Pinkbike Poll: Would You Rather...?

Nov 6, 2020
by Daniel Sapp  
Nico Vouilloz s bikes. Berre-les-alpes France. Photo by Matt Wragg
Ahead of its time, Nico Vouilloz's Sun Radical Plus was from the late 90's but living in a more modern era.

Ahh, the simple times. No dropper posts, 26" wheels, parts that didn’t work all that well and it was fine. Bikes have come a long way over the last twenty years or so. Literally everything has changed. Disc brakes were the new and scary thing for some riders back then, and progressive geometry was a headtube angle in the low 70's.

Nowadays, bikes are more advanced than we would ever have imagined. Progressive geometries coupled with advancements in materials and manufacturing allow us to have performance that is unmatched by even bikes a handful of years old. Bikes are really, really good.

But what if you couldn't have it all? What if you had to pick? Take the geometry of a modern bike and the parts and build of a bike twenty years old or, modern parts but restricted to twenty year old geometry? Or, would you rather split the difference and ride a bike from the awkward year of 2010?

Travis Brown s 2000 Sydney Olympics Trek Fuel
2000 geometry and 2020 parts?



A 2010 Bike
A 2010 Bike



Or, 2020 geometry with 2000 parts?



Would you rather ride...?




197 Comments

  • 354 2
 New parts on old geo is just a new gravel bike
  • 10 0
 Nailed it.
  • 6 0
 Shhh! Don't let the bicycle industry know you are on to them
  • 8 0
 The only reason for this article to exist is for you to make that comment.
  • 2 0
 1985 geometry with 2020 parts, including disc brakes, front shock (aftermarket slackening of course), and dropper post. 26" please. www.pinkbike.com/photo/18893193
  • 3 0
 Yep, I owned that 2010/11 Enduro.The thing was great.
  • 1 0
 @headshot: Yup! I had a 2010. That bike was truly ahead of it's time. could be why that frame design lasted so long!
  • 73 1
 In fact, there is still some 2020 bike with a 2000 geometry
  • 88 0
 Ellsworth still makes bikes?
  • 9 0
 @znarf: Allegedly.
  • 39 1
 @znarf: Moment of Truth right there. An Epiphany, really.
  • 8 1
 Surly? (and I ride a Krampus)
  • 5 1
 @padrefan1982:

I see what you did there.
  • 25 0
 @znarf: Ellsworth hate is possibly the most universal truth in the mtb community
  • 4 2
 @znarf: they make decals. probably also in Chyna
  • 9 1
 @Fix-the-Spade:

Lets not be talkin' about no ostrich f*cking in here.
  • 10 0
 @chrod: I benefice Ellsworth hate is exactly what we need to unite the country in 2020. It bridges all socioeconomic and racial divides.
  • 1 0
 Believe*
  • 1 0
 @znarf: haha!!
  • 1 0
 @JoshMatta: wasn't it a sick ostrich? That's also a 2 man job there Darrey
  • 2 0
 @mildsauce91: I have a Surly Instigator, and Loving it.
  • 2 0
 @chrod: ...just because they spent all their R&D money on paint...
  • 60 0
 Poll concept brought to you by Legalized Marijuana.
  • 4 0
 perfect!!!
  • 3 0
 @surfer150: Well, I'm not saying it's a bad thing......
  • 42 4
 old geo would be pretty unrideable. old parts on new geo would probably be prone to failure.
2010 it is. You'd still get up and down the hill albeit a bit slower, and you don't have to fear your brakes just giving out under you (unless they're avids)
  • 35 1
 My 2008 SX Trail is still one of my favourite bikes ever. I’d happily ride that again
  • 1 0
 Big Grin
  • 8 0
 Totally... when I got back into riding again in 2017, I hopped back on my old 2007 Brodie Hoodlum (with some upgraded 2008 parts (brakes/suspension... that Domain Coil was awesome!)) and rocked that bike for a bunch of rides at the end of that year. Had so much fun I bought a new bike Jan of 2018. The difference was pretty big... but not crazy... still had tons of fun.

I think you could take a 2010 bike and still have crazy amounts of fun on it. But a bike with 2000's geometry? Uhh, nope. I started mountain bike racing on a 1992 Rocky Mountain Fusion... I was only like 13 or 14 so my body didn't mind going OTB every ride... I don't think my body would be very happy now.

What I did mind was replacing parts every two weeks... most under warranty thankfully (thanks for the four flexstems Girvin!). Sending it and bending rigid forks was not warranty-able though. At least with better parts, you'd have more fun for the few minutes you get to ride before ending up in the hospital.

2010 it is.
  • 4 0
 All you need is two wheels to go fast.
  • 6 0
 In the world of small sized frames not that much changed. My 2011 Spec SJ Evo was just fine.
  • 4 0
 @vp27: I still love my 09 Norco Six One. I ride it often. But I have an 07DHR that is a beast to pedal uphill even with an Avalanche tuned rear shock. Beautiful welds on that aluminum frame TBH.
  • 7 0
 I would say old bikes would be terrible for me toride now not so much for geo as in angles and such, more a case of bikes were so small then, I'm 6'3" and didn't get a bike that was close to fitting me til not long ago.
  • 5 1
 I dunno, the parts in the 2000s weren't terrible (all things considered) my my OG shiver and purple Hayes from back in the day were among the most reliable parts I've ever had.
  • 17 4
 2000 parts would just be heavy but plenty durable.. Modern geometry, a marzocchi bomber fork, any coil shock, Shimano XTR 21 spd. drive train, Hayes brakes and mavic rims laced to Chris Kings for the win
  • 5 1
 @slickwilly1: 100% agreed!!!
  • 5 0
 @vp27: I rode a 2009 SX Trail w/ a dropper post up until last year. Could barely climb but that thing was a blast on the downhills. Once I got on a newer bike tho it was eye opening haha
  • 8 0
 @vp27: absolutely... They really made a great bike with the SX Trail. Beer
  • 6 0
 Pretty silly choices tbh. In 2010 there was the summum which pretty much had a rideable Geo back then. Suspension was good as long as you kept it coil and fiddled a bit with the damping. Shimano Saint is still a good brake. For dh you might be pretty much sorted.
  • 2 0
 @vp27: Agree - and actually mine is still going strong. It was so much fun that I could never bear to part with it! I kept it in the family and gave it to my nephew :-) He is loving it.
  • 2 0
 @vp27: love that bike
  • 4 0
 The Rocky Mountain Slayer which was introduced and went on sale in 2010 has fantastic geometry and good parts.
  • 1 1
 Year 2000 parts on 2020 geo would ride like an absolute boat. It would be a downhill only affair.
  • 1 0
 @me2menow: Thats really what I'm referring to.
  • 2 1
 @bigburd: Xc hardtails used to be the worst!!! I remember when the seat tube was the only thing that changed across frame sizes and would have to run a ridiculous seat post height and stem length.
  • 8 0
 I rode a 2010 Specialized Enduro until 2 years ago. The new bike is better, but there really aren’t any trails the new bike can do that the 2010 Enduro can’t. In fact, the Enduro still holds a few Strava PRs, especially on certain downhill trails.

But my 2002 Stumpy? Forget it.
  • 2 0
 @n1ck: dunno about that, some other structural bits and pieces to connect the two and hold onto also help
  • 2 0
 @vp27: yah top tubes a bit short but ha was 66.5 and cornering was insane
  • 1 1
 @slickwilly1: coil van shocks constantly blowing up, hayes brakes sucked bag. Forks broke all the time. Cranks and bbs broke all the time. Bikes are better now.
  • 5 0
 A good downhill bike from 2010 would be fine. And the better long travel trail bikes weren’t bad either, SC Nomad anyone?

www.santacruzbicycles.com/en-US/bike/nomad/2
  • 1 0
 @Altron5000: until two years ago I was riding a 2008 Intense 6.6 with parts to match, only exception being 1x10 transmission and offset shock bushings. Fun as hell. It stil is, I often think it would suit my local trails better than my Process 153.
  • 2 0
 @vp27: Right? One of the best bikes The Big S ever made IMO!!
  • 2 0
 @bigburd: I hear you, I'm 6'1" and a large frame is fine until I add a dual crown fork then knee room becomes an issue...
  • 1 0
 @vp27: I had a 2009 SX Trail and kinda regret selling it now. It was terrible at climbing trails due to the pedal bob, weight, etc but it was a super fun bike at the bike park. The geo was decent, even for 2009.
  • 27 3
 2020 geometry FTW!
(a Grip2 damper and SRAM Eagle can't save you from a 72 degree head angle and short reach)

You can make some pretty good choices in 2000 for parts, but 90's tires and handlebars are really going to suck...

Dream 2000/2020 bike:
- 2020 Banshee Spitfire v3 (26" wheel compatible!)
- 2000 Marzocchi Bomber Z1 QR20 (130mm) coil
- Wheels: 2000 Mavic Deemax 20mm / rear QR (custom R dropouts?)
- Brakes: 2000 Hayes Mag disc brakes
- Drivetrain: 2000's XTR (2x9 with bash)
- Headset: uhh you have to cheat here.... but Chris King
Other stuff:
- Thomson Elite Post and Stem
- Easton CT2 Monkey Lite handlebars (660mm!!)
- Tires: 26x2.3" Continental Vertical Pro

Ref:
Forks by year: weightweenies.starbike.com/listings/components.php?type=suspensionforks&sortby=year
Shimano components: mombatbicycles.com/Shimano.htm#2000
  • 9 0
 Year 2000 me just snapped your octo-link XTR bottom bracket, ripping a 6" gash on his inner ankle, and is requesting a 2010 geo/parts bike under warranty.
  • 11 0
 @mammal: lol. Someone's just disappointed they didn't see "Raceface Turbine LP"
In 2000 you got a choice:
- Octalink: Shimano fragments in ankle
- ISIS: new RaceFace BB every weekend
  • 7 0
 @mammal: were Profile BMX cranks around in 2000? If so, that would solve the problem.
  • 2 0
 @skylerd: yes profile cranks were around. Same basic 3 piece design as today
  • 4 0
 Was anyone making a 800mm wide handlebar back in 2000? Because that would be a requirement.
  • 5 0
 @PHeller: could you just run a piece of steel pipe or would that be cheating.
  • 1 0
 I was still with you when you chose a good frame, good fork, good wheels but then Hayes instead of Magura Gustav like you want to not stop. 660 Handlebars but the worst offender is those tires. You don't like riding in the wet. or turn in any conditions
  • 1 0
 @hmstuna: no mx bars that would fit a 2000 stem?
  • 2 0
 @PHeller: the Tourque bar from Roox was 750mm decently short stems too for the dark ages
  • 12 0
 My Specialized Pitch was a 2010 bike, 450mm reach, 67 head angle, sure 74 seat angle. It was light running a 1x10 setup, still have some of my fastest times at my local trails on that bike. It ripped. I can't think of any 2000 components I'd not shit myself running on a modern geo bike, and I'll never go back to short reach bikes again. 2010 it is
  • 3 0
 The pitch was ahead of its time, its a shame spesh didnt continue with it. they went to short reach numbers with the enduro after that also
  • 2 0
 Yep still running my Pitch Pro. I think the fork and seatpost are all that’s left of the original. That upgrade itch is getting pretty serious. 10 years seems like a reasonable span.
  • 2 0
 @zyoungson: It's a shame what spesh does with the pitch name today
  • 1 0
 Loved my old 2011 Pitch, rode well on uphills and could really take a beating. Just sold it 2 years ago.
  • 11 0
 Modern parts on an older bike any day. Something always worried me about the older 30mm Boxxer forks......

www.pinkbike.com/u/rpb10276/album/Completed-2005-Turner-DHR-Project
  • 1 0
 Awesome build!
  • 1 0
 @smuggly: Thank you!
  • 1 0
 Great frame, and great colour scheme too! Nowt wrong with the old 32mm Boxxers though, they had the living sh*t beaten out of them by many people back in the day and seemed to hold up ok! Mine saw many Alps trips and Scottish race weekends (although I'm no heavyweight!) and finally cracked after about 10 years of use - only a tiny crack at the very top of the stanchion, still thinking about sealing it up and riding them again as a trail build! Now running a '09 WC, last of the skinny stanchions - sublime feeling fork.
  • 1 0
 @bmbracing: If it’s cracked, that means the metal has fatigued enough to start breaking. Not a safe plan if you value your face!
  • 1 0
 Did you drill mod your DHR? It was quite popular back in the day to drill the frame and get better geo. Would result in Modern geo.
  • 1 0
 @spaced: I know a lot did it but what they don't know about geometry and how they are affecting the function and design with that small change could fill large container. It isn't so simple as it seems.
  • 1 0
 @bmbracing: Thanks! I can't really bash the old Boxxer's. They just looked so thin back in the early 2000's. I'm sure there amazing. Everyone was winning on them back them.
  • 1 0
 @spaced: Nope. It was never drilled. The new owner could do it if he chooses. I just didn't want to mess up the frame when I got it. It was dent free and in perfect shape. It was just a project and ended up being eye candy in my garage till it found a new owner.
  • 8 0
 2010 for me. Maybe the progression has been slow enough I haven't noticed how big the difference truly is, but I feel like I could ride pretty hard on my bikes from 2010.
  • 2 0
 I was still riding my 2008 commencal DH still in 2010 so kinda missed out on what bikes felt like in that year, but I think I would be nervous/unable to push as hard on my old Commencal as I do my current bike, larely due sizing more than geo in regards to angles etc , bikes were waaay to small for tall guys back then.
  • 2 1
 @bigburd: Agree on that, mtb has now finally opened up to tall people. In 2010 you didnt have a lot of options if you were over 5'10".
  • 7 0
 I rode plenty of 2000 geo with 2000 parts in 2000. It wasn't that bad.

Shit, who I am kidding? Give me 2030 geo and 2030 parts. I might be 57 then but there will be 2030 pills.
  • 9 0
 2002 with new parts works good for me.
www.pinkbike.com/photo/19220248
  • 1 1
 that saddle?! big enough to sleep on.
  • 8 0
 I'm not sure 2020 geo can exist with 2000 parts. It would make current fox CSU issues seem minor.
  • 3 0
 nothing nice DC fork wouldn´t fix lol.
  • 1 1
 @Mondbiker: I don't think it matters what the fork is, that head tube is coming off.
  • 9 0
 Let’s be honest, life was better 10 years ago
  • 1 0
 You said it!
  • 6 0
 “Modern geometry with old parts, or old parts with modern geometry?”

There’s only one choice apparently. Redundancy department of redundancy?
  • 3 0
 Cant believe I had to scroll this for for that comment. Folks are sleeping today.
  • 1 0
 Heads I win, tails you lose.
  • 7 0
 Ah man, my 2010 on-one 456 summer season steel hard tail on 26” wheels was still my favorite bike to ride ever.
  • 2 0
 My daughter loves hers, bought NOS frame last year, recoated and built it up with mostly old and a few modern components. Coolest bike in the shed. OG sid and 1x11 shimano.
  • 4 0
 I ride a 2005 Cannondale Prophet frame with 2016-2020 parts. It works well for me. A modern bike will work better but my bank account doesn't agree. I also enjoyed reviving a classic frame.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, I had one of those too, unfortunately with mostly 2005-era parts so it was pretty terrible! But with a decent (and longer!) fork and shock and wide bars it could have been a cracker. Moved on to a 2008 S-Works Enduro which as many have already said was ahead of its time and is just way faster. I do miss the old Dale though - more soul, and those beautiful welds and bare alu tubes...

I do think that many old-school frames 2005-onwards with the right parts can be almost as much fun and far more affordable than a new bike. Finding a decent non-tapered fork is getting hard though!
  • 4 1
 THIS IS SO HARD TO DECIDE!!!

At first, I thought "no brainer, 2020 geo all the way". Then I remembered how many damn things I broke in 2000, disc brakes that only mostly worked, suspension that was worked OK in the best of scenarios, by today's standards. But there's no way in hell I'm riding 2000 geo again, my body wouldn't put up with it anymore.

Nobody wants to go back to 2010 everything, but if that's these are the choices, this is the way it has to be. At least some decent do-it-all bikes were coming out, and the top-o-line DH bikes were starting to get decent.
  • 3 0
 I dunno, bike geometry sucked back then (with the exception of the M1 and 222), but if you had say XT 4-pot brakes (aka Grimeca System 12s I think?), a Marzocchi Super T/Monster T or Shiver, Fox Vanilla RC shock and either XTR or RaceFace North Shore cranks along with some Mavic 521 (121?) or 321 rims you were doing ok and really not vastly worse off than current stuff other than it all being quite a bit heavier. I could be off by a year or two but all that stuff definitely worked ok by 2002. The main issues at that time that didn't have any available workaround were the extremely narrow bars (685mm max?) and lack of dropper post.

DH bikes by 2010 were not much different to what is available from DH bikes now. Banshee's and Mondraker's geometry were both excellent and comparable to current bikes, the Fox 40/RC4 (or CCDB) of the time was able to be tuned to be about as good as anything we currently have, we had M810 Saint by then so reliable drivetrains and powerful (though a bit inconsistent) brakes were completely sorted. It's really the pedalable long travel bikes (enduro/trail/all mountain/whatever lame term you wanna give it) that have come along hugely in the past 10 years.
  • 1 0
 @Socket: Yes, having long travel bikes that are efficient to pedal all day was game changing.
  • 5 2
 I was surprised that I was in the minority choosing modern geo with turn of the century parts. Perhaps absence makes the heart grow fonder but I would be stoked to shred a modern frame with the Z1 bombers I had back then. Old XT drivetrain was fine too. The Hayes brakes were a PIA by today's standards but once you got them working they would stop well enough. For all the self congratulating the bike industry does about how far they've come I'm not sure modern forks are really light years ahead of those old coil sprung, open bath bombers, but then again maybe it's just been too long since I rode one.
  • 4 0
 This was exactly my thinking. Some of the old coil sprung, open bath forks felt amazing, and the coil shocks weren’t bad either, as long as you weren’t climbing.
  • 6 0
 2010 for me, mainly because parts compatibility makes the other options impossible.
  • 1 0
 I agree 2010, def not older than 2005 jmho.
  • 3 0
 Had their been an option for 2010 parts and 2020 geometry I'd have picked that. Parts in 2000's were crap until perhaps the late 2000's. 2010 parts were pretty good. 2020 geo does not compensate for bad 2000s parts, but it would ride better than a 2000's geo bike with 2020 parts. 2000's geo was crap and would not be compensated by 2020 parts. For these options, 2010 geo and 2010 parts is the best option. Geometry was already slacker and longer to an extent by then, solid front thru axles were a thing, 29ers were a thing, carbon frames were commonplace, and 2x10 drivetrain wasn't that bad and 1x drivetrain was an option.
  • 3 0
 Does modern geometry not really rely on a dropper post? No dropper posts in 2000 so 2020 geo with 2000 parts could be an issue. Ashamed to say that on the couple occasions my dropper has died and I’ve ridden with it raised I find my modern trail bike some what unrideable. Weak, I know! On a positive 2000 xtr was plenty good.
  • 2 0
 I wouldn't say unreadable, but no doubt with steep STA's it puts the seat right in the way if your don't have a dropper to move it out of your way!! Smile
  • 3 0
 As a guy stuck riding a 2010 Cannondale Rize twice a week, I can definitely say that geometry wins out over parts. My only upgrades at this point are a dropper post, taking off the big ring to go 2x and a set of modern 4-pot shimano brakes with big rotors, so I'm already living the third choice. The rental demo bike I tried out this summer had 6.5" more wheelbase than my Cannondale.
  • 3 0
 2010 Trail bikes would probably be garbage by today's standards but 2010 Nukeproof Scalp? I'd ride that today.

Hopefully the guy in the video is seven feet tall, otherwise it's pretty small but it looks decent:
www.pinkbike.com/news/nuke-proof-scalp-eurobike-2010.html
  • 2 0
 Damn, that thing sexy as hell! I didn’t even know it existed.
  • 1 0
 Scalp was a killer bike, a bit heavy tho. As soon as i saw the pictures from eurobike, i knew i had to get one.
  • 3 0
 @danielsapp please please please build and review the three concepts that you have presented here. It's a really interesting debate and it would be great to know which is fastest/most reliable/most fun.
It would also be interesting to find out if modern geometry even works with old parts or did the evolution of the two come hand in hand.
  • 3 0
 Rode my 2011 Santa Cruz Nomad today and had a blast, it was my main bike till about 6 weeks ago. It's considerably easier to corner on tight stuff than my 2021 Norco Optic. There's no doubt 29" roll over rough stuff way easier, but the longer modern bikes take a lot more body English to corner properly, something I'm definitely yet to learn
  • 2 0
 Old bikes still ride pretty well with old parts. You can't have the expectation that they'll perform like new bikes, but people were shredding on some seriously marginal stuff. A bike with a little older geometry but good brakes and good tires will still be fun to ride.
  • 1 0
 Absolutely! And that first DH or trail run on a properly tuned bike or most that come close will leave the rider with a priceless memory. Hopefully not one of agony but life happens. Older bikes for the most part are steps in evolution and it's up the the specific rider to decide which he wants at the time. Without bringdown the house I would like to suggest a frame with tapered headtube as the straight 1 1/8th" are rapidly disappearing on the used market. But older bikes still make quite an impression to most.
  • 2 0
 Flashbacks of going OTB on my Klein Mantra and the thought of riding modern trails with wet V brakes make me feel that there is no right answer to this polling question and for this reason I’m out. Can’t wait to see Pink Bike crew doing a full shootout on this one though!
  • 3 0
 I have a 2009 bike that I ride occasionally and it is just fine. 2020 is an incremental improvement. It is not like switching from v-brakes, 2.1 tires and noodle 100mm fork. 2010 was rather solid already.
  • 6 0
 I'll take that VPS as is Pimp
Drunken urban assault ready
  • 1 0
 That was my actual bike! Haha! My picture. So funny
  • 2 0
 My Ironhorse Azure was amazing. Light, fast and nimble. Best XC bike I have ever owned. Had a dream spec on it too for the time. Loved having a 38, 27 as the smallest gear, all that whippet needed, was an absolute dream on single track. Was before 2010 so doesnt count.
  • 2 0
 Not even a discussion! 2010 all day. At least the bikes were solid and you could ride anything you wanted, just not as fast on the way up. 2009 sx trail from back then is still my favourite bike I've ever owned. Way ahead of its time in my opinion. www.pinkbike.com/photo/7386571
  • 2 0
 I’d be going modern geo and 2000 parts, a dh bike specifically - 2000 Shivers, Hope hubs on D321’s, Comp 16/24 tyres, XT/XTR group, Hope brakes, MRP Chain device, Azonic bar/stem combo. Basically it would be my DH bike from back then but with a good frame.
Hell, I’d even take that spec on a 2010 geometry frame!
  • 5 1
 I thought those old, heavy parts were the oldies but goodies? Is this not so? but that old geometry scares me...
  • 5 0
 A new geometry with a Marzocchi Supermonster would be neat
  • 3 0
 I’ll take modern geometry with a Shimano 7 speed M900 XTR group and be done. Cantilevers might be a bit sketchy but they worked for me back in the nineties
  • 3 0
 M900 was 8 speed.
  • 2 0
 @nozes: Ol’ brain ain’t what it used to be. Thanks for the fact check.
  • 2 1
 Just take a moment to pick up one of your favorite frames from the 2006-2010 era bikes. #1 they are heavy as hell. #2 Downhill geometries needed re-assessment and changes to seat tube and headtube angles. All in all we are where we are through a process of trial and error. If it works it's adopted if it doesn't it rarely is. There have been so many changes that most don't consider like seat/chain stay lengths, adaptations to rear link styles. A simpler question would have been would you rather have what the professionals consider a better bike or an outdated bike with outdated geometry and components. Experimentation leads to innovation which often results in a better product. You won't get that riding a 15 year old bike. It is very doubtful you would make any progress moving up through the competitive ranks riding one. Now if you haven't plans of competition you can have loads of fun on bikes from the mid 2000 era and you can likely find used but serviceable parts at a bargain.
  • 2 0
 year 2000 parts is old? most stuff was working well by 2000 compared to earlier decades of mtb

...anyone who rode in the era of fully rigid, cantilever brakes, tyres that didnt grip & parts that frequently broke.
  • 1 0
 I wasn't wanting to cut to the quick but yeah, anything pre 2005 is going to be 99% rider.
  • 1 0
 Early 2000s hope brakes were still really good! And there were a couple fork options back then that weren't entirely garbage i have a 2003 marz shiver sc and I honestly think it wouldn't be garbage if I wieghed less than 120lbs, and used the heaviest spring, and maybe heavier weight suspension oil, and modified the compression tune....ok its not a great fork, but the brakes weren't that bad!
  • 3 0
 I had that red VPS and it is still my favorite bike I have ever owned. I need to ride it again to see if it was as good as my 20 year memories say it was.
  • 3 1
 My dropper cable snapped mid ride yesterday and it felt like riding 2000 geometry with 2020 parts. It's really scary, I can't believe I used to ride with the saddle so high all the time.
  • 1 0
 Same thing happened to me, but beginning of ride. The dropper is such a game changer and without it, modern geometry isn't very useful. 2000 bike, 2020 parts every time.
  • 3 0
 Imagine a 2020 geo single speed SantaCruz super 8 or Lawwill 8 Cdale SVDH? 2000 suspension tuned with 2020 knowledge. The things would be weapons.
  • 4 1
 So it's a matter of which shitty bike you'd prefer. Being just 10 years old, I'll take a 2010 bike and parts over the other two.
  • 1 0
 I recently bought a 2012 Specialized Epic, mostly because it's 10 full pounds lighter than my Enduro bike and I wanted to see how much of a difference that made on the climbs (15%, give or take, turns out). With the 2x10, no clutched derailleur, and no dropper post it was nearly unrideable, at least not on anything rough. With a clutch and a dropper it's pretty fun, though I'm still terrified I'd break it.

new parts, old bike for me.
  • 1 0
 2000 is just vintage enough:

www.vintagemtb.org

I bought back my first decent Mountain Bike from 1995, a long stem makes you see the front hub between your arms. My back need a short stem ASAP!

Gravel is a new old MTB:

budgetbikepacker.wordpress.com/2018/07/01/converting-your-old-mtb-into-a-bikepacking-machine
  • 4 0
 Anybody wanting old parts on new geo obviously wasn’t around back then.....
  • 1 0
 This is a hard one. I require further clarification.

What precisely does "2020 geometry with y2k components" mean? Does it mean that you get a frame that could have been made in 2020, with modern geometry and modern standards, which is also built to modern quality and strengh standards? Or does it mean that you get an early 2000s frame, like that old Trek Fuel, that just happens to have a 470 mm reach, but with otherwise old standards and also the build quality you could have expected back in the day?
  • 1 0
 My current everyday bike is a 2010 Covert with pretty much all 2010/11/12??? parts sans tires, grips a couple other things. I love it and have been on it for, gawd 5 maybe 6 years now. I’d like to step up to 27.5 but I’m too cheap.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/16073586
  • 1 0
 I rode my 2010 Scott gambler up until 2017. I also had a 2011 Norco range that I rode until 2017. The fox 40 coil and rc4 shock was ahead of its time. I preferred the old 40 over my new 2018 boxxer WC. I upgraded to a new (at the time) custom built Scott gambler. Honestly the difference in speed/performance from the old gambler wasn't as significant as I expected. If I still has the old gambler today I would be happy shredding it in the park. The biggest difference was sizing and weight. The older gambler was tiny at 365mm reach but the overall geometry worked well around the short reach. It weighed close to 45 lbs. My current gambler sits at 36 lbs. My range had a coil Lyrik which was also a great fork. I really liked it. Both bikes were very capable and fun to ride.
  • 1 0
 Hmm, I don’t have a bike newer than 2010. I have a 2001 giant atx that I have upgraded most of the parts one. It now has a 2019 xt drive train, formula brakes and a 120 mz comp
Instead of the 80 z5. My 2007 norco manik is amazing except for the fork, which is stiff and too short (I am looking for a new one). My main bike is 2010 specialized stumpjumper which is not very stock but I is light and fast. In fact I can beet people on 2020 norco sights!
  • 1 0
 That sunn had a head angle of 67.5 so not crazy far off...in fact most of the XC bikes I rode back in the mid nineties were between 70.5 and 69 so not that far out (and that was XC bikes). A lot is made of modern geo like it's the second coming of Christ but those that lived through those times know that things were not quite as bad as the industry would have you believe. ????
  • 1 0
 I may be really wrong as I wasn't even born in 2000 so don't have too much experience with bikes from that era, other than having occasionally ridden my dads old bikes, but I feel like the the older short steep and twitchy geo and 26 wheels combined with the significantly better performing suspension of 2020 and a wide bars short stem cockpit would probably make a really fun and playful bike especially on flat and twisty trails where longer, lower, slacker geo can feel a bit draggy and cumbersome
  • 1 0
 you can get some rigid mountain bikes these days that absolutely shred*, and there were some great parts back then. Proper Bombers, XT groupset has always been great, 7/8 speed drive was fine. the problem back then was the 130mm stems. weve passed peak bike too, all this 55degree head angle rubbish is... well, rubbish.
You/One wants the geometry to be able to enjoy the ride. it doesnt matter if you've got 14 cassette sprockets and uber supple bump compliance across 6 different compression profiles, and multi compound tyre tread, or a bike that is 7% stiffer than the previous model. Thats the tail wagging the dog. run what you brung, smiles per mile.


*....Can i keep my dropper post tho?
  • 3 0
 Let’s just hope I never have to make this choice...I guess I’ll take the 2010 bike.
  • 6 2
 I bet the majority of us aren’t riding anything too much newer than 2010
  • 4 0
 I’m still riding a bike from 2010!
  • 2 0
 Parts sucked until around 2008. I can't tell you how many cranksets, forks and shocks I've destroyed prior to that. 2010 parts and geo all the way!
  • 2 0
 I ride a 2010 DH bike right now and for what I do I much prefer it to new geo bikes lol. That being said I do have a 2015 DH as well..
  • 1 0
 Title of article......

"Daniel Sapp Today
Pinkbike Poll: Would You Rather...? Pinkbike Poll: Would You Rather...?
Modern geometry with old parts, or old parts with modern geometry?"


Thats the same thing innit?!
  • 3 0
 I still ride my 2009 Jamis XAM and 2008 Turner 5.Spot occasionally, fun!
  • 3 1
 Read the title again... Anyway, 2000 parts with 2020 geo would probably break from silly angles lol
  • 2 0
 Ya I thought I was taking crazy pills, it just offers the same combination of old parts/modern geometry both times.
  • 2 0
 That's what I was thinking, that Monster/Junior T on today's super slack head tube angles would die a painful death...
  • 2 0
 @stiingya: not even close, those old Monster Ts were originally designed for 150 lb trials moto bikes and weighed like 10 lbs....WAY stronger than anything we have today...
  • 1 0
 @RadBartTaylor: Maybe?, but they were not designed for a 62.5 head tube angle. Have you seen the way the lyrik flexes on the Grim Donut? Same issue here, fork was just not intended for that angle and even if the tubes are strong as hell the slidy bits are being asked to do things that were unintended and it's gonna wear out and die...

OR at least that's my guess...? Smile
  • 2 0
 @stiingya: I see your point, I guess I just think that those old Monsters were way overbuilt for pedal bikes
  • 3 0
 this is a good poll, made me think for a bit.
  • 3 0
 This is fun content, more like this (:
  • 1 0
 Modern geo frame and parts from any era. I'll can deal with the crappy shifting and squishy brakes. I just want to feel confident when pointed down range.
  • 2 0
 Anyone who voted for anything but the third option hasnt ridden bikes from the times mentioned
  • 3 0
 My 2020 bike. My 2000 fitness and recovery. Oh what I could do!!
  • 3 0
 I'm old school.. 2001 Schwinn Straight 8 and modernizing
  • 2 0
 It wouldn't be compatible cuz the industry needed to make money through marginal gains.
  • 3 0
 2020 parts on 2010 geometry would be pretty legit if you ask me
  • 1 0
 I’ll take my old Sunday over any dh bike currently. That bike was just plain fast. Slack enough but also great in and out of corners.
  • 3 0
 2010 bikes were the best anyway
  • 2 0
 That VPS1 is/was my bike! Haha! My picture. Thanks for the repost! The glory days
  • 1 0
 My yeti 575 was badass in 2010. It would be hard to go back after a few seasons on my shred dog. Bikes have gotten so good, and reliable.
  • 1 0
 modern 2020 shocks, forks, anglesets, and offset bushings with old geo, will out preform modern geo with shit suspension. Figure it out.
  • 1 0
 Hear me out... If you went with the 2020 geo and 2000 parts, you could put the late and great Marzocchi Bomber forks on it! That's all you need.
  • 1 0
 I'm not particularly bothered about 'current' ST and HA angles but I do prefer a longer reach. 90's konas were good for this
  • 2 0
 Heart says 2020 parts on 2000 geo but my head says 2010 parts/geo
  • 2 0
 I ride an '08 Mojo with 27.5 rear/ 29 front 1x10 drivetrain and it rocks.
  • 2 0
 1991 Green VPS 1 with Monster T!! The holy grail of mtb's
  • 2 0
 My Devinci frantik from 2010 is rad
  • 2 0
 Aw, I wanted 2000 parts with 2010 geo
  • 2 0
 That norco looks so fantastic!
  • 1 0
 90s parts, 90s geometry, handmade preferably... so I can hang it on my wall, ride it occasionally to bike parties... Smile
  • 1 0
 I still have, and possibly always will have, a not so soft spot for a Norco Truax. Yes please.
  • 1 0
 I have a bike from 2007 with 2020 parts on it and it's great. I'd definitely go old geo, new parts
  • 1 0
 lol check the vintage bike FB groups, so many riders still holding onto old shit! its hilarious how poor these perform.
  • 1 0
 I loved my Trek Scratch geo and parts, minus the cracked chainstay. So I could live in 2010
  • 1 0
 Considering I still ride a 2011 TR450 every chance I get, I can say with confidence that bikes from that era weren't too bad
  • 1 0
 Dropper post, disc brakes, rear clutch derailleur, 2x10, dual suspension and 26" wheels works just fine!
  • 2 3
 If only I could go back in time and get back my set of Purple Hayes brakes... Those things were legendary. 20 years old, but still better than 2020 SRAM or Shimano.
  • 5 4
 2000 geo with 2020 parts is today's Giant Bike.
  • 1 0
 2010, and then the parts would even fit together!
  • 1 0
 i had that 2010 bike in 2018. It was still not that bad geometry!
  • 1 0
 Read the title and expected only two choices: Levy or Kazimer
  • 1 0
 A 2000 strapped on top of a geo metro...
  • 1 0
 2003 Balfa bb7 with and modern gear... wish I'd never sold mine.
  • 2 4
 2020 all the way, meme si je suis un old school rider ! les vieilles becanes sont nice a rider mais quelques fois par année a cause de la nostalgie sans plus.
  • 1 1
 Old trek looks like new giant
  • 1 4
 Uhhhh 2000's geo and "schralp" don't mix

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