerful brakes. The Trickstuff Maxima brakes are undoubtedly the strongest brakes in the world and I wouldn’t want any other brakes.Gian



Kilian Reil's Custom Gearboxed Steel Trail Bike


Kilian Reil drew on his experience touring through Siberia and Central Asia when speccing his dream build. Despite the many miles he is expecting to rack up on this bike, reliability and sturdiness were more important than gram pinching. The result is a 132mm travel frame with aluminum wheels, a coil shock and a Pinion gearbox but also a Berk carbon saddle, Beast carbon bars and Tune hubs.

The steel frame comes from Project 12 Cycleworks, a small Dutch builder, that uses a combination of water-cut parts, CNC, and silver and brass solder to bring his creations to life with a focus on bikes that are as nice to look at as they are to ride.


The intricate shock mounting and linkage is a work of art


The pink brake adapter is a neat flourish.

Favourite Part:

bigquotesI’ve been a keen Pinion user for a couple of years now. The gearbox has joined me on strenuous trips trough Siberia or the “Atlas Mountain Race”. I wanted to include my travel experience into this superb design by Michiel. Together we created a near maintainance-free downcountry bike.Kilian



Time to vote for the winner:

Who should take the “European Bike Challenge” win?

This poll is closed




122 Comments

  • 187 1
 Is it possible to vote for all four? I think I’d rather name which of my children I love most.
  • 7 0
 Kind of Sophie's Choice without the lifelong guilt...
  • 5 1
 Comment of the year !!! hahaha
  • 3 0
 Yes!
  • 11 0
 Why does this have to be a contest, Pinkbike? I’m not playing your game. And, everyone else is behind me on that......right guys?? Guys??
  • 2 0
 @zeeker: nah, she was just pissed off she chose the wrong kid.
  • 1 0
 @Ryanrobinson1984: and the best pink 'brake adapter' goes to...steel trail bike
  • 39 3
 I'd go for the stunning Huhn 129 Ti but, since the name of the competition in "the european bikes challenge" my vote must go for whom took the extra mile to assure every part was from EU.
So Crossworks for me
  • 3 6
 ...which part on the Moorhuhn is not from Europe?
  • 13 1
 @trickn0l0gy: As reported in the parts lists, Rotors and Bar
  • 3 0
 @trickn0l0gy: rotors: says that they are made in Taiwan
  • 22 2
 @Becciu: Thanks, I scrolled over that "parts list", too hard to decipher. Godzilla had a stroke and died, trying to read that... Also, new country discovered! Gemany! Gemini? lol... Anyhow, I think rotors are not a crucial thing, easy to exchange for sth manufactured here. The bar is more interesting though...
  • 6 0
 As cool of a fork it is, the Intend Ebonite is only partially made in Germany (www.pinkbike.com/news/intend-releases-its-regular-blackline-ebonite-fork-across-the-pond-beaver.html). So, not sure how you'd want to weigh that against rotor's (or other parts) from Taiwan. Should you do it on a weight percentage, a retail price percentage, a value added percentage, gut feeling? Or just vote for whatever you think is the coolest bike!? :-)

Awesome project in any case and really cool to see so many small manufacturers being featured in content here.
  • 6 0
 Just swap the rotors for Galfer, they work great and are even cheaper than Trickstuff
  • 2 1
 @minix: The Intend Ebonite fork is a bit tricky, I know. Some important parts are made in Asia, but this is also the case for all other forks which are made/assembled in Europe or the US.
A lot of parts for the Ebonite fork are still made in Europe (mostly Germany and Austria), plus the fork was designed and assembled in Germany. Overall, I think it can rightfully carry a "made in Germany" label (a product does not need to be 100% made in Germany to get that label).
  • 4 0
 @SickEdit: Or Formula rotors. Mine were labelled as made in Italy. Smile
  • 33 0
 You really, really should've made a spread sheet with the bike specs. That neverending list is a whopper to get through.
  • 2 0
 Scribd
  • 14 0
 The Huhn is my favourite bike for sure, but the Crossworx gets my vote as it’s the only one to achieve the stated goal.
  • 4 0
 Plus it's sexy AF. I don't even care how it rides, it just looks so good.
  • 11 1
 It seems that there is a new country in Europe: "Gemany" (copied and pasted numerous times in the parts list)
  • 4 0
 Is that near Taiwan?
  • 6 0
 That Moorhuhn looks fantastic and would take my vote in any other comp. However, it is a Made In Europe competition and only the Crossworks is 100% made in Europe so that must take my vote. I didn't realise there was so much European kit out there.
  • 4 0
 There are many more cool manufacturers that make products here, it's a shame we couldn't mount three saddles and two shocks on each bike! :-)
  • 6 0
 @TEBP: Bender did.
  • 8 0
 damn nice bikes, please put a price underneath each, so everyone can stop dreaming
  • 5 2
 As well as prices, I’d be interested to know where the funding for these projects came from. I.e how much of it is ‘I chose this because I want this/it’s the best’ vs ‘I chose this because a marketing department sent it to me’
  • 5 0
 It's the European Bike Challenge, so it was funded with money stolen from UK greengrocers by the ECHR. j/k before you get your panties in a brexit/remain bunch.

I spent all kinds of money on stupid things when I was younger. I bet most of these brands gave some kind of deal in exchange for coverage - it's not like there are dozens of choices for made in Europe items to choose from. Pick a Euro made fork how long is the list? Or brakes? Once you get down to it, it's a pretty limiting scope.
  • 3 1
 @nouseforaname:

Forks: EXT, Intend, Formula, Ohlins? Marzocchi? Loads of rigid fork makers too.
Brakes: Magura, Hope, Braking, Trickstuff, Formula.

While there aren’t dozens, it’s interesting that only 2 small niche suspension makers are used, one of which won’t send out products for reviews anymore, along with the exposure that would bring, positive or otherwise.
Feels like only firms that offer a deal/exclusivity get featured. After all, it’s all expensive kit, or stuff that simply wasn’t available to the public before it appeared here. Some of it still isn’t, or if it is, it’s a reeeeally long wait.

Don’t get me wrong, these are amazing bikes, I’d just like a bit more transparency on where they come from.
  • 7 0
 @tomhoward379:
Hi, first let me say that this Challenge was definitely not organised by some big company marketing office or something like that. We're all everday normal guys. When building such unique and pricey bikes, most people will approach some companies and kindly ask for a discount, and we did that too. In the text that was sent to PB there was a note on transparency, stating that all competitors had recived discounts from various companies (that didn't make it into this article for unknown reasons). However, it's not like we got all these parts for free. I can tell you that despite the discounts, I've invested a pretty high 4-digit number of money into my bike.

Regarding the parts on the bikes: All competitors were absolutely free to buy whatever they wanted. The reason why we all ended up with Intend and EXT suspension has to do with personal preferences and also availability. In the beginning there were plans to spec one bike with suspension from a third manufacturer, but after several months of waiting that order was cancelled.

Forks made in Europe (as far as I'm aware): EXT, Bright Racing Shocks, Intend, Formula, CR Conception.
The only mtb suspension product that Öhlins makes in Sweden/Europe is the TTX22 Coil shock. I don't know whether BOS and German Answer make suspension in Europe, as they never answered my messages.
  • 1 1
 @TEBP: i‘m sure intends marketing department set this up 10 years ago, working in teams to come up with a plan.

btw give us a number, retail without discount
  • 1 0
 @tomhoward379: BOS for suspensions too, not sure where they are manufactured but a lot happens in France
  • 2 0
 @TEBP: Your bike is the winner IMO. The one I'd ride. And looks so hot. You went with the Intend fork, was there a reason you didnt go with his shock too?
  • 1 0
 @nouseforaname: Thanks! We had planned to have a final photoshoot in September and the vote in October and back then, the Intend Hover was not available because some small parts were missing to assemble the shock. So when I bought the suspension in Summer, I had to go with a different option.
  • 8 2
 Visually Carbon Jack wins but man that steel FS with gear box got my voice!
  • 2 0
 Couldn’t agree more!
  • 2 0
 Love all of those bikes, but ended up voting for the Antidote, as that is the closest to what I personally would have gone for. Moorhuhn would hands down be the winner when it comes to looks and just being on a different planet when it comes to cost and just being insanely exclusive.
  • 3 0
 I'm not in that bike building stuff myself. And I would never thought that it is this difficult to build an all euro bike. Maybe I should think over my loved sport and my consumer behavior...
  • 1 0
 Ist isn‘t difficult. Just throw enough money on it, like these guys did and it gets easy enough.

My bike is 90% European and cost less than half of any of these (if they had paid retail and not got the parts sponsored).
  • 2 0
 Carbonjack gets my vote. The carbon craftsmanship is second to none. It’s too bad they/he couldn’t get “all” EU parts but that aside it’s a stunning example of cutting edge materials over traditional. Typically a harder route to go.
  • 2 0
 The Huhn is definitely the most dream bike of the group, but I feel like if you're making your own bike, you could do it anywhere, especially if you went singlespeed and rigid. The Antidote is a testament to European manufacturing that you can buy.
  • 4 1
 Would have loved to see a “HB” in the mix, wish Hope had joined in, as they now manufacture an impressive array of the venerable MTB in Barnsoldwick!
  • 2 0
 Maybe for the second edition of the Challenge? :-)
  • 1 0
 First, all these bikes are incredible - if I could have any of them I would consider myself a winner! And nothing says Euro bling more than Kapfinger's suspension!

As a European bike project, Alex's 100% European Crossworx would definitely take the win. And it looks great - the lines, the welds etc.

But that Moorhuhn is probably the most beautiful bike I've ever seen. Plus he made it himself. And a shiny inverted fork would elevate any bike to elite status! Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Thanks mate!
  • 1 0
 Hmm, so what I'm getting from this is that there could probably have been a bike entirely made in Germany but almost nothing in the list is from the UK...

A fully UK made rigid single speed may be possible with one of a number of steel frame plus everything that Hope make, but it may be tyre- and chain-less?

I'm no expert though so may be missing a lot
  • 4 0
 the bike I'd most like to ride with is Gian's bike Smile
  • 4 0
 Thanks, it rides like a dream ????
  • 1 1
 @GianTheRealHumpert: I must say, very nice bike, from pictures of just the frame I was not too sure on the styling of the seattower but built it looks really good. How is the fork by the way?
  • 1 0
 @christiaan: Thanks! So far I really like the performance of the fork. But I've just ridden the bike a few times and I still didn't had the time to test all the different settings in order to get a perfect personalized setup.

As I'm usually a trials rider I'm also not that familiar with suspension systems at all, so I can't make a comparison to other forks.

But so far I'm really happy with it.
  • 2 0
 Honestly, the Intend stuff doesn't do it for me, idk. The gear boxed trail bike is pretty sick, but I went with the Carbonjack, since it has my favorite linkage type.
  • 3 0
 Yeah, let's enter a contest and use pictures that are so dark you cannot even make out the bike. Dumb move.
  • 2 0
 Europe is a big place. Imagine what Taiwan could do. Materials research, AI and robots seem to be changing where stuff gets made. I went for the Crossworks.
  • 1 0
 I love that Ti bike but I feel like I have to acknowledge the craftsmanship that probably went into the steel frame, over a 3d print. Unless 3d printing steel frames is a thing now?
  • 3 0
 Ralf initially entered the Challenge with a steel frame (with 3D printed lugs). While the others were busy building their bikes, he made the Ti frame that you see here (also regular tubes with 3D printed lugs). So yes, 3D printing and steel frames is definitely a thing.
  • 4 0
 Who should win the European Bike Challenge?

answer: YES
  • 2 0
 Given that it's an european build challenge and only one bike uses parts all from europe, isn't a vote pointless when there's a clear winner?
  • 3 0
 Crossworx wins cuz its 100%

BUT GOOOOOODDDDDDAAAAAAAAMN

THAT MOORHUHN IS GORGEOUS
  • 2 0
 Quick search...
Magura assemble in europe from a global supply chain!

Does that meet the criteria?
  • 8 0
 I checked that with Magura before I bought the brakes. The MT7 calipers are made in Germany, plus the brakes are assembled and designed in Germany. Overall, the product is eligible to carry a "Made in Germany" label.
  • 3 0
 The master is surely also made in Ulm, near Bad Urach. They closely guard their injection moulding tech and it will never leave Germany.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: That's right, I just checked the information again. The master is also made in Germany. However it's worth noting that not all Magura brakes are completely made in Germany.
  • 2 0
 @TEBP: Yeah, I think the Taiwanese plant does part of the metalwork so likely the calipers. Maybe even assembly for the Asian, Australian and North American customers as back when everything was based in Bad Urach and Laichingen, loads of customers from there were upset by the long wait times for service and parts (whereas European customers were generally happy). But even there, even the lowest end masters will be injection molded in Ulm.

That said, I doubt any of these bikes actually has European stanchions.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: Apparently it's not possible get get high quality, low weight stanchions from European suppliers. As far as I'm aware, all stanchions on these four bikes come from Taiwan.
However it's worth noting that even on a "Made in Europe" product, not every single part of that product must be made in Europe. Overall, the major part of manufacturing, finishing and added value must have taken place in a European country.
  • 2 0
 @TEBP: www.pinkbike.com/news/from-the-top-formulas-giacomo-becocci.html
This "from the top" article from 2018 already addressed the problem
  • 2 0
 Lovely side by side shot from the p12 and Moorhuhn: ep1.pinkbike.org/p5pb19928200/p5pb19928200.jpg
  • 1 0
 If it got welds then the pick is easy, so uhm... well the boldest ones are on the Crossworx! But the frame seems very short in reach, not long low slack for sure.
  • 1 0
 It has a 450mm reach, but the 79° seat angle makes it look short. 65° head angle.
  • 2 0
 Antidote Carbonjack is lovely and maybe the most beautiful design of all of them
  • 1 0
 I’m surprised there’s no BikeYoke in sight considering the great reviews, all four chose Vecnum instead... Are BY not german enough or was it availability issues?
  • 3 0
 Bikeyoke seatposts are made in Taiwan. Company Now is rather open about it, too.
  • 2 0
 All four of these bikes are pure class and all deserve praise. Going to be hard to pick a winner.
  • 1 0
 I would have expected some Ohlins in the mix. Is that not European, despite the umlaut that my American keyboard can't produce? Or is it just too yellow for these builds?
  • 2 0
 Mostly not made in Sweden according to @tebp
  • 2 0
 @nouseforaname: Correct, as far as I'm aware only the Öhlins TTX22 Coil shock is made in Sweden. There's a Pinkbike article on Öhlins where they are absolutely open about this.
  • 1 0
 Couldn’t be bothered to merge the category with the data for each bike huh? I offer super affordable Excel classes, hit me up...
  • 7 6
 Are we considering UK as part of the EU for this? Asking for a friend ; tax purposes.....
  • 14 1
 While the UK ist not part of the EU (union) anymore, it's still a part of Europe (continent).
  • 5 5
 @TEBP: Sarcasm my dude, sarcasm
  • 17 1
 If you are from Switzerland there is absolutely no sarcasm in this question.
  • 3 0
 @Alturis: Thanks mate :-) You know how I feel.
  • 2 0
 Don't take it ... British and Swiss are known to stand with one foot in two shoes Wink
  • 1 0
 The parts list could have been put into columns rather than one long list. Be much easier to view
  • 4 3
 Hey what happened to Waki-Leaks ? Has he got banned or did he die in the Covid ?
  • 6 6
 sadly banned, I miss his comments and subsequent flame wars around them
  • 3 2
 @elyari: thanx . Someone neg propped and I bumped you back up to zero .
Yeah I could see that ( that he got banned ). I think he took it hard a la maison not getting enough time to ride and having too many kids then weed on top of that . I mean similar stuff happened to me and I went negative and crazy . So frustrating being stuck behind the keyboard
  • 2 2
 @elyari: that makes one of us!
  • 2 2
 you can still follow Waki on Insta. He still lurks here. Just dosen't (or can't) post.
  • 2 0
 @laksboy: yeap, I follow him there, but the comments here where hilarious and people taking him seriously and all
  • 1 0
 Antidote is the obvious choice here for a bike you'd actually want to own and race.
  • 2 0
 Antidote! Any other answer is wrong
  • 1 0
 The Crossworks is what an Evil could look like if it was alloy and handmade.
  • 1 0
 Would be cool to see an American challenge next year, and whatever other regions are possible.
  • 1 0
 There is an Instagram account named The North American bike project which work like the European bike project. However I don’t think that a challenge like this one is plan.
  • 1 0
 @Gregzell: Ah. I'll maybe start an account called The Americas Bike Challenge and see if I can trick some people into building some sick bikes...
  • 1 0
 @dingus: That would be a great idea ! You will have an instant follow from me if you manage to do that.
  • 2 0
 Antidote. Other are cool, but they are too wierd for daily use.
  • 1 0
 Why such a showdown with the photocopy of the Ancillotti, the Crossworx Dash, instead of the real one?
  • 2 1
 Where is the Actofive P-Train CNC??
  • 1 0
 I think when they started the bike was still a prototype, I think it’s only been the last couple of weeks that you’ve been able to order one, but yeah, next time that should definitely be in it.
  • 2 0
 @Ben2601: Correct. In case there's a second edition of the Challenge, that frame would be a great contender.
  • 2 1
 Did the raw materials come from Europe?
  • 6 0
 Unfortunately it's not possible to trace the raw materials to their origins in 2020. I checked that with various manufacturers and usually they don't know where the raw materials come from. That's a point that could certainly be improved and I hope that supply chains will become more transparent in the future.
  • 2 0
 Steel is sourced in Europe so it could be European, but are titanium and aluminum even sourced in Europe?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: According to Wikipedia, most Titanium is sourced in Australia, South Africa, Canada, China and Norway. So there is some Titanium in Europe.

Aluminium is mostly sourced in Australia, China, Guinea, Brasil, and India. Apparently there is also some Bauxite in Southern France, but it is not mined at the moment.
  • 3 0
 @TEBP: Good luck trying to find and use Titanium from Norway. Probably costs more than Californium 252...
  • 5 0
 @TEBP: Over half of the Aluminum in the world comes from China. why? it has nothing to do with abundance of the Bauxite ore it is most commonly found in. It's because the only way to get it out of the ground is strip mining and the rest of the world doesn't really want to dig 1000 sq. mile, 1 mi deep holes in the ground you can see from f*cking space!

I have said it before and I will repeat it here...Aluminum isn't the greatest material from an environmental standpoint. The future is in recyclable, and hopefully organic, resins.
  • 2 0
 @conoat: I agree, it's certainly not great from an environmental point of view and I hope that more eco-friendly materials will find their way into the industry rather sooner than later.
In general, I think it's important to mention that the bicycle industry uses only a fraction of all the metals which are sourced worldwide, a large proportion is used for cars, trains, bridges, military vehicles, construction, packaging and so on.
  • 4 0
 @TEBP: It's a cool project and a great bike. This kind of project will hopefully gain the attention of those in the industry where more customers are looking for products that are made locally and from local material where possible to reduce the amount of shipping.
  • 1 0
 Everyone knows an ant can't Move a rubber tree plant. But his hopes are nationally pure
  • 4 3
 Bang: Antidote, Marry: Huhn or Project 12, Kill: Dash.
  • 2 0
 All of them
  • 1 0
 Still waiting on that side view of the carbon Jack....
  • 1 0
 DreamBuild Movie HuhnCycles ???????? youtu.be/nWV0ypNy1Og
  • 1 0
 Best thing is that they're all flat pedal.
  • 1 0
 Zoceli bikes ?
  • 1 1
 China wins
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