Intend Products Available to Order

Aug 12, 2017
by Paul Aston  
We've met the man with the best name in mountain biking a few times in the past, while he was working for the German high-end brand Trickstuff, once at Bike Festival Riva and once at Eurobike in 2015. A very passionate individual who has an eye for form and a close attention to detail. Over the last couple of years, Cornelius has been making a few parts for himself and friends in his spare time, and with various pressure from others to produce these products, including from myself, he has gone all in to make his dreams a reality. - Paul Aston



Press Release:




CNC-milled in Germany, small batch, fairly made products and high-quality German engineering – this is what Intend stands for. This is what Cornelius Kapfinger stands for. Cornelius is a 30-year-old guy from Bavaria, Germany, near Munich. He was in an arts class at school, studied economical engineering in Vienna afterward, had some jobs in the bike industry and decided to go his own way with starting to make his own upside down suspension fork.
Cornelius Kapfinger
Cornelius Kapfinger, the man who Intends to make his dream a reality...

It started with a by making three units. Then a run of eleven, followed by the demand for another thirty.

But it didn't stop with suspension forks: stems, headsets, headset wedges, and a crankset called "Rocksteady" coming in the future. All of these parts can be done better, lighter than the competitors, with a modern design. Always with the best technical solutions possible. This is the aim of all Intend products. Beneath these technical parameters, all Intend products should be made with fair conditions and be packed in renewable or reusable packaging.


Intend Edge USD fork
27.5" Edge and Infinity forks are ready to order - lead time is around three months.
bigquotesFor me, it doesn't matter if an Asian guy or a European guy earns money, both want to live and feed their family. I want to be sure that the conditions of work are fair and I only can guarantee this in Germany.

Intend Edge and Infintiy crowns raw.
Intend Edge and Infinity 'steerer-less' crowns.

To finance this special combination of expensive production and small quantities, Cornelius decided to sell his aftermarket products only online, B2C. This is a great way to get in touch with the customer and be able to figure out his needs, for example for the damping settings of the fork.

Now a couple of products have been engineered and prototypes are made. Intend works together with EFBE-Prüflabor in Germany to finalize the fatigue-safety tests for the products, now it's up to the customers and their orders to make this possible!


Intend Grace Stem
The Grace EN stem fits a 31.8mm handlebar with a 35mm length. Including the black titanium bolts, it weighs in at 82 grams and costs €139. All fame and honor goes to Michi Graetz, who gave me the courage to make this one-piece solution.
Intend Grace XC stem
Following on from the Grace EN, the XC version will have a 77mm length and again fits a 31,8mm handlebar. Black titanium bolts, €169 and limited to 11 pieces for the first batch! Due to the oversize construction, this part will be very stiff for its weight. FEA-analyzed to remove the final grams.


Intend Stiffmaster headset
Intend Stiffmaster headset
The Stiffmaster headset (upper only) for ZS44, includes one spacer with 20, 13,or 7mm height and black titanium bolts. This patented headset technology stiffens the 1.1/8 steerer on any single crown fork. Giving more support for the handlebar at hard turns or sprints. €79.


Due to the lead time of German CNC production, the delivery time of all products is two month or more. In this status of the business, it does not get faster. That's why Intend is starting a big pre-order for all products:

All parts are available in black or blue anodized.

All further details can be found on the website: www.intend-bc.com

All products will be delivered in reusable or renewable packaging like the "Wastesucker" a mobile trash bag for your backpack to keep the woods clean.

For all orders, please use contact sheet here: www.intend-bc.com/order with name, address, product, color.

Unfortunately for technical insurance reasons, we can't deliver to Canada or in the USA – sorry guys!


Intend crankset rendering
Intend are also working on a crankset called the 'Rocksteady'
Intend Grace Stem
Intend Grace Stem Smarty Topcap, M4 bolt with adapter for M6 threads in the starnut, €15.

Intend Grace stem in the destruction lab.
Intend Grace stem in the destruction lab.



121 Comments

  • + 97
 Sorry dude, 3 months lead time..... No standard can last that long these days.
  • + 2
 Haha!!
  • + 9
 Do or do not ..there is no intend. -Yoda
  • + 24
 All looks incredible! Good luck and I hope you make it in the industry! To be a big name like hope and have the technology like FEA already is ace. Keep up the good work.
  • + 2
 You can get pretty decent FEA for £1800 a year subscription, or even monthly if it's not required year round for about £200.
  • + 26
 @Racer951: the program is easy to purchase. Getting usable data is a different story.
  • + 2
 @Racer951: or 0 USD if you're just a garage engineer that won't be putting out a product
  • + 4
 I do truly hope he hires an aesthetic designer though, I think the addition of some matte paint finish and a couple other design elements could take this fork to the next level. Also please please please make plastic guards available for the stanchions, that beautiful black coating is in a place of great danger.
  • + 6
 @ryanandrewrogers: No, that's not the German way, function over form! Let him spend all his time and money on design and having things turned and anodised, that'll do nicely!! :-)
  • + 1
 @meathooker: how do you know his data is useful?
  • + 20
 Cornelius Kapfinger is hands-down the best name ever...
  • + 4
 But have you met Satchel Cronk?
  • + 1
 Agreed! Almost worth considering changing my name to this... Haha!
  • + 2
 @hellbelly: haha Davey and Goliath! That brings back memories!!
  • + 14
 3 months is like ordering form a shop here in Canada anyway
  • + 5
 Good to see a new startup but 3 months wait? That's not going to work, time to get it the bank, get that loan out and put your own ass on the line rather than getting customers to bankroll you with credit.
  • + 13
 I dont agree fully with that statement. Sustainabilty is one of the major goals with his product. I have opperated a small buisness sustainably for the past 10 years, and am currently looking to expand my product line. I do not have the capital to do this on my own. But i do have faithful clientel who are willing to support and wait for high quality and sustainably made goods. I believe that creating more un-backed debt is one of the biggest mistakes small buisness can make. Btw with success and failure, in the end, the consumer will be paying for anyway. Someone has to pay the dept left after bankruptcy.
  • + 7
 3 months isn't that bad, most people who pre order their bikes wait longer than that. I am thinking about my Fork upgrade for next season right now... Fair, you loose out on the "shit, I needed a fork yesterday" market.... But that crowd can't be very pickey either, as many products are limited in their availability any way.
  • + 3
 as one who works in the machining trade , 90 to 120 days is pretty standard for wait time in any quality CNC Machine shop .
  • + 2
 exactly my point. So use another business credit rather than customers.

This length of time is fine for a large purchase like a bike but a stem? Really?

Sustainability? Why does a lack of confidence or ability for you to invest in yourself / own business display sustainability? Making a small bath of stems for stock is hardly radical? Infact this is the opposite of sustainable as CNC works at its most economical when items are produced in batches, not one-offs.
  • + 7
 You want to stand out from the crowd? Put a key/notch system in there for those of us who are OCD about aligned bars.
  • + 2
 Maybe a laser cut line on the steerer and a "peephole" of sorts to visually align the steerer on the stem, but you don't want a physical notch that mechanically aligns the stem with the steerer, things need to slip just in case you send your bike flying down a hill, better for them to move than to break.
  • + 1
 @robwhynot I'm working on a $20 tool right now. 2 equal-length straps attach to the end of the grips, meet at the center tire tread. Would you want a spring clamp or an elastic band to attach to the grips?
  • + 1
 @jamesb78092: interesting. But the ideal solution is one that is integrated with the parts, imo. It needs to be sure. The problem here i believe is OCD tendencies, not physical alignment... riders who obsess about bar alignment are more dealing with mental confidence... my bars don't need to be perfectly straight to ride confidently, I need to believe my bars are perfectly straight to ride confidently. So any alignment system needs to address the psychological aspect of the need as much or more than the physical problem of having truly aligned bars.

Re breakaway, very good point. Could be a system where both the steerer and stem are slotted and a removable "key" is used to align the slots during installation but is removed after install so the stem is able to slip in a crash.
  • + 1
 @robwhynot: Yeah I'm picky about my bar alignment, but I agree it is a confidence issue.
  • + 1
 @robwhynot: While I understand the desire for perfectly aligned bars, in my case I have slightly different length arms, so I may actually be doing myself a disservice if I have them exactly straight. I suspect this is the case with most people as well.
  • + 1
 @kjjohnson: I hear you, broke my elbow years ago and that arm doesn't extend naturally as far as the other. But when I tried to compensate on my bars it didn't help. To each their own. A removable key system suits the bill, use it or don't.
  • + 2
 So I kept looking at the picture on the main page trying to remember why that headset top assembly looked so familiar...

pereda-vintage.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/yst-hp-208-nos-headset-pereda-vintage.jpg-1.gif

Over ten years ago... YST had this threadless headset design that got around the DiaCompe split-collar patent that was part of the NoThreadset heatset design, by having an upper assembly that was internally threaded. You clamped the top assembly to the steerer tube, then used a wrench to preload the bearings by threading away from the top assembly (which is what contacted the steerer tube) and then locked that in place with a seperate lock collar. In the process you also stiffened the steerer tube, so single crown forks felt better. They only made a FEW MILLION of the things.... but yeah sure...patented by this guy in germany....sure.

As a result, you also didn't need any sort of top cap and internal wedge/plug/bolt assembly, so you were free to route the front brake line down the steerer tube, if you wished. Or use the steerer tube as a storage space.
  • + 21
 We all know you know loads more about loads more than the rest of us deeeight, however, I didn't know you were a patent lawyer with the inside story on the wordings of all the patents associated in this area. You never cease to amaze me.
  • + 3
 @orientdave: he has a point though.

I will go so far to say that steerer tubes really don't need to be any stiffer, giant went 'Overdrive' and everybody laughed. I have never before thought about the flex in my steerer - maybe for bmx racers or something but not on an MTB where the whole thing is 'wiggly' anyway and the terrain dynamic and not a road where you may feel a small amount of flex
  • + 3
 Patent laws are different in the US to Europe ... and the rest of the world.
That may well be one of the reasons Intend can't ship there.
It's certainly why YT couldn't sell in the US until Spec's Horstlink (fsr) patent expired.
  • + 2
 @Racer951: "Giant went 'Overdrive' and everybody laughed" - so did we with Boost... we were lucky that at the moment when Giant released it, there's been plenty of other things going on, so their bullsht marketing pitch was silenced by real stuff. If they would do it next year, and we can be quite sure that there won't be any revolution coming, we'd be in deep sht.
  • + 4
 I remember those headsets, they were garbage! Hopefully these designs are nothing like the old yst. And they were over 20yrs ago now. Haha!
  • + 8
 I think the headset you linked to was for preload. The Intend one appears to not affect preload. It is just to tighten the collar to (maybe) stiffen the system. In other words the Intend system still needs a starnut.
  • + 0
 @OneUpComponents: the separate thrust and radial bearings ensure that no amount of preload (or varying vertical load) is going to affect radial stiffness, unlike an angular-contact bearing. At least that's where I see the design improving the stiffness of the system, and not necessarily through the clamping collar or spacers
  • + 1
 I'm sure someone would stick their dick in it..
  • + 1
 How to ensure your company fails:

1. Make it super cool and desirable
2. Tell over half of your potential customers that you can't sell to them (North America)
3. Tell the rest of your customers that there is a 3 month wait and all products must be pre-ordered
  • + 1
 3 months is a little long but I've waited a long time for other high end products. Even big bike companies make you wait. There was a 4 month wait for the 17 remedywhen it came out. Even bikes available now you can wait weeks or even months before you get it. Just as long as there are not delays after that it seems totally fair
  • + 4
 Check out all this new dentist recreation equipment!
  • + 0
 Remember the Point One split second stems 70-90? Yeah, Intend to copy and change a few small details. No real innovation or creativity. That stem can't even accommodate a bar with a high rise, probably why the "Stiffmaster" was created since you would need to put 100mm of stack spacers under the bar because the highest rise bar you might be able to use is 10mm.
  • + 1
 What am I missing here?

Spend more money on something new and innovative

Or

Pay less for tried and tested with years of development and solid warranty / customer support?
  • + 3
 You are missing the mindset of an engineer.
  • + 0
 How do u get minus comments! I like your commentSmile
  • + 2
 @erx808: I won't sleep tonight!
  • + 3
 @Bob-Agg: this is the mindset of a punter looking to buy components in an industry that is already ridiculously overpriced
  • + 1
 Yeah... It takes one
-30 y.o.
-economic engeeniring degree - look it up
-Art student

To make "better designed, lighter and stronger" forks, headsets, crankset than competition.
  • + 1
 You probably wouldnt say this if you knew the Guy.
Heute ist, for instance, the engineer Behinderung the Trickstuff Diritissima brake (used by worldcup DH racers)
  • + 2
 Cool!
Small companies making after market stuff in anodised colours reminds me of the 90's (like Paul Components).
Seriously want!
  • + 3
 Damn those forks look sexy!
  • + 2
 That's nothing, look for pics of the intend DH forks... Drool
  • + 2
 @Skootur: lower guards required before they can be considered....no fork no matter how good will stuffed first run without guards on.
  • + 1
 @AntN: agreed..can't see any aggressive riding done with those forks with no damage to the stanchions unless they have guards.
  • + 1
 Agree that the fork looks lovely. I predict that at some point in the future all forks will be inverted. Then I'll be able to afford one ☺
  • + 1
 There is cool genuinely innovative patented stuff from Germany that I buy that can be bought and sold in North America-this just isn't
  • + 1
 Looks good and great to see a new company emerging, but without shipping to the USA and Canada, your market remains very small Frown
  • + 1
 i hope they make a lower crown that has a 1-1/8 strait steering tube on it that will fit the DVO emblem DH fork so I can put it on my old demo 8 !!
  • + 3
 how do you get a handlebar in that stem??
  • + 1
 Right? Straight bars only; no risers. At least it looks that way.
  • + 1
 Everyone runs flat bars now, didn't you know?

*insert sarcasm emoji*
  • + 2
 You use the "wooden thingy" in the background to open the stem slightly, more details -> www.pinkbike.com/news/intend-suspension-bike-festival-riva-2017.html
  • + 0
 unless your bar get thicker towards the end why would they not just slide through?
  • + 1
 @jamesbrant you must be a Boobar rider, lol
  • + 1
 With the supplied wooden thing, You geht something Like a 30mm rise Renthal Fatbar in there...
  • + 2
 Anything about warranty? Dropping 1600 euro on a fork is all well and good but I'd want a box of spares..
  • + 1
 @sethius had a look at the webpage - nothing there and you are right, that would be a very interesting information.
  • + 0
 As a hobby machinist i luv this stuf!!!
I also know 3d forged blanks are stronger than billit.
Is he investing in near net forged blanks for his head sets, stems and cranks?
  • + 2
 I see a lot's of upside down fork in the fast future.
  • + 1
 Is the single crown inverted fork strong enough? I know people had issues with single crown inverted forks in the past.
  • + 1
 It wasn't strength, but tortional stiffnes. Maverick used a 24mm oversized axle to help with this, the x fusion rebel uses a 20mm, which they seem to feel is stiff enough.
  • + 2
 @carym:
I think the x fusion has another patented inner design to make it stiff. It's similar to the lefty design
  • + 1
 It'd like to see the bending fatigue, torsional and tensile test data....otherwise, I wouldn't buy one.

Why is the focus on the chassis and not the air spring and damper????
  • + 2
 Not too many 160+ bike stems under 100g...any others?
  • + 1
 3 month lead + 3 month turnaround for warranty (if needed) = half a year with no goods. Seems legit.
  • + 1
 after an exhaustive 5 min google search, I'd actually be surprised if the US was more than 25% of mtb sales.
  • + 1
 I want that blue stem in 35mm so bad! But lead time, no Canada and 31.8 only. Such a tease!
  • + 1
 It IS coming in the 35mm version.
Just follow Intend in Facebook Smile
  • + 1
 Too bad a fork this exclusive is still using 51mm offset on a 29er.
  • + 1
 Dude! Make a drop crown!
  • - 1
 Thank you, Intend, for being innovative and picking up the slack. I'm glad Intend is able to offer well thought out products that other industry "leaders" don't.
  • + 7
 What parts would they be that they are picking up the 'slack' with?
  • + 1
 Stiffmaster? Awesome! ! Must have.
  • + 1
 I think the fork looks ugly, but obviously I would love to try it.
  • + 1
 come-on, Canada has nothing to do with the evils of the USA were good
  • + 1
 Good luck!
  • + 0
 Love the stem, but 35mm man!
  • + 1
 It is coming Smile
  • - 1
 Steerer less crowns is ripped from Maverick dual crown forks, of which the patent is still valid.
  • + 1
 Try avalanche suspension back in late 90's, idea came from motocross..
  • + 1
 @bat-fastard:

Maverick was the company Paul Turner founded after he sold RockShox.
  • + 2
 @deeeight: yip but avalanche had 10" upside down forks back in late 90's with no steerer, still can special order them too. www.avalanchedownhillracing.com/mtn10.html
  • + 0
 No pun intended.
  • - 2
 stiffmaster headset might be the best thing to happen to single crown forks since the Z1 Bomber
  • - 3
 We will miss that uninsurable patented crap here in America - we should sue because the rest of the free world gets such nifty crap...
  • - 3
 If these products can't be shipped to the U.S., then why do I care?
  • + 9
 You may not, but it's the WWW bro. Not USWW.
  • + 0
 Exactly
  • + 1
 If you do not care, then why comment? Not everyone is from the US.
  • - 3
 @DownhillDoozy: well, over half the MTB market is...one has to sell to the majors markets to make it in this industry.
  • + 1
 @morpheous: i don't think its half could be, but I seriously doubt it.
  • + 1
 The world ist bigger than the US... Big Grin
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