Pinkbike Poll: At What Age Is a Rider at Their Peak?

Sep 10, 2021
by Henry Quinney  
Greg Minnaar solidifying his claim as the G.O.A.T

Depending on what sport you're in the age at which you reach your supposed peak can vary wildly. In some Olympic sports, like swimming or gymnastics, you could well be retired by your mid-twenties. With other sports, like golf for instance, a player can continue their career well into their autumnal years.

Mountain biking requires a mix of both technical, mental and physical attributes. It often takes riders a few years to get up to speed. In fact, I've often heard racers talking about learning how to win at an elite level and the opinion seems to be that it can take a few years to learn the required racecraft and mental resilience.

Of course, there are examples of people who delivered from a very young age in both downhill, cross-country and enduro. In recent years we've seen Thibaut Daprela and Matt Walker assert themselves on the World Cup downhill circuit. Tom Pidcock win an Olympic gold medal and Loana Lecomte dominated the World Cup series, both at 21. And who can forget Martin Maes bursting onto the scene as a teenager, flat pedals and all, while riding with the GT Factory team alongside the Athertons, Richie Rude dominating a sport that supposedly favoured an experienced head, or more recently Hattie Harnden winning her first EWS at 20.

Ending a 6 year dry spell by striking gold in Italy
Two elite world titles that are nearly 20 years apart for Greg Minnaar.

But there are some riders who seem to extend their peak far into their 30s. Are these notable exceptions? Or is it the result of a sport that's undergone a wave of professionalism over the last 20 years seeing riders stay at the top for longer? It's not uncommon in other sports: Fernando Alonso is back in F1 at 40, Roger Federer and Serena Williams have played top-level tennis all through their 30s, and both Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo are still at the top of their game in a sport where you're often considered past it as you approach your mid 30s. Mountain biking also has its superstars in their relative senior years. Greg Minnaar and Nino Schurter certainly asserted themselves at the recent world champs against many younger competitors, but what age is your prime? And are these athletes merely exceptions that prove the rule?

Then again both Minnaar and Schurter not only won the most recent world championships while approaching, dare I say it, the latter stages of their careers, but they're also both winners of the same title at a very young age, at 21 and 22 respectively. Maybe they are just once-in-a-generation talents to begin with, and should be considered as outliers.

This one might feel even sweeter than the others given Nino Schurter is winless in the World Cups this year.
Never count Nino out.

What age do you believe an elite level mountain biker reaches their peak? Is it relative to the discipline in which they compete? Are you personally still getting better? And what does age mean to you? Let us know in the poll and comments.

At what age does a downhill mountain biker hit the peak of their powers?



At what age does a cross country mountain biker hit the peak of their powers?



At what age does an enduro mountain biker hit the peak of their powers?



Do you think you have hit your peak? If so, how old were you?




212 Comments

  • 21 5
 you're not allowed to joke on pinkbike apparently
  • 63 6
 the (now previous) world champ has spoken
  • 44 3
 Sorry about your flat at Champs! Hopefully next one goes better!
  • 12 0
 Nice
  • 5 1
 Great work in the commenter's booth!
  • 3 6
 69 comments, baby! Oh...
  • 11 4
 Imagine telling the previous world champ he isn't allowed to joke on pinkbike
  • 6 0
 mmm dinner for two
  • 5 25
flag billreilly (Sep 10, 2021 at 14:44) (Below Threshold)
 @adrennan: Reece Wilson?
  • 4 1
 Nice champ
  • 11 26
flag qman11 (Sep 10, 2021 at 15:06) (Below Threshold)
 @BMXJJ327: imagine mistaking Reece Wallace for Reece Wilson hahaha
  • 2 0
 You give me hope
  • 3 0
 Freedom!
  • 3 0
 how about a 68 and I owe you 1?
  • 3 0
 Nice
  • 3 0
 nice
  • 7 25
flag andydhteam (Sep 10, 2021 at 17:29) (Below Threshold)
 How on earth do you guys get Reece Wallace and Reece Wilson mixed up? Reece Wilson was previous champ not Wallace.
  • 4 2
 Let’s see if we can get to 420 likes and maintain it
  • 8 0
 @andydhteam: whoosh
  • 9 32
flag Kysic (Sep 10, 2021 at 20:19) (Below Threshold)
 @adrennan: Does anything sum up the PB comments section better than people getting downvoted for correctly distinguishing between Wallace and Wilson? As if knowing facts—and politely correcting those that don’t somehow subjects one to down votes. Jesus.
  • 7 4
 The moment you realize the people on pinkbike commenting childish shit could be grandparents. Priceless. I’ll log out now.
  • 5 0
 @usedbikestuff: Enjoy the horror while it's still free.....
  • 4 12
flag dmock157 (Sep 10, 2021 at 22:06) (Below Threshold)
 @BMXJJ327: reece wallace isnt a previous world champ.
  • 2 0
 @dmock157: welcome to pinkbike.
  • 1 0
 @reecewallace you should totally try to talk cycling Canada into letting you ride world Champs.
  • 3 5
 @stormracing: Reece Wallace isn’t Reece Wilson
  • 5 1
 @Mcphisto1978:
William Wallace: Scottish
Devinci Wilson: Canadian
The plot thickens.
  • 2 1
 Niiice
  • 2 1
 42
  • 2 0
 @cxfahrer: Indeed - the answer to Everything. But RE: bike content, did you know 42 is the atomic number of molybdenum?
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: Excellent merde-poste.
  • 1 0
 @andydhteam: you must be new here
  • 135 0
 I'm 47 and never had a peak. More like a small hill, maybe a speed bump.
  • 22 0
 Well, that clearly implies your peak is yet to come. Choose the last option, just like everyone did.
  • 6 0
 Undulations are how I like to put them.
  • 6 0
 I've achieved a false flat at best.
  • 23 0
 I'm 53 and I believe that whist it takes longer to get to the peak physical fitness and hold it, my technical abilities keep improving. Have I reached my peak? Don't know and don't care as I'm never going to race for anything other than the fun of it. The trash talking and bragging rights amongst my mates is the only reason I would compete nowadays
  • 7 5
 Maybe some Viagra will help Wink
  • 2 0
 "Not so much as a has-been, more like a never-was." I think this came from early Nitro Circus or something?
  • 1 1
 Biking got scary in my early 30"s so I took an PMBI Level 1 and 2, now in my modish 30's I can push send anytime safely and have far more control then ever before. And am smart enough to recognize when I'm getting tired. Send it!
  • 2 0
 I'm a year behind you and I don't think I've slowed down yet. Became a father 11 years ago, and gradually getting more time back for riding has probably offset waning natural fitness. Injuries do seem to linger for much longer than they used to though...
  • 1 0
 @locaroka; you and me both dude!! How about adding a part to the so called “pole” if you hit a peak that was justified as something good, what age would you be?

I reckon @mikelevy wrote this! The only Peak he’s hit was via a fire road climb…….
  • 4 0
 @Blackers: Right there with ya. Riding better at 53 than I ever have. Love hearing zoomers and millennials talk about being old. So cute, that affectation. Weird how us cynical Xers never rushed to adopt anything “old” ever.
  • 82 20
 What a stupid poll. Oh wait, that’s the norm.
  • 21 3
 PB sells the data to partners.


All the while PB members get into arguments with each other over the subject creating endless chaos.


The Joker runs PB now, didn't you hear?
  • 3 0
 I feel attacked. I am older than the GOAT, tho.
  • 7 0
 Wait for the Top 10 stupidest polls
  • 7 2
 @scott-townes: why/how would they sell it if it is publicly available?
  • 2 1
 @brandaneisma: They gots your data.
  • 42 1
 currently in my late 30's, I would whoop my 20 something self in almost every aspect of biking, except for jumps/drops. 20 something me had no fear of injury and would huck the bike off most things without blinking...older/wiser me knows better and is much more cautious though the difficulty of trails I currently ride is much higher. As long as I'm not competing at a professional level, I think biking is one of the sports you can get better at with age (the 40-50 somethings I sometimes ride with are a testament to that).
  • 7 0
 I largely agree with you as I am a far better rider in my mid 30’s than my twenties. However, I have to admit that during a recent trail side conversation with a few other riders the general consensus was that a large part of the reason we’re all better technical riders with age (mid 30s-40s) is due to finances. We all rode what we could afford and would be sidelined for a full season if anything catastrophic happened to our bikes. Admittedly, my mtb’s were all hand me down hard tails but I rode decent bmx stuff and cracked frames with regularity and taco’d countless Alex triple wall rims. So I guess I’d have to say that skill improves with age but largely as a result of financial situations improving as well?
  • 8 0
 @TKRRRG: Am I getting better or my bike’s just getting better?!
  • 5 0
 @TKRRRG: Also the cost of gas and a vehicle prevented us from getting to places to ride. I went "urban" riding for 75%+ of my riding in my 20s.
  • 4 0
 Don't forget the pre-frontal cortex, the part of the brain that cares about the future, is not fully developed until 25-30. That's my excuse and I'm sticking with it.
  • 2 0
 @warmerdamj: Very true… So I must give my younger self credit. I don’t think I’d go shred the concrete skate park and drop huge sets of stairs with no brakes downtown during rush hour at 35. Could I? Maybe. Am I that dumb? No! Ha!!!
  • 3 0
 Agree. Been riding for 30 years and I think you get technically better as u ride with age if you ride consistently. Not talking about fitness cuz I think that's a different subject. But at 49 I'd say I peaked at 46 because my distaste for crashing has grown a lot in the last few years. Takes me longer to get that dialed feeling back after a gnarly crash, and so it takes longer to get back to the former peak and surpass it. Whatever. I'm still stoked at the bottom of the downhills.
  • 2 0
 I wonder how much improved bikes/tech play a part in that - I‘ll be 40 this year and man, bikes 10 years ago were crap!
  • 1 0
 @Germanmike: you’re not wrong! It is super helpful when stuff doesn’t break constantly.
  • 32 2
 Eh what??!!
So I was in my teens in the 90’s. Bikes were crap. I am in my 40’s now and bikes are ace. The bike makes a difference.
I would argue Im a way smoother rider now with cash to buy better kit but I dont have the same fitness or balls due to repeated injuries and life.
I ride with guys my age up to 50+ and they would smash most folks in terms of fitness getting KOMs etc. They pop out for quick round-the-block marathons on a sunday morning before gardening.
Its a totally pointless survey in that sense. The question and answers should be-
At what point did you start to die on hills?
-when you get a mrs
-when you buy your first house
-when you try for promotion at work
-when you get married
-when you have kids
-when you dont have the time to go on week long road trips
Etc etc etc
  • 8 0
 Agreed. And I saw the evidence. I've been racing XC for about thirty years. No kids. When I was in 'veterans', which is 30-40, there were hardly any other men in my class. Once I hit masters (40-50), we were the biggest group and had some of the fastest lap speeds - these guy's children were now old enough to look after themselves and these dads hit the trails on awesome bikes with time to train.
  • 2 0
 Better question for (former) racers: at what level did you decide improving didn’t mean being faster?

Even the best eventually decide they would rather do other things, regardless of the sport, even if they are still better than nearly everyone.

Personally, my progression has tapered off significantly and I am losing endurance too now that I only ride one or two times per week, but my career is flourishing, my relationships are better than ever, and I’m even a dad.
  • 1 0
 @CaptainBLT: good on ya mate!
  • 1 0
 Amen to that!!
  • 23 1
 Oh this is fun. I like to compare this to my alcohol consumption skills. Thought when I was 21, I was a pro. Now that I'm in my thirties I realized I am much better, and will probably get even better when I hit my forties and so on. Shit, when I hit 60 I'm hoping to be able to crush a case of Busch heavies solo.
  • 17 0
 Hmmmm...I must be out of practice. At 35 years old, I get a decent hangover and sh*tty night's sleep past the 3rd drink mark. When I was 21 it was standard practice to near blackout, and a hangover was seen as amusing.
  • 6 2
 21 year old me needed a mixer. Now I can sip peaty scotches or bourbons with the best. I think that’s more of an achievement than can counting Budweiser’s
  • 4 0
 @snowwcold55 are you drunk now? 30 more years of "crushing a case of Busch heavies solo" is not gonna be great. It never is.
  • 10 0
 Bruh, you obviously haven't hit the point in your 30's where you can't drink for shit. It's coming.
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: this is the truth
  • 3 0
 Youare about to be surprised and not in a good way if that is your expectations getting older
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: wait until you're 45.
  • 2 1
 Wait until your 50's when your pants are your bathroom because your GI tract is so damaged you have about 45 seconds from the fist inkling of having to piss or poop til you're between two parked cars with explosive diarrhea and using a sock to wipe. The harsh reality.
  • 6 1
 @suspended-flesh: bro, it’s the Internet but there is still some level of details that can remain a mystery
  • 1 0
 Busch heavies LMAO!!
  • 1 1
 @suspended-flesh - this is a mountain biking website. What have you done to yourself?
  • 1 0
 @suspended-flesh: fu... talk about merde-posting....
  • 3 0
 @suspended-flesh: I'm 64 and it would take a lot of beers to achieve that. But I'll give it a shot. For science or course.
  • 18 0
 It all depends on your attitude! Some people age gracefully...and some RAGE gracefully!!
  • 4 1
 And some grow old disgracefully.

*Looks in mirror for confirmation*
  • 4 0
 And some people Gray Ragefully
  • 18 0
 Thanks Outside™️…
  • 16 0
 I think Minaar just showed how stupid this poll is.
  • 15 0
 Dude, I'm peaking right now
  • 2 0
 Came for this comment, was not disappointed.
  • 3 1
 Me too! Oh wait, it's the mushrooms.
  • 1 1
 Like a Chinese duck?
  • 15 0
 Pick an age and be a dick about it
  • 14 0
 Riders don’t peak, they just switch disciplines or get an ebike.
  • 14 0
 Where’s the Greg Minnaar option
  • 13 1
 I thought Hans Rey peaked during Pacific Blue. He still hasn’t peaked, probably why they dropped the trials vote.
  • 6 0
 Seems like the only people who can really answer this, would be people who can confirm they've past their peak? Otherwise you're just trying to guess based on pro riders we pay attention to, and their performance.

Which, again, with people like Nino, Sam, and Greg still seeming to be pretty competitive, can be pretty hard to tell when their "peak" was, or if some of their "lesser dominance" in recent years could also be from the competition getting better?

I started riding after I turned 30. And I'm in my mid 30's now, and can say that I'm definitely still getting better/faster. But personally I'd bet my true physical peak was a few years ago (in terms of max potential). But I'm also noticing that with consistent practice/training, I'm still capable of the same weightlifting weights/etc that I was in college. The trick is just keeping it up. So while I might be on the backside of peak, I'm not far off (I don't think).
  • 1 0
 Very well put. Agree!
  • 5 0
 Really depends on your starting point. I started riding in 1989, and probably peaked around 2012 even though I was passed my physical prime, new technology let me push the boundaries farther. Now as I ride less and parent more, my level is decreasing despite better equipment and accumulation of technique. These factors (age, time to ride, relative starting point) vary for everyone.
  • 3 0
 I started riding in the early seventies, between bike technology advances and my ever evolving skill set, I would crush my younger self.

Getting old rocks, just keep the bike tech coming …
  • 7 0
 Age is irrelevant, it's the bike that makes the difference not the rider... that's what the guy at the bike shop said while asking for $12,000.
  • 5 0
 Im 43 and not as fit as I used to be, but...I'm a much better rider than I used to be. Old age and treachery beat youth and enthusiasm, in my case. Better line choice, years of improving my skills, and knowing when to send and when to stay low makes a difference in my riding.
  • 3 0
 This, very much. I don't have the same V02 anymore, but I am a much better and more well rounded rider. I regularly score race results well above my level of training (even compared to those much younger than me). I choose smarter lines, I waste less energy, I capitalize on the areas I know I can make a difference. I can jump, but I scrub most of the time. I don't burn matches, but I diesel all day efforts that put the "kids" to bed. My ego isn't at the forefront. Mountain biking is crazy good on modern equipment, and I still see a decade of personal growth on the bike. Cheers
  • 4 0
 They really need to bring back the ‘I’m not voting, I just want to see what everyone else thought” as I can’t be the only one who just picked one to see the results without thinking.

On the upside I’m quite surprised that the voting seems to be sensible.
I was half expecting some super low age to come out on top but quite agree with what I’m seeing so far.
  • 3 0
 I picked 32 for all sports, as that's close to peak physical condition. I've always used the Tour De France as the gold standard of maximum performance exerted from a human, and average winner age is 28yrs.

Those who are blessed with genetically high V02 max (and have proper training) will be excelling in a high aerobic sport. We lose ~10% per decade of VO2 max after age 30 (reduced loss if we train), and I think this starts to accelerate in our 60's or 70's.

Sometimes I wish I was 20yrs younger and riding.
  • 2 0
 And superb use of drugs!
  • 2 0
 Totes. The physical side deffo peaks under 30 for most people. Empirical evidence from pro sports tells us this. Technical skills wise, probably over 30 for those who keep practicing.
  • 5 0
 What the hell means "above 45"!??
I'm not above 45. I'm just 46. Not even 46 and a half.
How do I check my age in this poll?
  • 1 0
 Exactly. How ridiculous. I’m 47 and going strong. Never stopped riding, and plan to ride til I drop dead
  • 3 0
 I think for many people comparing your own performance peak to that of an elite athlete is irrelevant. I'm certainly not someone who has ever pushed against the wall of my physical capacity and, as such, as a 40 year old haven't really seen a decline in many areas of riding and still see growth. However, I think if I were someone in a situation where I was at the edge of what was possible for my body those declines in reflex speed, muscle mass, and inability to figure out how zoom meetings or facetime works might be more noticeable in my riding outcomes. Turns out 39 is likely the peak though based on recent evidence...because Greg...kidding... but Kudos to Greg, how hard he has worked, and what a wonderful ambassador for the sport he is.
  • 1 0
 exactly what i was thinking. you have to be at world cup speeds for a very long period of time before you start noticing a serious decline in your riding ability with age. for normal people practice will make better
  • 3 0
 “Peaked? Peaked Dee, let me tell you something, I haven’t even begun to peak, and when I do peak you’ll know because I’m gonna peak so hard that everybody in Philadelphia is gonna feel it.”
‒ Dennis Reynolds, ‘It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia’

youtu.be/PrxJJv_Za6M
  • 3 0
 The only people who worry about getting old are the ones who have nothing better to worry about.

Age is s state of mind, there’s really not much more to it.

But I gotta admit that I get a little giggly whenever a younger person talks about getting old

I’m approaching sixty and I ride hard up and down, but more importantly I enjoy riding as much or more than I did when I was younger.

This ^ is the key to life, have fun, don’t get to bogged down in triviality, and never turn down an opportunity.
  • 1 0
 “When you rest, you rust.”
  • 1 0
 I worry about about getting old, because every year everything hurts more. How is anyone still intact at 45 after 4 decades in the saddle?
Unless my worsening back pain goes away through some osteopathic miracle, this may be the year I throw in the towel and become a swimmer (ok, technically that's picking up the towel).
Peak age? Probably 35.
  • 2 0
 this is probably like fighters where it's largely dependent on the amount of abuse they suffered on their journey. from a technical/physical standpoint you'd think 30 is the perfect medium but then you see people like AGGY who are just plagued with injuries.
  • 2 0
 I'm a 49 yo enduro/downhill rider and my peak was in 2018 when I was 46. I rode 88 times that year, hitting lots of admittedly small jumps but charging hard every day. Since then it's been downhill in more ways than one. I also didn't start serious DH riding until I was 36.
  • 1 0
 What’s the biggest difference
  • 2 0
 Lots of fine wine out there, me included. As I lose my reaction times and testicular fortitude my progression will not diminish due to technical improvements. 142, 148, ans 157 are all age related numbers, not standards, once I get to 157 I'll be faster than Minnar.
  • 2 0
 On one hand, physically I peaked a couple of decades ago. Still very fit but when you're closer to 60 than 50 the power curve just ain't what it used to be, On the other hand, mentally I'm still finding new peaks every time I hit the trails.
  • 2 0
 What makes a better rider is time and effort. You need to master your skills and improve them,that is why this sport is so rewarding for a 4 year old or 50 year old person.
At my "peak" I broke ACL in my left knee,it was a huge stop. But now I´m ridding a ton of pump track,I started 3 month ago,my leg was weak and I had no real clue about pumping my bikes in a track. I take the same approach as any kid,just get fun,no hurry to do things,enjoy the moment. Start from 0.
Now my leg is decent to do some easy trail ridding,had new friends made in the track and I learn a lot.
MTB is awesome!
  • 2 0
 At 34 I’m in the best shape of my life, but definitely have more fear than I did at 20. Being a father and knowing that an injury would be a massive pain in the ass keeps me in check, but I’m having more fun then ever out there.
  • 1 0
 I was also careful when younger, but moreso now that I'm not (ahem) 20.

But I think the same - an injury will derail my training and fitness and prevent riding. But sometimes it's easy to get carried away on a fun trail and speed happens. I suspect any crashing I'll do will be unexpected by clipping a pedal or bar.
  • 3 1
 I'm in my mid 30s, I'm more scared to injure myself as I don't bounce back as quickly and I don't have the endurance that I had when I was in my late 20s but my downhill times are still getting faster
  • 2 0
 Scared to get hurt in your thirties?

Wahahaha, at this rate you’ll be using a walker by sixty
  • 1 0
 If i had started at 18 immediately after finishing my high school swim career it would be a different story but I started at age 36 and fat. Skills have improved. Built a better bike. Fitness has been up and down due to injuries and Covid-era and general inability to manage my time. Might have peaked at 37 but holding out that the best is yet to come (mtb-wise at least).
  • 1 0
 Too many factors without addressing skill. How many teen and 20 year old's really know the key skills vs raw power and/or fearlessness. Plus nutrition, visualization, endurance. Yet much this stuff presents so many aha moments as you age with riding.
  • 1 0
 The peak is getting younger and younger. As the generation with much more information and better equipment comes though the peak age is going to come down. We have seen that in the road too.. When an EWS rider turns up at his local enduro and gets beaten by some youngsters. Think they were 14 and 15 it goes to show how the age is coming down. The top juniors who are first season juniors in Dh would be too 20 elite men! Crazy.
  • 1 0
 let me say one thing, everyone in there early 30s are those who tool to DH and freeride in their early teens when the sport was at its peak. long before youtube and groomed trails. I have zero doubt in my mind the reason top riders are in their 30's is because they are from the OG generation who learned to shred gnarly homemade stuff on shit ass bikes. No days progressing is hard, here is a 170mm travel bike which can handle your lack of skill + smoothest groomed trail systems of all times. you can't progress as fast the OG's
  • 1 0
 When I was 17-19. More disposable income? Check. Less niggling injuries holding me back? Check. Less responsibilities? Check. Yolo mentality only a teenager can pull off? Check.

Literally couldn't do half the shit now that I did back then, cos if it went wrong I'd be out of business, home and bike.
  • 1 0
 I started too late. I get more skilful and braver every year, but my fitness and recovery are waning.
I don’t regret how I filled my younger years, but I would have needed parents that were both rich and supportive of expensive hobbies to even be able to begin to compare myself (unfavourably) to any pro athlete.
  • 1 0
 I think that most athletes peak physically in their mid-30s. Yet it's also the time that you start to heal slower and less well from injury. I think you could peak in DH in mid-30s if you are lucky with injuries, which most are not by that point. I'm 25 and have already clapped my left arm.
  • 1 0
 As others have said, this is hard to answer for us non-pros. When I was in my 20s, my potential peak fitness was undoubtedly better than now in my early 40s, but for various reasons I was definitely not a better rider then. For one thing, I was actually 20+ pounds heavier back then and knew nothing about diet or nutrition, so I lived on the cheapest food and drink I could get. For another thing, not only could I not afford the best bikes then, even the best bikes back then were garbage compared to what I ride now. In the last 5 years especially, I've learned much about fitness and injury prevention/management, which has certainly made me stronger in ways that make me a better rider. My diet and nutrition are better, but certainly not perfect as I'm carrying several extra pounds for sure. I have a wife and very young kids and a busy working life, so I don't have as much free time to ride as I did in my single years, but I think I make more of the time I do spend riding and training. I feel like this year I'm a faster, better rider than I've ever been, and I'm honestly surprised at my own progression even in my 40s. I definitely know what risks I am not prepared to take, but on trails I feel comfortable with, I'm absolutely faster than ever. I intend to keep this trend going as long as possible, but I know eventually it has to reverse. My main goal at this point is to still be riding at a good level when my kids get into their teen years and can start to ride faster than me.
  • 4 0
 Does anyone ever really reach peak MTB?
  • 2 0
 Needs a “when they aren’t competitive anymore” option. Idc if the rider is 80 if they’re passing everybody in the field.
  • 4 0
 My peak the season before I became a dad. It's been downhill ever since.
  • 5 0
 This guy gets it. Becoming a dad immediately limited my time to ride to about 30% of what it used to be, AND created this little voice in the back of my mind before each descent that whispers, "if you break or sprain something, your wife is gonna kill ya..."
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230:

Its totally true... although I became a rider after I became a dad. But I can totally see how I'd have spent wayyy more time riding before kids.

Two things though.

My dad once told me he kind of "forgot" how to have fun for himself when he retired. And thinking back on it, my dad never really did anything fun for just himself. So I think showing my kids that "daddy has a hobby" is healthy/good.

My wife is supportive of me riding, as it keeps me healthy, and happy. She understands it has some risks, but trusts me to make good choices, and that generally speaking injuries are because of some freak accident, not that I was doing something wayyy outside my pay grade.

And this is why lots of older guys wear more pads too. At some point, we realize its cheaper to buy a set of pads/full face helmet, than it is to lose time from work, pay the insurance premiums/ER bills, or not be able to help out around the house.
  • 2 0
 Once they become teenagers, you get some time back. Also, your wife may not want as much attention as before you were a dad as well because of all the parental trauma. Of course, its all too late for you anyway - get an ebike.
  • 2 0
 @ocnlogan: Totally get it. Fortunately for me (and my family), I have plenty of hobbies that keep me having fun. I'm one of those people who truly loves weight lifting, I obviously have mountain biking, I shoot archery regularly, and there's skiing in the winter. Frankly, its trying to maintain some balance between these hobbies and my family (2 kids under 3 years old) that has probably eroded my biking time.

I'm 100% on the "more pads for dads" train! In my 20's I used to ride our local gnar shirtless, with no more protection than a helmet and gloves. Now I wear a 3/4 sleeve jersey, knee pads, elbow pads, and invested in a full-face convertible helmet. It's amazing how many gashes and bruises can be mitigated with armor.
  • 1 0
 @zeedre: Hell - mine will be on mountain bikes with me way before their teenagers!! Smile
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: don’t marry a bitch. I’ve got a 6 year, a 2 year old and a few broken ribs and a bruised sternum. The wife hasn't said anything because she gets it and she understands me. Is she disappointed? Sure, but so am I.
  • 3 0
 Damn, that sucks dude, maybe you’re doing it wrong?

When I got kids I rode as much as ever, then I started riding with my kids and got even more trail time.

Now my kids are adults,I still ride a bunch, then when we visit them or they visit us, I ride even more.

You’re doing something wrong, yup.
  • 1 0
 How old are your kids? The first 2 years are a write off. Heck, the best advice that was given to us as a couple was "Don't consider a divorce for the first 2 years", and it was true (well, 2 and a half years, actuallyWink Now it's no problem, schedules are worked out, kids are starting to ride. Life's back to normal, but even better. Road riding as a commute took the sting out of not riding as much, as nobody will fault you for riding to work!
  • 1 0
 Hold on, is there a Dad joke in there?
  • 4 0
 Choose an age and be a dick about it.
  • 2 0
 I would but can't find my viagra...
  • 1 0
 Now im in my late 20s i defintely fly off of the bike much less then i did. I used to tumble down the mountain like a loose tire and walk away with a smile. Now id rather just stick to good form and wise braking lol..
  • 1 0
 Stupid poll. At 34 I'm in the best physical shape I've ever been in and I'm sending bigger lines than ever. 25 year old me would be terrified of the trails I'm riding today. Some of the gnarliest riders I know are 40 to 50
  • 1 0
 this is a general comment for the overall population, there are 10 year old kids doing shit these days i can't even wrap my head around...
  • 1 0
 45 years old, ride with 20 & 30 year olds. I'm learning & getting better/faster all the time.

I guess you can teach an old dog new tricks.
  • 1 0
 47 1/2 here, and despite 2(!) crashes in the whistler bike park today, still haven't hit my peak. Don't really give a hoot about anyone else.
  • 2 0
 I bet most of us hit our peak about 15 minutes after we hit the brewery for post-ride refreshments. 30 minutes tops.
  • 1 0
 In a surprise turn of events Pinkbike readers think they have “not yet peaked” and likely are “one upgrade away from EWS/DH domination.”
  • 1 0
 Greg Minnaarrrrrrrr will define the peak age for DH thank you very much. At the current rate we are looking at around 65 or so.
  • 1 0
 All y'all that think you get better with age.....must have all the free time, money and life figured out...or you live in a van and only mtb. I don't see any other way
  • 2 0
 Most men eat better and sleep longer as they age. It balances things out.
  • 1 0
 got slower in my mid 40's even though I had stopped drinking and was trying to keep the fitness up. Doing the same runs over time you can see it.
  • 2 0
 Apparently whatever age Greg Minnaar is
  • 1 0
 This poll should be split by gender. I think it's pretty well known that men peak at a younger age than women.
  • 1 3
 26-27yrs - period, undisputable, all things being the same. This is the sweet spot balance of all components learned......after that one becomes delusional racing other older riders. You need to always race against 18-20 yr to keep reality.
  • 2 0
 The older the rider, the harder the send. Planning for first Rampage at 80
  • 1 0
 I think you implode into dust at 80, as opposed to bouncing like rubber at 18
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: Perfect way to go.
  • 1 0
 doesn't make sense to have exact years as poll options. I see it being more useful with time ranges like 20-29 etc.
  • 2 0
 53 and still improving. Took it up late though.
  • 1 0
 I feel like I’ve peaked but yet have still to peak.. Maybe just been flat this whole time, this poll really bummed me out
  • 3 1
 You're only as old as the woman you feel!
  • 1 0
 I'd say I peak every few months. Usually only for an hour or two at a time.
  • 1 0
 Minnaar and Kelly Slater extending GOAT status into their 40th year and beyond. Inspiring stuff.
  • 3 0
 4 times a week...
  • 1 0
 Making better choices the older I get. Having less stamina and will to compete though…
  • 1 0
 Kind of ironic two of the names of star athletes named just came off suspension soon for P.E.D'S.
  • 1 0
 If i was juiced to the gills with hgh and test, and have stemcell treatment when i get injured, i'd still be in my prime.
  • 1 0
 Who’s the oldest person responding to this thread?

Anyone over sixty? Seventy? Seventy-five?
  • 3 0
 I'm 64 and climbing as well as I ever have. Down hill is a little toned down but as fun as ever.
  • 1 0
 @Brazinsteel: How long riding?
Physiologically your best at age 64 could not rival your best at 34.
  • 2 0
 @njcbps: I've been riding mtb on and off since 89'. It could be more psychological than any real physical thing. I'm riding with more focus now so the perception could also have an affect. But shit am I having fun. Maybe that's the thing.
  • 1 0
 @Brazinsteel: Concur about the perception. I feel like I'm going fast on downhills and that's the most important point. Although checking Strava KOM segment times afterwards can deflate that a bit. lol
  • 1 0
 Hard to say, skills an balls definitely are more prominent in my youth but, strength an endurance come with age
  • 2 0
 Outside wanted to know what age you all were.
  • 2 0
 39 duh
  • 10 1
 don`t you mean 69 my bruh
  • 2 0
 This seems arbitrary
  • 1 0
 It definitely is! Polls are for politics.
  • 2 0
 meh, old as you feel...
  • 2 0
 ...said by nobody in their 70's
  • 2 1
 yeah...another stupid poll
  • 1 0
 Given modern technology, a rider is never at their peak
  • 1 0
 The age of Jack, Greg, Nino and Jolanda.
  • 2 0
 Nino really fks up the results. I’m convinced he’s a cybernetic organism, living tissue over metal endo-skeleton
  • 1 0
 bouta turn 30, shredding better than ever
  • 2 0
 4000 ft
  • 1 0
 The age that a rider reaches his/her peak is when the rider gets an emtb!
  • 1 0
 What? Poll ends at 45? Turning 46 in a couple of days - oh my…
  • 2 0
 I'd say it's all downhill from there, but according to the polls, it's all XC from there.
  • 1 0
 Dunno... ask Greg Minnaar!
  • 2 0
 Dick Pound .... he's 79
  • 2 0
 It damn sure isnt 45
  • 2 0
 My age + 1
  • 1 0
 I'm very disappointed that everyone didn't put 39 in the downhill one.
  • 1 0
 Tomorrow, always tomorrow.
  • 1 0
 All I know is that Greg Minnaar is an absolute machine!
  • 1 0
 About 5 years ago
  • 1 0
 39 - the GOAT and myself
  • 2 1
 28.99

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv42 0.024838
Mobile Version of Website