PNW Components Introduces the Rover Hip Pack

Nov 15, 2021
by PNW Components  
Meet the newest member of the PNW Components family the Rover Hip Pack. A booster shot of trail storage with plenty of pockets to keep your items organized paired with a cozy back panel that supports the ol lumbar and a smart adjustment system that feels like the type of embrace you never want to leave.

Press Release: PNW Components


We’re thrilled to announce the newest member of the PNW family, the Rover Hip Pack. A booster shot of trail storage with plenty of pockets to keep your items organized, paired with a cozy back panel that supports the ol’ lumbar and a smart adjustment system that feels like the type of embrace you never want to leave.

Meet the newest member of the PNW Components family the Rover Hip Pack. A booster shot of trail storage with plenty of pockets to keep your items organized paired with a cozy back panel that supports the ol lumbar and a smart adjustment system that feels like the type of embrace you never want to leave.

The Rover Hip Pack has a large, main compartment for easy access to tools, nutrition (might we suggest a burrito?) and even your PNW Lander Jacket in case the weather turns mid-ride. Smaller pockets and compartments on the “wings” of the pack keep items like keys and chapstick within reach while also providing a place to store your snack wrappers so you can pack it in and out.

Blanketed in tri-layer sailcloth laminate fabric (if it’s good enough for racing boats, it’s good enough for us), the Rover is exceptionally lightweight and durable. The Rover’s “wings” adjust individually with tension locks, so you can fine-tune your fit better than with a single point of adjustment at the center. The compression straps on the main pocket add further adjustment to keep your program tight, while the padded air mesh panel in back keeps you both comfortable and ventilated.

Like our new apparel, we’ve kept a fine eye on the details while designing the Rover. The water bottle holder is detachable in case you have a bottle cage and don’t need your hydration to ride shotgun. The polyurethane-coated zippers keep water out, and a secure key clip keeps your chances of hitchhiking or pedaling home at a minimum. The Rover Hip pack is priced at $69 (USD).

Meet the newest member of the PNW Components family the Rover Hip Pack. A booster shot of trail storage with plenty of pockets to keep your items organized paired with a cozy back panel that supports the ol lumbar and a smart adjustment system that feels like the type of embrace you never want to leave.

Meet the newest member of the PNW Components family the Rover Hip Pack. A booster shot of trail storage with plenty of pockets to keep your items organized paired with a cozy back panel that supports the ol lumbar and a smart adjustment system that feels like the type of embrace you never want to leave.

Shop the PNW Components Rover Hip Pack here.


62 Comments

  • 39 1
 No price in the article or am I blind? It is $69 in case anyone was wondering. hehehehe
  • 10 0
 Noice.
  • 3 6
 Yes, 69!!! LOL
  • 4 2
 $69 will be adjusted to $96 soon enough, due to inflation.
  • 2 0
 @spendtimebehindbars: Just due to being in Canada.
  • 31 1
 Fanny packs are like dropper posts back in the day: They suck ... until you use one.
  • 5 0
 Agree. I brought one for short local rides to keep essentials in, and since then my backpack has sat in a corner gathering dust.
  • 3 0
 @HankHank: Until it gets cold and my big, thick, legitamitely waterproof jacket has to go on the rides with me.

Then...I gotta leave my Osprey Savu at home and slip the big plastic lifesaver in a Camelbak Mule.

The other 99% of the time, the hip pack is all.
  • 2 0
 I prefer bibs with back storage pockets. Winter time I like long sleeve shirts with back pockets built in. Cheap amazon
  • 1 0
 Ok@HankHank: oto
  • 3 0
 Hmmmm, I started using one for a while, but with all the on frame storage solutions (tools in pump, strap for tube and tire levers, etc etc), I find the good old pocket in shorts does the trick.
  • 3 0
 @vp27: On frame storage is the future. I've gone from backpack to hip pack to frame bag and happy to stop there, until getting a new frame with proper storage.
  • 1 0
 @vp27: you must wear some super snug shorts. Anything in my pockets eventually tugs my riding shorts down. I don't ride with shorts that need a belt.

I know plenty of folks will toss stuff in pockets but even my phone in a hip pocket will pull my shorts down if I've not got a hip pack to act as a faux belt.
  • 4 0
 Y'know i recently bought a hydration fanny pack and was going on a long ride in the middle of nowhere and made sure to bring everything that could save my ass with me. Ya needless to say it was an uncomfortable ride with 5+ pounds hanging off my lower back. But that was probs dumb on me for thinking it was practical for that style ride. backpacks still have their use. Both are practical depending on the scenario
  • 1 0
 @stumphumper92: Yup. Both have their uses.

Back in the middle of nowhere where I live, there are a bunch of guys doing mega rides only carrying one water bottle and a Sawyer Mini since there are so many creeks and streams here.

But can't imagine adventures in other places have near that much water access
  • 1 0
 the most uncomfortable ride i'd had in years. I returned mine to REI.
  • 1 0
 @P-I-Engineer: what did you ride that was uncomfortable?

...oh, specifically the item from REI to be clear. No personal glory...
  • 7 0
 I haven’t ridden with a Fanny pack, those who do, can you list features you feel are necessary? This one looks really nice to me, except the water bottle holder looks like it wouldn’t be easy to put the water bottle into...but hopefully I’m wrong about that.
  • 5 0
 One of the immediate advantages that we felt with the hip pack is taking the weight off and free up the upper body and shoulders. Although this is not a "feature" that you're asking about, it could be one of the main advantages to consider.

A feature that we see on few packs is an outer bungee type strap, that some of us have added to some of our favorite hip packs, that allows us to carry an outer layer jacket on the outside rather in the main compartment where the other essentials should be easily accessible. On the PNW pack, it looks like one could loop the jacket thru the compression straps.

Sounds like you can add on a bottle holder to this pack which could be a consideration for longer rides. A single bottle on the bike is good for as long as that bottle will last, but on the long rides we need more than one bottle. For those longer rips, if you have water sources on the ride, we'd recommend carrying a Steripen and keep it to a single bottle and reduce the weight on the hip pack.

Long story longer, if you haven't ridden with a hip pack we'd highly recommend you give it a try and there are a lot of options out there.
  • 8 0
 The absolute dealbreaker for me when I was searching for a hip pack was an elastic strap. Otherwise I just feel you're stuck between having it bounce around or having it too tight restriction motion and/or breathing... I ended up going with an Evoc hip pack pro, as it was the only one I found that matched that criteria. Really happy with the bag, it has what I call "party straps" that can be tightened and loosened on the fly when coming up to rowdy descent/hard or long climb. I use them multiple times every ride and they work really well.. The Evoc bag can be run with or without a hydration bladder of 1.5L or so. On shorter rides where I still want to bring more than just a multitool and CO2 I just remove the bladder, and on long rides it's nice to have the option of both a bottle and the bladder.
It's pretty essential that the bag can fit something like a thin rain jacket or a windbreaker, and it's nice if it's easy to open and close with gloves on and has good storage organisation inside so you don't have to search for things just dumped into a big open compartment. Again I think the Evoc scores high in those areas. I really can't fault it apart from it being pretty expensive.
  • 3 0
 +1 on a bit of elastic to let the strap move with you and stay tight. A bottle/can holder is nice for longer rides and/or party laps. Especially for bigger hip packs, compression straps that cinch it tight when not fully full are really important so your load doesn't bounce around. In general, I'd say get the smallest volume you think you'll need vs. having a big one that's half empty a lot of the time. I would also love to see a light/bright colored interior to make it easier to find that second half of a quick link that must be in there somewhere...
  • 4 2
 @sernevi: Hip packs are meant to be worn with the strap routed just underneath your pelvic bones, with the pack resting on the top of your butt/sacrum. Since it rests on bone (like the lap band on a seat belt), you should be able to tighten it down to make it stay in place without compromising breathing.
  • 2 0
 For me the biggest advantage was increasing airflow around my back using a hip pack vs a backpack. It was a noticeable reduction in my temperature riding in the warm months. Secondly, I've broken eight ribs now and I really don't like the idea of possibly breaking more due to landing on some tool kit in my backpack if I crash wrong. I do miss having a "straw" next to my face to drink from, but don't miss worrying about if I'm cleaning the reservoir bladder enough.

For me, 100% must have hip pack capability is ability to carry at least one (should be two) water bottle. No water bottle - no go!

I run an EVOC Pack PRO 3. It's dialed and I have zero problems with it. BUT, I'm digging PNW's philosophy/culture and would easily consider passing it forward for the right PNW hip pack.
  • 3 0
 @sestone: Still a pretty hard pass on non-flexible/stretching straps there as well, then they just dig into my hip flexors and hinder movement there (that's what I meant with that line above, but I should have been clearer I was referring to having it on/below the pelvis or just above wrt. movement/breathing)
  • 1 0
 I ride with one that is much smaller than this one, big enough for a multi-tool CO2 inflator and my phone. Phone because if I try to ride with it in my pocket, I keep pocket dialing random people in my contacts who have to assume I've fallen and can't get up.
  • 2 0
 Easy and accessible front/side pockets is a must IMO. The Osprey Seral and Savu (1st gen at least) have this. Large enough to fit multitool, keys, even sunglasses. If you're just doing regular rides, I would also recommend as small of a bag as you can get away with when choosing models. And even smaller bags (like the Savu) can hold two water bottles. This should be an option for sure.
  • 3 0
 @Jetmo: I'm with Jetmo. If you're starting anywhere with hip packs, try the Osprey Savu first. Can fit most anything in it (I even squeeze a Lezyne hand pump in it).

Can try it with 1 water bottle or loaded down with 2. I've made the mistake of not tossing the bungee on for a descent and been surprised to find my bottle still there at the bottom.

Side pockets right now have a Stans Dart, Lezyne 25g CO2, Nature Valley Granola, small bottle of contact solution, Cane Creek Double Barrel settings tool, ear warmer, chapstick & cough drops.
Center pocket has a Topeak Alien XC multi-tool, Lezyne Mini-pump, first aid pouch, t25 wrench, half dozen zip ties, emergency poncho, ID, Gloworm headlamp & battery.

Top pocket has my Google Pixel 4A w/ Otterbox case. Yesterday on an hour ride, 1 water bottle & then I tossed my knee pads in the other water bottle pocket for the climb up.

Do NOT...I repeat....do NOT get one of the Savus or Camelbak's that have the angled water bottle sleeve. Pain in the butt trying to land a bottle in it and if happens to be your off hand for braking with the rear, you may be forced to use your front brake to grab a sip of water on a shallow descent. Savu, you can put your go to bottle on whichever side you favor.
  • 1 0
 Side pockets for Key, some coins and a multi tool. And enough room for 1-1,5l bladder. Im happy with my Evoc hip bag- looks kinda funny but its nicer to ride without a backback sometimes.
  • 1 0
 honestly I use funny pack for water purposes only, camelback podium is nice, also there some runner hip packs are decent;
Putting lot of stuff into the pack will lead to horrible experience, 20 oz bottle and kill-cliff - perfect combo;
paired with on frame water bottle that gives me enough water for couple hours ride under SoCal sun;

I'd rather put tools/tube on the bike then in the hip pack
  • 1 0
 @sestone: do you know where the pelvic bones actually are? If they were meant to be worn at the location you are speaking about that would mean the strap would be getting pinched between your anterior superior iliac spine and your quads. That would be wildly uncomfortable as well as damaging. having the strap positioned to be resting on top of those bony protrusions is where a majority of straps where designed to be positioned.
  • 1 0
 a wide hip belt is key, which this seems to have.
  • 1 0
 I have had a couple different backpacks but riding with them is not comfortable and I sweat quite a bit so I stopped using them. I now run a Dakine Hot Laps Stealth hip bag after having a bad crash that rendered my phone in two pieces and a nasty gouge in my other thigh from my car keys. I pack light anyways so I was looking for something that let me carry my phone, keys, small multitool and maybe a snack or another odd item. Being able to have it under a jersey or rain jacket is a huge deal for me as riding around with a military medic pack on your hip makes no sense to me.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: Alternate opinion for those who care: I really like my Savu 2 with the angled water bottle sleeve. I find it super easy to retrieve and replace the bottle. The opening for the botte is nice and rigid, so it doesn't collapse. There are left opening ones as well on sale on the Osprey website.
  • 2 0
 @Lt-Scallywag: It's a detail I don't think most buyers would think through is which side that angled pocket faces. It's also harder to get to for riders with bad shoulders.

With my 2 bottle Savu, my first ride I took off with one bottle, in the right pocket. Reached back with my right hand, went to slow down and a healthy fist of front brake on a bumpy road made me realize my error and swapped it to the left pocket super fast.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: Makes sense about bad shoulders. I have good mobility so reaching the bottle is not an issue.
  • 3 0
 Does anyone else put their shirt OVER the straps of their hip pack? Seems like with those bigger straps it wouldn't sit as nicely on my hips, over the shorts. Love the idea, but would need to try it in person
  • 1 0
 depends when with body armor on Jersey, without under
  • 1 0
 It'd be nice if they could have included pics of the
"the padded air mesh panel in back keeps you both comfortable and ventilated. "
It's the main point of contact with your body and the bit that I usually find the worst part of any pack.
Evoc seem to be the only ones that get the ventilation part right for those hotter days.
  • 2 1
 Bontrager makes the best hip pack by far...I HATE Bontrager stuff, but there pack is so much better than any other on the market...not even close. I have used Dakine and Camelbak, both good, Bontrager is just another level of comfortable and quality.
  • 5 0
 Very hipster
  • 2 0
 So do people wear the pack over the jacket? I always put mine under my jacket so stuff in there is more protected from the elements.
  • 1 0
 especially if you have a hip pack with water bottle not bladder, it keeps the bottle clean on rain rides if under your jacket.
  • 3 0
 Why is no one making a hip pack that can nicely carry a chin bar for a convertible helmet?
  • 1 0
 I have a dakine hip pack with loops on the outside, so i use a gear twist tie looped thru the chin bar. Not the best, but def good enough for mellow climbing.
  • 3 0
 - "the Rover is exceptionally lightweight".
- doesn't post weight
  • 2 0
 keeping with the trend of not posting specs: theres no weight so lets just assume its 69 grams
  • 2 0
 Now the question is, if you destroy it like an Osprey one, will it be replaced no questions asked?
  • 1 2
 The humble bum bag/Hip Bag/Fanny Pack, wait until you discover jerseys with back pockets, 2 or 3 pockets, then a gilet too. That has a nice pocket up the top to put your phone in, you even get waterproof Gilets for the winter.

www.dirtbikexpress.co.uk/kit/motocross_waterproof_gear/leatt_waterproof_gear/leatt_race_black_vest?gclid=Cj0KCQiAys2MBhDOARIsAFf1D1ciqbswlOKjGL12QEw8HMTjZ38SD-pQQ5H0S7ELK2Q_lWiTgS-i_DUaArZSEALw_wcB



A discussion from back in 2005 before this new craze came around.

www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/104701-fanny-pack-vs-jersey-pockets.html
  • 2 0
 A $69 fannypack. I can't even say "nice" to that.
  • 1 0
 69 and fannys nice
  • 1 0
 Can u get the bottle in and out with one hand while pack is on?
  • 1 0
 Yep! We're able to get a standard 20oz water bottle in an out pretty easily with one hand.
  • 1 0
 I kinda interested in trying one of these
  • 1 1
 Moose did it first for the offroaf KTM nerds
  • 1 0
 Okay
  • 1 2
 does that hair do come with it? If so, count me out.
  • 1 1
 Hip packs still hip eh?

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.014519
Mobile Version of Website