Pivot Firebird - Reviewed

Oct 15, 2010
by Sharon Bader  
Pivot Bicycles is one of the three companies licensed to use the DW suspension linkage design. The dw-link, developed by Dave Weagle (hence the "DW") is designed to be efficient, provide good traction, and eliminate pedal feedback. Pivot Bicycles was formed in 2007 by bike designer Chris Cocalis, who is known for building tough, good quality bikes and creating a dedicated following of riders. If you know about suspension, you will have heard of Chris. If you don't, know that he is up there with the most respected bike builders in the world.

The Firebird, designed in conjunction with downhiller Kevin Tisue, is Pivot's fourth frame model introduced in 2009. Having 6.7inches of rear travel, weighing it at 31lbs, this is Pivot's first long travel trail bike. Is it good enough for a one bike quiver? The Pivot high above the Chilliwack River valley. A long hike for a short, but incredible descent.
The Firebird, designed in conjunction with downhiller Kevin Tisue, is Pivot's fourth frame model introduced in 2009. Having 6.7inches of rear travel, weighing it at 31lbs, this is Pivot's first long travel trail bike. Is it good enough for a one bike quiver? The Pivot high above the Chilliwack River valley. A long hike for a short, but incredible descent.

The Firebird comes in four sizes - small, medium, large and extra large, with the medium being used in this review. The made in Taiwan 6061 aluminum frame uses large diameter tubes, and the one piece rear triangle is connected to the frame via the carbon upper rocker at the top and an aluminum link at the bottom. An aluminum upper rocker link is available for purchase as well. The shock is not rigidly bolted to the front triangle, but mounted to the lower link instead. This creates a floating shock that allows the engineers to have an easier time fine tuning the rate to their liking. All pivots feature oversize axles that rotate on sealed cartridge bearings, there being 8 in total. The rear triangle is stiffened via vertical tubes connecting the seat and chain stay. This provides a unique look to the frame, as well as using enough material to keep the bike light, but stiff. The seat tube drops low enough to provide ample seat post extension, but provides enough room in the linkage area for the suspension design. The 30.9 seat post size can accommodate the Gravity Dropper, Kind Shock, Command Post and Joplin adjustable seat posts, among others. This is an important consideration being that a lot of Firebird owners will look to spec their bikes with one of the above. It uses a 10 x 135 mm rear axle in the name of stiffness, as well as a full length 1.5" head tube (although our test model was equipped with a tapered steerer Fox fork. Hidden behind the drivetrain are the ISCG05 tabs that let you easily mount up a guide if your riding demands it. A bare medium sized frame weighs in at 7.11 lbs.

A closer look at the business end of the Firebird. Take note of the carbon fiber upper link and quality pivot hardware. Hidden from view is the floating front derailleur that tracks the chain through the bike's travel.
A closer look at the business end of the Firebird. Take note of the carbon fiber upper link and quality pivot hardware. Hidden from view is the floating front derailleur that tracks the chain through the bike's travel.

1.5inch head tube is designed to accommodate a 160mm or 170mm fork, but also allows you to use one of the new angle adjusting headsets if desired. The Firebird comes standard with the Fox Float 36 RC2. I was told that the top tube and down tube are welded separately to the head tube for weight savings and strength.
1.5inch head tube is designed to accommodate a 160mm or 170mm fork, but also allows you to use one of the new angle adjusting headsets if desired. The Firebird comes standard with the Fox Float 36 RC2. I was told that the top tube and down tube are welded separately to the head tube for weight savings and strength.


Pivot Firebird geometry, size medium

Head angle66.7 degrees (with 170 mm fork)
EFF Seat Angle71.5 degrees
Theoretical Top Tube23"
Chainstay17.25"
Bottom Bracket Drop13.85"
standover28.5"
Wheelbase44"


The Specs


The front of the Firebird was graced with a new 2011 Fox 36 Float RC2 that I was very excited to put some time on. The 170mm/6.7inch travel fork weighs in at 5.18lb (with tapered steerer) and can brag about having stiffness, plushness and a very confidence inspiring ride in a relatively light package. With external adjustments of low and high speed compression and rebound, there are ample adjustments to suit any riding style or situation. The FIT damper with hydraulic bottom out resistance keeps the weight low by reducing the amount of oil used for damping by using a bladder instead of an open bath system. This system also increases low speed compression adjustability. It uses a 20QR tool-free axle system with the stepped thru axle, combined with 36mm stanchions to be as flex free as possible. The tool-free axle system facilitates removing the wheel quickly and effortlessly. Complimenting the fork is a Fox DHX Air. This 0.97lb shock features adjustable bottom-out resistance via the boost valve, air spring pressure, pro-pedal, and rebound adjustments. Enough to keep most people happy! While the Firebird is also offered with a custom tuned RP23 that is valved to work well with the dw-link suspension of the Firebird, the DHX air shock shown here is suggested for riders who will be using the bike for more downhill applications.

Prior to riding my suspension was set up and tuned for my weight by Suspensionwerx, North Vancouver.

Two build kits are offered with the Firebird. This Demo bike was essentially an XT equipped bike with lighter DT Swiss 5.10 wheels.

Frame and SizeOversized, triple butted, hydro-formed 6061 aluminum
Rear ShockFox DHX Air (tested) or Fox Float RP23
ForkFox FLOAT 170mm RC2 FIT Tapered
HeadsetPIVOT Precision Sealed Bearing
CrankarmsShimano XT Dynasys 24/32/42
Bottom BracketShimano XT
CassetteShimano XT Dynasys 11-36 10Spd
Rear DerailleurShimano XT Dynasys 10Spd
ShiftersShimano XT Dynasys
HandlebarGravity Light OS 710mm
StemFSA Gap
BrakesShimano XT
WheelsetDT Swiss Custom EX1750
TiresKenda Nevegal
SaddleWTB Vigo Race
SeatpostGravity Light
RetailMSRP $5665 USD




The Ride


The Firebird enjoying some proper North Vancouver terrain. Dales Trail on Mt Seymour.
The Firebird enjoying some proper North Vancouver terrain. Dales Trail on Mt Seymour.


Sharon's Impressions:

Riding on technical trails is where the Firebird excelled. Whether climbing or descending, the bike was plush. The suspension did not absorb rider input, but helped the bike to find traction in a lot of places where traction should be questionable. The bike liked to sit high in its travel and would only respond as the terrain mandated, no more and no less. Traits of the dw-link combined with some well thought out shock tuning? Acceleration was firm and really moved the bike forward over rough terrain, with it being noticeable while both climbing and descending. Sitting on the saddle and casually rolling over bumps revealed a bike that wants to hold its speed well, which is always a good trait of fast bike. On fast and rough terrain the rear end followed truthfully, proving to be stiff no matter what I put the bike through. On one particular deactivated fireroad descent, a rougher, rockier water bar section appeared and I had no time to slow down, the bike went straight through the chunder with one or two loud bottom outs, but didn't eject me, much to my surprise. How the rear tire didn't flat is beyond me. The geometry biases this bike for speed and stability, but not so much as to make it a handful on slower sections. The 44.8" wheelbase with the Lyrik DH fork that was also tested on the Firebird, a 17.25" chainstay, and 13.85" BB Height combined with relaxed head (66.6 with Lyrik DH fork) and seat angles (71.5) made for a machine that advanced riders can use to their advantage, but more timid pilots will feel comfortable on. The low 28.5" standover aids in its nimbleness. On smoother terrain the bike just wanted to go faster. The rear triangle was stiff in corners and over rough terrain resulting in smooth, consistent tracking. The bike only used the suspension it needed or what you brought out of it. The responsiveness also made changing speeds and direction quick and easy. In switchbacks or in tight trees the Firebird turned on a dime, regardless of the slack angles. Pro-pedal was used on non technical, tedious longer climbs, but I left it open on rough climbs that demanded the right line choice without it hindering efficiency.

Watch the video to see the Firebird tackle Dales Trail
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More Firebird action on Mt. Fromme
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This is the sort of ride that the Firebird felt at home on. Long climbs up into the alpine that opened up into incredible views. Lunch at the top and saddle up for desert!
This is the sort of ride that the Firebird felt at home on. Long climbs up into the alpine that opened up into incredible views. Lunch at the top and saddle up for desert!

The same low bottom bracket that helped to make the Firebird so confidence inspiring at speed resulted in more pedal strikes than I expected. This was most annoying on technical climbs and traverses when you wanted to maintain an even cadence. It was necessary to choose lines carefully in these situations to allow for pedal clearance if any extra stroke was needed. The 23" cockpit was comfortable for climbing and descending, but the slack head angle was noticeable on longer climbs when more concentration was needed. The 71.5 degree seat tube would also contribute to this feeling, making me feel as if I was behind the pedal axle a bit too much. The 28.5 inch standover made riding slow technical trail sections easier. We had two weeks of riding in wet, mucky conditions and the bike performed flawlessly, although the pivots did begin to squeak slightly, but this was fixed with the application of some lube. While the floating front derailleur is designed to move in line with the chain throughout the bike's travel in order to keep shifting consistent, I found that it resulted in a lot of clanging on rough terrain. The chain would also slip down into the granny gear, but would immediately return to the middle ring once I started to pedal. I'll admit that I never had an issue shifting, so maybe there is something to this feature as besides being noisy, it did work as advertised.

Overall the Firebird is fun and poppy for how much travel the bike sports. It is really responsive to rider input, both while climbing and descending, and this plays a large part in the bike's great acceleration. Not many bikes weighing 31 lbs and having 170mm of travel can brag about that. While the bike climbs great, the geometry and suspension make it more than capable as a park bike if that's your gig. If you need to choose one bike for all your riding needs, this could be it. Light and efficient enough for long pedaling rides, tough enough for burly descents.



Lee Lau's Impressions:

Riding in the Babines, Smithers
Riding in the Babines, Smithers

In its class, the Firebird is an outstanding climber. Where it particularly shines is its stunning traction in slow technical climbing. On fireroads, it was no better or worse than any bike with its amount of travel - meaning you will get to where you want to go without much fuss. A short story; what inspired us to ask for the Firebird to review was following John Finch around Sedona's technical trails. John could ratchet then stall then ratchet, accelerate and/or crawl up the most relentlessly steep grinding technical climbs. Being someone who enjoys technical climbing, I was incredibly curious about the Firebird. What I found was that, although John was indeed a remarkable climber, he was also on a bike that climbed remarkably well. I think there are a few reasons for the Firebird's climbing ability. First, the bike sits high in its travel. Even properly sprung (with appropriate sag) the suspension stays taut and keeps the climbing rider from striking pedals or BB on babyheads or the ground. This is the case with or without the Firebird's DHX air suspension ProPedal engaged. Second, the Firebird sticks to the ground when you grind up trails, providing incredible traction for the rider. As long as you keep a fairly steady cadence and soft-pedal, the bike works its way uphill in slow and steady fashion without letting anything stop it. It goes without saying that the Firebird is not an XC bike and shouldn't be expected to climb like one. Where this will become apparent is in sprinting out-of-the-saddle climbs, a situation where the angles and travel will work against you. Relax, sit down, and make your way to the summit in a non-fussed manner and you'll be rewarded. After all, who won the race between the tortoise and the hare?

High Society
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It is a bit of a given that the Firebird excels as a descender. It's confidence-inspiring in the steeps, it jumps incredibly well, and it's easy to manual - all important ingredients to any fun bike. The angles keep it from being nervous at speed and this fact combined with the stiff rear end made me never question its abilities. While it is a great descender, that really isn't the story here for me. The way that the bike allows you to earn those turns without excessive punishment is my focus.

A great bike no doubt, but the Pivot Firebird is not without its quirks. As alluded to by Sharon, the floating front derailleur takes some getting used to; I found the sound of the chain slap to initially be distracting and I was always worried that the chain was dropping. It took one ride for me to get used to that sound and to learn how to finesse the chain so it would stay in place. Also, the Firebird rewards rider input and accordingly, is ridden actively. I found that it was a very playful bike and responded well to pumping; I could keep rolling through terrain where other riders had to pedal just by using body English and by popping the suspension. This is not to say that someone who prefers to be more passive and ride the bike more like a couch couldn't also enjoy the Firebird. Because of this trait, I think that the Firebird would be an especially rewarding ride for dynamic, aggressive riders who like to move their bikes around under them.

Pros:
• Active, but poppy suspension
• Stable climber that is able to change speeds smoothly in those stop and go sections

Cons:
• Clanky floating front derailleur
• Tough to get on two pronged bike rack
• No water bottle holder


Have a look at the Pivot website for more details. The Canadian distributor is On the Edge Sports.


102 Comments

  • + 12
 Nice bike, but are you kidding with the "no bottle holder" on a 170mm travel bike?
  • + 4
 ^^ agree. maybe theyve never heard of camelbak's...
  • + 5
 ...He's wearing one, lol.
  • + 1
 Bottle cage can be nice for hauling batteries for lights.
  • + 2
 A bottle cage can be nice on those long back country rides when you are looking for a bit more than a 3l bladder can hold.
  • + 2
 Would like to see a matchup between this bike and the Scott Genius LT. I have a Genius 50 and the twinloc technology alone will probably keep me loyal if I step up to longer travel bike- but I'm always interested in other options.
  • + 1
 I reviewed the Scott Genius in 2009. Genius had a way more stiff rear suspension that really stiffened on rough trails at speed. The Pivot was a lot more plush. Climbed great though.
  • + 1
 Coolness
  • + 2
 I know that's actually all about the frame but.... a Fox Float RC2 2011 of 170 mm travel??? This does not officially exists. Proto? Whatever Float RC2 in 2011 only exist in 180 mm. But this is not the chassis of the 180 mm but instead the one of the 160 mm with color schemes of... a Talas pre-2011! So Proto or fancy preparation?
  • + 1
 There are 2011 OEM's of the Van36 that are 170 mm travel, but as you've intimated it appears as though the text doesn't match the photgraphic evidence as even the 170 mm version is clearly different from what is on that bike in the pictures. Also, it might not matter as in some of the photos the bike clearly has a Rockshox fork. E
  • + 1
 You can shim down the 180 to 170. I rode this bike mostly with the 170 Lyrik DH Solo Air.
  • + 1
 OK but the lowers are not those of a 180 mm model (which go lower than the 20 mm QR). These are lowers of a 160 mm Fox 36. Can in be "shimmed up" then?
How does the lyrik 170 works compared to the standard 160?
  • + 2
 The 2011 Fox reference was an editorial change. This bike came with the 2010 Fox Float 160 RC2 which was replaced with the Lyrik DH Solo Air after it was damaged. For 2011, the Pivot will come with a Fox Float 180 shimmed down to 170mm. I really liked the Lyrik Solo Air. Found it to be more compliant then the float. Even after I got the Float fixed I didn't put it back on since I found the bike rode great with the 170, even though it slacked in out for climbing. I also had the 160 Lyrik 2step on my endorphin before the 2step did what it does. The DH damper is WAY better the standard mission control.
  • + 2
 read a review of this bike a few months ago in bike - the reviewer said that tech climbing was the bike's forte, and a paragraph later described it as a bear on hard climbs. sharon seemed to find the bike's climbing ability in tech lacking, while lee found it to shine in such conditions... i'm so confused
  • + 1
 Hey, not sure where you got that. The bike's a great climber. Better then my endorphin for sure.
  • + 1
 you: The same low bottom bracket that helped to make the Firebird so confidence inspiring at speed resulted in more pedal strikes than I expected. This was most annoying on technical climbs and traverses when you wanted to maintain an even cadence. It was necessary to choose lines carefully in these situations to allow for pedal clearance if any extra stroke was needed.

lee: I think there are a few reasons for the Firebird's climbing ability. First, the bike sits high in its travel. Even properly sprung (with appropriate sag) the suspension stays taut and keeps the climbing rider from striking pedals or BB on babyheads or the ground.

me: wtf?
  • + 1
 That was more a reference to the low bottom bracket and that my pedals did hit a lot more on the same trails I have ridden other bikes on, not its climbing ability. I'm not sure the context Lee was referring to.
  • + 1
 I climbed the bike on technical trails without rocky ledges. Shar climbed it more and used it more and climbed it on rocky ledges. I didn't really have to pop and accelerate a lot. Shar had the bike more than I had and her impressions on the bike are to be preferred over mine. Both of us found the Firebird to be the best climbing long travel AM bike we've ever ridden - which should say something
  • + 1
 boom - a bike with a good platform can have a better bb height. Also a 170mm travel bike is not really meant for xc like technical trails. It may climb well compared to other 150-170 enduro bikes but it wasnt meant to compete in super tech. Also if the climbs were so tech - didnt the slack ha annoy you more? I used to race xc and going to slack was 10x worse than going to low.
  • + 1
 Its hard to describe how good the Pivot is at climbing. It truly is one of those bikes that blows your preconception of how a 160mm travel bike should climb. Too bad they are so rare as anyone who demos it would be able to see what I mean just from a short ride
  • + 1
 Not sure what molds this bike is breaking... The Reign has been out for like 5 years now. That said, it does seem like a cool set up with the 1.5 head tube and all (if I could afford it, I would replace my Reign with it when the time comes). I dig it, just not seeing it as revolutionary...
  • + 1
 I have mine set-up with the 36 180mm fork and it's bad ass! It's a mini-dh bike w/ 2.5's, 31" bar and a chainguide. It would be sub-34lbs if I got off my lazy ass and converted to tubeless. It pedals awesome and the travel feel bottomless.
  • + 1
 nice!
  • + 1
 ok. read everything here and this is my take: UGLY LOOKING [ and just because it 'looks different from all the bikes out there' how does that not make it look like crap?! - anyway, different? hello! looks are similar [ enough ] to Giant glory, reign etc. ] as for the endless tedious comments about no bottle cage, get the violins out and call the waaaaahhhhmbulance! has no one ever heard of velcro! i have a stable and simple velcro set up on one of my rides that holds extra water, no problem. i can think of an endless number of ways to conveniently bring extra water, this is only one...all in all this ride 'looks'like an upside down camel, but will still suit certain styles of riding and not others - can't really say anything about her from experience, and anyway, what do i know, i used to think the Norco B-Line was a good ride! aaahhhhhahahahahahahahaha ha ha ha! on the other hand, some new bike designers these days try too hard for their bike to be different and need to remember : "if it ain't broke don't fix it" [ TR 250 anyone? a ride that is only 'different'in size to her big brother the 450 and with a few changes that address a real need with variables that work for almost everyone ]
  • + 1
 'Con - doesn't fit on two prong rack' - really. How do you expect to get all that technology into a frame with low stand over height and a rear shock? It amazes me that I still see 1-4 $5000+ bikes on a crappy car rack.

People will spend the $$ on a bike and drive hundreds of miles to get a good ride but will not buy a rack that is easy to use, secure and lasts. One answer to that con - get a Northshore rack or if you like power lifting some thule roof bars and lockable bike racks.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the nice review, guys. I don't think it's ugly. My only concern is the lack of gussetting around the head tube with that much travel. I've seen a number of broken frames with similar designs that break at the headtube welds. You can even browse pinkbike broken stuff pics and see it a lot. But with the amount of work these guys seem to have put into r&d, i suppose they have it worked out.
  • + 1
 i've had the 2010 and 2011 reign xo, went to the firebird , love the bird, the reigns still have an issue with the lower link breaking, but the bird is just a bit snappier in the pedaling dept, and just seems to hold a better line on downhills
  • + 1
 Definately interesting to see this as yet another bike that can handle 170mm travel front ends. Looks like it could be good for riders like me who are looking at a "one bike does everything well - but not amazingly well" type of quivver as I cant really justify having a full on DH bike anymore. But then its not that pricey which is good, but compared to what is coming out next year-
Pivot FireBird £1370
Santa Cruz Butcher £1300
Nuke Proof Mega £900
Definately the frame I'm most excited about getting a ride on is the Nuke Proof, it looks like its going to have stellar performance coupled with long travel fork compatibility for under a grand, can't wait!
I know the Butcher and the Mega have less travel than the firebird but the riding they are designed for the same type of "over the hill" riding that the Firebird is designed for.
  • + 1
 Nukeproof looks promising sure, but personaly I think while might being able to match Butcher, it won't be a tough uhpill adversary to Firebird. Mega and Butcher in theory can match Pivot on downhills but when the trail turns upwards they are as good as any singlepivot. Pricing of Firebird is pretty impressive as I don't think it is any much worse than superbikes of SC Nomad or Mojo HD kind, which are way more expensive. Having that said I can say basing on my experience that it is the travel adjustable fork making the biggest difference between do-it-all bikes and do-it-all wannabies. Put a Lyrik uturn on let's say SC Heckler, take it down to 115mm travel and you will outpedal any magiclinker on fixed travel 160 fork, just because you gain better body position and handling.
  • + 4
 I think its a rather ugly bike. I don't like all the swoopy tubes.
  • + 2
 I disagree. I like it. It not like the other bikes around and the tubes make it look diffrent.
  • + 3
 Please let someone else choose the music for your edits next time. It's like vomit in my ears. Nice review tho'
  • + 1
 I have mine setup with a Fox 36 180 TALAS and a Truvativ Hammerschmidt crankset. It's freakin' awesome. www.flickr.com/photos/rodeptchev/4822470735
  • + 3
 C'mon Sharon, you reviewed the Reign X - comparisons please!
  • + 2
 Yeah I second this!!!!!!!!!

And Sharon are you serious that the firebird climbed better than your Knolly edno???? little comparison on that would be awesome also
  • + 1
 pm me, I don't want to distract from this review.
  • + 2
 Such a sweet bike... Quite possibly the perfect do-everything bike.
  • + 0
 bblb are you kidding... a do all bike? maybe weight wise, but doesn't come close to any number of 'do all'rides out there [ Eg. Tranny Blindside or Bottle rocket w/ a geo that allows for a true 'does anything' build / Devince Hectic 2 an amazing AM bike park or Freeride even DH bike ] although i admit the weight thing is !!! wish my ride was 31 lbs [ 37.5 on mine but with single sidewalls and extra air for holding off those pinch flats i could drop it to 36 ] still, i wonder about a bike as lite as 31 lbs being very stable DHing especially for someone as lite as me [ 140 lbs ]
  • + 2
 Might have to agree to disagree here. I've got a 2010/2011 Blindside. It's a really good bike but not half the climber of the Pivot Firebird but then it doesn't pretend to be. It sounds from your profile that you're more biased to downhill performance. That's fine and I can respect that. I just happen to think the Firebird is really well balanced - uphill vs downhill is really good. What does "bblb" mean?
  • + 1
 What does "bblb" mean? I think he meant badbadleroybrown in acronym. Look above you leelau.
  • + 1
 Blindside and Bottle are not do it all bikes. You define a do it all bike by a bike that is good at all things that go down and that can go up though not as good Wink A good do it bike is a burly enduro bike. If the firebird holds up to abuse it is very close to that. I wouldnt want to pedal bottle or blinds for a harder/longer climb.
Though in all fairness no bike is do it all as every person has its own definition of all Wink If it was a euro brand they prolly call it a Mega bike.
  • + 1
 yep...i was using badbadleroybrowns acronym...and leelau, i suppose you are right, i am biased for DHing and did not consider going 'uphill' in the 'do it all' ride equasion; and spaced, i sort of agree that the BR is not [ always ] a do it all but it was made to accommodate a build of your choice that allows for weight, w/ adjustable fork and shock w/ lockout, wheelset, crank etc; all factors in trying to have a do it all ride - the BR was especially built with this in mind [ one of the guys at Dunbar Cycles here in Vancouver had his BR down to 33 lbs ! ] but, yeh, hard to build or buy a bike stock that is a true do it all....and by the by, i ride the Shore here and even though it seems the Pivot is capable [ especially in a good riders hands ] it seems a little too light for my taste on the Shore...oh well, still learning.
  • + 1
 I was just saying that if you had to have just one bike... to ride XC, DH, AM, DJ, FR... just one bike, this would be a damn good choice. Light enough and with good seat angles & suspension characteristics so that you can pedal it around all day or climb with relative ease for such a long travel bike but still with slack enough head angles and a well balanced enough design that you can have some fun bombing back down once you earn your way up or just hitting some dirt jumps at the bottom of the hill. Personally, if I had to trim my stable down to one bike I'd take this one before any of those you mentioned but that's just a bit of personal preference. Tranny's are cool too...
  • + 1
 Seriously that head angle for XC? did you ever did technical XC climbs? My bike at 67.5deg with a 140mm fork(so much much lower front end) is hard to climb at steeps and it often lifts the ground. Anything slacker than 67-68 deg will not climb anything technical so its not XC.
Also anything 67 deg will not do PROPER dirt jumps (not jumps made of dirt) well. It will eat up to much of the lip and feel wack. Belive me - I tried it. Its a horrible feeling. For xc with a good travel adjust fork its doable but dirtjumps? Be serious. Proper dirt geo is needed for proper jumps. Its a downhill bomber with uphill capabilities - call it a modern enduro bike or a mega bike if you ever been to such race (do it - they are AWESOME!). but do it all bike? You always have to sacrifice something. There are not do it all bikes.

If you live in the mountains, do not like tech climbs and do not ride dirt jumps (or have a dj ht) this bike may be a do it all bike but living in the city a 100mm 4x fully would be more do it all bike than anything else. All depends on what you want Wink
  • + 1
 Living in a city any real mountain bikes a waste... This bike is about as do-it-all as you can get. If I had to own one bike, it'd be between this and a Reign X. Is this an XC bike, no... is it a DJ bike, no... It is a bike that, if you owned just one bike, you could got out and ride XC and DJ with and not be at as much of a disadvantage as would be the case with nearly any other bike with as much capability for going back downhill. I'm not looking to start an argument, just clarifying my earlier point. If you think a 100mm fully is more do-it-all, more power to you but it does nothing for me compared to something like this.
  • + 1
 Im not trying to start an argument here either - just a polite discussion Wink Im just trying to show you a do it all bike varies with every person.

Some people may live in the alps and a do it all bike would be something hardcore, some people live close to small hils and some people live in the almost flat parts Wink Do it all changes with location and what you want to do. As for DJs - too much travell. Capability for going on dirts is close to zero. You are either close to dh or close to dj. Cant be on booth. Though for me a do it aller would have a bit less travel with a bit more beefyness added to it. Short travel sturdy bikes are more do it all for me. Be it GT distortion for the smaller hills (or banshee spitfire) or something like the banshee rune if you go in the bigger hills.

Also - the seatube area is plain ugly. Never seen worse
  • + 1
 It would all look that little bit sweeter with a shorter rear end. 17.25 seems a little long.
  • - 2
 One of the worst bikes out there. The rotating linkage its a Mud Trap and the only way to get it out its with water,the new front der. its an improvement but stills a quick fix to that pivot which is soooo high. No bottle cage?
Do yourself a favor and if you really like the suspension, Randall Scott still has Ironhorse 6. at an amazing price and full Warranty.
  • + 1
 I have no doubt its a great bike, but it would be better if it didn't look like it got hit with an ugly stick
  • + 1
 The Pivot website says the frame has 135mm standard axle but above it states the use of 12mm rear. Which is it?
  • + 1
 And the Pivot site is correct, Pinkbike is obviously confused and cannot tell the dif between a DT Swiss RWS 10 skewer and 12mm axle. The FB comes with standard 10mm 135 dropouts. I wish it were 12mm believe me!!
  • + 2
 that would be my mistake. sorry. The DT swiss with Maxle lite is 10mmX135mm.
  • + 1
 Maxle is RockShox product. I think you meant to say "DT swiss RWS"
I edited the review and changed 12 to 10. hope you don't mind?
  • + 1
 the forks are different on has fox and the other has rock shox
  • + 1
 How does it compare to the Nolly Endorphin , if it could be compared.
  • + 2
 The Endorphin would be more like the Pivot 5.7. The firebird would be between the Chilcotin and Delirium. Different bikes, both fun.
  • + 1
 This is the MTB I demand!AM++++++
  • + 1
 on the contrary, i'm in love with her looks
  • + 1
 one sweet looking bike..!!
  • + 0
 shoot in a couple years 6-7 inchers will be the norm for full suspension all around bikes thats just my guess
  • + 0
 My guess is.... your wrong....
  • + 2
 31lb 170mm/6.7in bike! That climbs and descends well.
  • + 1
 Con: no water bottle holder? Really?
  • + 2
 In BC, lots of people take their downhill or AM bikes on really long rides. On those long rides (6hours + or more - sometimes lots of climbing so you can get an amazing descent) you can go through a 3l bladder and its nice to have an extra bottle. For me, also its sometimes nice to have a bottle of some energy or flavoured drink separate from my bladder with the bladder just water. I don't see so many people hauling around kind of heavy bikes on long rides elsewhere so maybe that isn't so common elsewhere?? In which case i can see why some people are surprised by that. Btw some other long travel bikes designed in BC like say the RM Slayer and the Knolly Chilcotin are pretty proud of having water bottle cages. I do agree its a pretty small negative but it is one thing that some people care about
  • + 1
 You could just attach a bottle to your seatpost if your willing to sacrifice some adjustability, just make sure the wheel wont hit it.
  • + 2
 Backpacks have pockets Wink Though I see your point.
  • + 1
 5600 without tax, fun
  • + 0
 that looks like shit. too many pivots n linkages
  • + 2
 excatly the same amount as an ironhorse 6.8 or a iron horse sunday for that matter?
  • + 0
 your point? more to break
  • + 1
 nah, i own 3 ironhorses and not one broke yet, better preformance instead
  • + 0
 the one and only ironhorse i owned snapped almost instantly
  • + 2
 What Iron Horse Model was it? Also seriously? Properly designed virtual pivot bike will be as strong as any single pivot. So your arguent is invalid.
  • + 0
 i dont talk too much ,but when i talk i meaN it.esp, when im drunk1
  • + 1
 tht bike looks mint
  • + 0
 ugly!
  • + 1
 why's that? becouse of the rear pivot? i can't really see that
  • - 3
 Nice bike but pretty pricey for XC me thinks.
  • + 3
 more of an all mountain than a XC bike
  • + 3
 And XC bikes get more expensive than 5k.
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