Propain Acknowledges Long Lead Times and Price Increases

Jan 22, 2021
by Alicia Leggett  
Propain Spindrift review

The German bike company Propain posted a statement on its site about how a sharp increase in demand for bikes due to COVID-19 has affected lead times and pricing for its bikes.

The statement explained that the delays come from problems with supply for the numerous parts that need to come together to build a complete bike. In some cases, the company wrote, shortage of parts can mean lead times of up to 14 months. For reference, the average lead time was around 90 days before the COVID bike boom. Propain’s online customization tool, which allows customers to pick the colors of their decals, saddles, and grips in the US and offers many more customization options in Europe, makes it even more difficult to predict what the company will need to stock in advance.

The statement also explained that the company has faced significant shipping cost increases and will have to pass that cost to consumers. Because of backups in sea cargo shipping, Propain has changed some of its shipments from sea to air transport to try to minimize the delays. However, air transport is expensive at baseline, and prices are rising as demand increases because more manufacturers have had to make the switch. It used to cost $10-$20 to ship one bike frame by sea, Propain CEO David Assfalg said. Now, the company has been quoted $175 for the equivalent shipment by air.

Propain is not alone in facing long wait times and shipping cost increases. Commencal posted a similar press release in late December, and although most other companies have been less forthcoming about the problems in supply this year, they all rely on essentially the same suppliers for parts that come from Asia and are scarce right now: suspension, drivetrains, tires, and more. No company is exempt from these challenges, so we can likely expect to see similar delays and pricing changes throughout the industry.




208 Comments

  • 221 2
 Damnit Bobby
  • 64 1
 I swear if their accessories are effected... Imma be mad.
  • 8 3
 oh sweet jesus thank you. my favorite, of all time.
  • 73 1
 I would assume this news release covers not just Propain, but also Propain accessories?
  • 12 1
 @husstler: I am a butane ( the bastard gas) man myself
  • 3 1
 yup..
  • 8 0
 It’s those damn salespeople down at Thatherton, I tell you what!
  • 3 0
 Taste the meat, not the heat!
  • 3 2
 That’s some pro-pain for sure....
  • 1 0
 LOL!!
  • 2 1
 @recon311: I bet this guy grills with charcoal and that’s just asinine.
  • 3 0
 @chillrider199: must be 25 years since I last watched king of the hill, or heard that line but Damnit you just brought it all back!
  • 57 2
 Transparency...that's a novel business practice!
  • 65 15
 Shipping bikes around the globe by air is a horrendous prospect...
  • 254 7
 Yeah we should just have holes that go through the earth for shipping. Just drop bikes down and pops up on the other side of the world. For the flat earthers just find a way to tip the disk and let the bikes slide down to the lower part.
  • 78 3
 @makripper: Whoa dude think we can just DH across the disc and then tilt it back for limitless vertical? There might be some good that comes out this flat earth stuff after all.
  • 4 0
 @SupraKZ: for sure! Maybe the flattys are on to something
  • 9 8
 Ever seen a solar powered cargo ship? Ya, me neither.
  • 8 2
 Ok, I'm going to surf to Taiwan when I need a new chain.
  • 3 0
 @makripper: nah bru, it’s turtles all the way down.
  • 2 0
 @makripper: Flattys - another new standard.
  • 9 5
 Well if we really cared we'd all buy local and 'suggest' local mfg'ing. But I'm all for free markets(so long not to aid an enemy like china). Of course local usually means unaffordable.
  • 2 0
 Should use a big catapult instead.
  • 1 0
 @cains08: or a trebuchet!
  • 2 4
 @jrocksdh: how is china your enemy?
  • 11 2
 @themouse77: seriously? That list is long. Whether it be enviro; hong Kong; intellectual property theft; fishing;...
China is the enemy to a free world.
  • 36 4
 I guess the majority of people visiting this site already has a decent bike. Just keep it 1-2 more years and spare the hassle. Then buy the dip like the stock traders say.
  • 3 0
 Already some recent model high-end bikes hitting local craigslist, for over msrp of course. I wish I had thunk to buy a nice ride, shred for a season and sell it for what I paid.
  • 3 3
 I have 5 year old bike with f*** up suspension, I really need new one this year...
  • 2 0
 I don´t have one since last year... so waiting mine until may...
  • 2 0
 @trelleder: wow that sucks. reminds me to never violate the n+1 rule.
  • 3 0
 WallSTBets?
  • 44 24
 Airfreight is not a good option to transport bikes. In fact, it's not a good option for anything regarding the CO2 emissions.

Transporting a bike by air emits roughly 100x as much CO2 as sea freight and can roughly double carbon footprint of a bike before it even gets to the customer. Just to make sure it arrives a couple of weeks earlier :-(
  • 19 6
 It saves about a month if you count in loading and clearing. So for a company struggling to make revenue it looks like a price worth paying.
  • 102 14
 Suicide is the only true green option
  • 55 29
 @prevail: yet another sad case in point as to why capitalism is almost always fundamentally opposed to environmental interests. i'd love to scold propain for not making a more responsible choice as a company in an industry with an ostensible interest in sustaining the spaces we do our sport in, but actually the problem is much larger! as you point out, the delay of a few short weeks of revenue when everything has ground to a halt can be life or death for such a company as this, and they will always do what they have to in order to survive.

the direct to consumer model of operating on a razor thin margin (and forcing everyone else to try to do the same!) to depress prices and be hyper competitive on the consumer side is only exacerbating the effects of the globalization of labor and the resultant localized specialization in industry and manufacturing. such a system that services consumer demand across the globe is very complex and, as we are now learning, not very robust at all! it's a tower made of toothpicks and mini marshmallows, and COVID is a rain storm giving it a good hammering!

think that's bad? it gets worse! COVID, a relatively short term crisis that hit everywhere on the planet hard and fast thanks to our globalized system, incentivizes short-sighted behaviors such as shipping bike frames via air freight to keep the juice flowing (as capitalism demands) at the long term expense of emitting more C02. think the rain storm of COVID is bad? guess what kiddies, climate change is an F5 tornado and it's headed our way quick!

but we got to ride some pretty sick bikes, didnt we? thx for coming to my ted talk
  • 26 10
 @curiousincident: it’s that damn capitalism ruining the climate!

*shakes fist in communist*
  • 12 10
 @curiousincident: china doesn't give 2 craps about any sort of environmental matters. Until theyre properly dealt with, it doesnt really matter whatvthe reat if the world does. Of course, take care of local sources; manage forests etc but in totality, China is the problem.
  • 10 4
 @jamesmx159: It's funny you say this but the best thing anyone on the planet can do for the environment is have less children.
  • 11 2
 @sspiff: spoken in true ignorant fashion. That they produce the most renewable energy means nothing without considering the population and industries consuming that energy, as well as other toxic practices undergoing without our keen western eyes ever perceiving them. I'm not saying that china is or isn't leading in terms of renewable energy, it's just taken out of context.
  • 5 3
 @jrocksdh: China says: We don't do anything until the US and the EU do something. The US says: We don't do anything until China does something. All the other countries: We don't do something until the US, China and the EU take action.

So some country has to start, right?
  • 3 1
 @curiousincident: Thanks buddy, you know how I feel.
  • 3 4
 @nhlevi: environment is a large and complicated issue. They're still doing a piss poor job regulating resource extraction, but China is, and will continue to be, a world leader in renewable energy. Go to OWID and look at any dataset if you need convincing.

I guess it's pretty easy to vilify their recent history burning fossil fuels when you are already part of a first world economy. However, now that they've created the only modern new middle class they're tackling that problem at larger scale than practically any other large nation with an industrial economy. That's how I interpret the data at least.
  • 2 5
 @TEBP: im in emssions/source testing.
Usa is clean. We rarely fail our source tests for co; nox; amd pm's. The dirty sources that do fail are usually bio masses.
  • 2 1
 To save the environment, we should all stop riding bikes and using social media, cars, electricity, etc... I say let's go back to the caveman era. With one exception, toilet paper.
  • 1 1
 @brassinne: and I'm known to state that often on here Big Grin but since we can't even accept a society reasonably balanced between the better elements of socialism and capitalism, and humanity isn't willing to abandon their toys in any case, we might as well just phase out fossil fuels, decentralise industries and start replanting forests to replace over-extensive grazing lands. The path of least resistance is quite clear, but social inertia has only just started swaying in the collectively beneficial direction. The key is to demand only the next logical step, so as to ensure that it will be taken.
  • 2 1
 @jrocksdh: Clean is an odd word for a country allowing the drilling of new oil wells in Alaska..
  • 1 0
 @neilpritchett: you realize the world still requires petroleum products right? There isn’t just a magical switch we can flip right now where all of a sudden we are all on green energy sources... investing in renewable energy is great, and we should continue to head in that direction, that doesn’t mean the need for oil is suddenly gone. And countries relying on domestic oil (when possible) is probably better than shipping it across the ocean from the other side of the earth.
  • 1 1
 @TypicalCanadian: it's not necessarily better, Canada's tar sands being a prime example
  • 2 1
 @TypicalCanadian: And yet half of the US senate literally denies climate change exists? The president of four years pulled out of the most important agreement to combat climate change currently in existence? I get that we can't just switch the oil industry off, but atleast BEGINNING to wind down on expansion would be a reasonable goal.
  • 1 1
 @neilpritchett: yeah you wind down oil production when there is no longer a demand for oil (which there is because green infrastructure is not yet ready to take over the energy needs of the world)... helloooo.
  • 3 1
 @TypicalCanadian: low costs due to billions in subsidies and ignoring externalities helps keep that oil demand up as much as anything.
  • 1 0
 @neilpritchett: not common for drilling to pollute per rig. ..I get it tho, 'not in my backyard' right?
  • 16 0
 I hope bike companies are smart enough to recognize that this "boom" is a bubble and as things slowly go back to normal it won't be a seller's market anymore
  • 3 0
 This.
Yet, when you see '21/22 predictions articles everyone is acting as if this was just some increase in market size and therefore the new normal.
Can't figure out if they act like this on purpose to keep expectations high or if they're just drunk with the numbers
  • 2 0
 I can't imagine what I see at the local trails these days is sustainable. Meaning - like "New Years Resolutions" they will slowly fade away.
  • 4 0
 @swellhunter: I'd think at least half of those that came into the sport during the pandemic won't stay. And these crazy lead times will contribute to that drop as well.
  • 1 0
 @swellhunter:
I was thinking the same thing. As we all have seen, hikers(primarily) have taken over (our) trails since last March, but I couldn't believe how many people have been out there this month. Then I remembered January always sees an increase that typically tapers off once all the 'resolutioners' lose motivation.
The same thing *should* happen with the CV bike buyers, and then the market will get flooded with hardly-used bikes that will drive down prices(you know...supply>demand). As 'enthusiasts' we'll need this. Nobody serious about something wants it to become popular with the hordes.
  • 1 0
 The boom happened 8 months ago. We switched to a bust mode 4 months ago. Bike shops have known this for a while. We have been in full-on supply chain crisis since August 2020. YES the market did grow, YES there was a huge boom that gave bike companies more money than they have ever had. It is also true that the greater supply chain from raw materials forward cannot keep up with the demand and when combined with the myriad of complex struggles brought on by covid, it is essentially broken. Things simply do not move fast enough at a global scale to "react" in any sort of time frame that feels right to the individual. 2021 will be the toughest year the bike industry has ever seen. 2022 MIGHT be somewhat normal depending on a whole host of political and social factors.
  • 1 0
 @HurricaneCycles: All good points, specially considering that a lot of people won't want to wait 12-14 months for a new bike or frame. With the scarcity and raised prices of components, it makes for a good formula for going into a recession.
  • 1 0
 @matadorCE: I would love to be wrong with my suggestion above. But things do not look pretty for small shops like mine.
  • 1 0
 @HurricaneCycles: Sorry to hear that, but people will always need a good local shop whether they're riding the latest $12K axs-enabled enduro race rig or a 20 year-old bike they found on facebook market.
  • 1 0
 @matadorCE: I've never seen the local shops as busy. Interestingly there is still inventory on the floor. To me that means people are not spending over $3000 on bikes which makes sense because it is a surge of new riders. I live only 2 miles from one of the most popular trail heads in NJ. Typical Saturday is somewhere around 75 cars in the lot. That alone is enough to keep most hardcore shops busy within a 50 mile radius IMO
  • 2 0
 @swellhunter: the biggest shops get priority on shipments AND they are able to order so much earlier and more product that they are getting inventory. It’s the little guys that will struggle so much.
  • 1 0
 @HurricaneCycles: That is already an "understood". But does a small shop really make its money on inventory or service?

A small shop that offers exceptional service with much less overhead is a recipe for success unless I am living under a rock.
  • 1 0
 @swellhunter: HAHAHAHA!!! Sorry. If it were that easy there would be a bike shop on every corner. Seriously, start your own and get back to me.
  • 1 0
 @HurricaneCycles: There's not a Home Depot on every corner either. Once again - "understood" to most.

It is the job of the big guys to put the little guys out of business.

Little guys need to find a way to work their way into a market share

Easiest way to do this in the bicycle industry is turn a good wrench. It's one of the reasons the direct sales model isn't really affecting the industry negatively.

My local shops attitude is "the more bikes the better". They treat my Canyon the same as my Kona (which I bought from them).
  • 12 0
 So weird I just emailed them today asking how much longer will I have to wait for my bike, it’s already been 6months!! Not sure to cancel my order or not! Bloody Covid riders are doing my head in, give it a year and there will be so many bikes for sale!
  • 30 0
 Might be easier to complete an engineering degree, buy a CNC machine and glue some metal together.

I mean, it’s been done
  • 12 0
 Canceling one bike before you confirm another is rather risky at the moment. It's basically getting out of one line where your not sure your at and into another, longer one at the back.
  • 6 0
 Maybe just go to the configuration tool and check the lead times of the components you´ve chosen.
Perhaps you find an option for a critical part, you can live with?
If yes, get in touch with them and ask for a change of your order. As far as i know these guys (i had... well... some beers with them), they will try to help you.
  • 2 0
 @Werratte: can confirm it. I ordered a f/s with two spare dropouts which are not available right now. So I asked them if they could send just the frame. They kindly replied, that they will send the dropouts for free as soon as they will receive them.
  • 1 0
 I heard from a very credible industry source that it is expected that a full 30% of all bike shops in the world will go out of business in 2021 due to this crisis. This will have long-reaching negative effects on everyone. We may be part of that statistic. I was just told in the last few weeks that it is unlikely that I will get any of the bikes I ordered back in September of 2020. If you ordered your bike from a shop, I can tell you for 100% certainty that you might just make the difference in that shop staying open or not by asking for a refund.
  • 1 0
 @HurricaneCycles: Im not sure about 30% but I can tell you as a buyer for bike builds that the market is so screwed up right now that someone's going to get burned.

All the stock is going to end up in the wrong place, the grey market is going to explode, and its going to be a rough year for many who can't capitalise on that.
  • 1 0
 @benpinnick: 30% sounds inflated to me as well. I just hope it’s completely wrong and we all come thru it somehow.
  • 9 1
 Man.

As Propane sells a bit on “value” as a direct to consumer brand, that increase is going to be rough for them.

Also, if the issue is complete build components...Hopefully frame only options stick around.
  • 12 0
 Prices are going up for every manufacturer. Specialized has also raised prices recently.
  • 9 0
 @salespunk: It was about time, they haven't done so since last year.
  • 2 0
 @xsixx: I thought about getting an Enduro but thought for that price tag you can't get quality.
  • 1 0
 The configurator I checked only had waiting times for the frames. The parts I checked were listed as available.

In the video the guy specifically mentions tires and brakes that can't be ordered. Coincidentally these are the parts I really don't care for in their configurator since they only offer sram/magura brakes and schwalbe/vee tires. I'd actually prefer to buy a "complete" bike without brakes and tires...
  • 14 6
 Honestly, if it costs $175 to fly me a bike vs. $15 to boat me a bike, I would absolutely pay the difference if it meant riding or not. Sounds like that's one of many issues though.
  • 6 1
 Tragedy is the effects on the supply chain volatility will be seen for a long time. Most supply chains are a mess due to higher level suppliers having no idea what will happen in 1 year from now. Sure, I can make a million tires now, but what if the demand isnt there in a year when they get to the distro?

Nightmare for everyone. Sooner we can get normalcy, the sooner demand can get anything close to stable.
  • 2 0
 Bug facts. People are acting like these price hikes are a Covid tax when in reality they are more like when gas prices change. It isnt about what already happened, the prices are going up for what might happen.
  • 2 0
 If only we could have domestic production, which, paradoxically, Germany has, in bikes, in tires, suspension products... is this really just about the masses wanting to buy what’s best value, even if it’s all from Asia? There are other options. Yes, they might cost a bit more, but this is the problem as stated above, with large online bike companies offering high value. Fragile supply, among other compromises (quality, CS, customization, etc.)....
  • 5 0
 Thank you for posting this. The problem that Propain is experiencing is not restricted to the bike market - anyone who is involved in shipping "stuff" globally is affected.

Shipping companies were above capacity last year, with some of them are dumping routes - those that pick up the slack are in high demand and so pricing increases. This is not bike companies gouging - its simple economics.
  • 4 0
 Longer shipping time and price increases is a global problem we will notice it on every product which is made from parts on the other side of the globe. I‘m running a business where merchandise is imported from the China, India and US to Germany. All shipping companies have increased prices for containers up x 6. Example: freight rate China August 2020: 2500 €, January 2021: 12.000 €. The more cheaper and bulkier the product, the more expensive the final import price. IMO the shipping companies exploit the situation as they were whining since many years about too low freight rates. Now they see the demand for PPE and Heath care products where prices went up x10 and they want a piece of that pie. Air freight is the only chance to reduce lead times but costs a fortune.
  • 6 1
 Maybe a good thing for the enviornment and in the long term for us all when it will be not that lucrative any more to produce practically everything in low wage countries with vague envionmental restrictions.
  • 3 0
 @XIVXV:
Freight rates and loading space will go down to the old level when the pandemic crisis is defeated, this will be approximately end of this year. Also local manufacturing is still more expensive then sourcing in at this high freight rate level. So finally: no, your fantasy won’t come true - unfortunately. This would need much more efforts then a little virus.
  • 4 1
 I know of someone who used to order parts from an OEM for bike builds and has seen a 30-40 day total lead time for the last 5 year of trading, as of January this is now 120 working days, or like 150 days from order date, fine if you have notice of this, catastrophic if not. The bike 'boom' is going to be good for some, but there may be some casualties on the other side of all of this - this person is having to look into alternatives to keep their business trading so thats one potential lost customer for their supplier.
  • 10 0
 Try 240 days for large OEMs. Place a PO today, get your fork in November.
  • 3 0
 @creativefletch: Ouch. That’s going to hurt if you have frames waiting to built, they will almost be last years model before they reach customers.
  • 2 0
 There are parts with over 24 months leadtime atm and smaller brands who wont be able to sell complete bikes in 2021 due to these shortages
  • 3 0
 @mirskeinereingefalln: So a ‘boom’ to a disaster for some companies.

It’s not like it’s easy to solve either, manufacturers don’t usually have lots of excess capacity so catching up will be difficult if not impossible if they can’t / are not willing to invest and increase capacity. Even if they can catching up on a years production won’t be easy especially if brands will be putting in orders now for 2023 as you say.

Victim of success if I ever saw it.
  • 2 0
 I’ve heard some parts manufacturers are upwards of 400 day lead times. And companies like trek and giant are over a year on some models
  • 5 2
 @justanotherusername: Just sell the frames, for the love of god. We have most of the parts, or can get them used.
  • 4 0
 @noplacelikeloam: ah yea, just ignore the signed PO’s for all the other parts and sell the frames off to the PBers with some old parts.

Then sell all the parts off when they do arrive.

Then shut up shop because business is kaput
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: haha! Or sell that oversupply parts inventory with margin to your competitive set! ;-)
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: 2021 frame colors will be sticking around for 2022
  • 1 1
 @justanotherusername: They have just built their NEXT new Headquarter! The "old" one not even did it for four years! They are realy doing their best, to keep up with their success...
  • 2 0
 @Werratte: ah I wasn’t suggesting Propain weren’t succeeding, it was more a general comment that some brands may now fail as they won’t get parts in time to continue business.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: was no critic - got you right - cheers
  • 1 0
 @creativefletch: ha I dream of 240 days. One big OE just pushed it's key lines to 450. Just in time for Christmas 2022....
  • 1 0
 @benpinnick: you part of the uk direct selling company I think you are?

What do you do in that situation, can you get an alternative or is that a run of bikes in the can now.....
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: we build on demand, so we can run options, but its a problem as what happens is one ups the dates, so everyone buys company B's product, which then maxes their dates, and so on.

Its going to crash and burn, badly.
  • 7 3
 1st world problems are a mother fucker. The good news is, YT owners can now rejoice and revel in the long wait times for everyone else's bike orders. It's good to not be alone.
  • 3 0
 I do wonder with all the price hikes, delivery issues etc. When does it become viable for most people to buy "local" from companies with local manufacturing like nicolai, hope, guerrilla gravity etc. The issues most companies are facing are understandable with supply chains. So it seems obvious to remove the supply chain where possible
  • 4 0
 Raw material costs and supply issues are also an issue. Everything is an issue at the moment. Its like every single problem you can face for every business happening all at the same time
  • 1 0
 @Lorieng: absolutely. It's why included hope as an example because there only company I can think of that supplies nearly the entire bike made in house except for suspension and tyres and even then if suspension was an issue buy them from a small company that manufactures in house like formula, EXT or intend. My point is with rising costs in the east especially with the added shipping costs there must be a point we're in house manufacturing particularly for large markets like the EU and US
  • 1 0
 @briain: it does make sense for those markets to some extent if things get worse like currency rates but setting up that infrastructure is costly, lengthy and expensive.

And in the end, it wont help the uk ????
  • 1 0
 @Lorieng: wasn't really thinking UK directly. More make a frame in house and buy locally(in country) sourced components. Because looking at other articles like the new nukeproof Giga there really isn't much difference in price between brands producing in house and companies producing in Asia. Personally tend to buy bikes a year old and let someone else take the year 1 50% depreciation. Either way bikes are really shooting up in price
  • 4 0
 FRAME ONLY!

They mention delays on tires, suspension and I'm guessing most parts are unavailable. Frame only could be an option?
  • 1 0
 So many company complain about long lead times on major components but looks like no one add the "frame only" choice... I really can't understand this!
  • 1 0
 I tried getting commencal frames in but the lead time is still 6 months or so for most of them
  • 1 0
 Because where do you think the frames are produced.
  • 1 0
 @pk71:

Yea produced in the same place as the components hence why ‘frame only’ doesn't quite work as easily as some
Would imagine
  • 1 0
 @Lorieng: the "frame only" solution works with those who produce in house, or for those who have produced a lot and sold a few Smile
  • 7 2
 What about Propain accessories?
  • 7 6
 God Damnit, BOBBY!
  • 6 2
 Literally Every Bike Brand in the World Acknowledges Long Lead Times and Price Increases Fixed the title for ya there.
  • 2 0
 Was going to get a propain. The bikes look amazing but with long lead times, this was before Xmas, and with brexit looming opted against it. Glad I went for an airdrop edit which will delivered soon.
  • 1 0
 The times are just the excuse to disguise the fact that oriental producers are increasing costs, until now we have bought at the cost of a bowl of rice and we have zeroed production in the west, now we are only consumers and no longer producers and who is contented with the bowl of rice asking for steaks. they will be difficult, very difficult years.
  • 2 0
 Shoot just ordered a bike from German company VPACE for my kid, it better get here before he outgrows it.

(On a side note - their customer service excellent so far-Marcus)
  • 4 2
 Let’s have more riders. Everything will be better they said....

Now some dirt bag who doesn’t even ride is going to get a bike before YOU
  • 2 2
 Worried about shipping times? Stop relying on China for everything then. Make it yourself you f*cking douchebags.

The entire planet has become so reliant on China for everything that now when supply slows (or they decide to choke supply) our world ends. The only way to stop this is to re-invest in local brands and infrastructure, whatever country you are in.

A proper size wake up call has been sent our way, maybe it's time to pay attention kids?

Probs on the wrong forum for this, as all the cool kids want the latest and greatest Charbon Uber bike, apparently that's all that matters these days.

Go Capitolism!
  • 5 2
 So when can I get a bike from Propain?
Propain: "no."
  • 1 0
 By the time a yuma 26 or jeffsy 26 bike is available i can get my kid on a sweet used size small enduro for half the cost. Just have to stretch his hardtail one more season.
  • 5 1
 Poor David Assfalg...
  • 19 4
 and the L is silent.
  • 2 0
 great to see company saying how it is instead of keeping ppl in the dark for weeks or even months
  • 3 0
 Yeah. China is making way more money now.
  • 1 0
 It's happening across the industry. I ordered my new MegaTower had a ship date and then my order was cancelled. Bike was paid for. This is killing my local shop.
  • 1 0
 If bike manufacturers started building bikes in country, could a lot of these problems could be (i.e.. Devinci; nicely done!Smile
  • 3 1
 This is going to be the MO for at least the next year or two.
  • 5 2
 IDK... once prices go up, they don't come back down. The many impacts of this whole shutdown thing have yet to play out. Probably why cooler heads never shutdown before.
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: Yeah, probably some truth to that. I am specifically talking about not being able to get parts and bikes for a while though. We shall see what happens with bike pricing in the future, however. It is a competitive industry after all.
  • 4 0
 @Baller7756: prices will potentially go down once companies sit on inventory in '22 created by over ordering on '20/21. Many of them are seeing this as a boom, when in reality is a bubble
  • 3 0
 @Arierep: I see the supply/demand logic, but i have never seen bike prices go down. Maybe the price of commodities like corn, pork bellies and gold fluctuate with market demand, or a product that is approaching the end of its life cycle might go down in price, but not bikes.

Bike manufacturers will just change the model year of their inventoried frames... this was a 2021 frame, now it’s a 2022 frame. Look at Yeti... selling old SB100 front and rear triangles with a different linkage and shock as the SB115... that frame is from 2018.
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: Prices can go down as discounts. Don't know about the US, but here in Europe end of collection periods are often the best time to grab a bargain.
But yes, agree that changing model year of collection will likely also be employed.
  • 5 2
 This is proPAINful
  • 4 0
 The Poor Pun Police will be at your door shortly . (-;
  • 3 1
 Just think how good this is for anybody selling a bike.
  • 5 1
 hmmm, good point! Nah, I am hoarding..... spare bikes = spare parts +1 factor.
  • 4 3
 Long lead times Low levels of customer choice Slack service Welcome to 2021!!!!!
  • 2 0
 Well, I was about to buy a TYEE CF... Guess not anymore.
  • 3 0
 I mean, if you were looking at anything you're not getting it this year.
  • 2 0
 It looks like a pretty flammable bike
  • 1 0
 I get it, but why wont you sell frame only in US? Seems like thats something you could do quickly, fill a gap?
  • 1 0
 Raaw seems to be having similar delays... frame has been on its way for 10+ weeks
  • 1 3
 Who buys a Christmas-complete anyways? Just buy a frame-only and build up your dream bike with the parts you select and purchase. You don’t need the latest-greatest to build a sick bike. There are plenty of previous-generation-parra available at clearance prices.
  • 1 0
 A wait time of 14 months ?? wow , i thought waiting for six months for my new bike was insane .
  • 1 0
 Bad news - i will order my next Spindrift next week... Need to check the lead times for the components in my config now.
  • 2 1
 Phil Atwill signs back 1 day and already hes broke the company with orders!!!!
  • 1 0
 Just give us the framesets then. The 150€ price increase due to shipping is standard every year anyway, even before 2020.
  • 2 0
 Phil Atwill not such a free athlete they'd thought he would be, I see
  • 1 0
 That would be funny if Arnold delivered this message: "We'll be back with more bikes soon, stay pumped!!"
  • 1 0
 14 months? The whole bike industry will have moved on to different standards by then!
  • 1 0
 All I know is every time I see a Propain Spindrift picture, I drool...
  • 1 0
 Do they get a pass for gimme $'s or sorry cant deliver so gimee $'s.
  • 1 0
 They should hire UBER to deliver the goods.
  • 1 0
 Lahey is going to be pissed
  • 1 0
 Oh well, there are still a million other bike brands...
  • 1 0
 Couldnt get a Propain in the US before, now i extra can't get one.
  • 2 3
 Ye ole supply and demand. Shutdowns increased demand and prices on a lot of stuff. Ugh.
  • 2 5
 They just translated their self-admitted shipping cost increase of 150$ per bike into a 250€ (300$) price hike overnight.

I was dead set on getting a Tyee, but I'm no longer interested.
  • 1 0
 but you get the European 2 year warranty instead of the American 1 year warranty on the, umm, shipping and, umm, things...
  • 8 1
 $160 higher price on the frame delivery costs alone. That doesn't take account any increase in cost of any component or their delivery costs.
  • 1 0
 Alicia s Legit!
  • 1 2
 Specialized been knowing about high prices and now everyone will follow shortly
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