Praxis, KS and WTB - Taipei Show 2015

Mar 17, 2015
by Mike Levy  
Taipei


Praxis' Ten Speed Solution

Looking for a wider gearing range? There are all sorts of add-on solutions out there right now, but Praxis feels that these modifications can cause both less than ideal jumps in gearing and hurt shifting performance. The better answer, they say, is their new $129.99 USD ten speed cassette that sports an 11 - 40 tooth range with a 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-34-40 spread.

Praxis
Praxis' ten speed cassette offers an 11 - 40 tooth range.
Praxis
The two largest cogs are aluminum, while the rest are steel.

Praxis' mission to design and manufacture a cassette had a few rules: they wanted it to fit on a standard freehub body, be competitive in both weight and cost, and not require any modifications to the derailleur. That last point was especially important as they feel that forcing a derailleur to work with a 42 tooth cog is pushing it to its outer limits, and that add-on cages are not an ideal solution when you factor in the total cost of the system. That's not to say that they won't offer a wider spread in the future, though, just that, at least at this point in time, they firmly believe that an 11 - 40 tooth spread is the ideal range when talking about ten speed derailleurs and drivetrains. The cassette weighs 320 grams, which is slightly lighter than an 11 - 36 XT model, and will be available in early June.




KS and the Electric Dropper Post

Remember that electric dropper post from KS that we showed you last year? Well, KS is still working on the design, but it's not yet close to production. There's still no wires to be found - it employs a wireless remote that activates a piezoelectric motor within the post - but KS have been tinkering around with a more powerful battery since we last saw them. That added power means more size, with the brick-shaped battery clamped low on the display bike's seat tube, but the company is surely working on an integrated solution that will tuck it into the post or frame to be out of sight.

KS
The prototype's battery is huge, but it's only to test the concept.
KS
The dropper post itself uses KS' proven internals.




KS
No wires to be found here. Expect the production remote to look very different.

The post itself employs the same internal design as used within their other droppers, but instead of a plunger activated by a cable, a piezoelectric motor opens and closes a small valve to accomplish the same thing. There's the obvious possible tie-in with batteries that power electronic drivetrains, which means that KS might have the option of eliminating a battery altogether. Battery life is uncertain at this point in time, though, given that KS has yet to decide what they'll be using to power the post, but sixty or more hours of ride time is what we've seen out of suspension forks that use a piezoelectric motor to control its lockout function, so there's is no reason why KS couldn't come up with something similar to that. But what happens when the battery dies? This prototype automatically reverts to full extension if its battery runs out of juice, thereby allowing you to pedal out of the bush without wrecking your knees.

It's clearly a ways out, but it's easy to see how KS' wireless post could be a real headliner if and when it gets the nod for production.




WTB Goes Big and Bigger

The push for 27.5+ is coming from frame manufacturers, and it looks like it's going to be a hot topic in 2016. But what the hell is 27.5+ all about? If you take an extra-wide 27.5'' rim and mount a wide tire to it, one that's in the neighborhood of 2.8" or greater, the result is what's being called 27.5+. The height of the wide rim and wide tire combination is nearly the same as that of a 29" wheel, but with a larger footprint. The claimed benefits are greater traction and flotation, but without the sluggishness that a fat bike has. Is it a good thing? We don't know yet, but the frame manufacturers going ahead with their plans means that companies like WTB are asked to produce tires and rims to fit.

WTB
The 27.5+ Trail Blazer measures in at 2.8'' wide.
WTB
The Bridger is even larger, with a 3.0'' width.


WTB's first two tire options are the 2.8'' wide Trail Blazer (shown to the left) and the 3.0'' wide Bridger. The former has been in development for quite some time, even before it was obvious that there would be 27.5+ specific bikes, and the idea behind it is to have a large volume tire that will still fit in many 29er frames without rubbing the chain or seat stays. WTB hasn't thrown rolling speed out the window with these massive tires, though, with the Trail Blazer sporting a prominent center line and the company's Dual DNA compound to that end, as well as their TCS casing to make tubeless conversions safer and headache-free. Also, it's not nearly as heavy as you might suspect, coming in a 980 grams.

The 3.0'' wide Bridger is a much more serious looking 27.5+ tire, and it's also one that isn't likely to fit on many (or any?) standard 29er frames that never had this sort of rubber in mind. The open tread pattern and massive, rounded profile should add up to predictable traction, and WTB is actually recommending it for pretty much any type of terrain and conditions. There are two versions in the works, with the lighter coming in at 1,207 grams and using their TCS Light casing and Dual DNA rubber compound. The big-boy option sports a TCS Touch casing and Gravity DNA rubber, with the total adding up to 1,510 grams.

WTB
  WTB's Scraper rim is converted to tubeless very easily, and features a 45mm internal width.


Big tires mean big rims, and the Scraper checks out with a massive 45mm internal width. The 32 hole rim uses WTB's TCS inner profile, as you'd expect, and has a welded joint. The 27.5" version weighs in at 697 grams, while the 29er model is 735 grams.


171 Comments

  • + 147
 Shimano, SRAM you fools, if you'd brought out a range of 11-40 10 speed cassettes they'd sell by the bucket load ! Go Praxis
  • + 21
 Yes, I think a far better idea than add on range extenders as the spread is far better, and when you factor in the cost I think its a bit of a no brainer!! As you say, Go Praxis!!
  • + 19
 Exactly. Id brought up the exact same argument in the review of the wolf expander cog yesterday. Ill definitely be buying one of the praxis cassettes when theyre available.
  • + 11
 Yeeep, they've got my money.
  • + 13
 i found the difference between 36t to 40t not big enough to make much difference. 2 cents

would like to see cassettes with wider spaced ratios less cogs and lighter.
  • + 9
 The reason they haven't done that is because it would probably deter people from buying any 11 speed drivetrains, put it this way;
Whats the point in paying £500+ (or however much it is) for an 11 speed drive train when you can get an the same wide range 11-40t cassette in 10 speed for a fifth of the price?
Undoubtedly they both shift the same and do the same job at the end of the day.
  • + 1
 Even wider range? How is 11-40 wider than 10-42?
  • + 2
 I made the mistake of posting that before I read it, my bad!
  • + 11
 Shimano so should have done a 11-40 tooth 10spd cassette, think that would have won the war with SRAM.
  • + 5
 @inked-up-metalhead wider as in not close ratio, fewer gears with a bigger difference between them is what I mean.
  • + 2
 Their gear ratio is 34t-40t. They felt the same way as you iffy.
  • - 1
 Shimano used to offer this untill about 7-8 years ago. It came as standard on most bikes. I still have a MegaRange on my old bike. Today you just have to pay the price for a big cog. Smile
  • + 6
 Except that was still only a 34t big cog.
  • + 2
 Megarange cassette? That thing weighed about 4lbs.

I'm here waiting to buy that Praxxis cassette. Why an 11-40t cassette is not common is baffling to me.
  • + 3
 Looking forward to a PB test of this cassette.
  • + 3
 I can get a wolf-tooth for like $90, or for a few bucks more the whole cassette!
  • - 1
 I know , what about putting a small sprocket on the front ,or has that been done before ?
  • + 0
 Not exactly price competitive with XT like was rumored, though.
  • + 0
 Trickstuff released a 10speed 11-41 (!) cassette: www.trickstuff.de/de/products/Kassette_4111.php
  • + 3
 269euros!
  • + 4
 I saw a 10 speed 11-40 cassette at the Microshift booth. I think it's going to be priced more competitively than the Praxis. There no reason to pay 129USD for a cassette that simply has a wider range of gear. Microshift also got a wide range(11-40) dedicated rear derailleur to perfect the parallelogram to match the 11-40 tooth spread, so you aren't just cranking on the D screw to get it to work. QBP will probably carry them, so look for them on the Q website.
  • + 4
 Shimano cannot just start selling a 11-42 cassette because they've been telling us that their derailleurs dan't handle more than 36 for years... They are not like Specialized! (Witch tells us something and then the next year they do the total opposite, see 27.5). Shimano needs to update the XT and SLX to accept such a larger cog and that will probably come in the next year or so...
  • + 1
 I don't get it. An XT cassette and an expander cog can be bought for the same price (or even less). The expander cog should outlive roughly two or more cassettes, costing $170 dollars for two cassettes and an expander cog. But with the Praxis cassette, that leaves you paying $260 for two cassettes. And also you can get 17t cogs for $15 or even less if you look hard enough. I could be completely off the point here, but isn't this a false economy in the long run?
  • + 2
 @NotDannyHart XT cassette MSRP is like $50, and the cheapest extender cog is Hope's for around $80 and doesn't come with a 15 tooth.
  • + 4
 The Praxxis offering adjusts the ratios in the middle of the cassette, between 20t & 30t. Whether the difference in ratios is worth it to you is certainly a valid argument, for the price. It isn't for me, especially since I don't have a problem with using a RAD cage, & want to use the 42t it allows.
  • + 1
 CRC had an absoluteBlack one going for around $45.
  • + 1
 Those are thew new cheaper AB expanders, they only come in 40t. Basically the same as their more expensive ones, just with less finishing.
  • + 1
 SRAM and Shimano have already moved forward with their 11 speed. Especially when the Shimano 11 sp will eventually trickle down to XT and SLX. There is no point for them to go backwards and redesign their RD's and make a 40/42T cassette. The Shimano setup is a big win for hubs that are not XD compatible...and I'm sure there are still plenty that are not. Even if Shimano does not make a 42T cassette when XT or SLX comes out...I'm sure third party companies will make one. I'm currently running a 11-42 10 speed setup with a X0 shifter and mid cage RD. I'm pretty happy with the way it works.
  • + 1
 I know right? such a good idea why hasnt it been done before (dont say xx1 that doesnt count as it involves a whole new drivetrain) now i will happily go 1x10 and feel like i can perfectly get away with a 36t or even a 38t chainring with that 40t big cassette sproket. after demoing the xx1 earlier last year i felt it was perfect but it deffo needed 34 or 36t chainring, not that silly small 32t that it comes with as standard. Do they expect us to have legs made of matchsticks or something.
  • + 3
 Erm, it was in your head buddy. 10t bottom with a 32t chainring is almost the same as a 36 with a 11t small on the cassette. So a 34 11 is a slower gear than x01.
  • + 1
 @NotDannyHart i hadn't heard before that expander cogs last for the life of 2 cassettes- why is that the case?
  • + 3
 You'll spend more time on the stock cassette cogs than the expander cog
  • + 3
 ^can't disagree. expander is my bailout gear, which is why I don't want to compromise 2 teeth. Mine certainly doesn't get used an inordinate amount. Of course, If I'm riding someplace I think I might really need to get out off, I'll probably do what ACC had on her enduro bike last year: granny ring with no derailleur. if you need it, stop & grab your chain, put it down on there yourself. granny ring only costs you about 24g of weight. Plus you get to keep the chain retention of a narrow wide for your main gear. You need something to keep the chain on in the front: you have to run a narrow-wide, a chainguide, or a derailleur. if you ditch all 3, your chain will drop allofzeetime.
  • + 0
 Why? Why do you need to get your full range of gears off your cassette? Run a 2x and get that low you want with 24 36 combo or even a 22 36. While introducing their new 1x11 XTR the spent more time talking about why their 2x and 3x11 are better more effcient offerings.
  • + 2
 because your chain will fall off if you want to go fast.
  • + 1
 Or you have to run a chainguide. the lack of noise from the chainguide sure is nice, now that I can get away without using one.
  • + 1
 1x10 with a narrow wide and clutch rear derail. Still run a chain guide. While my chain did not come off as much as it used to. I had a pretty nasty shin strike when my chain came off on some high speed chatter. Was the second time it happened. The deep ditch bleeding from my shin, was enough to buy a chain guide to prevent a maybe in the future.
  • + 1
 I drop chains once in a while, now I'm back to running a chain guide. The E13 XCX. No rubbing, no rub, just an added few grams of security
  • + 1
 Still, point I was making is that if you run a chainring with shiftramps, no FD, & no chainguide, you're going to have a bad day(in fact, I've had bad days using shiftramped rings with a chainguide.) Always dropped chains with 2x, too, though I haven't tried it with a clutch, which is why I run 1x, @davemud
  • + 0
 I use a 3x8 sytem made up of a Raceface square taper crank, 3 different brand 22 32 44 straight cut teeth and 2 year old alivio rear deraileur so no clutch and no chain guide and my chain doesn't fall off... why is that?

... oh wait I know, its because I know how to set up a front deraileur, how to shift, how to choose a gear combo and maintain my bike...

Oh and all the new 1x rings with the long, high, square teeth? Straight out of the 1970's man... like back when we didn't have shift ramps, release teeth and pick up pins or index shifting... man we knew how to feel the shift back then... Lol.
  • + 1
 So I guess the chain guide on your Norco is just for looks then.
  • + 3
 @USMC must be a special, 3x compatible chainguide that enhances trolling ability by +2.
  • + 2
 We need to tell the idiots on the WC DH scene that the answer to chain retention is by running 20 year old crank technology and triple rings. Morans.
  • + 0
 Yeaaaaah....you spelled MORONS wrong.
  • + 2
 whooooosh!
  • - 2
 Nope the guide on the Norco is to maintain chain tension and to prevent the chain getting wedged between the lower link and inner ring if it did fall off but it nver did. The 3x8 bike never had or needed a chain guide and just because 8 speed is older tech doesn't mean it doesn't work. It works well without all the bandaids and enhancements the 11 speed systems need. I just saw Saint 9 speed and all the enduros using 1x11 from the major brands with OEM chain guides in Whistler. Clutched RDRs and narrow wide were marketed as eliminating the need for guides but of course that isn't the case. Since DH bikes don't run the 1x11 speed systems I'm referring to they aren't included comments. If you have been paying attention to DH you'd know they have gone back to 7 speed cassettes, even older tech than I use. As I mentioned above even Saint has stepped back to 9 speed so maybe you guys want to take a closer look at what's going on in DH this year.
  • + 2
 hahaha, if YOU were paying attention to DH, you'd know that those are 11 speed systems with spacered cassettes. Nobody is running an actual 7 speed spaced system in the World Cup.

I've run both 8 speed & 7 speed. Their chain retention was shit.
  • - 1
 Grog, Sram has their 7 speed DH system on their web site. Both of Sram's Canadian distributors do as well so maybe go have a look. WC riders have a never ending supply of parts and team techs to look after their bikes. They are also constantly prototyping all kinds of gear so you really don't know what they are running one week to the next. One thing for sure is they will never be training or competing on any component that has any where near the amount of wear on it that the average rider has even if the are diligent with their maintenance. If you can't keep your chain on your bike its likely due to your set up, gear selection or wear beyond the manufacturer's acceptable tolerances. BTW you don't actually have to run rings with shift features either. You might be surprised how well straight cut rings can shift if your drive train is set up properly and you have good shifting technique.
  • + 1
 Here's a side on view of that cassette: www.pinkbike.com/photo/12194836 Notice the big chunk of aluminum on the back? That's what takes the place of the remaining 5 cogs. Here's the product page for 7-speed X01 DH: www.sram.com/sram/mountain/family/x01#sram-mtb-x01-dh-7-speed Notice how it uses the exact same chain as 11 speed X01? Go click on the derailleur, check what cable pull ratio it runs: X-actuation, the SAME. AS. 11. SPEED. X. OH. ONE.
  • + 2
 davemud, I can't tell if you're trolling or serious. Because no one could be that daft. If joking, well played.
  • + 2
 Oh, I already accused him of being a troll, like 10+ replies back. But I think he's an unintentional troll, one of those misguided souls who thinks they know the secret to bikes that no-one else has figured out, including all the people designing these parts. One of those poor unfortunates who might actually learn something new if they took just a small second to reflect on the fact that they might not be the genius he thinks he is, but alas, he's been doing this longer than you(or believes so, anyway) & that means your feeble attempts to educate him are so much noise, in the yawning gulf that is the difference in knowledge between yourself & him.
  • + 1
 Some world cup team needs to hire him because he clearly knows how to set up his shifting! Guess what, its not hard. A lever pulling on a cable - its probably the easiest part of your bike to work on and set up.
  • - 1
 Lol, pink bike is fun. It doesn't take much to stir the pot.
  • + 42
 Sweet. For a little more than a single ring you can get a whole cassette. On my list for sure.
  • + 3
 LoL!
Also, I think after they get the bugs worked out, I think a dropper post is the only place I will use wireless on my bike (I think).
  • + 6
 2016 is around the corner, and the new XT will have a 11-40T 11v just like the 2015 XTR, but at half the price.
  • + 2
 So stoked on praxis right now
  • + 1
 I don't know, XT always seems expensive when it's newly released. Go praxis
  • + 16
 Praxis are doing EXACTLY what Shimano should have done after SRAM brought out XX1.

Too little, too late I fear as so many bikes come XO1/X1 as standard now.
  • + 3
 Agree, especially when there new XTR 11 spd is only 40 tooth on the largest ring!!
  • + 2
 The Praxis only has a 40t big ring as well. If you want more range you'll need a smaller chainring.
  • + 3
 Chainring size has no effect on the size of the range.
  • + 14
 cool, dumb, dumber
  • + 2
 I'm kinda intrigued by the 3.0" tires - reminds me of the Gazziloddi but without the insane amount of weight. Or the required Monster T.
  • + 5
 1,500 grams is a lot. The last place you want to add weight is the rims/tires. This is just another silly trend and hopefully the sheeple won't fall for it.
  • + 1
 They aren't for every type of riding, but there is definitely a place in the market. I was able to run sub-15 psi on Dirt Wizard 2.75's, but got a few too many pinch flats for it to be reliable. 3.0" might be just the ticket.
  • + 2
 nowdays everbody is a sheeple @jaydawg69
  • + 5
 I'm wondering about the wide tires. DH riders used to run a minimum of 2.5 and up to 3.0, but today it seems most pros run 2.35. Surely they were seeing performance gains, because almost every fork and frame can handle wider tires if they wanted.
  • + 6
 They used to run maxxis 2.5 which was specified incorrectly. Compare a modern 2.35 or 2.4 to the old 2.5 and they are actually pretty much the same size. Some larger than the old minion, high roller. Some smaller
  • + 3
 minions are quite small for 2.5 , i have a wicked will 2.35 and its bigger than any 2.5 i know of for sure , maybe not kenda but still
  • + 1
 Maxxis always used to come up small volume for their given size, the first tire they seemed to size properly was the Advantage. Specialized tires on the other hand, massive volume for their given size.
  • + 5
 Huge volume tyres are fine if you want/need to float/roll about on a cushion of air. But I don't think they are as good compared to a lower volume tyre when it comes to cutting a turn or changing direction fast. Probably why the mid volume has stuck for dh.
  • - 12
flag betsie (Mar 18, 2015 at 5:32) (Below Threshold)
 tobiusmaximum - This was not really an issue for the pro's as they have been running 2 tubes for a long time to counteract this effect that you talk about.
Plus they run higher pressures so it is also not an issue.
Lets not forget some of them have tyres with side walls and compounds that the public cant buy too.
Beginner - Everything is soft (Tyres, spring rates etc.)
Pro - Everything is firm (Tyres, spring rates etc.)
  • + 11
 betsie. pretty much everything you just said is wrong...
  • + 1
 When my last set of HR2s ran out I bought some 2.3 WTB Vigilantes. They are HUGE and I hate them. In certain locales maybe they make sense but in Vancouver I need a grippy scalpel that brings precision. These are not that. They're not bad tires as far as rubber compound or construction, I just don't like they for how I ride.
  • + 1
 Wat did @betsie say?
  • + 2
 @alexsin
Yeah I went from 2.5 minions to 2.5 muddy marys. Oops. big mistake. Braking was great. Other than that felt like I was riding a fat bike. Riding rocky chutes was like trying to bat two ballons down a narrow coridoor.

On 2.35 magic mary's now. Super gravity casing. Couldn't be happier.
  • + 0
 batsie eaint entirerly full of crap , pro deffinately run shit stiffer, i run my suspension 10-20ln stiffer with more linear stroke , and my tires at 35-40 , makes your bike feel alot mroe solid when your bead rolls half the amount it used too

@gabriel-mission9 magic marys are way too slow , try wicked will :p
  • + 3
 40psi? jesus christ. Do you stop and walk round the corners? Anything more than 30 in mine and I feel like I'm riding some sort of insane drift trike pogo stick hybrid. Its fun sliding everywhere, but its not fast.

And yeah they are a little slow rolling, but most of the tracks i ride don't have many long straight bits.
  • + 1
 yea well im sick of going through 5 rims a year , the drift factor is rad bro
  • + 1
 I gotta ask. What rims and tyres are you running? Cos I don't believe you need to run 40psi to stop you going through 5 rims a year, unless you are riding a road bike. And yeah drifting is rad. Rad but slow.
  • + 1
 flow ex , 729s , couple others
  • + 0
 5 729's a year, on tyres that I assume have proper dh sidewalls, running at 40 psi? Something just doesnt add up there.
Either you are riding a full rigid or you throw your bike a lot. Maybe you weigh 20st?
WC racers run much lower pressures than that, and much less burly rims. I know Enve's are carbon, but I heard somewhere Peaty ran the same set of rims for a full season. He runs pretty narrow tyres and he's not a small guy.
  • + 0
 I would say with confidence that some... Enve rims may have had issues throughout the season. but I read that peaty only drank monster energy at the races, so it must be true.
  • + 1
 Did you actually read that tho? Or are you just making stuff up? Seems to be a lot of that going on. For one thing Peaty is a Stella man...
  • + 1
 2 729s , 1 flow and one carbon hoop .... your euro trails have alot less rock form the looks of it from where i live :p
  • + 2
 Ok, we're obviously just gonna have to agree to disagree. All I can say is watch this vid.

www.pinkbike.com/news/Aaron-Gwin-Bike-Check-Fort-William-trek.html

Gwin is well known for liking to run his bike stiffer than anyone else out there. In this vid he talks about how he upped his tyre pressures from 24/26psi to 26/28psi because the track at Fort Bill is so rocky and punishing and he was worried about flatting. If Gwin can run 28 psi in his rear tyre at Fort Bill, I don't see how anyone can need to run 40psi in either tyre for racing. Maybe for more jumpy flowy stuff, but not for racing DH.
  • + 0
 Having ridden fort bill many times and Canada. I can say that there are tracks in Canada much rougher than fort bill. Especially when the WC comes to town and they turn fort bill into a pretty smooth track. I remember fort bill with the old top section and old full pinball. She was rougher then.
  • + 1
 Whatever you say... No Fort Bill isn't the roughest track on the planet, but its definitely rough. And Gwin is definitely hitting stuff at speeds no one here can come close to. How does he deal with the much rougher than usual wc level track at twice the speed any of us are riding it at? He ups his rear tyre from 26psi to 28psi. Tells me everything I need to know.

Cya
  • + 0
 Twice the speed... I ain't that slow... yet. I run similar pressures at Fort bill on my current bike. Had to run higher on my turner to avoid punctures. I am pals with some boys who are pretty handy at Fort bill. In the 4mins 4xtimes. I can keep up through sections but no way for anything longer than 30 seconds of the track. I am no where near fit enough.
  • + 4
 On another note. I am so over this tire size BS. I ride a 26 inch hard tail and my next bike will be whatever I find that's affordable (I see a full suspension bike in my future). I'm sick of reading about the benefits of big wheels vs. small wheels. I just want to ride.
  • + 4
 Shameless self promotion. We get it, you're that cool guy
  • - 1
 Ok buddy. You're right. Excuse me for voicing an opinion. I'll make sure I don't do that again.
  • + 0
 You're super pleasant. I'd like to buy you a beer sometime.
  • + 7
 hey praxis, why are you named after a teacher's license exam? ...
  • + 3
 We've been testing the 2.8 Trail Blazer for a month or two now with our Parkwood frame. It fits just nice and the frame wasn't made with stupid tyres in mind, just fair mud clearances for UK riding. The Trail Blazer and the Scraper combo makes a lot of sense and delivers a lot of fun.
  • + 3
 Ok if the "marketing" reason they're going to keep repeating for 650B Plus is to have less weight than a fat bike tire/rim combo... it defeats the purpose to then go and make a tire that weighs MORE than a fat bike tire does with less air volume and no frame compatibility to anything but fat bikes and new frames built for them, and mount it to a rim that weighs as much as a 65mm width fat bike rim weighs. I've got a half dozen 3.8 to 4.0 actual width fat tires that are all less than 1300 grams, and they're all tubeless-ready foldables with stickier rubber compounds and lots of air volume. Unless of course the Bridger is also like the Trail Blazer in that they're measuring the casing width, and the actual tread width is significantly less than claimed (the Blazer is a 2.3 inch tread, so that'd likely put the Bridger around a 2.5 tread). Meanwhile in other tire maker world, Vee Tires has the Trax Fatty that's a real 3.25 tread on an i45 rim, at under 900 grams and for less money.
  • + 1
 I'm not sure of the accuracy of what I'm about to say, because I haven't weighed it my self, but on WTB's website, the claimed weight is less than 1000 grams for a tubeless compatible version of the Trailblazer at 2.8" wide.
  • + 1
 That's correct however (and there's always a however with WTB tire claims) the Trailblazer 2.8 is measured in casing only (further down from the tread) so that it fits into more existing 29er frame/forks than true mid-fat tires will, but while you reap some increased air volume for cushioning, unlike true fat tires you're restricted on how low you can run them because of the available tread width. With most makers of fat bike tires, the difference between tread and casing widths is usually about a fifth of an inch overall, not a half inch.
  • + 1
 Heres a good one @deeeight....A bike fanataic with a fat wallet, that likes to stay ahead of the latest trends out does himself when he decides on his next build. A 27+ frame that he mounts with 29er rims and tires. His reasoning is to save weight from those heavy 27+ tires. haha. Seriously one thing I haven't seen is TPSM wheel/tire display for bikes. I can imagine a Garmin or Powermeter display screen on the handle bar that keeps track of your tire pressure. When a tire is losing pressure your screen will let you know before you crash or so you can let your crew know you need a new wheel.
  • + 5
 And read about praxis 2weeks to late. After I just bought a new XT cassette
  • + 1
 Oh Bummer!!! I have been looking for deals for the XT cassette for the last couple of weeks so I can do the one up conversion but I got lucky I have not pulled the trigger. Sorry to hear that!!
  • + 2
 FWIW, I'm still going to go XT cassette & range expander, as I've been riding a 40t for the last year, & I think that extra 1.5% you get with the 42t is worth it.
  • + 2
 hey praxis, you say derailleurs can't make the jump to 42T. not true!!! wolf tooth goat link and RAD-R cage get you there easily. ok, goat link gets you there with less hassle and more money left in the wallet, just sayin'...make another cassette, please!!!! 11-42. i'd buy 2. tomorrow.
  • + 7
 The point they made was not to mod the derailleur, it was literally the sentence after the one you are referencing.
  • + 2
 Wolf Tooth said the same thing about the goat link. I've got to be honest: I think they're both overestimating the amount of people who want to do this, but aren't willing to use a RAD cage. Most riders want the improved performance, & the RAD cage gives you basically stock performance, with 42t capability. Installing it really isn't very hard, & even if someone isn't willing to do it, they've probably got a friend who will. There's also the SRAM option: regular medium cage SRAM deraileur needs less b tension adjustment than a stock shimano, & the X01 DH 10 speed deraileur should require almost none.
  • + 2
 Praxis Cost effective? Maybe. Depends how Sunrace prices their new 11-40 and 11-42 ten speed cassettes. I saw the cog sizes in an ad the other day and its better than the Praxis cassette offers. (its not for example a 28 to 34 to 40T jump).
  • + 1
 AFAIK, SUnrace are not known for the high quality of their cassettes. Would better put my money on Praxis.
  • + 2
 I've used and sold their cassettes for years. Their higher level models are every bit as good as what Shimano and SRAM put out.
  • + 1
 27.5+!? Get the hell outta here. I wasn't riding 24+ when I had a 3.0 irc on it. The first time I hear someone go 'no.. mines 27.5.. PLUS' I think I'll lmfao.

Just wait.. next thing you know 'enduro minus!'. It's like an enduro bike, but with 120mm of travel. Sheeeesh.
  • + 1
 Sramano are such dicks for not offering this. I have been riding 1x10 setups for years, but after moving to a 29er it just didn't offer the low gears I wanted for steeper seated climbs. If this thing gets decent reviews I'm all over it.
  • + 1
 I'm curious why 27.5+ is being considered something different from 27.5. Before suspension and while it was shorter travel and stiffer than it is now we had 26 x2.7 and 26.8 they weren't called 26+. Tires over 2.5 went out of favor as suspension improved because those bigger slower tires were no longer necessary. Since suspension is still improving I don't see how these bigger tires are beneficial beyond sand, snow and maybe bogs since they are both heavier and slower for normal trail riding. It seems a lot like one of those trends the industry has brought about through new terminology because there isn't anything better to focus on.
  • + 1
 Uses ks' proven internals, proven to fail and be unreliable. Sorry but what is the point of an electric post if the internals are the same, to add weight with a huge battery. How about refining the internals so they are reliable? Also work on making the current design lighter not heavier. I am a fan of having less cables, but this seems useless, what happens when the battery dies. My issue with ks was never their cables, in fact the lev has the best cable attachment as it doesn't move up or down with the post, my issue is with their complete lack of reliability,poor user serviceabilty, and weight. Get on track ks and work on your products' issues don't create more by adding a battery for a non issue.
  • + 2
 Indeed, other electric dropper prototypes I've seen replace the internals with a lead screw. should be absolutely bombproof, though I worry about how long it will take to move. It'll also drop without your weight on it, which is something everyone should be after. squatting on your seat to drop it compromises your weight distribution.
  • + 3
 Interesting. My KS LEV has been running strong for almost 3 years without a single issue. Just sayin'.
But yeah, I agree about the electric dropper. Electric? Really? No.
  • - 3
 Do the people who design these crazy ideas even ride bikes? An electric seat post is just wrong.
  • + 4
 It's just the way things are going.
Think about what will soon be all linked to the same batteries.
Xtr di2 shifter, ks post, shock lock out.
All will be running on one battery.
Lot less cables.
Soon it will be integrated to google glasses (or equivalent) that will read the trail ahead and automatically drop your post unlock you shock and start changing your gear for the down hill.
  • + 3
 Praxis - make an 11 speed 10-40 version for XD freehub - even if $200 you sell boatloads to people like me with worn-out XX1 cassettes. And make all the cogs steel!
  • + 2
 We can fit a computer in a 3x5 inch phone but can't figure out how to make a thing go up and down with a motor?! Is it really that hard?
  • + 3
 KS is on to me, I've been toying with a wireless remote that retrofits on to my X-fusion stealth post..!!
  • - 6
flag ballardski (Mar 18, 2015 at 1:56) (Below Threshold)
 Im not even bothering with dropper posts, just ride it as it is. Its all extra weight to me, something im always battling with!!
  • + 9
 Do you even drop.. bro?
  • + 8
 Yeah, droppers are just a fad, like bar-ends, flex stems, and the internet.
  • + 2
 No need for wireless remote, just slap a bluetooth deal on that post and let the trailforks or strava app tell me when to drop and descend!! ha!
  • + 2
 Now that would be something, wonder how long that will take for someone to sort out!
  • + 1
 Like my attempt to program my quad copter to follow me through following my iPhone Bluetooth signal while riding.... Sorta worked apart from the trees haha....
  • + 1
 Ah, Strava cant do everything then.....lol
  • + 1
 But of course it wasn't strava, but your bluetooth signal, silly me!!!!
  • + 2
 Praxis cassette very cool idea, you should set up 'direct to public' sales like Wolftooth and Oneup.... just make sure you have tonnes of stock to avoid internet crash!
  • + 3
 Ive got a gazzaloddin3.0 on right now
  • + 2
 Seriously awesome job praxis. Just what the industry needed. I'll probably be picking one of those bad boys up.
  • + 2
 You should check out their chainrings too. Top quality stuff
  • + 1
 Would you be able to push a Zee 10 Speed wide ratio 11-36 rear mech with this cassette?
  • + 1
 I ran a stock zee with 11-40 for 6 months. worked good(though it works better with a RAD cage.)
  • + 1
 Sorry just googled RAD cage, thats a good idea, cheers
  • + 1
 Oh it's better, but let me be clear: I had no problems with the stock cage. the RAD cage just makes everything shift a little smoother, quicker,etc. Just don't try a 42(unless you buy the cage.)
  • + 1
 Finally a company with a complete perfect 10 speed cassette, thumbs up for Praxis
  • + 1
 Lot of love for gazzaloddis. My buddy still runs a pair i sold him 5 years ago! Perhaps he should ride more.
  • + 2
 Gazzas 2.6 were my first tyres with large knobbs, after riding NBXes for like 2 years. But Gazzas - woooha, they were biting it! I didn't know much about riding back then and here I will come to conlusion how spoiled pussies we are these days, with Toss Ready Exo, shmexo, Sausage Skin lightweight bullcrap. I didn't know any of that stuff I know today so I've been doing all day rides, some with 3000ft climbing, over 30 miles on freaking gazzalodis 2.6 on "Dirtish" hardtail with 145mm fork wit h doublewide rim on the back. I still don't measure time on my rides so why do I care? Ehhh... it just makes me think what the fk do we have those toys for.

I must say, in presence of excellent 26ers and developed 29ers (in terms of geo and componentry), this 650B "invention", "innovation" made me as excited as a dog crap sticking to my seat tube, BUT this 275+ looks really promising to me and is something I would really like to try as soon as my kids grow up a bit and I can make some frame for myself. I'll sure test one in the mean time.
  • + 1
 how well does "The claimed benefits are greater traction and flotation" work in mud?
  • - 2
 I've been eagerly awaiting the KS electronic dropper since last year. I was hoping it would be ready for production by now. When it comes out I'm going to buy two. I love the idea of a dropper but hate the idea of extra cables. Three is too many if you ask me. Some people are running six... yuk!
  • + 1
 Pracis just got my business, and it's even a reasonable cost! Why didn't shimano do this?!
  • + 4
 Because 28-34-40 is absurd spacing compared to 27-31-35-40 (XTR 11spd) or 28-32-36 (XT 10spd). Obviously sacrifices need to be made to get that kind of range out of 10 gears but a normal XT cassette (11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-36) with the 15 and 17 replaced with a 16 and a 40 tacked on the end is a lot more logical than ending with 28-34-40 in my opinion.
  • + 1
 fuck this I'm getting a BMX
  • + 1
 The cassette looks like a solid offering for a trail rig.
  • + 1
 Any pictures of these massive wheels on a bike?
  • + 1
 I will definitely be buying one of these. Thanks praxis
  • - 1
 Shimano might release a 10 speed 11-40 cog silently like what they did to a 9 speed 11-36.
  • + 2
 I think you mean 12-36. I certainly can't find this 11-36 you claim they make, I was excited for a second.
  • + 1
 im actually wondering if a 40t will work with a 9spd 11-34 shimano cluster.
  • + 1
 There is a 40t expander cog that's specifically for 34t cassettes, I forget which one, though they intend it for 10 sp. I'm more attached to having a clutch than I am to 9sp drivetrains, though, so not an option I've really explored.
  • + 0
 So 130usd is now considered as 'affordable' cassette?
  • + 4
 Yes.
  • - 2
 hey praxis , could i run a 42 t aswell? or would i not hav enough jump from 40-42 ?
  • + 1
 oh for fucccs sake the jump is completely pointless. do you even need 40t?? why not just run 28t like a real man?
  • + 1
 because i am more of a man on the way down and run a 32t in the front
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