"Smart" Fans, a Titanium Hardtail, & Carbon Fiber Brake Rotors - Eurobike 2018

Jul 10, 2018
by Mike Levy  
Eurobike 2018


Like a lot of riders, I can get my geek on all day over the latest full-suspension rigs and other bike tech, but I'll always have a soft spot for titanium hardtails. I mean, just look at it - it's beautiful. Pipedream is a British brand that does the slack, fun hardtail thing, and usually in steel, but this version of the Moxie is made using 3AL/2.5V titanium.

Manufactured in limited numbers, this particular bike's brushed finish and shiny Moxie logo are even rarer - just two were made so far, and I think I want both of them.


Eurobike 2018
Eurobike 2018

Eurobike 2018


With a 65.5-degree head angle, a short 420mm seat tube length, and ready for a long-travel single crown fork, the titanium Moxie ain't no warmed-over cross-country rig, either. Other numbers include a properly steep 76.5-degree seat angle, and a 64mm bottom bracket drop that should see it absolutely fly around the corners. Reach is forward-thinking, too, with either 470mm or even roomier 510mm of space up front.



Eurobike 2018


I know this isn't the usual place to read about indoor trainers, but Wahoo's new Kickr Headwind is a pretty neat piece of interactive technology that some of us (and me) might find interesting. How is it any better than a $30 USD fan that you can find from any store? Well, it talks to your Kickr trainer for starters, with it able to change fan speed depending on either how fast you're going, your heart rate, or your wattage output - it's your call as to what metric it reads. Basically, the more effort you put out, the more cooling you'll have, up to 34 mph. You can also adjust it manually, of course. The wind direction is also much more focused on the rider than a big round or square fan is able to put out, and it can be easily angled upwards as required thanks to adjustable rear feet.

Perhaps the most interesting thing is that it could conceivably be able to be interactive with training programs like Zwift. Just imagine that you're in a big group and make a break for it - the Headwind might be able to instantly increase fan speed to simulate a, er, headwind, or speed up when you're coasting down a hill without pedaling. It doesn't do either of those things right now, but you never know given that its API is open.



Eurobike 2018


Carbon fiber rotors aren't new - a few brands have tried over the years, all unsuccessfully - but I still want them to work one day. How cool would that be? Some of the challenges include heat issues and brake pad material, but Alligator looks like they're going to have a go at it again after showing a few different versions over the past years. This one employs an aluminum carrier and looks like it weighs less than a gnat's fart, although they didn't have an exact weight for me to quote. It requires carbon-specific brake pads, which makes sense as you don't want your sintered pads eating through what is probably quite an expensive rotor.

Alligator didn't have much more for me in the way of information, but here's hoping that they figure it out. We've seen a bunch of smaller companies trying the carbon rotor thing over the years, but none of them have come anywhere close to being properly useful for real mountain biking.


73 Comments

  • + 107
 Aaah roadies, prefering the simulation of riding bikes to actually riding bikes.
  • + 40
 No no, this is a true mountainbike product. In summer, I'm going to place dust, flies and other rubble behind the fan to give me that summer sensation. In fall and winter, I'll place wet leaves and mud over there so that I can still enjoy the cleaning process after my "ride". This may actually work best with the Tacx conveyor belt type trainer which may help recycle my chosen projectiles to the back of the fan again.
  • + 7
 If someone could please make a Dh bike simulator that would be amazing, I want the 4D experience though. I bet if it was affordable everyone would want one.

Don't flame it just because we cant have one for our sport Wink
  • - 17
flag SnM-Ben (Jul 10, 2018 at 4:25) (Below Threshold)
 Aaah roadies, prefering the simulation of riding bikes to actually riding bikes.

^^^

This!
  • - 19
flag markg1150 (Jul 10, 2018 at 4:46) (Below Threshold)
 What ever it takes to get the pri#ks of the road I'm all for
  • + 0
 @Pejay: Just glad the rider in the video didn't crash. Also glad that the backrest was overbuilt. Even though it has a grip, these aren't typically dimensioned to carry tricycle with kid. That said, the kid seemed to be wearing proper protection so, what could go wrong?
  • + 2
 @Pejay: you just made my day, lol.
  • + 6
 I have been dealing with a broken ankle for the past couple months and an indoor trainer has been my salvation.
  • + 4
 So let's see if I understand the Wahoo fan correctly. The harder you pedal, the more air it blows. Have I got that right? Because if I have got that right, the fan is about as smart as a fan that is directly hooked up to your bike wheel on a trainer - like a Kreitler Headwind Fan from the 1980s...
  • + 1
 someone just needs to make an adapter for a rowing machine, connect a cable adjust to the fan block and the bike to the fan, job done. 2 for the price or 1 and nobody likes the rowing machine either.
  • + 5
 Wahoo's also prototyping a true indoor road experience: At some random point in your session you get crushed by a 2-ton weight with a person using a mobile phone sitting in it, seeming surprised that you're upset. The Kickr Drivr.
  • + 3
 Well, maybe they're wising up and realizing that cars are more dangerous than dirt and rocks.
  • + 3
 Got carbon brake pads with steel discs on my trackbike. Can't see it working for Mtb simply due to lack of heat. Until there hot they are useless I mean proper useless like having a badly contaminated setup useless. And then you have to also maintain that heat. Not gonna be easy on a Mtb in the varying conditions and trails.
  • + 5
 Yeah, heat is the issue. When carbon rotors made apperance in moto gp years ago, the warm up laps totally changed with much more braking to heat up the rotors.
On a mtb it takes a while to heat up metal pads, can’t imagine how long it would take a carbon rotor.
  • + 6
 Why do you have brakes on your track bike?
  • + 2
 @humanpowered:
a suzuki gsxr that I use on race tracks ie silverstone ect. Hence track bike. What you call them in USA?
  • + 3
 @markg1150: A track bike to a cyclist is often a bicycle for racing at a velodrome. No brakes or gears allowed. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Track_bicycle
  • + 5
 @markg1150: yeah, small thing, but if youre saying track bike on a bicycle based website, one should specify that it has a motor attached
  • + 1
 @jaycubzz: No worries.
  • - 1
 @markg1150:

Hahaha!
Bicycle wankers have a totally different idea of what a "track bike" is. Here you need to refer to your motorcycle track bike.
  • + 1
 If you read the couple of sentences below the pic you'd know that it requires carbon pads as well (so carbon on carbon, not carbon on steel). We ran custom made carbon rotors and carbon pads on our FSAE car in university, and they actually worked pretty well together, even at low temps.
  • + 0
 @Fresh1:
Amount of heat generated by stopping a car is a heck of alot more than a pedal bike, so hitting that sweet spot is much quicker and easier. Dunno what a fsae car is but I'm guessing the brakes are somewhat shielded from air flow more than a pedal bikes.
Carbon pads on carbon disc are even more temp critical/sensative than carbon on steel. So consistency and power will be even harder to manage or predict.
EG Most moto GP riders still use steel discs with carbon pads in the wet. More Mtb like condition I'd say. Carbon discs don't always /can't/won't maintain the optimal temp for consistency, feel and power in the wet. The riders that do (marquez) run carbon disc and pads in the wet have covers on them and have god like talent to ride around it.
Not saying it's a no go things improve. But can't seeing them working well or being worth it outside a bike park on a hot dry day doing high speed runs.
Muddy cold wet windy day hmmmm who wants to swoping brakes every time the weather changes.
  • + 1
 @markg1150: Our car was the lightest in the field that year at about 400 lbs. Of course I'm sure you know that the heat energy into a brake has more to do with speed than weight, but I specifically said they worked well when cold, which was the point of the previous comment.
  • + 7
 say F1 one more time , mother @*&@er. I double dog dare you .
  • + 3
 What did you just do to your mother?
  • + 3
 why not make the central disc section carbon & the actual rotor surface steel, surely that would make more sence... not saying I'd ride it, happy for others to be the guinea pig Smile

if you want lightweight rotors that actually work, try the hope race x2 floating rotor (within its limits, I still wouldnt ride even those down super morzine, or whole enchilada)
  • + 1
 www.brakco.com.tw/products/products4.php?C11_Id=5&C2_Id=61&P_Id=291&pages=1

Carbon carrier brake disc does exist. BTW these guys supply the likes of uberbike & superstar components.
  • + 6
 Ti is so choice. If you have the means, I highly recommend it.
  • - 1
 Haha, I'd be so embarrassed to have a titanium bike. For the onlooker it would be like, "this guy sucks dick, good thing he has a titanium frame".
  • + 4
 @Grmasterd Wake up! It's titanium! Big Grin
  • + 3
 and with a fantastic head badge
  • + 1
 I thought CF rotors need more heat to have a better bite, so not good on a bike where you're only using the brakes sparingly and don't brake like you'd break on a car or motorcycle.
  • + 2
 Carbon fiber rotors...great, more plastic waste.
  • + 1
 Based on my steel Moxie experience, this is probably the best non custom hardtail in the world.
  • + 2
 Ahhh, plastic brake rotors...... what could possibly go wrong?
  • + 1
 What would be the benefits of carbon rotors apart from not bending?
  • - 2
 No over heat brake fade, much lighter and also last longer.
  • - 1
 They would just crack instead of bending, no benefits though. Lol
  • + 4
 Releasing nanoparticles of carbon during braking so that the person behind you can inhale them deep into their lungs. Great way to decrease lung capacity and damaging your riding partners lungs making you the faster rider in the long run.
  • + 1
 @ppp9911:
Wouldn't wanna breath any of what goes in any brake pads tbh.
They can still use asbestos in the US for motor vehicle brake pads!
  • + 2
 @markg1150: while ive only done a full on 1000m descent once that was steep for most of it, i got brake fade on that but that was back when we had 160 rotors and no fins on the pad, i dont think brake fade is really a huge issue if you have the right brakes for what you are doing
  • - 2
 What a terrific waste of resources those simulators are, get out there and ride your bike!
  • + 12
 Some of us participate in a process called "training". Said process requires straining oneself a specified amount on a specific point in time. While "riding your bike" may often be beneficial for said process, issues such as weather, family and professional obligations frequently interfere. Should mentioned circumstances occur, an indoor trainer and simulator make the "training" activity much more bearable and effective.
  • + 1
 @Konyp: Those are just excuses! The bike industry loves that! That's how they make their money!
  • + 1
 indoor trainers are way safer than riding a road bike, for training i tried a road bike but it was way too dangerous, the sydney roads are not safe. using a trainer allows me to do proper training in a safe environment , and you dont have to wear clothes on a trainer
  • + 1
 @BrianRichards: You don't have to wear clothes on a Mountain Bike either.
  • - 1
 +10 bling bling
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