Polygon Collosus N9 - Review

May 27, 2014
by Mike Kazimer  


Polygon may not be a familiar brand for most riders, but the Indonesian company's sponsorship of the Hutchinson UR team has helped them gain increased recognition, at least with followers of World Cup DH racing. Polygon has also been working to expand their higher end offerings, which includes the Collosus N9, a bike we first saw in prototype form at the 2013 Taipei Cycle show. The futuristic-looking shape of the carbon fiber frame is certainly unlike anything currently on the market, and elicited numerous comments, usually involving aliens and outer space, whenever we rolled up to the trailhead. Polygon is a consumer direct operation, which means riders can go to the company's website and have a bike delivered straight to their door. Available in sizes S, M, L, and XL, the 27.5” wheeled Collosus N9 retails for $5799 USD.


Collosus N9 Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / enduro
• Wheel size: 27.5''
• Rear wheel travel: 160mm
• Carbon fiber frame, aluminum links
• FS3 suspension
• Fox Float 34 CTD fork
• Fox Float X shock
• Weight: 29.8lbs (w/o pedals)
• MSRP: $5,799 USD




Frame Details

The N9's looks are polarizing, which is usually the case when a bike's appearance deviates from the norm as much as this one does. The rectangular junction where the top and down tubes meet the head tube and the diagonal lines at the rear of the bike combine to make a frame shape that's 'unique', to say the least. But despite its out-of-the-ordinary appearance, the N9 possesses the features we've come to expect on today's all-mountain bikes such as internal cable routing, including the ability to run a stealth dropper post, 12x142 rear dropouts, ISCG 05 tabs, and a press-fit bottom bracket. There are also molded chainslap guards on the rear swingarm, although, surprisingly, there's no down tube protection in place to prevent rocks and other objects from damaging the carbon frame. There's also no spot to mount a water bottle, which isn't deal breaker, but would have been a nice addition, especially for those quick laps where you don't want to carry a pack.

Polygon Collosus N9
  The N9's rectangular head tube junction combined with long curved seat stays makes for a bike that's sure to attract attention at the trailhead.

As far as geometry goes, the Polygon has a 66.3 degree head angle and a chain stay length of 431mm, numbers that are on par for a bike intended for all-mountain usage. The forward positioning of the links that join the bike's front and rear triangles makes the relatively short chain stay length possible, although this does come at the cost of tire clearance – there's a reason the bike comes with a 2.25” version of Schwalbe's Hans Dampf tire in the rear instead of the 2.35” width found in the front. A 2.35” Hans Dampf will fit, but the clearance around the front of the chainstays is minimal, and on a muddy ride any mud or grit picked up by the tire would end up getting ground right into the carbon frame.

Polygon Collosus N9
  The N9's floating rear suspension design has the rear shock mounted to two aluminum links that connect the carbon front triangle to the carbon rear swingarm.


Suspension Layout

The N9 uses Polygon's FS3 suspension design, which uses two aluminum links to join the carbon front triangle to the carbon rear swingarm, with the rear shock mounted to the links, thus creating a floating suspension design. This is the third generation of Polygon's take on a dual link suspension design, with the current revision designed to remain neutral during pedaling while having an improved leverage curve. The N9's rather slack seat tube angle creates enough room for the swingarm to go through all of its travel without hitting the frame. The longer, lower link has a u-shaped portion that allows it to wrap around the base of the seat tube and connect to the swingarm. The left side of the swingarm has a diagonal support in place, a feature intended to provide additional frame stiffness.

Polygon Collosus N9 Review
  The N9's upper link is mounted to carbon fiber arms that extend upwards from the bike's down tube, and the horseshoe shaped lower link wraps around the seat tube.


Specifications
Price $5799
Travel 160mm
Rear Shock Fox Float X Adj CTD Factory kashima
Fork Fox 34 Float TALAS Remote CTD, 160mm
Cassette SRAM XG-1199 10-42
Crankarms SRAM XX1 32T 170mm
Rear Derailleur SRAM XX1 Type 2
Chain SRAM CN-XX1
Shifter Pods SRAM XX1
Handlebar Spank Oozy LTD 740mm
Stem Spank Oozy LTD
Brakes Shimano XT, 180mm rotors
Wheelset e*thirteen TRS Race
Tires Schwalbe Hans Dampf, 2.35" F, 2.25" rear
Seat Fizik Gobi XM
Seatpost RockShox Reverb Stealth
Polygon Collosus N9




bigquotesGiven the right terrain, the N9 will zip around like a bat on crack, seeking out every little bonus trail feature, hidden jump or transfer line available.

Climbing

The N9 is a nimble climber, and on the trail feels lighter than its 30+ pound weight would suggest. In fact, if we'd been asked to guess how much it weighed we would have pegged it as being a couple pounds less than it actually is, which is a good thing. This light ride feel made it easy to find the motivation to put out a solid effort when confronted with tricky climbs, climbs that the N9 didn't have any trouble with. Whether it was multiple tight switchbacks in a row, or a long section of awkwardly spaced roots, the N9 maintained excellent traction with quick and predictable handling. The rear wheel grip available for the climbs was impressive, and it seemed as if the harder you pushed down on the pedals the more the rear wheel would dig in, giving that extra traction that can make the difference between cleaning a climb or getting spit off to the side of the trail. We did find that there was a visibly noticeable amount of lateral movement in the seat stays during hard out of the saddle efforts, but this didn't seem to have any affect on the bike's climbing abilities.

The FOX Float X rear shock will cycle rhythmically through the first quarter or so of its travel if it is left wide open for the climbs, but flipping it into Trail mode immediately quiets this movement down, and still allows the shock to have enough compliance to provide grip on the trickiest ascents. It's fairly easy to reach down to flip the Float X's CTD switch for those on-the-fly settings changes, but it seemed odd that the handlebar mounted remote controls the front fork's compression damping instead of the rear shock's. Given the choice, and if we were forced to have a handlebar mounted remote at all, we'd rather have it control the rear shock, as the ability to firm up the rear end makes a much bigger difference on the climbs than adjusting the front fork. The N9's 34 Float also has a travel adjust dial that switches the fork between 160 and 130mm of travel, but this feature rarely saw use, and most of our time was spent in the longer travel mode.


Polygon Collosus N9 review
  The N9 doesn't shy away from rowdy trails, but it does have its limits.


Descending

On the descents, the N9 has the manners of a go-cart, a quick, lively ride that can get up to speed in a hurry, but, just like with those rental carts, there's a limit to how wild you can get. The N9's rear suspension was very supple and sensitive to terrain changes, and turned out to be highly effective at absorbing small to medium sized hits, which made it easy to carry good speed through rough sections of trail. However, when faced with larger drops or harsh g-outs, the N9 reached the end of its travel rather quickly - there didn't seem to be a strong enough ramp up to prevent it from bottoming out. At the front of the bike, even though Fox has done well to improve the feel of their 34 series forks in Descend mode, we still preferred the increased low speed compression provided by running the N9's TALAS Float in Trail mode the majority of the time.

The N9 likes nothing better than diving in and out of corners, but when pushed hard, especially on firm ground, the rear end of the bike doesn't provide the rock solid support needed to allow a rider to redline it without hesitation. Some of the blame for this lack of cornering support may lay with the swingarm flex we noticed on the climbs - this motion is amplified by the forces generated while blasting through a berm. Still, although there are limits to how aggressively you can ride the N9, it's a remarkably fun ride up to that point, and we had a good time trying to figure out exactly where those limits were. Given the right terrain, the N9 will zip around like a bat on crack, seeking out every little bonus trail feature, hidden jump or transfer line available. It's remarkably peppy for a bike with 160mm of travel, which makes it easier to navigate it through sections of trail that require multiple quick direction changes in a row.


Polygon Collosus N9 review
  The N9 is a lively ride, especially for a bike with 160mm of travel.


Component Check

• Spank Oozy stem and handlebar: As we mentioned in our review a few months ago, the Oozy bars are well made, but at 740mm are narrower than we prefer. A bike aimed at aggressive all-mountain riding should come with wider bars.

• FOX 34 TALAS with CTD remote: The handlebar mounted remote that allows riders to switch between Climb, Trail, or Descend mode with their right thumb isn't something that seems necessary, and we typically spent more time adjusting the CTD setting on the rear shock rather than the front. The same goes with the fork's TALAS feature – we rarely used it, and on the whole would have preferred the standard FOX 34 Float without all of the bells and whistles.


Polygon Collosus N9 Review
  The N9 comes with a top of the line build kit, but there's room for improvement.


• Fizik Gobi XM seat: Seats are a matter of personal preference, but we never quite came to terms with the shape of the Gobi. Its narrow, rounded profile made it tricky to find the correct sit bone positioning.

• e*thirteen TRSr wheelset: Part way through a ride the rear cassette stopped freewheeling, turning the bike into a carbon fiber fixie. Our best trailside efforts couldn't repair it, but back at the shop it turned out that the freehub lockring had worked its way loose behind the cassette, making it unable to freewheel. It was a five minute fix, and the freehub was trouble free after that, but it would be worth check the lockring periodically to prevent this from happening. We also found that the wheels came out of true rather easily, although the rims themselves held up well.

• Shimano XT brakes: We're glad to see that it's becoming more common for companies to spec Shimano brakes even on bikes equipped with SRAM's 1x11 drivetrain. The XT brakes' power and lever feel still places them above just about anything else on the market.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesAlthough it's billed as being an enduro race or all-mountain machine, Polygon's Collosus N9 is more like a trail bike with a little extra cushion - nimble and lively, and capable of handling technical trails, but within reason. It wouldn't be our first choice for an enduro race bike, as the speeds and hairball terrain associated with racing would be better suited to a more solid ride. It's the lack of rear end stiffness and the slightly quirky component selection that takes the N9's performance down a notch, but the bike does have potential, and with a few tweaks its performance could easily be raised to the next level. It will be interesting to see what the future holds for Polygon, especially with their focus on consumer direct sales - will the cost savings that are associated with this business model be enough to steer consumers away from more well known brands? - Mike Kazimer



MENTIONS www.polygonbikes.us and www.bicyclesonline.com.au




153 Comments

  • + 84
 Not the prettiest, but I'd tap that
  • + 71
 we are pretty confident that customers will be pleased with the way it rides.
  • - 15
flag chyu (May 27, 2014 at 21:34) (Below Threshold)
 Cover the frame; fire the base.
  • - 2
 It's like a mail order bride. Anyone can, and they send her right to your door.
  • + 3
 No mud clearance? Not for B.C. or Britts I guess.
But, I do like curving top tubes though.
  • + 9
 I have been riding one in B.C. for the past couple of weeks, with a wider rear tire as well, no problems with the mud.
  • + 13
 I think it looks cool. Its different which is a good thing.
  • - 8
flag omendelovitz (May 28, 2014 at 9:38) (Below Threshold)
 @ Polygonbikes-us: are you confident enough to give a return policy around a 30 day trial period? proof is in the pudding...
  • + 38
 we offer a 30 day return policy ...
  • + 27
 BOOM SHOTS FIRED OMENDEL
  • + 43
 I've gotta give props to any manufacturer who braves the comment section of Pinkbike regarding their own product. Cheers Smile
  • + 39
 we were going to run away and hide, but i crashed my bike yesterday and can not ride today, so i am spending my day in the PB comment section. just kidding, not about the crash, that really happened, we feel that it is important to meet our customers and PB is a good place to meet and talk to them.
  • + 5
 Ok good deal, yhat's a respectable answer, @polygonbikes-us
  • + 1
 I actually kind of like the way it looks... Except it must take quite the effort to clean though!
  • + 9
 It is not that difficult to clean, but it is so much fun that you are just going to get it dirty again.
  • + 2
 Looks like the old quad link suspension system marin used to use... Could make for a good riding bike.
  • + 2
 Trick with that quad link, or any multilink design is that it's REALLY hard to see what those links are actually doing just by gawking at pictures. A tiny change to the position of those short links makes a big change to the ride, and where they're attached doesn't really matter. Just gotta trust the reviewer and your own legs.
  • + 0
 love my dhx just got my wife a n9
  • + 29
 Whenever I see a bike review with a Fox 34 and Fox Float CTD, I wonder if the bike would be a shitsui tonne better with a Pike and a Cane Creek Double Barrel.
  • + 0
 i agree. They should have waited a year to use the new 36 at least.
  • + 13
 *shoud've gone PIKE... I'm just trolling though, I've not even ridden a new Pike. Or a fox 34.... Or a ccdb... Or a pogo stick...
  • + 26
 That bike is sexy. It's a unique design in a sea of cookie cutter bikes. Some people might not like it, but I think that the gamble will pay off. Also, the price is a good value.
  • + 20
 hey Polygon. Just put the DH bikes on your site already for north america so i can order one damit !
  • + 13
 Viatch, we are working towards making them available in North America.
  • + 2
 I appreciate the unique design as well
  • + 13
 In my head I just said, "Yeah, $6k is a good price point for this bike," and then I immediately thought, "Since when has $6K been a good price for a bike?!?!"

This sport is so unaffordable. It's getting exhausting to watch the prices rise. The technology that made our sport possible is becoming the thing that's making it unaffordable.
  • + 3
 Biking isn't unaffordable if you got a good paying job or know how to save $ OR your a young kid and your parents buy all your crap..

I get those dilemmas either have food in my fridge or buy some new parts or get my bike serviced sometimes I go with number 2 and starve for 2 weeks till my next pay...Kinda like a junkie but with bikes but with a job...
  • + 4
 Hahahah Big Grin 6k for a bike? Most of us just dreaming about these steezes in hungary with the ~300 dollar monthly payments. Well, if you can get a job at all...
  • - 13
flag marcus2065 (May 28, 2014 at 1:45) (Below Threshold)
 That bike is fugly and there are way better bikes available for around that price
  • + 4
 I know a lot of people bashed the N9 for its looks but I think its sexy. The rear end looks like a weapon.
  • + 3
 The sport is really unaffordable if you insist on buying everything new.
  • + 7
 whoa who knew there were so many Nazis and people who hate babies on this site.
  • + 3
 people say the same thing over and over and over and over again. I wish they would just leave the price off the articles because people only talk about the price and not about the bike. Its been said a million times over, but this bike is not for everyone and there are bikes at a lower price range that are great. But don't ruin the discussion by dwelling over the price. Plus this is full retail price and u gotta be pretty stupid to pay full retail on a bike.
  • + 8
 MDRipper, I agree with you that the price get's talk about too much, but at the end of the day the people who are interested in the bike are going to want to know how much the bike will cost them. We feel that a frame that rides as well as the N9 does and component spec that is proven (XX1, XT, Fox) and all for under $6000 is a pretty good deal.
  • + 3
 If they were interested enough to want to buy the bike I would hope they would do more research than a pinkbike review. Considering the steep investment of a new bike. That's why it's lame to buy new lol. Leave it to the rich suckers playing along with capitalism, wasting their lives away for more money. Next year they will sell it used on this very website's classifieds for more money so they can buy more new stuff and you can buy it for half the price, with all the same components in pretty much perfect working order. It's not like top end parts suddenly become shit when the next iteration of top end comes out. You can just pretend current technology is next years technology or something. My bike is over twice the bike I could afford new and it runs the same, only it doesn't look like it just came out of the bike shop yesterday. It's been ridden and it shows, that's all.
  • + 19
 Sub $6k carbon 160mm bike with xx1 that checks all the frame boxes. Damn.
  • + 4
 Exactly! Can't beat that spec for that price and most of us will never be able to "out-ride" it so the "lack of performance" is a moot point, if even a legitimate point at all...
  • + 4
 It's a legitimate point for those of us that want to excel though. We are among the pinkbike readers
  • + 4
 It's really not even a lack of performance, but more different performance than one would expect from a 160mm bike. The way they describe it makes it sound like more of a trail bike than an enduro bike, which for about 75% of everyday riding works for most of us. A lot of people on pinkbike seem to go for the biggest bike possible for the terrain, when most of us don't have full fledged dh or enduro tracks in our backyards
  • + 5
 The N9 is a mountain bike that most people are really going to enjoy, thanks matthewlikesbikes.
  • + 10
 I've been thrashing this bike in the Peruvian Andes for over a month now. Real riding, Claw, Buehler and I climbed and descended 60,000' through the gar in 9 days. You guys will see more on that soon. I have killed many bikes down here over the years in the name of product testing and I'm loving the N9. This bike should be ridden before being bashed by the peanut gallery. C'mon guys, ride first - spray later..

Pinkbike, I'm glad to read that you guys picked up on the light and nimble trail feel, dynamic tracking and grip in your test rides. I'm curious about a few things though, I'm running a 2.4 Maxxis Highroller 2 in the back and have never had a mud clearance issue. In the Amazon jungle. I'd wage anything that the N9 I've been testing has seen more abuse that you guys were able to dish it on this test. Especially huge high and low speed compression hits pinning these 9,000' rocky, muddy descents. In my humble opinion N9 loved em, and pulled on everyone down these monsters. Curious about your suspension settings?
  • + 7
 well said
  • + 4
 Tire clearance with a 2.35 Hans Dampf on a Easton Haven rim: www.pinkbike.com/photo/11005425. Granted, it's a wide tire, but there's not enough clearance that I'd feel comfortable running that configuration in the slop. As far as suspension settings, I was running around 30% sag, which equated to 10-12 pounds over body weight in the Float X.
  • + 1
 Massive low speed hits? Huh?
Maxxis 2.4" = Anyone elses 2.2"
Dynamic tracking. Is that marketing speak for bendy?
  • + 1
 Yes low speed compression as in g-outs and lips at speed. Ask anyone who's ever stood on a world cup podium about dynamic tracking. Especially legendary testers like Vouilloz and Barel.
  • + 1
 i know what lsc is. im just not sure what a massive low speed hit is. i dont know anyone who has stood on a wc podium so i cant ask them about dynamic tracking. can you tell me? as far as i can work out, tracking would relate to the lateral stiffness of the chassis, while dynamic would suggest it flexes.
  • + 1
 Mike, thx for the reply. Crazy how much less clearance you appear to have than my Spank and Maxxis 2.4 combo. I haven't had clogging issues yet, but duly noted. Did you play with the pressure or CTD modes much? As you know, suspension setup is a very personal thing and a lot of it depends on riding style. With stock valving I've always run a firmer setup than recommended. Suspension is always an interesting conversation for me, generally I've found that firm is fast. As far as I know, no world cup dh or ews race has ever been won on a "soft" setup.
  • + 1
 A massive low speed compression would be like coming into a blind gully g-out with too much speed, that "oh shit" moment when you just have to let off the brakes, lean back and just let the bike take it? A harsh g-out at the bottom of a long stair set, or when you hear someone buzz their seat on the lip of a jump? Classic low speed compression hits as opposed to high speed compression like pinning a whoop section or rock garden. It's the speed that the oil is pushed through the circuits and valves. Race bike chassis are tuned for flex, like race skis. Long gone are the day of sloppy linkage, bushings, etc. The front and rear end are engineered to work together now and at the world cup level super stiff bikes don't track as well, they skip and lose traction on chattery corners and have a "dead" feeling - shitty dynamism. The great bikes have a lively ride quality, a balance of many things like compliance and stability that tracks better and is confidence inspiring at the limit. Vouilloz was a pioneer of this level of tuning and was notoriously "ahead of his time" which is why he has to many titles to his name.
  • + 1
 according to pb's review those are two areas in particular where this bike fails to deliver. admittedly sus settings would have a large role in the lack of low speed support, but i assume the test riders know how to set up a shock better than most. as for the chassis being too dynamic, no amount of at home fettling will fix that. a bit of give can help with grip, but noticable flex makes grip less predictable.
  • + 11
 As far as high end carbon bikes go, this is reasonably priced. Looking good!
  • + 2
 compared to the BMC and similar stuff that goes over the roof with same components ok pricing Smile but i doubt anything on the market will ever beat CAPRA ! Razz
  • + 9
 I like the 'dealer direct' operation that they have going however if something that looked like that arrived on my door I'd close it
  • + 10
 Polygon is definitely making some sweet stuff now, they've really stepped it up. Can't wait to see how they progress
  • + 7
 thanks a lot
  • + 6
 I have to agree one thing with PB, Polygon should have used the CTD remote for the rear shock, not the fork. Rear shock IMO plays a greater role during climbing. Nice review overall. Perhaps the bottom out could be avoided using a more progressive rear shock like the CCDB? I just order one from Polygon US, let us see how it handles. Cheers.
  • + 6
 Nimble and flickable! This is the bike that takes the place of the 26ers! It's just what everyone says they want! It doesn't make the riding too easy, and it's really maneuverable. Fun not racing they say.
  • + 2
 Yea, it sounds like it just needs a volume reducer in the shock to become the ultimate bike! And $2k cheaper than bikes of similar spec!
  • + 3
 I see a lot of comments from people that have not tossed a leg over one of these bikes and "given it a go" themselves. I have been riding a Polygon T8 trail bike (140 mm travel version) for over a month now and have been having a blast while doing it. I challenge you to ride a Polygon bike on one of your favorite trails and not have a great time. I ride all kinds of terrain, steep, rocky, jumps and flowy singletrack trails and this bike seems to handle everything well.
  • + 7
 holy number of pivots batman!
  • + 9
 No more than pretty much every other 4 bar, vpp, dw link, maestro, ect suspension bike
  • + 3
 Maestro has one fewer pivots, the shock does not float. Two lower pivots and three upper pivots.
  • + 2
 No Maestro has 2 coaxially mounted pivots, but there are 2 independent movements there
  • + 2
 It's funny that you state that the XT brakes' power and lever feel place them above almost every other brake on the market. I personally can't stand the feel of their levers, and my Formula R1s are more powerful and lighter as well.
  • + 2
 Screw the bike shop, who needs bike shops anyway right PGone? Cut out the middle man and sell bikes at lower prices. All that money you save on a Polygone, you can buy a mint repair stand, truing stand, compressor and a F load of bike tools
  • + 2
 I'm actually living/working in Indonesia atm, and have been hitting the trails almost every weekend (apart from rainy days which are almost over) on a Spec Epic 29er (brain). Have seen a few polygons on the trails, but concensus is those that are riding them cant afford the European bikes. For almost 6k, I don't see locals splurging that amount of cash on a "local" bike. Kinda reminds me of an Ibis mojo.
  • + 4
 I spent two months in Indonesia last year and was surprised by the number of high end bikes. With the move to North America and the sales we already have in Europe and Australia we are hoping to change the Indonesians perspective from a "local" bike to a "world wide" bike.
  • + 1
 You can run an advertsiing blitz campaign for the N9 at the most trafficed trails (there's about four in Jakarta). Seeing as it's not your typical run of the mill frame, the N9 will garner some interest, as Indonesians love something different. And you are right about the number of high end bikes, plenty of $ on the trails, if only you ran a "bike class", teach them how to properly tear up the track.
  • + 6
 Peculiar design... I like it.
  • + 7
 Get to the batmobike
  • + 3
 The front triangle is one hot mess! It's look they made a prototype and then placed a bracing tube everywhere the frame flexed.
  • + 2
 No water bottle mounts? Deal breaker I put extra water bottle mounts all over my Full Suss bikes. Then I put little pebbles in the bottles for an extra rattle effect. Not only does it look sweet but sounds cool too!
  • + 1
 well, atleast you can still fit pebbles in the bars and frame
  • + 3
 Good price. Good spec. But a flexy frame with 160mm of travel that can't handle drops? No thanks. Also, definately should've gone with a 2.35 on the rear.
  • + 2
 I have been riding the N9 for a couple of weeks, the frame flex is not noticeable while climbing like Mike says in his review. I have also been running a Maxxis Minion in the rear on a super fat rim with out any tire clearance issues.
  • + 1
 You're saying there is only flex when descending? Still, not good.
  • + 1
 I have not experienced any flex feeling during descending. I put a gopro on it and I can not see any flex during the DH.
  • + 1
 I've ridden bikes that had improperly tensioned spokes (loose) that made the back in feel squirmy.
In the review he mentions wheels not staying in true, which tells me they aren't staying in tension either.
How much of what he was feeling was rear wheel related?
  • + 1
 I beg to differ on a flexy frame that can't handle drops. Have you ridden one or even seen one in person? This is nothing compared to what I heard from people while we developed the Cannondale Jekyll a few years ago. How many people spray about that bike now? In my experience it's a good idea to actually ride something before formulating an opinion on it.
  • + 3
 Jeez. Such a nice build and its still cheaper than a Specialized sworks epic.....
  • + 1
 1 thing I don't see as practical, how do you stop dirt and water always running into the shock instead of running away? Looks like it would foul or squeak a lot more than most.
  • + 3
 The seat tube is in front of the shock and stops most dirt and mud from hitting the rear shock.
  • + 0
 oh well that's alright then, I hope it works out for You. I ride in WALES, and unless its been dry for a Week there is always some mud, My question relates more to the laws of gravity and the weight of the dirt, but as I said I wish it all the best.
  • + 1
 ^^^ How about your fork? Same situation no? Wiper seals are designed for just this reason.
  • + 2
 stunning looking bike - just swap the fox for a pike an a CCDB air and I'd part with cash (if I actually had cash that is lol)
  • + 4
 We are going to be spending the summer testing the frame with all of the new suspension products out there. We have been riding the N9 with a Pike on it for the last couple of weeks and we are looking forward to the Fox 36 making it's way on there.
  • + 1
 i can handle pretty much everything design wise here except that rear end. i'm sure it helps with stiffness but having the seat and chainstay's joining so far head of the axle just looks out of place.
  • + 3
 30 pound carbon fiber trail bike that COSTS 6K........... .............................N O T
  • + 0
 My XPREZO ADHOC with a steel rear end and aluminum front weighs the same as this bike, and comes with a 36mm fork. If some bike company makes a carbon bike it better be light, otherwise what's the point?
  • + 2
 it matches my Darth Vader underoos.....
  • + 1
 negative props....hahahahaha....losers
  • + 0
 I don't see how you could fit a water bottle in that trestle of carbon. It isn't the deal breaker for sure, but it likely isn't there because it would be like playing twister on your bike.
  • + 2
 Camelback, no?
  • + 1
 @gnarbar...Camelbak for sure. Mike had commented in the article that it lacked a water bottle cage mount. That frame geometry would provide for the first ever auto eject design for a water bottle on full suspension compression. Actually that could be a benefit. Have a drink on landing your favorite road gap.
  • + 1
 Idk, if I'm not going out for like 20+ miles I hate carrying a pack. Bottle and jersey pockets for me. Much cooler.
  • + 1
 Those tight radius frame details, they don't look good and theres better ways to strengthen carbon. The whole bike looks like they struggle with their carbon manufacturing.
  • - 1
 Indeed...I don't like the look of the amount of leverage that rear brake is going to apply to that rear dropout/stay junction. I know carbon is pretty bombproof these days, but with the amount of scratches it IS going to end up with on the stays if ridden properly, I'd be a bit paranoid about it cracking near that junction after a couple of years (ab)use
  • + 1
 I work at a bike shop part time and I agree that prices are getting out if control. For that reason I'll stick to my Kona Process .
  • + 1
 When you say "we didn't like the saddle", are you referring to you and the mouse in your pocket? I thought these were single man reviews.
  • + 3
 Damn... That's beautiful @polygonbikes-us
  • + 2
 The added complexity of the design needs to add more to the bike than just looks. :/
  • + 2
 Sorry to pick small points, but they're either "customer direct" or "dealer direct".
They can't be both
  • + 3
 customer direct
  • + 1
 the polygon company they are making a really nice bike.. if they still making bikes like that they would be a hard competition in the market
  • + 3
 Ugly but in a sick kind of way... I'd ride it.
  • + 1
 Sounds like the only weak link in the ride is in the suspension. The ctd stuff bottoms out to quick. Maybe next year this bike will have it all together.
  • + 2
 That rear end looks more messed up than snookie in tiger print g string.
  • + 12
 Didn't Snookie lose a bunch of weight and get hot?
  • + 6
 ahhhhh you got me.
  • + 2
 BAHAHAHA!!! Taken...
  • + 2
 I'd l'île to try it. Weight isn't everything.
  • + 2
 Definetly aiming for the wtf is that market, pretty sweet though.
  • + 2
 Maybe something different for once is a good thing?
  • + 1
 to me honestly..its a Maestro design, just relocated. anyone?
  • + 3
 No it's not, but it kinda looks like it. The shock on the maestro suspension design does not "float". The bottom of the shock on the maestro does not connect to the lower linkage, and does not lift in the compression. This does. Trek and evil have shocks that float as well.

But whatever, this bike does not appeal to me visually, and the rear triangle just extends in a way that is a deal breaker enough for me. The fact that the PB article addresses the flex and how it's not a bike they would want to race with, says loads to me. Because, with all due respect to my friends who make this website great, they have a tendency to throw softballs in a lot of the bike reviews here.
  • + 1
 I agree on the rear triangle
  • + 1
 Think the older marin mount vision is very similar. Would love to try this bike. Its looks are growing on me, priced right.
  • + 1
 yep, not a maestro, obee 1 is correct. like a hybrid of trek and giant thought.
  • + 2
 Mondraker Zero is pretty much the same system
  • + 1
 I would call it The Mudhugger Smile
  • + 1
 like how the rear brake cable is routed
  • + 1
 i hope N9 to go down in fort william with double crown ^,^
  • + 5
 I hope not, Fort William is a DH bike course and we would like our team to be on the podium, not off the back ... ha
  • + 1
 Bike looks sexy to me. The rear flex may be an issue.
  • + 1
 The only thing that looks weird to me is the rear triangle.
  • + 1
 for that price ill get a knolly warden
  • + 0
 Specs and geometry are looking good, but Polygon screwed it up by hiring a 5 year old to do the design. Less is more...
  • + 2
 puta de bike!! Smile
  • + 1
 Is there an Al 26 inch version with even shorter stays?
  • + 1
 Is there a frame only option? And around how much will it cost?
  • + 2
 We are looking at having the frame only version available soon. If you email rob.dunnet@polygonbikes.us we will get you the frame only pricing.
  • - 1
 Wow. A 6 grand bomb... even the hubs were crap... ok. Close my eyes . Nomad... tighter. S works enduro 29....
  • + 1
 now open up...this is a very capable bike at a great price point compared to what you're dreaming up. In reality it's more about how you ride than what you ride to get the wind in your face.
  • + 1
 Lol.. I know... just being mean I guess...
  • + 0
 $6 grand and it doesn't even have carbon fiber tires? Guffaw!!
  • - 1
 Did I miss it....It looks good but it also looks a tad heavy...what does it weigh??
  • + 0
 face only mother could love
  • - 1
 the frame may work well , but its definitly not this year's prettiest bike !
  • - 1
 I'd rather slide down a plank with rusty nails in it.
  • - 3
 hideous. no sale here. bikes should be beautiful. this is not
  • - 2
 look! IM COMPLICATED FOR NO REASON
  • + 1
 i'm sorry to hear that
  • - 2
 ...Thats funny hahaha...Not
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