Poll: Does Your Trail Bike Have a Weight Problem?

Apr 26, 2019
by Richard Cunningham  
BTR Pinner
BTR Fabrications' Pinner: The Brits (who coined the phrase "winch and plummet") seem to be embracing steel-framed suspension bikes that set new records for acceptable weight. The Pinner comes in at 35.56 pounds (16.13 kg)


"Long, low and slack" may have become a metaphor for "overweight" as the influence of enduro and winch-and-plummet riders has pushed the heft of many trail bikes well beyond the once sacrosanct 30-pound barrier. After a decade of incredible improvement,
you'd be right to expect bikes would be lighter and stronger, but high-end trail bikes have since gained almost five pounds.

It's doubtful that the average rider has evolved into a much stronger beast who has no issue pedaling a porky bike uphill. Maybe the reason that trail bikes are fatter than ever is simply because the mountain bike is 40 years old, so a pot belly is acceptable. The most probable theory to explain the girth is that mountain biking may be evolving into a gravity-powered summer snow-sport and thrill seekers are happily trading pedaling performance for raw speed to maximize their experience.
Raw Madonna Bike Test
Raaw's Madonna aluminum-framed enduro racing bike hits the scales at 37 pounds (16.79kg) as reviewed - comparable to many downhill sleds.

Specialized Stumpjumper EVO Carbon
A lightweight: The carbon version of Specialized's new Stumpjumper Evo weighs only 31 pounds. With inserts and DH tires, however, it would be closer to 33.


What is certain, though, is that bikes are more capable and descending skills have improved. Both have forced designers to build correspondingly stronger frames and components. Strength usually comes with a weight penalty, but there's more to the equation than a three kilogram frame. Double-thickness tire casings, 350-gram inserts and gravity-certified suspension components are go-to's for many trail riders.

Intense Sniper XC Elite
Intense Sniper Elite: Trending on the flip side are gravity-inspired cross-country bikes with slack geometry, capable handling, and weights in the 23-pound range. "Downcountry" bikes, as some call them, strike a balance between XC racers like the Sniper, and dedicated enduro machines. They offer an alternative for those who don't want drag around the whole tool box for the six minutes they may need the speed wrench.


Arguably, some ride at speeds and intensities that justify those choices, but I'd wager that most riders who are huffing around on "enduro certified" trail bikes would be faster (and happier) without the flab. Today's poll asks (in a perfect world) what you think the maximum weight of an all-purpose trail bike intended for an aggressive rider should be.

What do you think the maximum weight of an all-purpose trail bike intended for an aggressive rider should be?




318 Comments

  • + 98
 Maybe there is an ideal weight, instead of a maximum, depending on the bike's purpose. Weight/ mass gives control and stability. So depending on what you ride it can be a good thing. And up the hill there is quite a bit more than just weight, your seated position, pedaling efficieny, tire choice..
  • + 9
 Oh yeah, and standing position too! I only moved to a longer frame last year May (from 375mm reach to 460mm reach, dropped stem length from 50mm to 35mm). The limitation on the old frame (DMR Switchback, like a DMR Trailstar) was that because my kneepads would hit the bars, I couldn't get my weight as much forwards as I would want to so I lost front wheel grip and it started to wander. On my bike now (BTR Ranger) I can get my weight wherever I want it to be and climb so much easier and steeper. It is probably a heavier bike but it is pretty irrelevant. If your bike ends up pointing in the wrong direction, you won't get up the hill anyway.
  • + 4
 100% agree with this, bikes are so good now weight is less of an issue, a heavier bike handles the rough stuff better anyway.
  • + 34
 Bikes are getting longer, so there is more frame, thus more weight.
However, most of the weight is due to the increase in wheel size. a 26" tyre is much lighter than an equivilent 29" tyre.
  • + 1
 The climate also makes a difference. There is no way I'm climbing 15 kg of bike in 40 degrees C for 4 months of the year.
  • - 5
flag EnduroRider1986 (Apr 26, 2019 at 4:07) (Below Threshold)
 I agree! More bikes weights more, as some S bikes are almost too long for really small People. 29ers are heavier than 27,5" and most bikes now run proper tires instead of compromised lightweight ones!

In size L/XL weight should be around 14-15 kg to get a stable and reliable setup! With today's Suspension Layouts like VPP and steeper seat angles you can pedal some 15+ kg bikes better up the hill than some direct sales lightweight 13 kg bikes!

My Trail/Enduro 'do it all bike' weights 15.8 kg's with Super Gravity tires but it's XL and super long so lots of material surely weights even with Carbon handlebar and cranks.
  • + 10
 @carlitouk: well you won't have that problem in the UK no matter how heavy the bike! Lol
  • + 17
 A 34 lb aluminum slugger is all I know.
  • + 4
 @bainbridge: Not lived in UK for nearly a decade. Sunny interior Spain for me Smile
  • + 0
 @carlitouk: ha, ha, great!
  • + 15
 riding a quite heavy bike (Raaw Madonna) since this season, and couldn't agree more: riding positon is much more imoortant to me (no more backpain after longer climbs), front wheels stays where it belongs to, no matter how steep the uphill is. When it comes to descending, the extra grams make the bike stick like glue to the trail and I ride with so much confidence.
  • + 3
 @EnduroRider1986: I don't know about that, my Canyon Lux xc bike weighs 11.2kg, and absolutely climbs better than my Santa Cruz 5010. It's not even close.

Yes, it breaks more and doesn't track even close as well as a proper trail bike.

I still have more fun riding the pig, but she stays home on race day.
  • - 32
flag oldtech (Apr 26, 2019 at 7:09) (Below Threshold)
 Pinkbike I'm 40 + and weigh 142 lds in full gear. 6 ft tall and eat everything in sight that's in its original form. Just because you guys are lazy and sit behind a desk eating junk food sporting a plus-size gut Tire doesn't mean the rest of the 40's crowd is. Put that in your pipe and smoke it.
  • + 61
 @oldtech: 142 lbs and 6ft tall, sounds like you need to lay off the crack pipe and start eating your oatmeal old man.
  • + 1
 @LarsonBush: anyone who's ridden/owned a bike with proper seat tube angle knows... and yet PBs reviewers can't be bothered to tell the difference between actual seat tube angle and effective... "it's too hard to measure", etc...
  • + 2
 @RAAWMountainBikes I completely agree, my geometron is the best climbing bike I’ve owned, and it’s also the heaviest trail bike I’ve owned. Seated position is way more important than weight. Plus the extra weight/stability is fantastic for going back down
  • + 4
 I want my bike to weigh as lite as possible. This whole thing that the bike should have some weight for better handling is ridiculous.. DH bigs have gotten lighter..FACT! Trail bikes should aslo. I'll let my fat ass make up the the weight issue. Mmmmm..beer!
  • + 0
 @oldtech: Too many donuts for too many 40 plusers nowadays.. I get pissed off if I hunch over and have an inch of flab on my lower gut.
  • + 2
 Madonna weight is a bit of weird 37 pounds is 16.79kg not a 6.79kg right?
  • + 4
 @allbiker: Thats right, but also keep in mind that it was a pretty heavy build with coil, DH casing and GX Eagle. Our 'Fox Factory' bike weighs 15.1kg. If you like it a bit lighter you could easily build it up at 14.5-14,8kg without much compromises.
  • + 7
 @oldtech: being 6 feet tall and weighing only 142 could also mean you’re lazy and need to hit the gym for some strength training. Many people can be your height, but weigh 40 pounds more with excellent endurance and far more strength...
  • + 2
 Is a winch-and-plummet bike a trail bike tho? Sounds halfway between trail and dh, aka enduro, aka mini dh, aka all mtn. 35 lbs seems reasonable.
  • - 8
flag oldtech (Apr 26, 2019 at 9:09) (Below Threshold)
 @bohns1: the truth burns like fire for the haters probably ain't seen their winky in years
  • - 9
flag oldtech (Apr 26, 2019 at 9:13) (Below Threshold)
 @TypicalCanadian: if you're ever in my area or in a East Coast Enduro let's Shred. Enduro boys be sporting a plus-size gut also in today's circuit. Most XC racers still keeping it tight. Haven't met the first person off this site yet that could hang other than my wife.
  • - 2
 @Nerra: sun's out guns out.
  • + 7
 @oldtech: you realize you can hit the gym, ride hard often, weigh over 180 and not have any fat on you right? Not that complex. And you better have endurance when you weigh the same as fit people who are 5” shorter than you, otherwise you will just look malnourished. I’ll help you put your bike on your bike rack so you don’t hurt your petite physique.
  • - 9
flag oldtech (Apr 26, 2019 at 9:34) (Below Threshold)
 @TypicalCanadian: talk is just that never seen you at any races or on any boxes you can help me carry my trophies to the car Nancy as they are usually so large they Clash against my petite figure
  • + 0
 @oldtech: Nancy? Haha good one. And congrats on your sick trophy collection, you’re clearly an amazing rider. Very impressive.
  • - 7
flag oldtech (Apr 26, 2019 at 9:50) (Below Threshold)
 @TypicalCanadian: only going to let you carry them if you wear speedos and a muscle shirt. Don't want all those hours of gym time to go unnoticed. I always knew when I spent countless hours in the gym I would get so much faster on the bike.
  • - 11
flag oldtech (Apr 26, 2019 at 9:51) (Below Threshold)
 @TypicalCanadian: I pick bikes up I put bikes down I pick bikes up I put bikes down I pick bikes up I put bikes down I pick bikes up I put bikes down
  • + 7
 @oldtech: Just give up dude, you sound desperate. We get it, you think you’re the absolute shit because you weigh the same as a pre-pubescent boy. Time to move on!
  • - 6
flag oldtech (Apr 26, 2019 at 9:55) (Below Threshold)
 @TypicalCanadian: I don't ever give up its called endurance boi! You seem to forget this is what this all started about endurance and you're ready to give up already. You Gym Rats are all the same.
  • + 4
 @oldtech: Haha you’re such a badass dude, we are all so impressed with you and your incredible physical ability you claim to possess...
  • - 6
flag oldtech (Apr 26, 2019 at 10:32) (Below Threshold)
 @TypicalCanadian: we? Got a gerbil in your pocket?
  • - 4
flag oldtech (Apr 26, 2019 at 10:39) (Below Threshold)
 @TypicalCanadian: youtu.be/SIqGRMf3LYc
Bro I found you a sponsor get more bro
  • + 3
 @oldtech: @TypicalCanadian: Find a room together ok? This topic was about bicycle weight, not your own bodyweight. There sure must be places on the internet for that kind of stuff.
  • + 3
 @oldtech: so you weigh less than 140 without gear. That's sad. Maybe you need to do some weight lifting, push-ups, pullups, etc.? Come ride some real trails out in AZ (not ohio garbage), but don't fall, you'll probably easily snap a bone on a rock with the lack of muscle protection....
  • + 6
 @zyoungson: depends what you ride with your bike. if you go mainly downhill, yup, weight is no problem. if your trips are 70+km and more than 1500m of gained elevation (without shuttles Smile , the 2+kg difference is big factor...
  • - 4
flag oldtech (Apr 26, 2019 at 13:09) (Below Threshold)
 @S851: you can't argue with science
  • + 1
 @S851: Sounds like you need an xc marathon bike not an enduro rig.
  • - 5
flag oldtech (Apr 26, 2019 at 13:49) (Below Threshold)
 @Phazz470: you believe everything you read on the internet you know it's true There's a saying about people who run their mouth and have no idea what they're talkin about. Utah's where it's at. Arizona's for squids that can't cut it in Utah
  • + 3
 @oldtech: Lol. X has harder trails than X. Very broad statement with zero evidence. Both Utah and AZ have their fair share of technical trails.
  • + 1
 @allbiker: Good spot mate, at least someone correct that now Wink
  • + 4
 @oldtech: calm down dear! It's only an article in a website.
  • + 4
 @oldtech: @Typicalcanadian
We've all fallen into the trap of assuming oldtech is a man!
If he is a man there really is nothing to brag about looking emaciated. That's for road bikers.
  • + 1
 And then I get people with 12 kg bikes who laugh at my 15,6 kg Giant Reign while carrying a 7 Kg backpack filled with shit! As @RAAWMountainBikes says, it's about ideal weight, not maximum weight. And there are more factors such as fitness which are crucial. I 88 kg and my current 15,6 kg Reign gets me up the hill much better than my previous 12,6 kg Yeti SB6C, simply because I'm way fitter now than back then. Ride what you want and have fun doing it.
  • + 2
 @mych79: he’s the new Randy. The slim rider.
  • + 1
 @mych79: spedo kale KING BOI
  • + 2
 @mych79: sorry it took me so long to get back to you I've been out riding my bike. I'm calm as a cucumber always. I just use this site as a time-waster when I'm stuck in line somewhere or something like that in life and not on my bicycle. Good day bro
  • + 2
 @oldtech: cool story bro
  • + 73
 I see a lot of riders who are carrying an extra 5kg - 10kg of body fat and they aren't too fussed about it. They are just enjoying the ride and pushing the bike a bit more than others. It puts an extra 1kg - 2kg of bike weight into perspective.
  • + 25
 This. Any time I think about gear swapping to save a pound or two, I remind myself of the 10-15 I’m carrying around that needs to go first.
  • + 7
 This is the smart reply. Even for a fit rider, the bike is at most 20% of the weight equation. Weight weenie is no longer a thing.
  • + 5
 I’ve argued this for years. It’s insane to me people are so concerned about the “grams” of their bike when they are overweight themselves. And additionally the 20% comment above is spot on.

Taking a long bathroom break reduces weight for free.
  • + 6
 A fit talentesnrider can make the most of a well designed bike regardless of the frame. However, I think a strong light bike (especially wheelset) can provide “snap” regardless of rider weight. When racing, having a bike that can be compliant and track through rough and snap out of corners, at a race start, or when passing another rider, provides a real advantage, even if some of it is just placebo. Placebo is powerful. @Virtueman:
  • + 0
 Then you lose that weight and realize just how much it was holding you back. Being overweight is from being lazy. Lazy about what you eat. Lazy about how much you eat. Lazy about exercise and awareness of calories in and out. You wanna be fat and lazy be my guest just don't try to glorify that lifestyle.
  • + 4
 Doggone. Got a new, two-pound lighter bike last fall, then gained 5 pounds. Frown
  • + 4
 @richardcunningham I would like to have seen some mention of sprung vs unsprung weight. It's such a little-discussed part of the weight conversation but I would argue one of the biggest considerations. Power to total weight ratio means a lot on the climbs.. If you weigh 140 lbs, and can push 400 watts consistently on a 25 lb bike, you will rocket uphill. But downhill it instantly changes to momentum, stability and suspension performance. Less unsprung weight will make a big difference here, whether the overall bike is 30 or 35 lbs matters less. Ditch the huge cassette, DH tires, heavy inserts, wheels and hubs made of lead. The performance gains are real. I'd take a 33 lb bike with well-spec'd wheel/tire setup over a 29 lb bike with heavy wheelset on long rides in the mountains any day of the week.
  • + 3
 @g123: if you can push 400 watts consistantly you'll be dusting off nino!
  • + 10
 @g123: There are two sides to unsprung weight. Bikes are pretty lightweight vehicles. As far as the wheels go, heavier wheels store a lot of inertia and their gyroscopic effect creates a significant measure of stability while descending. The trade off for that mass-related stability are negative steering traits and poor acceleration at low speeds. The effect of unsprung weight on the suspension less important as far as mountain bikes are concerned. Unlike motorsports we use higher (relative to our total mass) spring rates and much less negative travel. High speed video of mountain bike suspensions at work reveals that the tire and rider do the lion's share of smoothing high frequency impacts, while the suspension takes care of lower-frequency, higher amplitude events. That said, the difference can be felt, and I agree that there is a break point where the mass of the wheels (and weighty frames), becomes an albatross for anything but descending.
  • + 3
 Doesn't work that way with body weight. A normal size guy can weigh 120kg and still function in daily life. But if you strap a 50kg backpack on a 70kg guy he won't be able to manage a normal day.
  • + 6
 @Ttimer: I bet @oldtech could manage a week with 50kg on his back, and he's only 62kg.
  • + 2
 @clink83: hah yes! This was just to illustrate the point that power/weight has an overwhelming effect during climbs, and 8 or 10 lbs of bike weight is very noticeable.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham: I think we are mostly in agreement; I still feel the unsprung component is largely ignored when people put a bike up on the scales. All people want to see is that the scale reads u see some magic number, while there is more to the equation. 29” wheels magnify these handling effects, where the same weight increase leads to even worse low speed performance traits.
Overall, the average rider on identical 30 lb trail bikes would benefit from the one with a much lighter weight wheel assembly (all unsprung parts included). They’re more responsive with handling and accelerate quickly, both of which are immediately noticeable from the first pedal stroke.
  • + 1
 f=ma for objects not moving in uniform circular motion, f=(1mv^2)/(2r) for objects moving in uniform circular motion.
  • + 2
 @Virtueman: That only holds if you think of average sized male riders from North America.
For women, a heavy enduro bike can equal a third of their body weight and among Italians can be above 20% easily.
  • + 0
 @RichardCunningham: I cannot get over how much better the suspension works on my Levo than on far lighter non-E bikes, and the big difference is the increased sprung mass.
  • + 41
 This is a virtuous circle in my eyes. Rider grows in confidence fitness, and speed- breaks lightweight component on bike, component is replaced with adequate weight component more suited to task at hand- heavier component means rider has to be fitter to maintain same pace- Rider grows in confidence, fitness etc etc.... Repeat as many times as appropriate until bike no longer breaks.
  • + 6
 the circle of 'bike'...
  • + 8
 But the cycle doesn't end there. Bikes today can cover up a lot of incomplete/poor bike handling techniques, riding heavy and breaking things, so you need to use heavier-duty stuff. This was me. Heavy cheap bike. Want to get a better performance bike, so I want lighter. I got more confident and then wanted to do more tech stuff and jumps, but then am constantly flatting, tweaking wheels, breaking stuff. Got a bigger all mountain bike to get confidence on this new terrain without abusing my bike. But then figured out how to 'really' ride this stuff and went lighter trail bike again because I know longer needed the extra 'beef' to avoid breaking my bike and wanted a faster more responsive pedaling bike again. Now I have started doing some park/lift riding, and am starting with a full DH bike to learn the ropes because it makes me feel the most confident and safe (which is really important to me being 48 years old). Eventually I may slim down to a lighter enduro/all mountain bike for park riding if I do enough of it to improve to the level where I find a DH bike overkill.
  • - 15
flag thenotoriousmic (Apr 26, 2019 at 4:04) (Below Threshold)
 Air shocks suck and if you don’t run at least double downs you’re going to burp / rip your tyres. At the end of the day the weight pays for itself. I’d rather have a bike I don’t have to fix all the time.
  • + 2
 @kilazilla: "Life Cycles"
  • + 1
 I am a victim of said cycle. It feels good to ride a section of trail and not have to worry about the bike or components and only your ability. Components/frames still break of course just less frequently.
  • - 3
 How I’ve been downvoted for that is beyond me. These pinkbikers are on another level.
  • + 3
 @thenotoriousmic: because what you said is nonsense. Coil suspension and DD casings on a trail bike?
  • + 1
 @clink83: That’s what I run sometimes run a 2.5 minion exo on the front but you have to run them so hard on the back to stop them burping or rimming out that it’s worth taking the weight penalty just to have a better damped tyre you can run at lower pressures and have better puncture protection. Same with the coil. Way better performance and I never have to do any maintenance where you have to service an air shock all the time and they’re super unreliable too. Like I said I’ll take the weight not to have to deal with all that and judging by this article I’m not the only one. It’s not like I’m racing world cups I can’t be the only one having these issues.
  • + 3
 The reality is that riding uphill on heavy bike will not make people fitter. On a lighter bike they put in the same effort but ride farther in a given amount of time.
  • + 4
 @thenotoriousmic: look at the stuff XC racers are riding on 4 inch bikes and single ply tires and tell me you need coil suspension and DH tires on a trail bike. Do you ride on obsidian riddled trails?
  • + 1
 The ultimate goal is a KTM 640 adventure and just swap the drivetrain with a 1x10 SLX with 36 front and 10/36 rear
  • + 0
 @clink83: XC racers who have to get one ride out of their tyres on mellow xc tracks? And I said double downs not dh but I do use dh tyres sometimes when double downs aren’t enough. Not obsidian but there’s a lot of slate here.
  • + 1
 @clink83: I want to be able to ride three times a week hassle free. I’m never getting that with a air shock and exo’s. Happy to pay the weight penalty for reliability and better performance.
  • + 38
 My Bike might have a weight problem but let’s not fat shame the poor girl. I still love it even with a bit of skin folds and fat rolls!
  • + 10
 I heard that she is really dirty.
  • + 1
 @bigtim: Underrated comment!
  • + 26
 Bikes are just settling around what I'd call "sensible weight".
Super light bikes aren't just more expensive, they're arguably less stable and more fragile.
33lbs seems to be roughly the sweet spot.

Modern bike's pedaling characteristics are also much better, so weight is slightly less of a burden
  • + 4
 Exactly. I just accepted that this is how much a mountain bike weighs.
  • + 17
 I find the poll in lbs leads to funny values in kg. You can chose either 13.6kg, which is competitively light, but if you chose 14kg, you also agree to 15kg (which I find to heavy unless you count it with Cushcore and DH tires for racing).

My full alu DH bike with 27.5 Magic Marries in Large is 15.9kg (Solid Strike EVO).

For me, a trail/enduro Bike around 13.5kg is light, around 14kg is normal and above 14kg it is heavy.
  • + 3
 My aluminum Transition Patrol setup with 2.8 inch tires on 38mm rims is at 36lbs, but I probably carrying an extra kg or 2 of body weight.
  • + 15
 It annoys me how people go out and buy top of the range bikes and focus on shedding weight wherever possible and then you see them carrying around multiple spare tubes, pump, CO2 cartridges, lunch for a village and everything else they can fit in their bag or on their bike.
  • + 27
 Well it is even more annoying if they don’t carry the spares and then always have to rely on other people carying all these things. Instead use your spare half hour to go out for a run will help you to drop that extra pound of body weight and gain some extra fitness.
  • + 4
 so you want us to carry all this stuff and ride heavier bikes too?

I also carry a tiny shock pump (Topeak Microshock), spare derailleur hanger, chain links, zip-ties, a knife, a disinfection spray and a small medkit
  • + 3
 I think the rider should think about what/where they are riding and take the essential bits of kit. Obviously everyone has a different idea of what they would class as necessary in the kit bag. Ditching kgs from the kit bag and body weight is going to be a hell of a lot cheaper than shedding weight from the bike
  • + 2
 You need to chill out then. What other people choose to carry should have no bearing on you whatsoever; what they choose not to carry is the only thing that might affect you.

I’m a bit of a minimalist myself but it’s the guys who ride w/o a tube or pump or multi-tool and then want/need my help that affect my riding; not the dudes with a 12 lb pack even though they are doing a 1-hour loop.
  • + 5
 Nothing other people do annoys me, unless it affects me directly. Go ahead and get a 25-pound XC bike and strap a water cooler jug and an army field pack on your back for all I care. Just don't ask me to help you carry it.
  • + 2
 the point is to be able to carry all that and shed weight... its like when people go about saying youre saving a couple hundred grams by spending 300 bucks when you could just not drink a third beer, but this way i can still drink that third beer and be lighter.
  • + 2
 @js11: Any way you put it, you're lighter. Drink the third beer, and have a lighter bike. Don't drink the third beer and have a lighter bike. It's win-win either way.
  • + 4
 @minix: This argument about "just drop weight on yourself" is silly.
First of all, not everyone is overweight, second, I usually see the lighter, fitter riders on lighter bikes, while the heavy gravity bros and shuttle boys ride the heavy bikes. And third, being fit and having a light bike is obviously better than being fit and riding a heavy bike.
  • + 3
 @minix: Plus the village goes hungry....
  • + 1
 @matttauszik: haha yes and we wouldn’t want that, would we!? Wink
  • - 1
 @Ttimer: Body weight is umspring weight on your frame.
  • + 1
 Funny, I get annoyed on trails when I see people without the same gear. It's called "preparedness," as in being capable of handling mechanical issues, real flats, and other events, while staying hydrated, protected from the elements, and not mooching off buddies or strangers when they get into trouble.
I had to give up a 26" tube to a guy on a 29er (and yes, it can be done) who'd gone thru his only spare; I suppose that he actually expected tubeless w/ sealant would really work, which it did not.
The 26" state of the art Ti softtail I first rode almost 20 years ago weighed a bit over 24 lb. Same bike today, still my main ride, with different Fox fork, front disc only (if a V brake will skid your rear wheel, you don't need a rear disc), beefier Mavic wheels and the widest tires I can fit into the frame and fork, say 2.6", is now more than 28 lb. but I am small and have not had a tube flat in over a year running just 17.5 psi, regardless of terrain. The ride is far more comfortable and stable than the original was, to where I indefinitely keep postponing a Full suspension, because I want to keep my triple crank thank you, and can ride most everything I want to risk trying at 68. Rode the Poison Spider on it a few years back (sensibly walking the death zones), and I found it generally a POS. The lower loose rubble had no appeal, and a long FS enduro bike would have made the ride barely less disgusting. I may just stay on enjoyably smoother terrain and let you macho thrashers beat your fillings out on unaesthetic but also treacherous new era testpieces.
Re: weight - loss is instantaneous, when the result of purchasing a lighter bike or component. I have never known a single rider whose weight has fluctuated more than five pounds in one or two decades, while conditioning and fitness has. Trouble is, few have the time to invest in either major fitness gain, or weight loss, over time. Year to year, we all inevitably seem to ride about the same as ever.
  • + 11
 Pretty much all the upgrades I put on my bike (which already came with an alu frame on the heavier side) made it gain weight: dropper post, bigger rotors, waaay heavier tires, soup plate cassette (although I did get rid of the front derailleur), etc.
But is it more fun to ride now? Hell yes.

The fewest of hobby riders are super trained athletes with below 8% body fat, and I’d rather lose 2-3kg of body weight than spend several hundreds or thousands to make my bike one or two pounds lighter. The only point where I see a big advantage in weight is wheels because it’s rotating mass, but otherwise I’d rather have a sturdy low maintenance do it all bike than a lightweight race machine where I always have to worry about shit breaking.

Because at the end of the day, if something breaks and I have to replace it, I can’t ride my bike in the meantime. And riding my bike is what it’s all about.
  • + 3
 I never saw someone with about 8% bf- thats really really Low (and unhealty for non enchanced).

And yes- you wont notice 2kgs in Suspension/ frame.

If the bike is too heavy go work out and get stronger.
  • + 4
 @NotNamed: When people say 8% body fat they really mean 13%.
  • + 11
 My bike also is heavy, but I'm also tall (6'10'') and heavy myself. So I build a bike for myself that doesn't break. Way more important for me than the weight. (Also there ist a mistake above with the kg weight of the madonna raw...6.8 kg ist lighter than an xc bike...)
  • + 3
 Yeah I've found there is more maintenance on lighter bikes. I was on a 130mm aggressive bike for a few years was so sick but every time I took my 34 and float dps shock to my suspension guy he had to strip everything down entirely and do an overhaul. I'm on the commencal meta am now with the coil shock and everything, it's a tad heavy and everyone was all going for it in the comments section after the pink bike review. It rides so sick though an I don't mind the extra couple of kilos.
  • + 12
 A heavier bike beats a broken bike any day of the week.
  • + 2
 Fit comes into play as well. If your bike fits you correctly (proper STA, reach, stack for your height) then there's a good chance it'll be heavier. Not to mention gear that will survive. A heavy bike with good fit/ergonomics is superior to a light bike that doesn't fit.
  • + 10
 29.9lbs on my Edit with skinny Rev's and lightweight Thunder Burt's. Probably hit 33-34lbs if it was set up in full gnar-mode. I think a lot of bikes are overweight because so many riders have become obsessed with puncture protection - using DH-spec tires, inserts and 15m of rim tape to ride local trails and the occasional red route...
  • + 9
 Most interesting point made is this: "The most probable theory to explain the girth is that mountain biking may be evolving into a gravity-powered summer snow-sport and thrill seekers are happily trading pedaling performance for raw speed to maximize their experience."

There's a clear divide between people who like to ride their mtbs up and down for a big part of the year and the summer-gravity people. There's a lot to dive into here: What other kinds of riders are there? Would the summer-gravity people be better served by a DH bike? An e-bike? What are the demographics, is there an age gap? Wealth gap?

Personally, the "downcountry" bikes interest me the most (except that the name is awful), I'm pretty sure one of those bikes would be perfect for everything that I want to do on a mtb.
  • + 5
 I'd both agree and argue with this point. I've been a dh rider my whole life and while on the one hand I do agree that you see a lot of local trails starting turn towards gravity riding, taking away technical climbs and making things direction in favor of enduro riders. But from a DH rider's pov it's also killing dh as the bike parks and trail centers are taming down to meet this middle ground enduro rider with flow and jump trails that are really just too much work on a dh bike and it's left most bike parks without a real need for a DH bike on 90% of their trails. Aside from Whistler I can't think of a major bike park where there are still more technical "race quality" dh trails than flow trails... and it SUCKS cause my dh bike isn't getting near the attention it deserves! haha
  • + 2
 @CONomad: depends where you ride. The northeast US still offers up the old school tech and some riders still look like storm troopers...
  • + 1
 @yzedf: Good to hear, haven't ridden in the north east in about 10 year now since I lived in Ottawa. But I loved the rocky techy side of things.
  • + 3
 @CONomad: Agree to a point... It's NOT enduro riders pushing this. Enduro is all about natural terrain with only a little bike-park type riding. Enduro races based at resorts focus on tech trails with some flow and backcountry enduros often have NO flow trail at all.
  • + 2
 @davec113: Solid point, I should have clarified between "enduro racers" and over weight middle age dudes who buy most enduro bikes sold. I actually stopped enduro racing because I got more injured in 2 season of that than I ever did in 20 years of DH... racing blind tech trails just seemed like a good way to get myself permanently jacked up haha. So now I have a short travel fun bike and a dh bike... lets me ride the middle intensity trails but keeps me from getting too brave and stupid while doing so.
  • + 5
 @CONomad: Martin Maes was just commenting about Enduro being more dangerous vs WC DH... In DH you are going fast but are usually much more familiar with the track. I did a couple enduro races last year (CB and Aspen) but at 44 y/o I'm not taking as many chances and my times reflect that. Wink But still good fun, and riding blind or with minimal practice is a skill on it's own.

As far as all the smooth flow at resorts, given some time hopefully they will add more natural/tech trails.
  • + 8
 I've been seeing the weight of bikes climb over the last 5-7 years- dropper posts, wide range cassettes, tire inserts, it all adds up and certainly hasn't been offset by carbon (in most cases) or by dropping a couple of rings and a front shifter.. As far as I'm concerned, anything in the range of 25-35 pounds is fine with me, totally not hung up on weight any more- performance trumps weight.
  • + 7
 Also, the carbon frames have been getting more and more overbuilt. Probably trying to prevent a lot of warranty costs and bad press.
  • + 6
 @yarbianthebarbarian: Exactly! And once a carbon frame is close to an aluminum frame in weight I really don't see the point.
  • + 3
 @yarbianthebarbarian: probably but that's just poor design. It's easy to put more material in than design the layup properly
  • + 8
 What's wrong with my bike? simple, i'm lightweight, 58Kgs 1.72m and not aggressive, it can easily weight 12Kg instead of 14Kgs, my shoulders and spine would be very happy to hike 2 kilos less going uphill (yes i hike a lot) and i don't think i would brake it during the descends, but frames and parts are designed around the average rider and he is at least 20kgs more than me and much more aggressive goind down.... not mentioning the dimensions of his pockets, way fatter than mine.

f
  • + 1
 Lol, that was my weight too but 30 years ago, now I’m 88 kg at the same length. My steel hardtail weighs around 13,5 kg +/- 0,5 kg (haven’t bothered weighing it), however the bike’s heft is not an issue for me, rather a heavy bike may be a tool for me to reach a more healthy body mass index this year. Hopefully...
  • + 7
 People seem to be running dh tyre/wheel set ups-dual ply casing tyres,tyre inserts,hd rims on trail bikes these days.Are we riding so much quicker these days that they need the extra protection or does it just mean they can take worse lines and smash through stuff with little skill?
  • + 6
 I think most people just don't want to get a flat or end up walking out of the woods they rode into. Would you run thinner, flimsier tires on a sports car for for 1 more mpg and risk potholes and debris ripping it open, when there is a tire out there that corners better, stops better, and is more durable?
  • + 5
 @Deoratwo: If I puncture (which is pretty rare since tubeless arrived) I usually assume it's because I've made a mistake (unless it's a thorn) either from bad line choice or clumsy riding.I've noticed the people who puncture a lot do so regardless of what set they run and usually have wheels that resemble a Dorito.
I am pretty old school and come from an era that most bad decisions ended up meaning breaking something on your bike......so we just got smooooth.
  • + 4
 i think your assumption might be highly subjective as most bikes i see on the trails sport exo/snakeskin tires. thats basically the only option you have when getting a new (complete) bike, which is again what most people do. most people then just ride these tires. for the faster guys of the spectrum it might be true that they are going faster on regular trails then a few years ago. my new enduro rig feels as capable as my dh bike from a few years back. my hometrails are not very rocky but other than in the past i cant get away with singleply tires. in the past i rode minion dhr II exo and aggressor exo with 24 psi in the back without issues. now after massive dents in my new flow mk 3 and wild squirms i run dd tires with 26 psi and suspect that even that might not be enough.
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: I see about 300 bikes every weekend (I work at the trails).To be fair a good number of them are dh/enduro biased but a lot of what I class as trail bikes are running pretty burly wheel set ups (they may change tyres and wheels when they ride there but I doubt it).
For enduro race bikes I'd argue that you almost need more tyre protection than a dh bikeYou are riding almost dh courses,nearly as fast,almost blind,with less travel and you've got to make them last 30+ minutes of racing.
Exo is still single ply and I'd say is more suitable for trail (120-140mm) bikes.
  • + 8
 @watchmen: it all comes down to where you look. a lot of casual riders do not even visit special trails , at least here in germany where we do ( or did) not have trailcenters, just regular trails and DH bikeparks. then again if you ride trails like the ones you work at, i would also ride such a setup especially with not much travel to compensate. tires are always a compromise and on a do it all bike you always struggle. sometimes your tires are just not up to the task, the other day rolling resistance kills you on a group ride with the downcountry crew.
  • + 7
 @watchmen: A large percentage of people run the set-up you're mentioning because the internet told them to. They have money to spare and like to 'upgrade', so go with the trends (probably).
  • + 5
 This. The trails found me are natural and so not really changed in 30 years so why do I need a bike that's 5lb heavier than the one I rode 5 years ago with the same travel
  • + 10
 @Deoratwo: Instead of flatting two times a year, they are walking their bikes up every 6% grade they come across.
  • + 1
 I'll take the extra weight with the DH tire and tire inserts if I don't have to stop my rides due to a flat. I enjoy smashing lines and some of my local areas are littered with sharp rocks and glass.
  • + 3
 I'm pretty old school and find that most bad decisions now end up breaking something on my body. The bike's usually just fine!
  • + 1
 @LeDuke: I highly doubt anyone running DHF's on a bike that came with Ardents is gonna start walking up hills they weren't walking before.
  • + 11
 Nope, i have a problem with my own weight.
  • + 6
 "...winch-and-plummet riders has pushed the heft of many trail bikes well beyond the once sacrosanct 30-pound bar..." What a great phrase. Real mountain bikes are for all terrains - up and down. 30 lbs has always been the breaking point of getting too heavy for a reason - bikes just get sluggish to use under your own power. I'd rather pedal than push, because the down is so much more rewarding.
  • + 9
 Damn everyone on PB has lead sleds...around here a 130-140mm bike is a trail bike and I wouldn't want it more than 26-27lbs.
  • + 1
 @clink83: The responses are fine (I don't care what you ride, so long as you are happy), but many sort of miss the point. I think what was intended by the author, but totally missed here was another question: Is a 170mm+ travel bike, with 180mm Lyric, downhill tires and brakes and a coil shock really a "trail" bike? Many people, the author likely included, would call these bikes enduro bikes/enduro race bikes/freeride bikes or "superenduro" whatever that is. Ride what you like, and pick components that work for you. I believe the intent of this article/poll was good. It wasn't to attack people for the weight of their bike, it was to provoke people to at least consider another performance aspect, rather than blindly following the more burly is better trend prompted by the rise of enduro racing.
  • + 6
 My 5010 comes in at 12kg and i do find that its sometimes too stiff and light to go as fast as my Nomad which is 14kg, but the 5010 is so much fun just jibbing around that fast isnt always fun.
  • + 5
 This. I bought a 2017 Intense Spider in the sales and built it up light. For me, as a lighter rider, 130mm travel on a light and lively bike is more fun than the 170mm bike it replaced. I live in the south of England though, so not a lot in the way of Alpine rock gardens to contend with.. don't think I'd necessarily want to take it Pleney bashing!
  • + 1
 Are you sure it is the weight of your 5010 that makes it not got as fast as your Nomad? I would bet that its mainly the addition of 40mm of plusher travel that makes it go faster.
  • + 2
 @bikeracer28: and the geometry differences
  • + 9
 i blame the food industry
  • + 5
 and Big Pharma, never forget Big Pharma!
  • + 1
 @Milko3D: Obama!
  • + 4
 A little weight may slow you down a bit on climbs, but hiking out with a snapped bar, tacoed wheel, etc because you wanted to save a few grams slows you down a lot.

We may get to a point someday where a fully capable trail/Enduro bike can weigh 20lb but until then it makes sense that capability/durability win over weight.
  • + 4
 I have ridden bikes that weighed up to 18kgs, uphill. If the gearing is low enough, no problem. Problem is, when you have to carry the bike uphill - and I found out, that I dont want to carry a bike uphill on my shoulders that weighs more than 16kgs.
  • + 4
 Given I have a coil sprung RAAW Madonna as my big race bike, I think it's pretty apparent I don't place weight as the most important characteristic of a bike Smile

Granted, mine isn't as heavy as Astons was, but it's not a light bike still.

My trail bike, depending on which I choose, is 26-29lbs. I have also raced local enduro's on these. On the flatter stuff, they are the better bike. It's nice to have a choice.
  • + 4
 Swapped my Enduro bike to coil suspension front and rear, and DH casing tires a few years ago, added about 4 pounds or so to the weight. Didn't notice the extra heft going uphill at all, not even a bit, only the massive increase in traction and comfort and reliability. Only time I have to touch the bike now is when the tires get worn to drag radial status and suspension once a year. More gearbox bikes please!
  • + 7
 I'd want my trail bike (140mm) under 30, but for a 170mm travel Enduro around 33 is nothing to complain about.
  • + 3
 My 170mm bike (with coil shock) is 30lbs, and the only bit of carbon are the bars. 26 for life.
  • - 4
flag donpinpon29 (Apr 26, 2019 at 1:48) (Below Threshold)
  • + 1
 @ChazzMichaelMichaels: hahaha you win although I can't read that scale
  • + 6
 I guess there is something wrong if your trail/enduro bike weights the same as your DH rig. And for sure you're not supposed to charge the same lines.
  • + 1
 yeah, but most average-priced 130mm bikes (downcountry or whatever) are around 15kg :/
  • + 2
 Well a really heavy cassette, 29" wheels and tires and 2ply casting (maybe even coil suspension) arent light.

Only the fork is heavier on the DH- the frame itself most often only some grams.
  • + 3
 @NotNamed: but that build isn't really a trail bike. Dh bikes have got 10lbs lighter over the last 10 years so why are trail bikes getting heavier to the point where they weigh very similar weights
  • + 5
 @chrismac70: because manufacturers bolt NX to anything that isn't made of carbon Big Grin
  • + 3
 If you are 200 pounds / 90kg guy you don't care about bike weight. The only difference is on a long climbs but as someone mentioned earlier, you stuff too much water, food or unnecessary tools and weight (you + bike ) is the same or maybe bigger. I can suffer a little bit more on the uphills but I feel better on the downhills ( bigger rotors, brakes, havier tires, bigger forks or coil shock add weight but also add comfort and confidence. I got steel trail bike setup 160/140 on air and it weight around 15kg+/- 0,5kg depends on tire combo. I am sure that bike can weight 14kg with different components but my fitness level still gonna be the same.
  • + 2
 I can confirm that this is correct. I'm around 250lbs and while I don't want to pedal my 10 year old, 42+lb coil sprung DH bike any more than necessary I've never once paid attention to the weight of my trail bike. It pedals well enough and doesn't feel like I'm going to break anything. I've thought it could be a bit lighter but I'm better off skipping cheeseburgers and beer than spending money on lightweight parts for my lard ass to pedal around.
  • + 5
 IME, it's less about total weight and more about sprung vs. unsprung, low vs high, etc. WHERE is more important than HOW MUCH.
  • + 2
 My hardtail with 120mm travel fork is somewhere between 12kg and 16kg. That's how finely calibrated my arms are, can't get any more accurate.

As for climbing, the weight is pretty irrelevant compared to the geometry. The problem I had with shorter hardtails in the past was that on steep climbs, my kneepads would hit the bars (I stand up when I ride) so I had to lean back, causing the front wheel to lose grip and wander. The longer bike allows me to put my weight wherever I want it to be so now I can clear stuff easily which I was struggling with on my shorter hardtail. If the bike is heavier (or I'm carrying more water, tools, mud, whatever) I just need to pedal harder or I'll just climb slower. But if I can't get my body in the right position, I just can't get up these steep climbs.
  • + 2
 My Capra AL 27.5 weighs in around 34lbs with a DHX2 coil. I don’t enjoy lifting it up on the roof rack, but that’s about it. It takes a little more effort to climb, probably limits my avg speed, but it descends like a champ.

After this bike, I’m far less weight focused than I used to be, but I can see a 27-31lb 130-140mm 29er in my future for the long climby days.
  • + 2
 I use to buy components to save weight and broke a lot, now I only buy components that save weight where it’s makes sense. 2 sets of Next SL cranks have been replaced with Turbines, 100 gram penalty, but I’m guessing they will last more than a season or two. Tires I run at least a DD or SG in the back and plenty of PSI. My flats came from not checking tire pressure before every ride and running too low a pressure even when I did. I’d still consider running DH casing or an insert in rear, front doesn’t give me as many issues. I think 30 pounds is a sweet spot for my bike and you can build it plenty burly enough at that weight. Carbon Spartan
  • + 2
 Fitness of people bigger factor than size of people - BUT a fit 150 lb rider will crush a fit 190 lb rider. That's just power to weight ratio.
Bike weight really matters if you care how fast you go up. Really fast guys beat average guys downhill by 10-30 sec. Really fast guys going up beat average guys by minutes. Among those fast guys going up, bike weight will matter. I'm 185-190 (sometimes!) when I'm as fit as I can be, and going up is never going to be my strong suit.

Bottom line - You are not a variable you can change much. Bikes you can.

Drop 5% of your body weight and you'll be faster. Ride a 25lb bike up a 1500 ft climb and you'll be faster than if its a 35 lb bike assuming the fit is the same. Service that suspension so the wheels stay on the ground when they should and you'll go faster. Get someone who's truly fast to teach you to lean your bike, and stay low, and stay in a proper position even when its gnarly and you'll be better at going fast and more likely to not wreck yourself.

Bike weight matters. Body weight matters. Bike set up matters. Knowing how to ride matters.

Not riding because you're reading posts on PB matters. My 26 lb bike is hanging in the garage and it needs a fork rebuild. Maybe I'll get out tomorrow . . .
  • + 2
 All you guys going out for Enduro laps with 30lb bikes are ass hats. But just like your Moms before me I'll be there to take care of you with my One up tool, pump, air canisters, tire lever, dynaplugs all mounted directly to my bike so they are never forgotten. Best part is I don't run EXO casing tires, and I do run Cushcore so I'll probably have everything available when when I come upon you in the trail. 36 lbs with a full water bottle and platform pedals.
  • + 2
 For me the weight is in tyres and wheels, if i put light hoops and non burly tyres on my bike i could knock off a kilo or so no problem but then , boom, drama's. Lots of rock here and i always end up smashing wheels and slicing tyres, i will lug the extra weight and enjoy relative reliability. Just ride smoother? If i could mimmic another riding style i would be a world champ, anyway, off to true my rear wheel now.
  • + 1
 Also, the cost of replacing a tire is about the same whether it's light or burly. If the XC tires we're a quarter the cost, the math of replacing more often might work out better.
  • + 2
 My DH bike weighs 35 lbs. im definitely not ok with my pedal bike weight being anywhere close to to that. But I’m not over beefing the fuk out of my trail bike to withstand a bomb either. Decent travel to have fun and plow a bit but I also dont need an absolute downhill machine with me when im out smashing miles. I do think that people are over bikes these days, coming from 165 rear travel on my past bike to 140 now I couldn’t be happier with how it climbs, descends and is able to goof around.
  • + 2
 My Dad's old nomad was around 36 LBS and you know what, it was great bike, it rode up everything i could ride up and even survived a trip to the alps. it was an 08 bike and it has only recently been sold on and is still in use. the geometry became more of an issue than the weight. been a few pounds lighter wouldn't have hurt but it wasn't much of an issue.
  • + 2
 I have both a 27 lb bike and a 32 lb bike. At the start of each ride I can feel it clearly, and in the punchy climbs, but other than that you just get used to whatever you're on pretty quickly -- mainly I just want to be on something similar to buddies so we agree on the same trails to ride.
  • + 1
 I agree, one tends to adapt after about 20 minutes. S'all good!
  • + 2
 I'm over 70 so maybe my opinion is skewed, but I sold my 2011 26" Trek Remedy three years ago because I was tired of pushing the weight (29# plus) around the hills. Yeah it had around 150mm of travel at either end but the weight just got annoying. And yet I've watched the weights of reviewed bikes just continue to creep up the last several years as Enduro has become the rage. After selling the Remedy I bought myself a slightly used 2014 Spec Stumper 29" hardtail (25#) and haven't regretted it. I occasionally miss the travel and rear suspension and have looked longingly at reviews of the Intense Sniper, Santa Cruz Blur, Scott Spark, and Specialized Epic. All of these bikes come in with carbon frames at around 23# to 25# with the lighter versions going for about $6K and the heavier around $4K. Not cheap and travel is short by current standards, but weight gets old unless you are just a lift or shuttle rider. Enjoy the heavy bikes while you can. Life is short!
  • + 2
 This is the first time I have added a comment without reading all the other comments.
When I started riding, most of my friends pedaled DH bikes because the XC ones kind of sucked.
*Get strength riding singlespeeds up a consistent hill.*
We all sessioned 36-40# rigs after taco-d wheels, too many pinch flats, and bent/cracked frames. Dh geometry doesn't climb well, which is part of reality. All our rides have climbs.
I rode plastic fantastic for 3-4 years, and that stuff is like a hard drug. Making you feel superhuman pedaling up climbs you always used to walk. I still dig the ride quality of carbon, but my tastes for trail dictate heavier parts. Absolutely loving CushCore! It feels like my suspension just got much better!?!
New carbon wheels, Surly Dirt Wizard 29x3 tires, air shocks, and it just topped the scales at #41! I know, most people cringe when thinking about riding that beast, but it is the best machine I have tried for the way I shred. #RideGG #trailpistol
#whiterimlap #bunnyhops #lovemywhip
  • + 2
 My AL Patrol is 18% of my body weight, and I think that's a decent compromise between durability and performance. To get the same mass ratio a 140 lb (63.5kg) rider would need a 25 lb (11.5kg) bike and a 60 lb (27kg) kid would need a 11 lb (4.9kg) bike.
  • + 1
 I had a 28 pound fully loaded carbon 150/140 felt decree and swapped it for a 35 lb alloy Patrol and could not be happier
  • + 1
 My new Aluminium Smuggler is around the 14kg mark, i built it up with parts that i knew would last rather than going for lighter less durable items. I did spend a little time wondering whether to go for the carbon frame but in the end £1k extra to save 1kg was a bit much, especially considering that I can lose well over 1kg from my gut for a hell of a lot less money...
  • + 1
 Factor in that many folks who in the past would have an xc rig for training or putting down miles, might today be content with a gravel bike. Training days are better spent when the trails are too muddy, so why fart around with another mtb? The gravel bikes are pretty damn capable now, and then you don't have to also have a stupid road bike.
  • + 2
 I feel it on the gravel bike. I have a gravel bike with xc wheels and tires (and a spare set for road) for long meandering rides and a Transition Patrol with 170/160 for when I can go out and fly down trails. The Patrol would be too much bike if it were all I had, but it isn't.
  • + 1
 I think it's a balance. A pound or two here or there isn't a big difference compared to geometry, suspension performance, etc. However a 27lb trail bike vs. a 35lb trail bike is a different story. Where the weight is on the bike also makes a difference. Heavy drivetrain including tires, cassette, crankset, etc. feels different than if you happen to ride with two water bottles that weigh 3lbs when full. Rider ability, size and strength trumps the actual weight of a bike (within reason), so know your body, know your capabilities and buy the right bike for YOU and set it up the way that works best for YOU. Weight is an important piece to consider when buying a bike, but its just that...a piece.
  • + 1
 Definitely just a piece. Recently went from a 28lb carbon felt decree to a 35 lb Transition Patrol and I could not be happier. If my Patrol rode the same and were lighter I wouldn't mind, although I think I'm happy sticking with aluminum
  • + 2
 This thread has a support group, "Hi, I'm Chad and my bike weighs over 33lbs." vibe going. Years of equating a more or less arbitrary number with status will do that I suppose.
  • + 1
 I think this is a pretty hard question. My current bike, a 2019 Stumpy 29 is heavier than my previous bike, a 2014 Remedy 27.5 by at least a pound or two but I go up and done the mountain or hill better on the stumpy. I really only notice the weight taking it in and out of the truck. My remedy was built up about as light as I could get it without any carbon and would still laugh off anything I could throw at it. The new stumpy handles everything better simply because it fits me l better and maybe larger wheels help too. That said I wouldn’t want it too much heavier. I think when you get north of 32-33lbs you are getting outside the optimal weight range of an all purpose trail bike.
  • + 1
 I currently ride a 2014 27.5 Remedy and want to switch it up to a 2019 Stumpy! I rode one a few times last year and absolutely loved the geo on the stumpy. Although, you're right, the Remedy will take anything you throw at it. I built mine up to be my downhill/bike park/trail bike and it's a solid ripper
  • + 1
 If you weight 86 kg, then going from a 14kg bike to a 15 kg one only makes for 1% increase of weight. Wich means nothing. Tire+wheel weight and tire rolling resistance, suspension efficiency, pedaling posture,... These are the true parameters that make a bike "feel" heavy/light.

Loose weight first, than ditch the backpack in favor of lighter options, get lighter gear, bring the essential and ditch the superflu (computer, big smartphone, electronics)...
  • + 2
 I'm 99kg and the difference between a 22lb hardtail and a 24lb FS on a long smooth 5 mile climb is 2 min or so...i don't think that's quite "nothing". It may not matter to you though.
  • + 1
 I’ve owned and ridden bikes on trails from 22lbs to 34lbs. Right now, my Carbon wonder EWS capable bike is around 31-32lbs ( I wouldn’t know exactly because that number doesn’t matter) and is only that light because I don’t need DH tires for riding trails that aren’t on closed courses. I grab that bike 90% ofthe time to ride over my lighter, shorter traveled other option just because it’s so much fun. And, it’s funny that is about the same weight as my 2003 Intense Tracer was when I was happiest with it (I did have it as low as 26lbs when I XC raced it). That Intense was an early version of downcountry with an option for a super slack for the time 69 HA, but only had 100mm of travel. Now, my Ripmo has 160/145 travel, 29er tires, Code RSC with 200mm rotors, and a proper reach. I don’t think bikes have gotten heavier.

I think overall weight is secondary to both tires and suspension design/ setup. If I can stand up and stomp on the pedals when climbing or sprinting, that matters way more than weight. And if you put XC tires on a heavier bike, it will roll almost just as fast as a lighter bike and if you aren’t XC racing the second or two you are slower doesn’t matter in the trail. But then again, I’m on the north side of 200lbs and the gram counting on the bike can seem silly to me.
  • + 1
 To each there own, type of terrain you ride, how fast you want to go(up...or down?), riding the machine groomed flow trails, or the root and rock technical trails, or loamy goodness...in Oklahoma, Vancouver island, or the alps??? Doesnt this question belong in the beginners thread?
  • + 1
 Its a noticeable thing with the new burlier bikes, my Transition Sentinel must be a good 2kg on an earlier Liteville 601 which has way more travel. As a 90kg plus guy living in the Asia I get round this by having a more lightweight weight trail bike for those days when its more pedalling than yelling.
I suspect that as these bikes get better and encourage most of us to push a little more they are building in a little more 'bracing' to keep things stiffer and not end up with a deluge of broken frames that need warrantying?
  • + 1
 Nice to have have light XC - Trail bikes for lighter riders.
Between
a) the higher bike-to-rider weight ratio for smaller riders,
b) climbing vs descending balance/priorities, and
c) snappy/flickable vs. planted/stable preference, it's nice to have choices on both ends.

Demo-ing that Intense Sniper after flying to altitude from sea level was a sweet deal.
  • + 1
 The average trail rider hasn't been dreaming of XC glory in about 20 years, so weight is pretty meaningless, to a point. My arguement about frame weight has always been: how much do you notice the weight of your full water bottle on your frame. If you hate the start of the ride but love the end when the bottle is empty, you are officially a weight wiener. Personally, I can't really notice a difference, which means 2.2 lbs of weight on my frame go virtually unnoticed. Tire/Rim weight are the only thing I can genuinely feel, but it's not more important that having grip in a turn.
  • + 1
 IMO, bike weight only "REALLY" matters, when you're racing at a pro level. IE, when you're already in your best shape, and can't realistically drop 1-3lbs. And, is likely the most important on races where the uphills are climbed (cross country).

If you're riding for fun, IMO, I doubt that you're really worried about if the climb takes another 4% longer, or more effort. I'd rather have a bike that was reliable, and lower in maintenance. That 4% is likely hard for us that aren't finely attuned to our personal performance/skill level to notice. And things like tire choice, suspension setup likely have more impact than that.

I honestly have a hard time telling the difference in climbing my new ~35lb enduro bike (Kona Process 153 AL 29'er), and my old hardtail (dont have the weight, but probably ~30lbs ish?). That said, I don't want a 70lb bicycle. So I do try to keep the bike as light as I can, within reason (durablility/reliability/price).
  • + 1
 My Kona Process 153 is 35 lbs (confirmed on multiple scales)I honestly don't know where I can shed any more weight without sacrificing durability. It doesn't actually bother me much, as if it shreds on the down, there have to be some sacrifices on the up, and vice versa.
I guess it really does come down to light, cheap, or durable; pick 2.
  • + 1
 35 lbs for a Kona sounds great, my ALU Process 153 with lyrik RC2 and a Super Deluxe comes in at nearly 39 with a tube and bottle, 37, 11oz dry, YAY KONA!
  • + 3
 My bike has a massive weight problem. Just one, however it’s a major blight. That problem being the heft of its owner/rider.
  • + 1
 I prefer a lighter trail bike hands down. Seeking advice though: I have a sub 29lb "enduro" bike that is probably more of an aggressive trail bike based on all the comments I've read. I'm entering my first enduro races this season, is my bike too light? I'm specifically wondering about the wheels which are of the stock 23mm Wtb novatech variety. Wondering if I should look into something wider and stronger (and I assume heavier).
  • + 1
 @jetmo run what you got. Some people’s style and aggressiveness combined with terrain dictate a need for more tire. Pro enduro riders generally need DH tires cause they are hitting the limits of their equipment. If you haven’t flatted going at your top speed, your tires are probably fine. One of my riding buddies needs DH tires because he was a former semi-pro level DH rider. He schralps almost every corner and slams his tires sideways into rocks, he flats without two-ply. I ride the same terrain with Maxxis EXO and almost never flat. He also smokes me by 2-5 seconds (more if it’s really turny) on a 2 minute section, so it’s reflected in his speed and his needs.
  • + 1
 @whambat: Thanks for the advice! Yeah I don't flat that often and run exo as well. Dented rims is more common. Apprx 180lbs @ about 28 psi which is what I plan on sticking to in whatever races I can can do.
  • + 1
 I had a carbon 27.5 trail bike that came in at 29lbs. It was great for climbing, but not very stiff for descending. Currently I have an Al enduro bike that weighs 34 lbs. In the year that I've owned it, I've crushed most of my climbing and descending PRs. I haven't lost any weight in that time (or gained). The difference I find is in two places. Geometry is better. I believe in the steeper seat tubes. I think it makes for a much better pedal position. 2nd, I overhauled the motor last year. Did a half Ironman and the training really paid off on the mountain bike. I get to the top faster, recover faster, and have more energy to focus on the descents.

(Fitness+geo)>bike weight
  • + 1
 I care about how much my XC race bike weighs, but that's it. For anything trail or gravity related, I don't care, and neither do the pros.

For evidence, I present this video of Tracy Moseley, who is no slouch on a bike, neither knowing what her EWS race bike weighs, nor caring when they tell her:

www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=279&v=k0ow1ZZBOzk
  • + 2
 I think an enduro bike and an aggressive, all-purpose trail bike are two distinct things. Imo an enduro race bike could weigh up to 36lbs, but a trail bike for everyday riding should be around the 30lb mark or less.
  • + 1
 A strong bike is a fun bike. Fitness allows you to keep momentum and weight doesn't seem like an issue. I'm sure Tracy Mosley could whoop my ass on a climb if she was riding an overbuilt slash and I was on the lightest of XC racers.
  • + 1
 It depends but now a days I can go downhill faster and with lots of confident in my actual bike (trek slash 8 2019) than when I used to have a downhill bike until 2012, also I can pedal uphill and forget lift or walking, my slash isn´t feather weight at 15 kg but it has dh tires. My dh bike used to weight 19kg , 15 is acceptable, the bike can be moved easily and can go uphill without any issue
  • + 1
 when racing XC, sure … lighter

everything else --- meh, who cares?

funny how you gotta pay more for less.

for just riding around, just reasonable is fine, just makes you a stronger rider for what it's worth


My 2009 Transition Dirt Bag sports around 34lbs.... jump on my road bike for a day, I'm passing guys on their mega-bling 15lbs carbon road bikes like they're standing still
  • + 1
 An awesome debate for those who care. There’s no doubt that a light bike is awesome if you’ve got to peddle up and if you’re looking to be as nimble as possible. All of the idiots stating otherwise haven’t ridden a light bike or only ride downhill. I mean, really, extra heft is totally cool for those who ride downhill only. And, sturdy bikes with solid weight are actually helpful in that application.

Carbon hardtails are awesome at around 20 lbs easily available nowadays in size L. But those are hard on the back for rough terrain. I love the intense spider at about 28 lbs and YT Jeffsy at about 29 lbs in size L. Both are capable of most anything and really solid going up and down. No doubt if you just go downhill a bigger and heavier bike can actually help and the specs / weight matter much less.

To me while I love a light bike I’m happy to ride 28-29 lbs over 22 lbs to gain 4-6 inches of travel on a bike that’s still super efficient. Still, if you’ve got to peddle up and want some rear travel, I’ll trade just about anything to stay in the 27-30 lb range rather than going up to 32-33, much less 40. The guys riding those bikes are clueless or don’t ever ride uphill.
  • + 1
 The lightest bike I've had in recent memory was a Santa Cruz Nomad that weight around 28lbs. A few years later I have a Norco Range 29 that weighs in at 33lbs. On Strava, I still get PRs on climbs, so I don't think a few pounds makes a difference, especially when you consider the weight of the rider & bike combined.
  • + 4
 My 32 pound bike is not the weight I sorry about.... It's the 245 lbs. Body sitting on it that's the issue.
  • + 3
 Trail bike (5010 CC) 26lbs
XC bike (Mach 429SL) 27lbs
AM/enduro bike (Deviate Guide) 36lbs

Bikes are built as they need to be, they weigh what they weigh
  • + 2
 What did you do to your XC bike yo make it 5lbs overweight?
  • + 2
 @clink83: 170mm reverb and tyres with a carcass you can’t see through.
  • + 1
 @clink83: and Fox 34 too, at 120mm rather than a 100mm 32SC
  • + 1
 @clink83: pivot frames are heavy and usually over-forked.
  • + 1
 My trail ht has a 1050gr rear tyre and appropriately strong rim. Stock set up was lighter, but didn't survive for long. I'm only 70kg and try to ride smoothly, but to really enjoy our trails you need to at least beef up the rear.

I loved the acceleration of the 640gr Ardent Race on technical climbs, but it only lasted 200km before it got a 5cm tear. 850gr HR2 lasted more, but died the same way. Tough/Fast Trail Bosses since then and they just get replaced when the tread is gone.

There's a weight minimum that depends on terrain, rider style/weight etc. Judging from my riding mates, stronger and heavier riders put a lot more strain on their equipment. From tyres and rims to brakepads, their wear rate is way different than mine.
  • + 1
 Trail bike or enduro bike? My Steel 160mm HT weighs about 14kg but my enduro bike closer to 16kg with a cheap build, i.e heavy wheels. I find the 16kg bike a bit much on the ups, and the heavy wheels inhibit the playfullness. I think a trail/enduro bike should no weigh more than 15kg unless you ride park with lift access in the main.
  • + 1
 On an xl carbon frame enduro bike, 17.3kg (38.1lbs) ready to go with water/tube/tools on the bike. Will take a bike you can put thru its paces over a lightweight one that breaks any day. heavy bikes handle better going downhill where it matters.
  • + 1
 My 160mm bike is 13.7kg and still feels suitably snappy. Carbon frame and bars, Stans Flows, Lyriks , piggy back shock, Saint brakes etc. Could do with a heavier duty rear tyre (or cushcore) for proper chunk. Have considered building it beefier but really should just run a DH bike if I want more gnar.

For trail riding the bike comes alive again on carbon wheels and lighter tyres, good for everything bar sending down rock gardens so I don't hit them when set up like that.
  • + 1
 Enduro/trail bikes are used by 90% of the people for the same exact purpose of a dh sled, so they should be as hard and safe. What is more important is geometry and an efficient platform for climbing. The advantages of a trail bike are its handling characteristics because of the less suspension travel, not the reduced weight.
Anyway,dh bikes are so light right now so I would like to set the limit of a trail bike with dh tires at lets say 16kg-16.5kg t (that leaves the torque,for example, out and many others). What they should develope the most to reduce weight is tyres and tyre inserts. I find it also unnacceptable at this level of prices and developement we are, that even with 1.5 kg dh casing tyres, tyre pressure is determined in most cases by rim longevity or to aviod flats. I would love to test that vittoria tube insert inventionwith lighter tyres because i cant stand tubeless, heavy tyres and new dented rims...
  • + 2
 For trail bikes, weight is super important and I’d probably take THE lightest bike I could buy. But for getting rowdy in the downhill tech riding enduro, I wouldn’t want to go lower than about 26 or 27
  • + 1
 My Yeti SB150 in Large weighs 14.9kg with CushCore, Nukeproof Sam Hill Pedals and Exo/Exo+ tires.
Thus, the Bike itself weighs around 14kg which should be the goal for most trail/Enduro bikes IMO.
Add max. 600g for DH tires if you race Enduro.
  • + 2
 Aiming for sub 13kg all alloy, 140mm front n rear. Haven't had a flat in years with tubeless sans all of this cushcore crap. Select the right tyre and actually put some air in it.
  • + 2
 I’m 1.84cm and I weight 76kg with gear. My bike is, 180 travel front and rear, weight something between 15.6 - 15.8. And I currently am looking for a way to lower it to 15.3-4kg.
  • + 5
 I don't even know what my bike weighs. That's intentional.
  • + 1
 See. I have a front 180 rear 160 traveled commencal., which weights 16.4kgs.But you can see a totem fork, two mavic 823 EFR rims, x2 shock, and a small yellow duck with a helmet on my bike. They perform well, especially the duck.
  • + 1
 my trek slash weighs 14.1 kg before cushcore, now it is more, a necessary evil. i want my bike to weigh 14 kg but that is not possible. im happy to have more weight, but only if the wheels are light and the frame is whre the weight is.
  • + 1
 I think it also boils down to the riders weight, riding style and who they ride with. I'm 70Kgs/11stone and I don't need a 33+lbs monster to not break bits. I now will sacrifice a lot to have the bike faster on the pedals, as modern geo gives good handling, cushcore removes the requirement for heavy, slow rolling DH tyres that are only a bit better in the worst bits, but a bit worse nearly all the time. Lighter wheels/cassette/tyres (now they have proper soft compounds) with fast rolling tread pattern in the rear help a lot, but a proper rear shock and fork are essential. Don't spend to save grams on a rear derailleur.
The main issue I have with modern bikes is how stiff they are. They translate too much vibration to you and they knock you off line.
I'm nearly as quick now on my 27.5lbs Mondraker as I was on my older bike because it's more reliable (especially wheels/tyres), so I can hit harder lines and it pedals better/weighs less and I was much fitter then when I was racing.
  • + 1
 My trail bikes an orange 5 weighing about 32lb with lyrik 160 and a Fox x2 air. It’s set up for the downs but climbs very well. Also sram code rsc brakes so yeah it’s a little dh bike that climbs too. Perfect for uk trails. Still blows my mind how fast it is and how after 4 years of solid abuse it’s not cracked!!! As it ain’t built for what I do on it that’s for sure. Best move I ever made getting rid of the dh bike.
  • + 1
 Maybe I am old school but apart from dh I thought the idea of MTB was to be able to cycle up as well as down for 5miles or a 100miles. I see people pushing their bikes up bumps at Swinley. Perhaps bikes will get so fat everyone will just get ebikes. In reality most are riding on far too burly bikes for actual use.
  • + 1
 Sometimes when I start to wonder if a should pull out a second mortgage and start the arms race on my 31 pound trail rig, then I look down at the 5 extra pounds I could shed free of charge on my mid section and I'm like keep on a truckin brotha...
  • + 1
 My bike is just over 15kg and I'm about 60kg, which is a pretty scary ratio. But given that it's quite slack and has around 170 travel, it invites some abuse and wouldn't have lasted over a decade had it been a weight weenie. Wheels and tires are pretty light and the gearing is forgiving, so climbing has never been too impeded. Who knows how different my life would if it were 2kg less. I probably wouldn't have it anymore and would be chasing the latest standards on a regular basis as I replaced broken frames. I weighed it at just over 13kg a while ago and discovered last year that the scales I used those many years ago were focked.
  • + 1
 My current bike is the heaviest I've ever had, but it's also miles faster both up and down than anything else I've had. Grippier tyres, good geometry and big wheels. I'll admit I was worried buying a bike in the region of 15 kg (no pedals) but actually riding it, I forget about it immediately.
  • + 1
 No idea how much my bike weighs. I know its an XL Aluminium 29er, with an air shock and fork at the 150mm travel point. I know the wheels are tough and long lasting while not being overly portly, and I know the groupset is a good solid midrange kit X9/XT hybrid. I know the brakes (Hope Motos) could be smaller and lighter XT models, but the Hope stuff is pretty and I don't need to spend that money.

Im sure it could be lighter, if I went carbon, XTR, Carbon rims etc etc, but I don't know if it would be better to the value that that would cost to do that
  • + 1
 So you "wager that most riders who are huffing around on "enduro certified" trail bikes would be faster (and happier) without the flab"? I've no dispute on your first (objective) assertion that riders would be faster...but I challenge you to elaborate on your second (subjective) assertion that riders would be happier.
  • + 1
 My “trail” bike, 2018 Sight, weighs around 30lbs. But my Nomad, with cush cores, DD tires and an 11.6 has never been on a scale. The performance increase of the weight I have added is immesurable, it is called the gym, get there.
  • + 2
 My aluminum frame bike has about 30.0lbs. I'd rather it be lighter, but not so much that I'm willing to spend the cubic dollars needed to make it happen.
  • + 3
 rider: 100kg naked
Bike: 16.2kg super slack Enduro (79° SA) with DH casing (Nicolai/Geometron) Coil
conclusion: happiness
  • + 1
 Rode my SB66c/34mmfork/carbon wheels at 28.5 lbs for 5yrs. Just built its replacement SB5.5/36mmfork alloy wheels at 29.5. I am 57yrs...150lb. If I was 200lbs I would ride a stronger heavier bike.
  • + 4
 Raaw Madonna at 6,79 kg with coil and dh tyres, imressive!
  • + 2
 DH casing tires AND inserts are completely unnecessary for pretty much anyone trail riding... DD/SuperGravity without inserts is plenty for the average enduro racer.
  • + 3
 "Heavy is good, heavy is reliable. If it doesn't work … you can always hit them with it."
  • + 4
 Durability over light weight all day!
  • + 1
 This is a huge issue that I've been debating forever. Like, "what's two pounds? I could eat two pounds". Also, "I'm 250 pounds, so what's ten pounds more on a bicycle?".........Very interesting topic.
  • + 0
 Do you save bike weight by putting stuff in your backpack or your pockets? -> If no most riders might consider including water bottle with water (600g), light bike tool (143g), light pump (90g) and light spare tube (142g) -> around +1kg (2,2 pound). My 29" Orbea Rallon including this and Maxxis Minion DoubleDown F+R -> 15,0kg (33 pounds).
  • + 2
 I would think low 30's for something I would actually want to pedal on a fairly regular basis. Anything else for the occasional uphill would be okay.
  • + 2
 Perhaps if the uphill sections of Enduro was timed we would see a change in bike design and a trend to lighter bikes. Really it's just laziness by bike manufacturers.
  • + 2
 I don't know of this true but I like this comment
  • + 1
 @Treadly And here we have someone who has hit the nail on the head. Every year, the same model bike, ostensibly for the same riding style/purposes gets heavier and heavier. This is pushed by current trends. The current trend is that enduro is hot. Thus bikes get heavier and burlier (whether or not you are riding any harder/rougher) and weight and climbing performance is not given much priority because the enduro format gives manufacturers an easy out with respect to those performance attributes. This may be fine for enduro bikes, and does suit many people's riding preferences as enumerated in the comments, but not everyone wants or needs a led sled downhill race bike.

I would really like to see these categories of bikes somehow differentiated. Continue making enduro bikes fit for the application: longer, slacker, burlier, heavier. But keep trail bikes (or call them something else) designed with true all-around performance as a goal. Some people do still ride uphill.

Or, do as you suggest: time the uphill portion of enduro races too (this will be a very unpopular suggestion). Then people will be forced out of their illusion and realize that their steep seat angles aren't saving them.
  • + 3
 Tire inserts & DH tires on a trail bike all the way, since broken wheels & torn tire casing aren’t fun or cheap
  • + 1
 My remedy 8 is around 14kg.. Would I like to test out a super light bike, yes but my next bike options are a Santa Cruz 5010 or a BTR Pinner. In my eyes opposites in the weight game. Just ride and have fun.
  • + 0
 I kinda have two trail bikes, for two kinds of trails. I have a Kona Rove LTD which is a drop bar gravel bike but I have Maxxis TT 2.0 xc tires on it and it can handle longer rides with decent amount of technical sections (I just have to slow down). It's like 25lbs. I also have a Transition Patrol for when I don't want to slow for anything and it is 35lbs. I love them both on "trails" so I think you can probably ride a lot of different things and have a great time most places.
  • + 2
 Proving that RC is still around simply to offer commentary from two decades past...
  • + 3
 Cheap, Light, Durable....it seems like that doesn't work anymore.
  • + 1
 28.2 lbs for my Cube stereo 160 with carbon everything. I could cut some weight by going 1x but it feels good between the legs so I'm sticking with it.
  • + 1
 I don't worry about weight, considering my dh bike is about 45lbs. My xc 29er hardtail is even 30ish lbs but I'm not worried about breaking components
  • + 1
 So I had to do 33+, but my phat ass Kona Process ALU weighs in at 37lbs 11oz, and 39lbs with a tube strap and 20oz bottle, where's that option?

fml
  • + 3
 My weight has a bike problem.
  • + 1
 Huh, my 8 year old triple ring aluminum Nomad weighs 31lbs with big old pedals and shimano xt mech. Got a cf V10(al rear triangle) shortly after and it weighs 36lbs!
  • + 1
 its absurd all that bikes weigh, those are like mini DH bike, with almost the weight of a DH. a good trail bike should weight 28 pounds. no more than that.
  • + 3
 My Chromag Rootdown weighs in at 36lbs. I couldn't care less.
  • + 1
 I feel like the trend towards heavier bikes will make ebikes more appealing....especially at the beginning of the season when you are out of shape and bike parks aren't open!
  • + 1
 My 2019 Gt sensor is a pig. Its like 36.4 pounds. Sure it has a coil shock with a steel coil but even before it was 34.6 pounds. But it its not too noticeable.
  • + 2
 A bikes weight has far more to do with £££££ than it's intended purpose.
  • + 0
 I ride a dual suspension fat bike year Roy.Its lighter with the different wheelers I run ( anywhere from 2.8- 4.6) tires depending on the terrain.But I could lose 10kgs which would make me fasterbthan a lighter bike
  • + 1
 I do trials and alpine riding on my 170mm radon swoop and it weighs over 17,4kg with all the stuff I put on it. Still works flawlessly and accelerates like crazy
  • + 1
 My Giant weighs a ton, has no lockout and I'm mega unfit, but when I do finally make it to the top if a hill, its very good at letting me catch me breath back on the way down
  • + 1
 BITD 30lb bikes were considered clunkers.

now they supposedly "climb like an XC bike".

bikes are too heavy, but i don't know what the answer is.
  • + 1
 I have a 34 lb. 29er trail bike. At 65, if it don't kill me, it will make me stronger. IF I ride it every day....
  • + 1
 25kg Ebike with a 6pack and a box of donuts in my pack - I'll wait for you at the top Smile
  • + 1
 90% of riders can stand to loose 5 lbs or gain 5% fitness instead of fussing on a few pounds on the bike.
  • + 1
 While your weighin I’m slayin lol. Please more stay in and compare weights of bolts..
  • + 1
 Under 30 is reasonable. Anything heavier and you mind as well ride a full on DH bike
  • + 1
 37 pound Alloy Transition Sentinel. That bad boy is ready to rip. I aint no weight wennie
  • + 2
 Heavy bikes equal fitter riders.
  • + 1
 Want = ‘enduro certified’ Want = ‘down country’ Need = Trail bike. Weight = under 30 lbs.
  • + 2
 i've honestly never even weighed my bike
  • + 1
 Raaw's Madonna aluminum-framed enduro racing bike hits the scales at 37 pounds (6.79kg) - RC, it's NOT 6,79KG Smile
  • + 1
 If there is a weight problem it has to do with my problem and the fact that I drink too muxh alcohol deapite all the riding
  • + 2
 My hardtail weighs 32 pounds hahaha
  • + 2
 I came to say the same thing. I have so much more fun on my heavy ass steel hardtail than I do my SC Hightower that weighs 2 pounds less and has a wider gear range. So far this year I haven't even ridden my squishy bike and probably won't until I head to a bike park. Passing people downhill on Enduro bikes while I'm on a hardtail is the highlight of my week.
  • + 1
 Banshee Darkside w/single crown and dropper post, just over 40 lbs...with pedals.
  • + 0
 My go to bike hits 15 kg (coil 180mm rig) , could be lighter - yes, easily; do I really care - nope.

Geometry and component reliability is first 2 things I care.
  • + 2
 Most people should check their own weight problem, then look at the bike.
  • + 2
 #JRYFB

It doesn't matter if you aren't XC racing.
  • + 1
 I have a 2019 Trek Slash 8, and yes it's 15kg, but it could still gain 4kg and i'd have just as much fun on it.
  • + 2
 Not very hard to build an ibis ripley around 25lbs, problem solved
  • + 2
 the weight problem of my bike is smaller than mine.
  • + 1
 Steel is real & gram counting is for XC.
Put on some lycra and throw a leg over the carbon if that is your thing.
  • + 0
 Pretty sure that last time I rode my aluminum bike it was real as well, either that or it's a helluva simulation I'm living in.
  • + 1
 My bike weighs 35 lbs. It generally does not break.
  • + 1
 Stop calling it downcountry
  • + 1
 My 2019 process is a fat biffer at 15.3kg and it rips
  • + 1
 A really good dump in the morning could give anyone the edge.
  • - 1
 Well, Weight vs $$$ is not adressed in the article. If money was no object, I think many would prefer lighter bikes with fancier parts...
  • + 1
 I'm too poor for a light bike.
  • + 1
 I’ll take stiffness over weight savings any day
  • + 1
 % of bike mass to rider mass is more important.
  • + 1
 Hell'no! I have weight problem! ಥ﹏ಥ
  • + 1
 A bike with 120mm front and back that weighs 10.5kg is all you need!
  • + 1
 29ers on, you may have at least over 14kg trail bike.
  • + 1
 Hahahahahahahaha yeah blame the bike . Fatty.
  • + 1
 26 didn’t have this issue!
  • + 1
 What? Pre Carbon Fiber? lol
  • - 1
 im at about 36lbs. but thats with a gearbox, dual crowns abd coal front and back. still pedals well and rides like a bat out of hell. no complaints about the weight
  • + 1
 I thought weight wienie-ness died in the 1990's
  • + 1
 (6.79kg) ????
  • + 1
 My enduro........14kg
  • + 0
 Holy Jesus, 37lbs? That's 77 Big Macs!
  • + 0
 Full suspension 29ers are heavy. There's no way getting around that.
  • + 3
 My SB5.5 Turq would disagree, and so would other bikes I've ridden from Pivot and Scott
  • + 2
 Tell my 29er, 26 lbs Ripley that it's heavy and it will cry Smile . It's that weight with dd casing Agressor on the rear (I don't like flats) and exo DHF on the front and 165 mm Revive dropper post. Though my 27.5 SB6 is my to go to bike at 29 lbs with a revive 185 mm dropper, same tires. For the steepest climbs (>12%) I am faster uphill on my SB6, all others I am faster with my Ripley, including downhill and even though a bit slower and 3 lbs heavier the SB6 I really enjoy riding that bike. I know it does not make sense as it should be reversed. For rides longer than 20 miles, the Ripley is better. To me bikes don't make sense and therefore I just ride them a lot.
  • - 1
 Everyone who says weight is not an issue - why don't you go buy a full sus fat bike then?
  • + 1
 Fat tires are spooky when you go too fast, so it becomes a matter of safety at that point.
  • + 1
 @Deoratwo: no such thing as ghosts though right?
  • - 3
 Anything over 30lb is over engineered but the issue with weight belongs to rim inserts tyre just gaining weight faster then cops & doughnuts
  • + 1
 When I installed inserts on my bikes I went to lighter tires. But I also don’t have a big problem with cutting sidewalls where I ride.
  • + 0
 I likem thickkkkk

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