PNW Components Launches New Pebble Tool

Sep 20, 2022
by PNW Components  

PNW Components today launched their new Pebble Tool, a colorful, compact and ergonomic multi-tool that features an integrated Dynaplug tubeless tire repair plug accessory.

The Pebble Tool makes on-the-go adjustments quick and easy with four carefully-selected hex sizes. A clever Dynaplug tire repair accessory makes puncture repairs a breeze while minimizing what you need to bring along on rides. Unscrewing the Dynaplug accessory reveals a bonus Torx T25 underneath.


bigquotesFixing your bike trailside without a tool is like trying to wrap a burrito without a tortilla. It’s not gonna be a good time, so why put yourself through that? Todd Cannatelli, CEO, PNW Components


Colors:
● Blackout Black
● Blood Orange
● Fruit Snacks Purple
● Golden Daze Bronze


Product Details:
● Bits included: Torx T25, 3mm, 4mm, 5mm and 6mm Hex
● Integrated Dynaplug tire repair accessory (including 1 Dynaplug® Soft Tip tire repair plug)
● Size: 65mm L x 21mm W
● Thickness: 15mm
● Weight: 51 grams
● Compatible Dynaplug replacement tire repair plugs include:
○ Soft Nose Tip (Dynaplug part # DPB-1472) *included w/ Pebble Tool
○ Pointed Tip (Dynaplug part # DPB-1670)
○ Bullet Tip (Dynaplug part # DPB-1496)
○ Soft Nose For Air Road Kit (Dynaplug part # DPB-406Cool

MSRP: $37 USD

Additional Dynaplug Soft Tip tire repair plugs can be purchased at pnwcomponents.com.

For other styles of compatible Dynaplug tire repair plugs, visit dynaplug.com.


104 Comments

  • 140 2
 With all the integrated tools these days it took me a second to realize this doesn't go into your bike anywhere.
  • 78 5
 You could put it in your downtube, but you'd have to remove your fork or BB to get it out...
  • 237 9
 You could grease it up and shove it up your down tube!
  • 20 2
 @chileconqueso: You could probably fit multiple in there
  • 37 2
 With all the smooth rounded edges, I can imagine the perfect little hole to shove this into.
  • 9 1
 @neatoneto: shhh, that's my secret.
  • 4 2
 You have to buy either a Santa Cruz, Trek, or Specialized for that.
  • 12 3
 need to rename it the PNWallet
  • 4 1
 Sure you can, if you run out of SWAT holes, there's still you tubeless tires to fill!
  • 4 0
 @seraph: use an angle grinder DIY
  • 7 1
 I have been thinking about a chamois liner hydration pack for those winter outings
  • 5 1
 @flipoffthemonkeys:
The Gere gear, for up there and out here.
  • 5 0
 We're supposed to use our pockets now?
  • 2 0
 Stores through your headset
  • 7 0
 You could store it in nature's pocket.
  • 1 0
 It would fit in the Specialized SWAT stem and be a better replacement than the standard tool as it has the Dynaplug.
  • 1 0
 @Bustacrimes: it would not fit...
  • 1 0
 @neatoneto: internal routing is noisy though.
  • 1 1
 I first read that as new pedal tool and thought "that's not a very good place to store a tool".
  • 65 2
 No 2mm, 2.5mm or 8mm? Who wants a multitool that can't install lock-on grips, tune a derailleur or snug a loose pedal?
  • 29 6
 "Fixing your bike trailside without a tool is like trying to wrap a burrito without a tortilla."

I think you're missing the point. This isn't better than other multitools, it's just better than no tool, or a handful of cheesy meat.
  • 30 0
 The OneUp tool can be purchased separately, has a 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, T25, and only weighs 60g.
  • 9 1
 With all these options available these days, I don't know who would choose a product like this one. Aside from the allen sizes you mention (I need 8mm for my rear axle, so pretty essential) I also need Phillips or flat blade to play with the adjustment screws of my rear mech (Shimano Zee).

They do have some fancy names for the variety of colors though. Try that with Park Tool. And yeah, people have different priorities apparently.
  • 5 0
 The colors are pretty!
  • 2 0
 @VtVolk: Todd is Captain Obvious
  • 2 2
 @VtVolk: I'm a vegetarian but I can't argue with your logic. This tool would be about as good as a handful of beans and rice for a large portion of typical trailside repairs.
  • 6 0
 @stella10: McGuyver would disapprove of your limited ingenuity when it comes to fixing typical trailside repairs. I'm no McGuyver mind you, but I'm sure he could use that to cook up some amazing (and tasty) tire sealant. Try that with your Abbey Tools socket wrench.
  • 3 4
 Tool looks nice! I like the rounded corners. I believe all SRAM RD bolts (limits and b-tension) are 3mm, so 2.5 is less needed, but if Shimano needs that size then maybe this becomes a SRAM only tool? Oh, let the flaming begin. I can't recall a time where I've needed an 8 on the trail in my 20 years of riding.
  • 3 0
 @garrettstories: Ive needed 8 on the trail going back to the days of splined BB/cranks working loose also more recently FSA , Race Face SRAM all have had cranks with 8mm and Ive had problems with nearly all!
Having said that Id gladly ALWAYS run Shimano in preference and happily do away with carrying the 8mm!


...if it wasn't for my pedals ...damn
  • 1 0
 Nor adjust rebound on SIDLuxe shocks, unless you're running a SID fork with the world's stupidest removable rebound adjuster.
  • 7 1
 @VtVolk: That is illogical. A tool that doesn’t work for what you need it for is worse than no tools, because it weighs more and costs more than no tools.
  • 1 0
 Agreed. To me if you're carrying a multi-tool it should be able to get you off the trail. Blackburn Big Switch is a solid solution. Soft case. Can stick a couple tire levers in with it super easy. And tucks into a tool strap with a tube and a C02 set up super easy.
  • 1 0
 @garrettstories: I think some road RDs from SRAM use 2.5mm
  • 1 0
 @GBeard: my one up doesn't have a 8mm ?
  • 10 0
 @Elgaucher: Yes it does. The 5mm side by side with the flathead tool acts as an 8mm together.
  • 5 0
 @VtVolk: There's no way this is better than a handful of cheesy meat...
  • 1 0
 @GBeard:
And the tools themselves are longer on the one up. A lot of the tools on this thing look too short to be useful in many cases. Also, that's what she said.
  • 1 0
 @GBeard: you seem to know a fair bit about multi tools do you know of any that is super cheap and can fix most things on a 3 hour ride. I currently own one that came with a bike from bikes online with basic stuff.
  • 1 0
 @GBeard: have you ever tried it? I use my EDC quite a lot at home, just because it's already in the bike (and my tool kit is a mess), but I've never had a good reason to use the 8mm. Intrigued to know if it's any use
  • 2 0
 @vinay: since swapping back from the kiddy trailer axle to the original on my bike I now need 2 different allen keys to get the wheels off my bike. Why can't bike companies agree on using the same sandards?
  • 3 0
 @CustardCountry: Ask SRAM and Trek - I bet you their marketing team will say it's new innovations that sets them apart. So, when everyone is using metric size hex keys, they would go and use Torx configuration. Wink
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: It wouldn't hurt if nearly everything would be T25. I think it could be done strong enough, even for my rear axle. Magura actually tried to go that way with their brakes, also used it to install the front axle and stored the tool in the front axle. Thinking of it though, I don't think it could be done to use it for rear mech adjustments (H/L screws etc).
  • 1 0
 @MTBER12: I don't know that much I just own a OneUp tool. If you need a chain breaker maybe the Crankbrothers M20 other people mentioned below, if not the OneUp works for everything I need it to. Although I don't know what "super cheap" means to you, if $30 is too much check Amazon.

@mountainsofsussex: It works enough to use in an emergency, I wouldn't use it at my house as my primary tool.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: The thing that gets on my nerves about these new standards is like the American stupid standards with the likes of Philips (cross heads), Robertsons (square heads), and flat heads screwdrivers. The sizes of these tools are like #1, #2, #3, etc and I have no clue as to what sizes and their actual names and which fit what screw heads. Allen or hex heads finally came out with actual sizes that can be measured accurately. Then, comes Torx again where the point-to-point measurements have no clear indication of what size you need based on the Torx number other than grab one that might fit the star hole. If only tool makers would all go with the metric system and go with whole numbers or in 0.5 increments of millimeters - makes life so much simpler rather than using fractions that are hard to figure out immediately.

Anyway, I just use one tool I bought for under $8 on Amazon. Then, I carry the necessary bits for hex and Torx. Total weight is probably around 130g but who cares. It's all the adjustment tools you need without spending all that money that's hardly seen. Spend the money on beer - makes more sense.
  • 1 0
 @MTBER12: it's not super cheap (£18 in UK) but the Topeak Hummer has everything you need, and I've used and abused mine for I guess 10 years, and other than a broken tyre lever is still perfect. Just have to watch out for the nuts holding it together gradually coming undone if it's stored in the bike. Though one of the tyre levers has a little hex tool to do it up again
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: Admittedly it may be hard to measure a Torx head to find the required tool. You need the inner diameter in tenths of a mm, by the way. But then again, does one actually use a caliper to measure a bolt to find out which allen key you need? At least for me, I just know. Or I try and if it is the wrong one, I pick the other tool. That's what I like those three way hex tools for, for working at home (though Crankbrothers also has some nifty portable versions of those). Either way, as for Torx, on a bike it typically is T25. Unless it is something really tiny like the reservoir cap bolts of Magura disc brakes (pre MT series). That said, I did once get it wrong. My Shimano Zee crankset uses T27 chainring bolts and I damaged a T25 tool trying to remove them. I replaced the bolts with aftermarket bolts, obviously. No idea why Shimano went with T27.

Personally I don't like using loose bits for my portable tool. But indeed I just stick to some basic folding tool with the allen keys, T25, cross and flat blade and that's it. If it is too small, you can't hold it. If it is too "complete", I feel it gets cumbersome to hold and rotate. I prefer my chainbreaker and tire plugger as separate tools. The plugger I use I can just jam snugly into my steerer from below. Always faster than having a plugger integrated in the multitool. As for the chainbreaker, there is no point being able to be able to pull such a tool in less than five seconds anyway.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: what's the plugger tool that you use?
  • 2 0
 @VtVolk: This one from Maxalimi:
www.maxalami.de/MaXalami-Basic-Tube-tubeless-repair-kit

If you shove it into the steerer from below with the black rubber cap facing down, it stays put and the contents can't fall out (as they're above the rubber cap). At least it works for me. I've got a Magura TS8 fork with a standard tapered 1 1/8 to 1 1/2 steerer. My steerer is fairly long (as the headtube is already 150mm) so maybe I could even install that One Up multitool (the one that only holds the tool, not the expensive one with the full system) above this. Haven't tried that yet. Maxalami also has a system that goes into a hollow crank axle if you prefer that and/or if your steerer is already occupied: www.maxalami.de/MaXalami-Twister-20-Tubeless-Repair-Tool with www.maxalami.de/MaXalami-Revolver-plug-storage
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: secret to Torx heads is to always grab the driver a size bigger than you think the bolt head is. Also, 98.6% of the time if it’s a Torx on a bike…. It’s a T25. Unless it’s not, then it’s a teeeny T10
  • 1 0
 @adriemel83: Well yeah, unless you've got the chainring bolts of a Shimano Zee crankset. These are T27 and will bend the teeth of your T25 tool.
  • 33 0
 A trail tool that doesn't have a chain breaker just feels useless to me, as I then also need to carry a multitool with one.

How old is the crankbrothers M20? Still yet to be bested.
  • 15 0
 how anyone would buy anything else than an M20 blows my mind
  • 5 0
 @jdkellogg: M17 for 10 years
  • 3 0
 The M17 is the only Crank Bros product I've owned that has lasted more than 10 minutes in UK weather. MK1 Mallets? Bent and seized. Candy pedals? Dissolved. Cobalt wheels? Bent and seized, Joplin? Dead.
  • 4 0
 Could not agree more. A chain breaker is the difference between a 10 mile hike and a 5 min stop to repair your broken chain. I've broken 2 chains I can remember and was pretty happy to have an extra quick link and a chain breaker Smile
  • 2 0
 My thoughts exactly. In my experience, 80% of trailside repairs that require tools are flats and broken chains. Chain breaker 2-8 hex, screwdriver, tubeless plugger, those are esential to me for a multi tool.
And yes, I also own an M20.
  • 1 0
 Yeah agreed on the chain breaker. I have an older model Lezyne Rap II CO2 and it has done everything I could need. Although the new Rap II 20 Tubeless looks pretty good since it adds a plug tool.
  • 17 1
 Huge miss to leave out a 2mm. Shimano 12-speed mechs use 2mm for hi-lo stops and b-tension, kinda the epitome of "on-the-go adjustments", right next to 3mm for suspension tweaks. I would have left out the 6mm instead: not too many 6mm that are going to get properly torqued with that little guy (based on experience with a similarly small Specialized EMT tool, which also lacks a 2mm and yet includes a freaking 8mm!)
  • 6 0
 Nah. Need the 6mm for fixing flats with a tube, or tightening loose pivots just enough to make it home.
  • 2 0
 Fox Rear shocks use 6mm for their high speed adjuster.
  • 1 0
 Not sure why Shimano switch to 2mm for the 12 speed derailleur. Their 11 and 10 speed uses 2.5mm bolts.
  • 2 0
 Manitou Hexlock front axle is 6mm
  • 2 0
 all my bikes be using 6mm for axles
  • 1 0
 oh yeah, axles. then I want 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 (opposite the 5 so it can be extended for leverage), t25, maybe 2.5mm.. SWAT EMT is close, just swap the flattened partial 8mm (or the flat head), for a 2mm, and probably a 2.5mm could fit too, and it's golden.
  • 1 0
 My Deity pedals use 6mm hex, front/rear axles too.
  • 10 2
 Good thing it's colorful, and that they told us. That's so much more important than properly sized and treated tool bits (status of which was not mentioned).
  • 7 2
 For all the dads with younger kids, just buy the fruit snacks color to prank your kids.
  • 2 0
 He gets it
  • 7 2
 I will stick to my Wolftooth 8-bit pack pliers
  • 4 0
 Wolftooth made a mini one that's a bit cheaper too. I like that wolftooth tools are flat so im not as afraid of falling on them in a zipper pocket.
  • 1 1
 The WolfTooth 8-bit pack pliers are the benchmark for me. I usually combine them with the encase chain and tire tool and that will cover pretty much any issue on the trail.
  • 2 0
 @FrankS29: Thats what I have been running for seasons now and it's been amazing and doesn't take up room in a pack like you would think. Plus with 8-bit tool you get leverage.
  • 1 0
 At least the bruise on your hip will have a cool unique shape . I landed on a clipped pocket knife on sum hard packed shell and it really kinda sukked. It broke the dang clip off my pocket knife and bruised my scrawny arse hip all the way to the bone inside for a damn week. I’ll stick to my one up tool stash in my fork steerer. They need to make a padded version of this somehow and it’d probably be a hit
  • 4 0
 I put it all in my Chad Box.
  • 4 2
 Silca called, they want to rip off your new tool, cover it in Cerakote, make a velvet lined wooden box for it and charge you 8x the price
  • 2 0
 I read a tolerance test for allen tools once (it was a while back) and Silca came out near top. I got an IAK Nove soon after and love it!

Also most mountain bikers have a load of old allen sets around the place broken or whatever. Just pick a nice small bodied one , take it apart , find your old bits and customize it completely to what you need most on your bike.

It's dead easy you just need the bits to be roughly same length and have the right diameter for spindle.
  • 1 0
 @BentonFraser: I actually bought a set of folding mini allens (standard, metric and torx) took them apart and reassembled a tool smaller than this one with every bit I needed and it only cost me $6.
  • 1 0
 No chain tool and limited hex sizes , I'm good. There is plenty of other multi tools out there that won't leave me stranded if a lower pivot bolt backs out, or pedal comes loose.
  • 3 0
 Looks good. Bike tools are cool.
  • 2 1
 Not bad. But I'd still go with the Topeak Ninja 16+ as the best, though no plug tool:

www.topeak.com/global/en/product/1160-NINJA-16
  • 3 1
 Have a look at the Crankbrothers M20, it's got a plug tool.
  • 4 0
 Just get an EDC Lite
  • 1 0
 Everyone needs to get on the FIX MFG multi tool game. They have a Dynaplug version that’s super small/light and with more bits. Plus other cool tools as well.
  • 1 0
 One up fits all there stuff in one convenient mini pump I can stash in my steer tube, Fanny pack or strap to the frame. Or if lubed enough. My downtube!
  • 2 0
 I wish it had a 2 and 2.5. Would gladly take the weight and size penalty.
  • 1 0
 A lot of tool opinions in this comment section.

Time for a poll? What's the favorite multi-tool of us many tools?
  • 1 0
 I usually just buy the one on sale, with all the tools on it I need... But, as I am old-fashioned and wear a hydration pack, I have plenty of space to put it... gets harder, when you wear a fanny pack and wanna use the storage of your downtube.
  • 1 2
 Any Dynaplug users here? Are these the most expensive and most shitty plugs one can buy? I've probably never really fixed any hole with it. Too thin. Cheaper stuff works much better
  • 2 0
 pick a trailside repair implement and be a tool about it
  • 2 1
 If it’s not OneUp or 1up I’m not buying it.
  • 2 2
 When i seen Dynaplug, i said Nah. would bee better to have a knife blade or 8mm instead.
  • 1 0
 What's wrong with Dynaplug other that it's expensive?
  • 2 0
 @schu2470: I didn't indicate anything wrong with it, just not my preference for multi tool. A solid set of Allens and chain tool if offered is all i'm after in a MT......but yes that you mentioned it, they are expensive AF!!! and Im sure if we read through the comment history on DynaPlug we'd defiantly find a ton of gripes why they might suck TBH.
  • 1 0
 No chain breaker. Meh. I’m out.
  • 1 0
 No chain-breaker? No Bueno.
  • 1 0
 Straight up press release. Do they pay to run this?
  • 1 0
 No chain breaker no deal.
  • 1 0
 Look a tool
  • 1 0
 same
  • 1 0
 The PNW Prison Pocket
  • 1 1
 delete
  • 1 3
 This makes PMW look bad, great marketing strategy!
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