6 Ways to Protect Your Bikes with Better Security Practices

Mar 19, 2021
by Colin Meagher  

Keeping your bike under you isn't rocket science. Rather, it's using your brain to limit your exposure.

There’s no such thing as a theft-proof bike: anyone with a set of $20 USD bolt cutters can get through a cheap cable lock in under a minute. Thicker cable? Thin chain? Yeah—that just requires a bigger set of bolt cutters for a few dollars more. And if a thief is armed with time, some privacy, and an $85 USD cordless angle grinder, they can typically cut through any U-lock in about a minute, Chains too thick for bolt cutters are more resistant to an angle grinder attack but can be unwieldy. Bottom line? You’ll always be at the mercy of a brute force attack on a bike lock.

What’s crazy is how little attention the police dedicate to bike thefts, especially given that a modern bike can be worth more than $5k USD and that a habitual bike thief can easily steal upwards of ten bikes a day in the right environment. And the chances of getting caught are microscopic: an analysis of 13,000 stolen bikes by the Portland, Oregon, ‘Oregonian’ newspaper showed only 2% of reported stolen bikes ending in an arrest and return of the bike. This statistic is reflected in most other major metro areas across the US, too—particularly those with a high substance abuse issue, like Seattle, Santa Cruz, etc. Additionally, on average, only one in six stolen bikes is ever reported as stolen. Basically, statistics like these equate to a license to steal, because bike theft is a property crime that the authorities simply don’t have time for, never mind the expense to the public. And it’s only gotten worse with Covid: many areas are seeing upwards of a 20% increase in bicycle theft.

So what’s a bike owner to do? Simple: limit opportunities for theft, make your bike difficult enough to steal that a potential thief will look for an easier target, and cover your ass with some simple proactive steps before you find your bike gone. In this article, I’ll go over some best practices to follow as well as some intelligent solutions for securing your bike(s) in all three situations.

There are typically three situations where your bike is vulnerable: locked up outside a bar/coffee shop/work, stopping somewhere with bike(s) on your vehicle, and from your home (typically the garage).


Documentation

But before we go to safe practices and security, the first and smartest thing you can do is document your bike. That’s as easy as snapping a few images with your iPhone: the serial # (usually on the underside of your BB shell), a pic of you with your bike, a shot of the drivetrain side, and a shot of anything unique to your bike.

The four images that will make or break recovering your bike in the event of a theft, as well as offer proof positive of ownership for insurance.

Once documented, register your bike in at least one of three places: with your local police department (look online for a register your bike page), at bikeindex and Project529. Or all three.

Insurance

Secondly, are you insured? Insurance won’t prevent bike theft, but the right kind of insurance is inexpensive and equals peace of mind. If you have renter’s or homeowner’s insurance, your bikes are already covered against theft under your personal property clause. The only negative is your deductible—if you’ve got a $1000 deductible, that'll come from your pocket. But you can cheaply up your insurance game AND eliminate a deductible fee by scheduling your bike(s) individually. This will typically only add $100-$150 USD or so to your annual insurance policy and will sometimes (depending on your insurer) expand coverage for accidental damage (like driving into a garage with bikes on the roof). Or you can get an insurance plan specifically for your bike, possibly through your regular insurer, but definitely through Velosurance whose policies start for as low as $100/yr—although a $7000 MSRP bike like an XT/XTR Pivot Switchblade will cost you $40/month.

Joe Lawill at Graeagle CA
WARNING: E-Bikes are considered a motorized vehicle and are NOT covered on the personal property insurance clause of your renter’s or homeowners policy. Get that scheduled separately from your personal property to get it covered.

Safe Practices and Security




I’m not going to say a cable lock is useless; they have their role in keeping honest people honest in small towns and rural areas—any place that doesn’t have close proximity to a city or an area rife with substance abuse. But since a set of cheap bolt cutters will slice a 10mm cable in seconds, they're useless as a deterrent in a high-risk area. How about one of those fancy new folding locks? A bolt cutter will have a tough time with those (although it’s not impossible), but a properly deployed $15 nut splitter can defeat one in less than two minutes.

Be smart: choose the level of bike lock required for security specific to your risk. From zip ties to burly "Forget About It" Chain/U-locks, every lock has its place. The zip ties in NYC or Santa Cruz? Not really a good idea. The Kryptonite NY Lock on a gravel ride coffee stop in a small town, miles from nowhere? Overkill. But the zip tie lock on that same gravel ride? It's lightweight and it easily tucks into a pocket, making it perfect for an extended break on a mixed surface adventure.

Your go-to for securing your bike outside unattended should be a short, thick U-lock or a chain lock with at least 10mm links—that chain size, while heavy, is something you can still carry relatively easily. Yes, a set of properly used heavy-duty bolt cutters can be used against a 10mm security chain if a thief can get enough leverage, but typically cutting both a high-security U-lock and a chain will require an angle grinder to be defeated (and the shifting links of a chain can cause the cutting disk to bind and explode, potentially injuring the user, which is fine by me). Plus, the locks on these kinds of U-locks and chain locks are difficult—but not impossible—to pick, pretty much eliminating your garden variety thief.

Bike security
Be smart about what you lock your bike to; these bike racks—while okay to secure your bike if you can see it—can be unbolted in a few minutes, allowing a thief to toss your bike into a waiting vehicle without having to defeat your lock(s) in public.

Even with a good lock, don’t be an idiot. 1) Lock it where you can see it. 2) Lock it in a brightly lit area with lots of traffic—thieves don’t generally like that kind of exposure. 3) Make sure whatever you’re locking your bike to isn’t going anywhere—cheap bike racks can be unbolted, small trees can be cut, and bikes can be lifted up and off of a street sign. 4) As shown below, use two locks: one for the frame/rear wheel and another one for the front wheel/frame—and keep the rear lock as tight to your chainstays and BB as you can; that makes it harder to get a good angle of attack to make a cut. 5) If you’re in an area like New York, Vancouver, Seattle, Santa Cruz, etc. your best bet is never to lock a bike you really care about unattended outside. Ever.

Bike security
Bike security

Proper lock-up involves two locks: one securing the bike's rear wheel and frame to an unmovable object, and another securing the front wheel and frame, ideally also to an immovable object. You won't make your bike impossible to steal, but the goal is to make your bike just difficult enough to steal that a thief will look for an easier target.





I’ve known people who’ve had an unsecured bike ripped off the back of their truck at a stoplight in Seattle and in Santa Cruz. Lock it or lose it. And that integrated cable lock found on many hitch racks can easily be cut, so while they’re better than nothing, they’re really only good for keeping honest people honest. Bottom line? If you’ve got a hitch rack and an expensive bike(s), only cables/chains in excess of 10mm secured with a high-security U-lock will work as a serious deterrent (although with time and an angle grinder they are still vulnerable. But remember: you’re just trying to make your bike security strong enough to send a thief looking elsewhere).

For truck beds, inside a van, or a trailer, your best bet is to install a bed anchor like Kryptonite's and secure your bike to that in accordance with the bike rack tips above. Make an angle grinder attack their only option: it takes longer than a simple snip and isn't exactly subtle.

Best practices? Common sense. If you’re at a somewhat sketchy rest stop (broken glass on the ground is never a good sign), take turns using the bathroom.

Keep an eye on the prize if possible, even if your bikes are locked up.

Gas stop/coffee break/bar in a high-risk area (pretty much anywhere with rampant substance abuse issues): don't leave it unattended if possible, and park it where you can see it. Basically, don't be a dumbass: parking at a trailhead littered with broken glass and leaving your bike unattended for hours—even secured with chains—is basically giving it away.





First, the place most people store their bike(s)—the garage—is (sadly) pretty vulnerable. Particularly if you live in a “secure” building with a “secure” bicycle cage—even the ones with video surveillance. Many of those kinds of buildings forbid bikes in your unit—usually citing fire codes. And the video surveillance? That’s to protect the building owner against liability. More often than not, that video footage isn’t available to help recover your bike after a theft unless the police ask for it. Plus the cameras aren’t always positioned to capture a face (and with Covid, and people masking up, that facial footage is useless, anyway). And accessing this kind of garage is child’s play.

But let’s deal with security in your home garage to start with, then move onto a secure building’s garage.

Home Garage

In your home/condo garage: 1) If you have an automatic garage door that you can “only” open with a remote or a coded PIN, disable the manual release ASAP. Why? Because anyone with a hook on a coat hanger can open most automatic garage doors from outside without the remote.


This cute little T-handle gives anyone access to your garage. Tie it off, remove it, or zip tie the manual release closed so it can't be opened except from inside. And if you live in a high-risk area, there's no such thing as overkill, just precautions to encourage a thief to look elsewhere.

2) Armor up soft entry points—a deadbolt on any outer door is good, but you should also reinforce that door jamb to make a brute force attack difficult. This can be as simple as swapping out the stock strike plate and deadbolt screws—typically only 2.5cm—for 7.5cm screws to get a deeper bite, or investing $20 USD into a lock and door reinforcing plate. 3) Paint over or use privacy frost on any windows so you’re not advertising what’s inside. Better yet, place a $50 USD grate on the inside with one-way bolts, which can't be unscrewed without a tap. Basically, think like a thief, and create counters for these and any other potential entry points. 4) Get a permanent ground anchor like the ones below and run at least a decent cable—something thicker than 10mm—through your bikes and secure that to your ground anchor with a high-security U-lock. In a somewhat risky area, use a 10mm or heavier hardened chain with a high-security U-lock. 5) If you’re living in a really sketchy area, use U-locks, etc to secure each bike’s rear wheel and frame a la the bike rack style. Yes, if a thief can get inside, an angle grinder will still defeat all of these precautions; but just like the other scenarios, all you’re really doing is trying to send a potential thief looking for an easier target.


The Kryptonite Evolution Ground Anchor ($69 USD) and the Abus Granit 100 ($65 USD) are two good Ground Anchor options with all the hardware included. Both have a hardened steel shackle in excess of 10mm, making a cutting attack the only option to defeat them. Warning: these are permanent once installed.

Secure Building Bike Lock Up

Secure Building Bike Cages are pretty much a candy store for thieves: they’re easy to access, bikes are usually in a laughably secure cage—typically chain link fencing that’s easy to cut (with the same bolt cutters used to defeat cables and cheap U-locks)—so tenants may have bikes lightly secured (if at all), and the video camera usually isn’t being monitored, so the chances of a police response are about zero.


So how to secure your bike? First, beg ignorance and store your bike in your unit even if it’s against the building rules. Seriously. Make friends with your neighbors beforehand so they don’t turn you in. Got ratted out? Ok, treat this as a high-risk grocery store parking situation: get two heavy-duty chain locks or U locks and use them to secure your bike(s) to whatever can’t be unbolted or easily cut in accordance with locking suggestions in the “outside lockup” section above. Then cross your fingers.

Even if you follow these practices, your bike can be stolen. At that point, if you’ve done your homework, you can report it to the police (for a case number) and quickly post it to your LBS, Facebook, bikeindex.org, etc. to increase your chances of recovery. Failing that, you’ve documentation and a case number to make an insurance claim as painless as possible—trust me: insurance companies do not want to pay you unless they have to, and a case number along with simple documentation makes a claim iron clad.


335 Comments

  • 238 5
 Bikes stay inside the house, they deserve better than the garage.
  • 39 5
 Yup and it's riskier for a thief if they have to break into a residence in the U.S. Regardless of the state, you can generally use lethal force if someone breaks in your home or residence to commit a crime. Breaking into a garage isn't the same as breaking inside the house itself so those laws vary
  • 47 3
 @Rokcore: At least you get to shoot them down there if you catch them.....
  • 9 0
 I'm amazed people still think a garage is safe. They sure as hell do deserve better.
  • 62 2
 Tell that to my wife.
  • 18 7
 @curendero: Had two bikes at my first apartment, one beater bike and my Yeti 575. Kept the yeti in the apartment at all times. The beater was the one that got stolen out of the storage locker. They used tiny chain link fence and thin metal plates as anchors to attach locks; these plates could easily be cut with a small hack saw in a couple minutes.

I've heard from former law enforcement that if you're going to shoot someone in your house you better finish it because the lawyers might get you. Someone in my hometown went to jail for shooting a couple thieves on their property and it was all because of what he said prior to shooting
  • 7 35
flag hi-dr-nick (Mar 19, 2021 at 11:37) (Below Threshold)
 @lagranger: your wife doesn't do the same activities as you? What good is she!?
  • 29 7
 @lagranger: It's 2021, replacing the wife will be cheaper and easier.
  • 23 0
 On a road trip once I had a motel room with two queen beds to myself. My bike slept in one, nicely tucked in.
  • 20 3
 @Rokcore: The only thing I can shoot them with here is a Nerf gun and even then I’ll be the one going to jail, UK laws on home invasion is a joke!! If you break in and come equipped, expect to receive it back too
  • 94 8
 @Rokcore:

"If you're going to shoot someone in your house you better finish it because the lawyers might get you."

That sentence right there explains so much of what's wrong in the world these days.
  • 4 1
 @hi-dr-nick: My garage is partinioned into a workshop and space for my truck. However I have added slide bolts onto the door on the left and right top and bottom on the inside. I believe some had tried to pull the door open some time back, but they couldnt get it open. I also have an alarm sensor on the door , a beam across the outside and an interior beam. So far the Damn PERPS have been fortunate not to get in.
  • 15 2
 @Rokcore: if you're in a state with castle doctrine/stand your ground laws, sure. In mine, you can't physically defend property and if you need to defend human life, you have to attempt to deescalate and then you can only retaliate with equal or lesser force. Of course, it's better to be judged by 9 than carried by 6, but with how difficult it can be to legally defend your property/self in some states/cities, shit can go sideways, fast.
  • 11 10
 @bocomtb: Replacing the wife is cheaper?
Maybe if you use a hitman, but not if you go through court.
  • 7 9
 @Rokcore: Lethal force, just for a thief.
  • 16 0
 @bishopsmike: Not saying it makes it right or wrong so I'm surprised I'm getting down voted for that. Personally I think the law is too lenient with regards to people breaking into your home. However, I was surprised to hear it from someone in law enforcement. You have to be very careful with regards to what state you're in and the circumstances when & where you are defending yourself/property. Personally I wouldn't risk it. There's plenty of other ways to deter thieves and recover your property such as keeping a TV on, lights on, loud dogs, gps trackers, bluetooth trackers, etc.
  • 10 1
 @hi-dr-nick: my wife is a great shuttle driver!!! She doesn't ride but has no problem shuttle driving us!!
  • 11 1
 @Henary: Lethal force for a home invader because you don't know why they're in your home. Again, not advocating for or against it. Just saying that it's a huge deterrent for someone thinking about breaking in because those are vastly different crimes and the consequences for it are much higher
  • 33 0
 @Henary: This is going way off topic but ultimately I think it's a societal problem where thefts shouldn't be remotely attractive options because the social services are good, wages are better, violence & prison sentences aren't glorified, and consequences for getting caught far outweigh the benefits for getting away. Right now you have a system where people are poor and would rather risk temporary riches than playing it safe working their whole life
  • 1 2
 @hi-dr-nick: so...you can keep riding all night long...

R/whoosh
  • 6 5
 @sjma: Let me guess, California?
  • 16 18
 @Henary: The real American dream is getting to execute someone with impunity
  • 4 0
 Who doesn't sleep with their bike these days SMH
  • 4 0
 @McArdle: I'm assuming that a handgun in your side table is a no go?
  • 8 0
 @graham2017: I don't want that, but yeah, there was a shooting in my area where the first shot was probably justified (guy came at him with a bat) but then the second was not (essentially an execution). All of the FB comments were like "well, the guy deserved it, so whatevs." Pretty absurd.

With that being said, I do have a 9mm that I can quickly access and I would not feel bad about having to use it if someone broke into my house while me and my family were in it.
  • 2 0
 @thrasher2: Awesome. I tried that at home but my wife was not impressed (likely jealous).
  • 9 0
 is there any mention of dogs on this entire page? they can be one helluva deterrent to a thief or peeping tom looking to mess with your stuff
  • 30 0
 My garage is intentionally in a state of disorganized chaos, to the point where it's essentially a living 99% played-through jenga game. At any moment the whole thing could collapse, saws and snowboards flying every which way. It's worked great for mice. Indiana Jones would have a hard time navigating it without making a great deal of noise, and lesser humans would be at high risk of flesh wounds, if not decapitation.

I'm not saying it's theft proof, but would be thieves aren't going to leave the same as they go in.
  • 2 0
 @Rokcore: Nah for sure! I was taking a shot at lawyers, not commenting on you at all. Beer
  • 7 2
 Why? My wife’s been in the garage for months and nobody’s taken her yet! @lagranger:
  • 6 0
 I have a 120 lb malamute that sleeps next to my bikes in the garage. He chooses to sleep there since it's cold.
  • 2 0
 I just park mine next to my decoy redalp and most people who think about stealing my bike have a stroke when they see the redalp.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: when in colleges my bike slept locked in my bed, we rode after class, chilled while locked to the side of the bed at night.
  • 11 13
 @bishopsmike: what explains most of the world's problems is people like you thinking that someone willing to break into another person's home, to rob them or for any other reason, deserves anything better than a bullet.
  • 6 0
 @badbadleroybrown: he's on the same page lol Having a justice system like that is the problem. Not the person defending their home
  • 3 0
 @gnarlysipes: Close, MA. Overall excellent place to live but I understand why some people are annoyed with the way the Commonwealth operates itself. Maine better watch its mouth though or we'll Make Maine Massachusetts Again /s
  • 1 0
 @Rokcore: I love this place!!
  • 1 0
 What about when you leave during the day though? How do you secure your bikes in the house? The benefit of keeping them in the garage is they can be secured to a concrete anchor.
  • 4 1
 @bob-oso: anchors can be placed in the house as well as other crafty guerilla warfare booby traps which I am personally fond of. In the house...easy homeowners claim if you’re pilfered and not there. While you’re there...or at least if “I” am there....expert marksman with no reservations.
  • 2 0
 @bob-oso: theft deterrents. Most of the time tools are in the garage anyway so unless you keep your tools separated then it's pointless anyway. Nothing is completely theft proof
  • 1 0
 Unless we're talking walk in gun vault...in that case you're covered short of getting the lock code stolen
  • 2 1
 @Rokcore: as long as you don’t have little ones around the house, it is always good practice to have several placements within reach for easy access, the vault is the armory for hunting or serious events.
  • 1 0
 @thrasher2: @thrasher2: And you can always hug it in case it has a nightmare. Double gain.
  • 2 1
 @HB208: yeah I’m fine for a water pistol
  • 1 0
 @bocomtb: Depends on the deductible.
  • 10 0
 @Henary: I used to think that too. But if you decide to come in my house with ill intent, your story has ended. Does it say "just a thief" on your business card, so I know you would do no worse?
  • 9 0
 @Henary: Lethal force, by a private citizen, who’s home has just been invaded? I say hell yes. Give the f*cker everything you’ve got.
  • 3 0
 @Riyadh: South Africa is really high on my list of places to visit & ride. Been to Kenya a few times. Have heard the crime rate/car jacking in SA is on a whole other level though Frown
  • 6 2
 @hi-dr-nick: my garage is 100% safe . i have an electric opener with a hardened bolt going through the track and one of the wheel assemblies . a thief cannot see what they are dealing with on the outside and would give up .IF they somehow entered my house they would be met with a 130 lb Kangal dog with the highest bite force of any dog on the planet ( 743 psi) . if the dog doesn't stop you , you will then have to contend with the scariest woman on the planet , my wife.
  • 1 0
 @jgottya1: who said anything about guns? The vault is just for the bikes lol
  • 1 0
 @thinkbike: unless you have a derpy lab/retriever...
  • 1 0
 @lagranger: grow some balls
  • 1 0
 @brncr6: My wife shreds. Hence, I never shuttle....????
  • 1 0
 @devanish: and then give them a tug
  • 2 0
 @gerhards: perfect, I always lean two or more snowboards on any bike and top it off with some ice axes, crampons and spearguns...
  • 2 1
 @mlunger: too much effort. Just park an ellsworth or a redalp in front of it.
  • 6 3
 @bishopsmike: It's the United States...we're madly in love with our guns, oversized pickup trucks and undersized penises.

And....cue: "America...love it or leave it!"
  • 5 3
 @Dopepedaler: that's why trump was so popular. Undersized wang and loved his kfc. Heil trumpler
  • 6 1
 @Dopepedaler: Don't forget the MAGA, blue lives matter, and American flags hanging off the truck so you can get em dirty when you roll coal. You know it's bad when the American flag starts feeling more like a racist symbol than a symbol of patriotism.
  • 1 1
 @Rokcore: Isn't the takeaway here not to start shooting if you haven't got a reasonable fear of imminent harm? If you're at the point of talking to the intruder, there's a significant likelihood that the reasonable threat prong of most states' castle doctrine laws hasn't been satisfied.

With regard to the person in your hometown, there's probably some other facts beyond what the shooter said that contributed to his being jailed.
  • 3 1
 @rodeostu: no, the takeaway here is don't break in to someone's home if you don't want to get shot.
  • 1 0
 @badbadleroybrown: Depends what state you live in . . . I live in Texas, where the courts and laws err on the side of home defense. California or Massachusetts, much less so.
  • 4 3
 @rodeostu: we're not talking about someone breaking into your vehicle... if someone has forcibly entered your home, then your priority is defending your family not considering how f*cked up your states laws are. The bridge of presumed intent to do harm was crossed the moment they entered your home. Even in shithole leftist states, you're still answerable to a jury of your peers... not many rationale adults are gonna convict someone for legitimately defending their home.
  • 1 0
 @rodeostu: yeah, can't say it better than anyone else below you... don't break into someone's home. If you do then you better be running/screaming from someone trying to kill you. My hometown had people pretending to need help just to get you to open the door so they could force their way in. Can't say I'm very trustworthy of strangers coming to my door
  • 1 3
 @Rokcore: Agreed. "Patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel."
  • 1 1
 @Dopepedaler: There aren't many more effective ways to declare yourself an idiot than to quote an elitist tory... kudos for succinctity though.
  • 1 1
 @gnarlysipes: I said what I meant... and I didn't mean succinctness.
  • 1 0
 @thinkbike: I have a dauchsand ...
  • 3 0
 @jgottya1: A moat of sharks with fricken laser beams is a good one...
  • 1 0
 @Rokcore: I stand corrected.
  • 2 2
 @badbadleroybrown: Considering its origins, the ironic sentiment is especially sweet, particularly in indictments of modern exceptionalism, patriotism, nationalism and trumpism. Should that make me an idiot, then I happily accept your endorsement.
  • 3 0
 @thinkbike: Dogs here are useless. Perps here will spend a couple of weeks getting the dog used to them. They will feed the dog treats through the fence etc. When the dog stops being aggressive to them, thats when they break in.
  • 2 0
 @loamhunter08: Dude, as much as we love tourist, the criminal syndicates love them even more. Honestly speaking, its no different to any where else. The difference comes in when the perp sees and opportunity and takes that opportunity at whatever cost. There is alot more to it as well, I dont want to mention publicly. Car jacking is high in certain parts and hardly in areas where tourists would frequent.
  • 3 2
 @Dopepedaler: There's nothing ironic about it at all... but solid effort doubling down on idiocy, with bonus points for tossing in some anti Trump sookery that's not remotely relevant like a good lil puppet. Truly amazing that you clowns can manage to turn literally any topic, no matter how far removed, into crying about American exceptionalism and Trump.
  • 1 1
 @badbadleroybrown: @dopepedaler get a room you too. The sexual tension between you two is through the roof.
  • 2 2
 @badbadleroybrown: Thanks for making my point for me. “Puppet, clown, idiot, crying.” My apologies that comments with subjective context and criticisms of frail constructs exascerbate your own feelings of unreonciled vulnerability.
  • 3 1
 @Dopepedaler: Look at you trying so hard to sound smart and still managing to say nothing intelligent. The only "unreconciled vulnerability" going on here is you being hurt by patriotism and the big mean orange man. Take a seat you clown... any chance of you being mistaken as intelligent or thoughtful went out the window with your first comment quoting Samuel Johnson.
  • 3 1
 @badbadleroybrown: Let's not pretend Trump is good. The international community knows he is a clown
  • 3 2
 @Rokcore: the point is that Trump, and patriotism, have f*ck all to do with bike locks and bike thefts... yet these clowns can't manage to get through any subject at all without breaking down in a fit of outrage.

And let's not pretend he's either as good as his fans think or as bad as his haters think. Funny how literally nothing has changed under Biden but folks want to act like everything is somehow better now. Rolleyes
  • 2 2
 @badbadleroybrown: I mean for starts we don't have an openly sexist president. So yeah I'd say at least one thing is better. I don't think people should idolize someone like that or idealize that personality. Or how about making fun of a disabled person. These are all things that are factually proveable and objectively better
  • 1 2
 @badbadleroybrown: "Must've hit pretty close to the mark to get you that riled up?!" That's a Han Solo quote. I say that even though I am not a space-faring pirate/mercenary/smuggler. Nor do I explicitly condone said actions of space-faring pirate/mercenary/smugglers.
  • 2 2
 @Rokcore: good job repeating propaganda and proving the point that y'all puppets can't manage an independent thought if your lives depended upon it.

But you're still missing the point while succumbing to your media induced rage of the big bad orange man... he has literally nothing to do with bike theft and bike locks and you fools bringing him up only proves how spun up you are. Get a grip, stick to the issue. Try to stay with reality here, Patriotism and Trump aren't relevant to bicycle security.
  • 2 2
 @Dopepedaler: it's cute that you think I'm riled up... I'm not.
  • 2 3
 @badbadleroybrown: there's literally video proof. That's not propaganda. You're so far down the rabbit hole if you deny video evidence of these things
  • 2 2
 @Rokcore: lmfao... there's video proof of him making the exact same gestures while mimicking people who aren't disabled so actually the only video proof is of him treating a disabled person exactly the way he treats non disabled.

I know you can't get past your Trump derangement syndrome long enough to take a breath but, again, Trump has literally nothing whatsoever to do with the subject of discussion here so the simple fact that you clowns can't get through a totally unrelated article without melting down about Trump really only speaks to your mental issues, not his.
  • 1 2
 @Rokcore: it's not nice to bait people with that few braincells.
  • 2 0
 @makripper: aww, are you feeling baited cupcake? Go have a quiet rest under your bridge, lil troll, it'll all be ok.
  • 1 2
 @badbadleroybrown: the fact that you can't get through your trump knob gobbling issues and stop supporting the guy says a lot.

2005: grab em by the p$$y recording

You already know exactly which disabled person I'm referencing. No. No one makes gestures like that unless they are targeting a specific individual that makes those exact motions
  • 2 0
 @Rokcore: lmao... I haven't said one thing in support of him and yet I'm "knob gobbling"? That's an adorable fantasy world you've constructed to defend your TDS.

There's video proof of Trump making exactly the same gestures mocking a number of non disabled people, both before and after he supposedly targeted the disabled journalist... and yes, of course I know which journalist you're taking about because you leftist clowns have been desperately crying about it ever since your media overlords told you to be outraged. But it's indisputable for anyone who isn't so overcome by their propaganda induced derangement that they ignore factual reality that Trump uses those same gestures to mock anyone he chooses to deem as foolish and considers an opponent, including both Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio in the 2016 primaries.

But, again, and I know this is hard to get through your angry little fantasy world ruled by the big bad orange man... none of that has a single thing to do with bike security so your incessant need to discuss only shows how unhinged you are.
  • 1 2
 @badbadleroybrown: I just feel bad for you.
  • 2 2
 @badbadleroybrown: just gonna ignore the grab em by the pssy thing. I second @makripper and I feel bad for you. I'm amazed you don't run into trees when you're biking since you can't see things right in front of you
  • 1 0
 @makripper: your sympathy means so much... lol
  • 1 0
 @Rokcore: I don't have any issue with it... the only part he got wrong was that you don't even need to be a star for em to let you grab em by the pussy.

I don't run into things because, unlike you puppets who need to be told what you're supposed to see, I see the facts without having to pretend the world isn't the way it is.

But do tell... what is it that you can't seem to grasp about Trump not being relevant to an article on bicycle security? It's gotta be hard moving through life with Trump invading every aspect of your existence. If you're gonna feel bad for someone, feel bad for yourself.
  • 1 2
 @badbadleroybrown: Need someone to talk to? Maybe covid is getting to you? Too much time in isolation
  • 2 1
 @makripper: Haven't spent a single day in isolation... I haven't been playing the cowering from covid and getting triggered over Trump game like the rest of y'all have, I've just been enjoying life. I'd suggest you try it but we both know there's not much to enjoy in your life so, just do the best you can I guess. Beer
  • 1 2
 @badbadleroybrown: no you are 100% right. No one lives life to the fullest like you. You are a national treasure. Is there a statue of your likeness in your town? I would hope so
  • 6 0
 Someone please tell me how to turn off thread notifications on my dash.
  • 2 3
 @badbadleroybrown: Whatever you say. You're cute when you're angry.
  • 3 0
 @OldDert: dashboard -> scroll to bottom -> edit dashboard settings
  • 1 0
 @Rokcore: thanks!
  • 1 1
 @OldDert: at least thats for mobile. On desktop there's a small settings cog in the middle of dashboard page
  • 1 1
 @IntoTheEverflow: wtf! Give your head a shake as this really is not funny
  • 1 0
 @OldDert: ????????????
  • 2 0
 @Riyadh: thanks for the info dude! Yeah, I totally understand that sentiment. Can’t count how many times family/friends have told me, “don’t travel to ______! You’ll get killed! Or kidnapped!” F’in shit news companies and shit social media is to blame. I’ve met some of the nicest people ever whilst traveling outside of the US!
  • 1 0
 @Justfucnsmash: my wife doesn't, hence she always shuttles us ??????
  • 116 0
 The LockPickingLawyer has ruined my trust in everything
  • 7 0
 so true, he makes it look like no lock will work and the only ones that would work are impractical.
  • 3 0
 I was just about to post this.
  • 4 0
 Oh ma god, LPL has some serious skills to make tough "impossible" HD locks seem like a cakewalk
  • 2 0
 Same here...
  • 1 1
 Lock pick, you can Dremel every signal lock, even those tungsten krytonite locks.
  • 9 0
 @lehott: no skills needed once you go to the hardware store and get yourself a battery angle grinder.
  • 1 0
 yes bike locks take seconds to open with the correct tools and practice. There are some lock barels which he cant pick easily.... I dont know why they dont use those...
  • 3 0
 @martyhourigan: real talk... every time I think about buying a lock I watch that dude dismantle it in seconds and then think "what's the point"
  • 8 0
 Meth heads don't know or care how to pick locks. Brute force is the name of the game.
  • 1 0
 @barp: lucky I don’t have any of those horrible cretins round these parts then!
  • 1 0
 @barp: meth strength plays a big factor there too
  • 3 1
 @McArdle: but you have Geordis. The only place I had bikes stolen was in the Toon. I remember once ridding up from the Tyne to Fenham after a long road ride. Must have been up from Elswick/Arthur’s hill, or something. I remember there were burnt out cars in the back alleys and I was completely nackered. Two ~12-year-olds running next to me: “that’s a nice bike. I’m going to f*cking nick it. Yeah, and knock your head in!”
Oh, the good old days.
  • 1 0
 @mitochris: That is true of the out skirts of the city centre, Fenham, Benshaw and Byker are quite rough in places, thankfully I live in a little village nowhere near!
I remember some little scroat with his face pressed upto the (tinted) car window peering through when I was picking a mate up in Fenham!
  • 58 3
 Strava has a function whereby it hides the last mile or so of your ride, so that thieves can’t use it in order to find the house youre riding from and storing your bike in. Think it’s in settings somewhere.
  • 115 56
 Or ya know, just don't use stupid strava in the first place.
  • 10 0
 And don't list your bike's make and model, just "trail bike" or "hardtail". And maybe not use your full name: at least in the US, if you own a home, people can find out fairly easily where you live just using your name.
  • 2 0
 Don’t put photos of your bike on your strava and use the zone thingy then it’s pretty much impossible for them to know what you have and where you live
  • 3 0
 its in the privacy controls section in settings. Just updated mine as i saw i had my old address in there. great reminder!
  • 17 3
 Who has Strava set to "public" anyway?!
  • 2 0
 This why companies need to be extremely responsible with people's information and digital footprint, but they are not. Every tom, dick, and harry seems is able to get people's digital footprint. Arghhh.....
  • 3 1
 @boozed: can’t go in segments with it in private or gets KOMS
  • 4 2
 @hi-dr-nick: bingo!! Or any social networking posting minute by minute life events that no one really cares about.
  • 2 2
 @boozed: can’t up vote this enough. Anyone that still has theirs set to public only rides bikes for the accolades. Pathetic
  • 2 0
 @boozed: There is a privacy zone of 5/8 mile. Criminals would have to have very detailed gps tracking information about you to know what house you live out about 100 or more houses. On top of that, you have to be riding from your house.
  • 2 0
 @jgottya1: How does posting random things on social media, give out your personal information like your home address or other private information? If the criminals are somehow getting that detailed information about a person that is a big problem and needs to be stopped.
  • 1 2
 @tacklingdummy: Most robberies are committed by someone that knows the victim so seeing their every detailed post, keeps the perp well informed... And further into the social media thing, not that many bike thiefs are hacking FBs databases, but no computer site based member is safe from information and location unmasking.
  • 3 0
 @jgottya1: Absolute BS. Not in my area of California. Stealing and robberies is a new career since they passed laws to turn stealing into a misdemeanor from felony. Perhaps random strangers that know the target because they have access to the target's private information through devious ways, but the target doesn't know them from Adam.
  • 1 3
 @tacklingdummy: Sorry...absolute fact. I won't go into what i do for whom, but i don't post random BS. It is surely sad that decriminalization has happened for whatever crimes that most of us consider serious. Legislation needs to be lobbied against and voted out. I hate it as much as yourself. No way to control scumbags if not with a heavy hand.
  • 35 0
 Having a secure bike is so much more important these day considering how difficult it would be to get a replacement any time before the end of 2021.
  • 7 0
 I've been thinking the same! "I want to send that drop, but if I break my frame, I won't be able to find another all season!" Haha, silly problems to think about.
  • 3 1
 @bishopsmike: and that's exactly why I have spare bikes available lol
  • 1 0
 @bishopsmike: lmao at first I was worried about getting hurt and having to go to a medical center, now I'm just fearful of breaking a part or heaven forbid a frame. Definitely been taking it easier this year.
  • 33 1
 Don't leave your garage door opener in a car parked outside the garage.
  • 13 1
 On top of this, if your car has a Kuat/One-Up rack on it or your truck has a high end tailgate pad and is parked outside all night, this is a tip off to criminals that there is likely a high end bike in the garage. Park in the garage!
  • 10 1
 @Snowytrail:
What is a high end tailgate pad
  • 34 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: I'm guessing anything more than a Harbor Freight moving blanket.
  • 9 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: Daking/RaceFace... aka not an old blanket/carpet.
  • 2 0
 @Snowytrail: I see your logic... but it would only apply to a bike specific thief, knowledgeable of high end items. I would expect that 1up rack to be attached to a nice ride, parked outside of a nice house as well... all indicators of many nice items to steal.
  • 16 0
 @Snowytrail: Who's got room for a car in their garage?
  • 1 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: anything more expensive than one of those mexican poncho blankets
  • 1 0
 @Snowytrail: Also if you have a One-up buy the locks for your add-ons. I once had someone steal an add-on off mine at a trail head while I was out riding.
  • 1 0
 @Snowytrail: ST...lol..my Kuat has been on my ride for 4 salty winters and most theifs/thrives would feel bad that I was too poor to afford a new rack.
  • 2 0
 @codypup: or room to manoeuvre properly if you have a child and a wife that wants to store useless shite!!
  • 1 0
 @codypup: why have so much crap to not park in the garage/car port?
  • 1 0
 @Snowytrail: let's not forget to cover our cars in huge bike brand stickers. I was at a race when two quite expensive bikes were stolen out of the cab of a pickup. Maybe the huge Specialized Sticker all over the side of it gave away what's inside, but we will never know...
  • 24 0
 I live in Vancouver and there is a new style of bike thief!!!
They lock your bike with their own u-lock!
You show up to your bike and go”WTF”!
You leave to get help and you show back up with your lock cut and bike gone!!!
Now you need to bring your own cordless grinder along with your lock. Alternatively you stay with your bike and call the police but I’m not sure if that will work?
  • 11 1
 Welcome to the year 2000, everyone has a cell phone. Where are you going to get help, make a phone call.
  • 4 0
 That's an ancient bike thief technique!
  • 2 0
 @FunctuonalMayhem: that is so f*#%ed
  • 22 0
 Our bike shop has (had) rentals and they are stolen like hot cakes. We supply every bike with a lock and then tell the customer "Don't lock it up on the DC waterfront, because it'll be gone in a couple minutes." We even put it on their rental contract. I think our first summer we lost 12 bikes and then it went up from there since all the bikes are the same and have the same dinky lock. Bad news is, now the renter is responsible for the full price of the bike, and an Uber ride. Good news is we never have a stale fleet of rentals.

Personally, My bikes stay in the basement, the garage is for tools and work. My wife has asked me to relocate them about 100 times... you'd think she'd learn. I have to explain to her every time that bikes don't like the cold and have to be kept warm and cozy in the basement. My four year old gets it.
  • 27 0
 If you're cold, they're cold, bring them inside...
  • 5 4
 You send customers out with completely insufficient "dinky locks" that you know are going to be defeated by thieves.

But when you get customer's money for the stolen bikes, you just buy another of the same "dinky locks" instead of investing in real locks that won't force your customers to pay for stolen bikes? You'll revamp your contracts knowing the "dinky locks" are insufficient, but won't actually provide sufficient locks?

Well, you aren't doing your customers any favors, but at least you are pocketing plenty of profit from the thefts. Good racket.
  • 7 0
 @r-rocket: Yep. Its clearly stated that there is significant risk of bike theft in certain areas if they leave their bikes there. We tell them safer areas too, but we're clear that bike theft is an issue and the lock that is included in the rental is insufficient to prevent theft in a high risk area.
To be honest most people refuse the lock and leave it at the shop. And we offer some U-locks but they literally never get taken because no one wants to haul a u-lock. We've have some long term rentals that those go with.
It's called personal responsibility. When you sign the contract, you assume responsibility for the bike.
And if we were lining up thievs to steal our bikes back, that would be a racket, we provide a service. If you want to rent a bike that has almost no chance of theft, rent a bike share bike. We provide comfortable, fast, easy peadling, quality bicycles. We tell customers these things, we're honest, it's a foreign concept to most.
When you get caught speeding in a car do you complain that the manufacture made a car that is capable of exceeding the speed limit?
  • 1 0
 Ive found that the best spot is in the garage but in that little utility room with the furnace and water heater. Door locks from the outside and no one will ever know its there
  • 30 5
 Guns!
  • 59 0
 Username checks out
  • 3 2
 [deleted]
  • 8 0
 Dogs!
  • 24 0
 @danny611: dogs with guns!
  • 27 0
 @Mac1987: Sharks with frikin' laser beams on their heads!
  • 10 0
 @Mac1987: or dogs that shoot bees when they bark!
  • 1 0
 Rabid hamsters!
  • 17 0
 WARNING: E-Bikes are considered a motorized vehicle and are NOT covered on the personal property insurance clause of your renter’s or homeowners policy. Get that scheduled separately from your personal property to get it covered.

Literally what I’ve been saying all along...
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the heads up, we're up for renewal shortly - we'll ask.
  • 15 0
 JUST A COMMENT ABOUT FILING AN INSURANCE CLAIM

I had my 2018 Santa Cruz Hightower jacked right off my truck while I was in a store for 10 min. Did all the proper follow up - police report, renters insurance claim, notice out at local riding spot.

Filing the insurance claim was a breeze and they quickly paid out 4k minus the deductible. Great right? One thing they don't tell you about is that insurance companies don't want you filing a claim for bikes like this. Yeah they'll pay it! but I just bought a home and when I went to get home owners insurance, we got denied by state farm because we were considered a 'high liability' after filing a $4k claim for the stolen bike. we managed to get insurance still through another company, but we were just astonished that they dropped us for actually using our insurance. Didn't realize that in some cases, if you use it, you lose it. How does that add up?

Has anyone else had an experience like this?
  • 6 0
 Yes, I can confirm that is a thing.

I haven't been dropped but nearly-so, more of a "no and shame on you for asking" when I wanted to add a specific rider to our existing homeowners' insurance for my bikes. So I went with a 3rd party company and got what essentially amounts to privateer racer insurance. It's about as expensive as the collision insurance on my car once I normalize for the values of car vs bike.
  • 9 0
 Yes! The biggest scam in an industry that is essentially racketeering. You buy insurance to protect yourself like a reasonable person is expected to in the eyes of the industry, then when you suffer an adverse event and use the insurance you are then considered higher risk and may be denied renewal or pay a premium. It’s such a f*cked up industry. We have no fault insurance and providers sell premium plans with “1 free claim”... the accident can be entirely the other persons fault but they argue that obviously you take some action to put yourself at risk and raise rates. If for any reason you ever have a policy cancelled the fact you were cancelled makes you higher risk. Stupid.
  • 12 0
 This is why I hate insurance companies. Give them tons of money and as soon as they have to give a small percentage back, they punish you. It seems like an experience such as yours should be illegal. A service that punishes you for using the service....
  • 4 0
 Yep. I paid for a separate rider on my home policy with RBC insurance for 12 years. The bikes on the policy changed from time to time, but I had an active rider the whole time. My garage was broken into and a bike stolen. They paid out and then when I tried to switch the replaced bike with the stolen bike on the rider they refused because I was high risk. Lucky for me I shopped around and got a better deal with another company.
  • 1 0
 @bikelust: can you share with whom you ended up going?
  • 4 0
 @crsimmons: gangsters are worse than thieves. & rich enough to advertise everywhere. If there were no insurance companies maybe there would be no bike thieves
  • 3 0
 Precisely the same experience!
A bike stolen and two years later a water heater that exploded causing significant water damage to my house, followed by a move and my insurance company, when I called to tell them I was moving, told me they wouldn’t renew my policy. Then calling my bank, because I knew they offered homeowners insurance (ahem... USAA...ahem) said they wouldn’t insure us because of our ‘Risk Profile.’
Pissed af!!!
Needless to say, let your bike sleep inside. Learned that the hard way. Since then none of my bikes have been in the garage.
Also if you have anything happen to your home, less than it burning to the ground or being sucked into oblivion by a tornado, don’t tell your vampire insurance company... your fault or not, it’s ALL your fault.

Btw, Progressive is the original insurance agency. They now have none of my business and they are not recommended in the slightest.
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: yup! It’s a disgusting industry.

They keep raising rates claiming increases in claims costs and legal fees.

They f*cking sue each other to recoup their own costs and then pass that cost on to customers, plus margin.

And when you do put in a claim it’s so over inflated with their “preferred” suppliers. I had an auto claim, their best of 3 quotes was $14k, I had it done for 9k. Once had minor tornado damage and had a quote of over $50k, I fixed and replaced everything under a 1/10th of the quote, less than my deductible.


How anyone can trust these scum bags with the health funding boggles my mind.
  • 1 0
 @pourquois-pas: if I had a family of four in California and no qualifying health insurance, I might have to pay the State USD 2250 annually: www.coveredca.com/learning-center/tax-penalty-details-and-exemptions/penalty. The mental health crisis is more institutional than individual
  • 2 0
 Yes, insurance is a racket.
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: intact, far more friendly. IIRC they covered my bikes without having to pay for a separate rider. Replacement cost not depreciated value.
  • 13 0
 I have the Kryptonite New York Fahgettaboudit, its kinda scary. And 10,000$ in insurance coverage.

Won't really help much if it gets stolen as it will be 2023 before it gets replaced.
  • 11 0
 If you're talking about the "included" insurance policy on many of those Kryptonite or Abus locks and not insurance specifically for your bike through your homeowners/renters insurance or another means, then I have bad news for you: Most of those policies aren't available in Canada even though on the box it says "$10,000 insurance policy!!!"
  • 4 0
 @j-t-g: on top of that you need proof the bike was stolen.. which usually means you need the cut lock plus a police report. Good luck getting the lock company to pay.
  • 1 0
 @j-t-g: no I have separate of house insurance 10k I pay monthly
  • 1 0
 Normal household policy in Ch is covering 100% (minus 200 chf) if the bike is stolen from inside the house (bike room and garage included) or up to 2k chf if the bike is stolen from the outdoors
  • 5 0
 @Dlakusta: just making sure buddy. People buy those Kryptonite locks for their 1000 dollar commuters thinking they're covered and they're not. Gotta look out for the homies.
  • 12 0
 When I was travelling around with my bikes a lot, a big concern for me was that anyone walking around with a few allen keys could easily walk away with thousands of dollars worth of components in seconds. I ended up pouring hot wax into some of the bolt heads with a ball bearing so that you needed a small pick to dig out the ball bearing before you could get an allen key in. Not sure how effective it would be, but I never had anything stolen.
  • 2 0
 If you're okay with it being permanent, epoxy will do the trick & won't allow for theft.
  • 6 1
 @shaun-ridefast-michael: yea, I like to tinker too much. The wax and ball bearing was just to keep the honest people honest
  • 13 0
 2 is set...binding on 3...aaaand it's open.
  • 13 1
 Clicked on the article because of the dog and was disappointed
  • 4 0
 Chewie is the worlds worst guard dog. She will totally disown us for butt scratches.
  • 1 0
 Came here to say this
  • 8 0
 read an interesting article recently saying that if you have a 'One Life Live It' decal on your van/truck/car you are up to 60% more likely to be an absolute twat. Nothing related to bike theft but thought it would flag this.
  • 7 0
 One thing to help improve the odds of not getting your stuff stolen from your home or garage is to not advertise that you've got stuff that a thief wants. I've read interviews with ex-bike thieves who have said that they don't just randomly break into people's garages, they actively look for cars with nice bike racks and break into those garages. Another classic you see in the US is people posting signs to the effect that they intend to shoot people who break in. That's like a bat signal to every tweaker or junkie for miles around saying that this house definitely has stuff you want in it.
  • 3 0
 And they probably also know that 99.9% of these tough guys who say they would shoot a thief would never actually have the balls to kill someone over a bike.
  • 1 0
 @sino428: this year, with bikes being worth more than gold, I’m sure a lot more people wouldn’t have an issue with that.
  • 3 0
 Yea, joke gun signs on your house (protected by smith & wesson, etc) is just letting the tweakers know you have a lot of expensive firearms to steal when you are not home.

Gun thefts are skyrocketing even more than bike thefts.
  • 7 0
 Just a random tip. We don't carry locks but we park the bikes in the easiest gear, then whale on the upshift trigger, if anyone tries to jump on the bikes and ride off they'll get a bunch of crunch, just increases your reaction time. When you get back to the bike just thumb paddle back to the easiest gear and ride away.....
  • 1 0
 Also, on a QR bike, pop the rear QR open and do the @themop 's gear trick, it will eject the rear wheel and jam everything up.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: that's a great tip..... Thru axles man, when will people learn that QR is where it's at!
  • 9 0
 "Secure your rear wheel to the frame with a lock"
Bernard Kerr doing 10 mile stoppie : "Hold my beer"
  • 2 1
 Oh, so he's resorted to gabbing bikes to pay the debt off now? Ouch.
  • 5 0
 Had my bike locked to top of my car with two locks and parked in front of an armed security guard shack at work (I worked at an airport). 9am on a sunny Friday and a tweaker tried stealing it. When an armed security guard isn't a deterrent, I don't know what will be. The thief didn't get my bike but did total the frame and did four grand in damage to my car. Might have been better and cheaper insurance wise to have the bike get stolen. Just sucks that the underlying problem isn't being addressed.
  • 5 0
 This is why I cling to my gas guzzling Suv: tinted windows (usually dirty), no cool "hey I'm mountain biker" (or guitar player for that matter) window stickers. No bike rack.
Keep the bike under a big black blanket inside and it's fairly stealthy. But I'm still nervous leaving it unattended for too long.
  • 2 0
 SUV here too, bikes inside always! I'd love the classic pick up shuttle truck but I just don't trust the bikes on display if I have to stop for fuel or a pee on road trips. Here, motorway service stations are classic thief sites. Vans too, the most robbed vehicles in the UK. because tools thefts mostly. When I'm loading for road trips, I have a long cable that I put through both rear door handles an bikes an make sure its pulled tight so the doors won't open. Not impossible for the pro thieves but another deterent for the opportunist tea leaf
  • 5 0
 Get ball bearings big enough to fit in Allen key holes. Get some hard grease and stick them in the holes. Then use a magnet to get them out when you need access. Won't get any components robbed at least.
  • 1 0
 great idea, i was using clear silicone gel that hardens. remove the gel with a dental pick. takes time. Ill try your idea
  • 4 0
 I live in small town BC and you can literally go to any house, open the front door, and walk in because no one locks their door. People leave 7K bikes unlocked outside the local micro brewery. I bought my house here in 2002 and it didn't come with a key for the front door, I still don't have one. Hopefully this post doesn't alert the criminal world that all of interior BC is rife for the taking.
  • 1 0
 "Kimberley!! Kimberley, powderhoundbrr told us we can come and help ourselves, is that okay?!?!"
Lol, just kidding, Kimberley's awesome and Bootleg Mtn rocks.
  • 3 0
 @powderhoundbrr . You're safe. Thieves are lazy - that's why they are thieves. It's too much effort to drive out all that way when you can just take what you want around you
  • 3 0
 When you renew your insurance make sure to confirm that there haven't been any changes to your bike insurance.

Insurance companies often change the small print (and large print) without informing the policy holder. I always call, take notes and get the name of the customer service person for y'know quality assurance.
  • 2 0
 I will add that you need to review what you've spent on the bike as well - I replaced/upgraded the brakes and dropper on my mtb before it got nicked. I was insured, but those upgrades raised the value of the bike above the insured value, and I lost out on the value of those upgrades.
  • 2 0
 Depending on your location it might not actually matter what the policy says, but instead what you thought you were buying.

I had an issue with rental car coverage through insurance where I thought I had it but lost it due to a change at renewal.

In the end the company still ended up paying for the rental car due to a law in my area that said if I had a reasonable expectation that I was purchasing coverage for xyz it didn’t actually matter if I wasn’t based on the fine print and I was still covered.

www.irmi.com/term/insurance-definitions/reasonable-expectations-doctrine
  • 1 0
 Absolutely! Just spent 45 min on hold with my insurance company - turns out each bike is only covered for up to 6K with a 2K deductible

If I want a special rider, say 10K coverage, $250 deductible, it's $180 for the year.
  • 6 0
 That bike room video is so disturbing. It is so great to know there are high quality citizens like this.
  • 3 0
 Renter's insurance saved my ass when I lived in UT after college. Someone broke a window and swiped my bike and insurance cut me a check for full replacement value of the independent parts on the bike since it was one I had built myself.
  • 3 0
 Not sure if this has been mentioned, but I built a shed in the backyard (to the tune of some $1500) to store anything that I don't want people to see when the drive by the house.
If anyone want's to break into it, they walk by multiple security cameras and two dogs (they're lazy, but better than nothing...).
I figure there are plenty of easier targets nearby.
  • 3 0
 In Germany you can get an insurance for 5€ am month and all your stuff inside the house, garage and even on vacation in the hotel room is covered. I had my bike stolen twice from the basement. Handed in the bills for the bike and all parts that I had changed and the insurance covered it completely. Only issue is, that you have to wait for your money and might not be able to ride in the mean time.
  • 5 0
 my bikes live in my room with me and I don't let them out of my sight if Im out with my bikes!!
  • 2 0
 I have 2 locks for locking the MTB to back of my car, depending on how long I'll be gone. - A cable lock which I trust sight-unseen for 5 minutes - An ABUS hardened steel 92 monoblock lock with hardened trapezoidal chain, which I trust for about 45 minutes. A thief would need to notice the bike and return with an angle grinder to cut the chain or trailer hitch to remove the bike unscathed. I always park in as publicly visible an area as possible and exercise a healthy dose of that bike paranoia while at lunch after a ride. I even lock up my bike while in my garage, in as hidden an area as possible, should a thief actually decide to break in it'll be a nuisance to free up. It takes 15 seconds post-ride.
  • 4 0
 It's unclear if you've done so, but the hitch pin holding in the rack is a major weak point. I had a buddy who had the entire NS rack with 4 bikes on it stolen in just a few minutes. Must of been a team of bike thieves or one very strong dude...
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: Yep, I agree -- the hitch pin needs to be as secure as the rest. 1up's solution is very nice, though you could pick that lock or grind the security pin off.
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: ... the key though is to lock your chain to the hitch or frame, which is what I do, leaving the thief with just the rack if they pick/cut the hitch pin and if they detangle it from the bikes.
  • 2 0
 I welded up a bracket made of 1/4" wall steel and welded it to a surface plate that is welded to my the side of my truck bed.
Then I use a giant chain and cylinder lock that can't be pried open from this website securityforbikes.com/security-chains.php#UltimateSecurityChains (many of their products have a US Distributor I lost the web site but once you decide what you want do a search you might find it in the US).
Then the bike is also semi-hidden in the canopy so at least its not right there in front of you. A nce bike hanging out on a hitch rack always looks so...tempting ?

They claim no bolt cutter can cut it. Obviously an angle grinder can still get through the chain eventually,which would be faster than cutting through the bracket as well.

Cost me almost $400 with shipping as I also bought two locks so I could "noose" the chain and extend it to lock up two bikes.

In fact I always lock up the chain when I remove my bike because I'm half paranoid someone will steal the super nice chain.

Anyway, I found that website super helfpul regardless of which route you go. It will expalin that even a giant chain from the hardware store is not nearly as tough as what they are selling above.
  • 1 0
 bracket is 1/4" wall tubing.

Chain is the 22mm version on that website, and the locks are the "round" locks that leave no exposed surface for prying apart or cutting.
  • 1 0
 @preston67: Focus on the weakest link. Its shocking to me how quickly an angle grinder can cut. I had to cut a cheap padlock and with a hand jitter when I shifted my foot I literally was through before I realized I'd started cutting. The hardened chain is terrific stuff and much more time consuming to cut but... The 1/4" sheet is cake. I cut 1/4" at > 1 foot per minute with my jigsaw. Truck frames are annealed and cut easily with a sawzall.

I use a $120 12mm kryptonite chain to lock bikes to my hitch rack, hitch rack is permanent locktit-ed to the hitch (and would take me a long time to coerce free.) But I recon I could cut the rack (and bike, and lock) all free with angle grinder in about a minute so that is how long I can keep my bike unattended.
  • 2 0
 DO NOT KEEP A GARAGE DOOR OPENER IN YOUR CAR. All a thief has to do is open your unlocked car door, or smash a window (which isn't likely to be heard if it's at night in your driveway or on the curb) to get red-carpet push-button access to your bikes.
  • 1 0
 This literally happened to a mate of mine who insisted on parking his cars outside their double garage. Ended up leading to the car window being smashed to open the garage door, someone getting inside the house and grabbing the car keys and the car disappearing.
  • 2 0
 At least keep it hidden if you do have one. Inside a storage cubby/glove box or down under your seat are good spots.
  • 2 0
 So my laziness in programming the integrated rearview mirror garage door buttons has paid off.
  • 1 0
 I use my phone instead. Like most, it's always with me. GarageMate bluemate.com uses bluetooth (no internet connectivity or subscription), only $50, and the app installs free on however many phones you want. Love it!
  • 2 0
 I had my Enduro SL stolen out of my backyard a long time ago, ended up finding it for sale in the next state over several years later. Met up to “buy” it and the police (who were pretty dismissive and unhelpful overall) found a guy riding my bike and confiscated it, I never actually saw the person that stole it.
I didn’t have my serial number, but luckily I had a flawless memory of each and every part, what colors, how many scratches on each part and where, my police report of my bike description covered the whole page
They changed my tires Frown
  • 2 0
 " If you put a small tracker on the bike that might help too, and some sort of ID hidden in the bike, like a piece of paper saying your name the bike and that it is yours."

A pro thief would strip parts and sell and discover your paper letter of ownership,
clean with solvent to make look shiny and new and remove markings, UV etc,
if discovered with parts proving they came from a certain bike is harder to prove,
whence a more viable option in cash back and minimum punishment,
but assuming all theives are smart.......

Trackers certainly need to be worked on more in the industry, and good locks should have a time code
stating duration taken to break via quickest methods, then perhaps work on improving this time attack code.

When cutting a steel D lock with a cordless angle grinder, why for eg is it not considered to counter
this? If you have a hardened steel outer and an inner core that would jam or swell, grip the cutting disc
( cutting 25mm Aluminium round bar with a steel cutting blade has this effect ) or even roller bars inside,
something that would help in giving extra time,
yeh Ive heard of the nasty smell locks, but them thieves happily live there days in shite.

The best Locks at best in public space should only be trusted for approx 30 secs from moment of
out of site from owner. Always maintain eyeball and short distance from bike, and rack the gear lever
for extra delay, a way to disconect disc brakes would help or lock them on via a caliper lever switch,
to add further delay and give you leg time to catch up with the thieving bastard.

At home keep locked in the house if pos out of sight from windows, if you are unfortunate to
have an intruder s, then you be your own judge when dealing with the situation
and accept the consequences of the law for your chosen actions, generally by default
going the extra mile is not advised.

I'd do a community order or short custodial if my argument of, it was the intruders bat that I picked up
and beat them with was disproven and shown to be mine, thieves play the system so play it back
I say, and the law is not a deterrent they only pick up from the aftermath of the event.
  • 2 0
 Now thieves are stealing bikes then registering them online if the owner hasn't already done so. Even if the cops get them back it's tough for you to prove you own it, so register your bike. I recovered 2 bikes last year by literally following sketchy dudes who did not match their rides, telling them I thought their bikes were stolen and if they left them now I wouldn't call the cops. One dude on a carbon XC bike I chased on my road bike for more than half an hour. Bike thieves are the worst!
  • 2 0
 What I take from this is that the normal ways we have been dealing with bicycle theft are not really working out. As a group of cyclists, we need to make the risk will not be worth the reward We just need to push the equation in the bicycle owners' favor a little. Instead of a Wednesday night ride, host a Wednesday night bike theave beat down. You know leave the 12k Dogma out in front of the pub and when the perp goes to take it...
  • 2 1
 This list shouldn't even have garage ideas on it. It is THE worst place in your home to store your bikes, thieves stake out trailheads and follow you home to come back later and snag it. No locks on your door or bikes are going to stop them. Your bikes deserve better than the dingy garage anyway.
  • 1 0
 I have locks on either side of my garage door. Probably not worth the effort for someone trying to break in.

Velosurance is also a good deal. I can’t stand the owner, but the policy is a good deal and I give him my money anyways
  • 2 0
 My garage has one that automatically deploys when the garage closes. You have to be in the garage to get to the manual override or have a connected door opener.
  • 1 0
 My rack is so old and crusty, I'm the only one who has the magic touch to pop it open. Sometimes I loop a cable around it to make it look secure. Works every time. It's also helpful to get to know your neighbors, people look out for people they know.
  • 1 0
 I tried adding my two bikes to my car and rental apartment insurance policy. The two bikes were more expensive than the car and apartment combined. They said Los Angeles, even if bikes are stored inside, has huge bike theft so the premiums are ridiculous.
  • 1 0
 Don't leave your 5 to 10 thousand dollar bike unattended. Lock or no lock. I lock up my disk brakes on my commuter , won't work as a get away vehicle. Formula had or has a quick disconnect for brake lines. Get away bike with no brakes probably quite entertaining.
  • 2 0
 They still make the quick disconnect! (Tempted to buy that now)
  • 2 0
 I like the suggestions but if they want to steal it they will. I make it A practice to put a photograph of myself with my information inside of the handlebars. Its easy proof that it's mine if it gets recovered.
  • 2 0
 I use zip tie lock to secure helmet whenever I park my commuter for over 2 years now, and so far so good.
(having said that it has some baby blue accents and someone said I look a bit weird in it, so maybe it helps)
  • 3 2
 it was really nice to get thru this article without seeing a bunch of judgy commentary about WHY someone would steal a bike. it's exhausting to see it constantly going on in my local bike trader fb group. idgaf why someone stole a bike, cause it's none of my fuckin business. it is, however, my business to lock my shit up and insure it if it's valuable.
  • 1 0
 I know people who have had bike insurance and had a bike stolen... The bike insurance wanted a police report, and the police wanted the insurance to confirm that the bike was stolen. All before any money would be given out. That's why I store my bike in my bedroom. Can't get it without waking me up
  • 1 0
 dogs for sure and I have a kryptonite new York chain set up and I challenge any thieve to break it. i have had it for 16 years and it has seen all the attempts and the chain and lock system is still winning. just don't loose the keys.
  • 2 0
 just take your bike apart and hide it in different parts of your house/ apartment. This method works especially well with full suspension or break away frames. I may have already said too much...
  • 1 0
 The best bike lock..... Is a beater bike, a bike no one wants to steal. Even the best, strongest locks can be broken VERY easily and VERY quickly. Theres even been instances of thieves cutting the bikes frame to take it for parts. Bike jacking too!!
  • 1 0
 The best security is stealth. Put inside a van that isn’t covered in stickers. And when you lock it up at home in your garage make sure no one followed you back and don’t see you unloading it.

If they donMt know it’s there they cannot nick it.
  • 1 0
 I used to lock up my beater townie with a bungie cord from the handle bars to the front spokes. I figured it would break something nasty within about 10’ of where i parked it and end up with a face injury one way or another. It never got taken far. There was also a big black widow that lived in the seat. I called it the widow maker. I miss that bike.
  • 1 0
 Don’t forget to have you rack locked to your hitch. Have heard stories where people had their bikes lock to the rack, but the hitch rack not securely locked to the hitch. I can just picture a thief driving up, pulling the pin, removing the rack with bikes attached, and putting the rack and bikes on their vehicle and driving away.
  • 1 0
 I keep a 15 year old flashy looking full suspension bike in my garage unlocked in hopes that they will just grab that rather than try to take my locked up expensive bikes. I also use 2 locks, which is twice the deterrent. 3 or 4 if leaving home for a few days.
  • 1 0
 You missed a couple of tips. Add a cheap motorbike brake rotor motion alarm. Difficult to remove and will be an alarm going off either first, or once other locks are tackled. At home add a couple of security cameras covering all angles. Stick a couple outside, deter before they commit. My bikes were ok, other stuff stolen, police recognised offender from footage, warrant raid and caught sorting through our stolen stuff. Back to jail (on bail ffs) then convicted. Occasionally the police have a win.
  • 2 0
 How did Venge Cycle not make the list? I mean, who wouldn't want to ride around with explosives in their handlebars? vengecycle.com
  • 1 0
 HOLY S*** !?! Brings new meaning to “bomb hills”
  • 1 0
 Knowing me, I'd forget about it and due to my ADHD, completely fail to recognize the warning beeps... But, I love the idea as bike theft is becoming a problem where I live
  • 4 0
 My heart sank the first time I saw a cordless angle grinder.
  • 2 0
 YOLO, like that's gonna stop a motivated thief with tools! I had one triple locked up in the 3rd story floor balcony, and the thief made out like Mission Impossible!
  • 2 0
 Hey, what about a bluetooth tracker sticker like a Tile? Does it seem worthwhile? 1 year battery life, replaceable battery, 400ft bluetooth range, $35.
  • 1 0
 Those specs are bull, I had one. More like 10ft an a week for the battery
  • 1 0
 my colleauge lives with someone that trains police dogs, if anyone wants break into his garage to take on 4 or 5 fully grown police alsations and hope they can get the bikes without anyone noticing then good luck to them!!
  • 1 0
 If you put a small tracker on the bike that might help too, and some sort of ID hidden in the bike, like a piece of paper saying your name the bike and that it is yours.
  • 1 0
 Take a picture of yourself
  • 3 0
 Didnt know about the ebike policy. Checking that now. Thanks!
  • 2 0
 Checked and bingo, not covered. Need a motorcycle policy or I get nothing. Even with an umbrella policy in place.
  • 1 0
 Thieves are the scum of the earth. Bike locks aren't susceptible to only brute force attacks. Guess no one is familiar with the lockpickinglawyer channel on YouTube?
  • 1 0
 i am familiar.. . hes a wizard with lcoks
  • 1 0
 @kindern: bit of a Freudian slip there...
  • 1 0
 @kindern: Unfortunately, he isn't alone.
  • 1 0
 There are some decent options out there for security alarms that I think would be a pretty good deterrent if installed in the garage.
  • 1 0
 It would have been cool if that Ankeny Bike Room had doors that automatically locked and trapped the criminals in. That would have been an entertaining video.
  • 3 0
 Dance fucker dance let the MF burn
  • 1 0
 If I’m stopping somewhere for a few minutes, I’ll flip my bike upside down and pull out the thru-axles. Not gonna make it far without wheels!
  • 3 0
 can we get GPS tracker volume spacers please
  • 3 0
 Dude, delete the comment and get it done before someone else does. tup
  • 1 0
 "I’ve known people who’ve had an unsecured bike ripped off the back of their truck at a stoplight in Seattle and in Santa Cruz."

Really?
  • 2 3
 Seems pretty weirdly specific, and downright shitty to draw a line from theft to "substance abuse issues" — whether or not you can rationalize why. Sure, this is probably statistically logical, but seriously. If you had 1 person with these issues in your life you cared about...f*ck a bike man
  • 2 0
 Whatever you do never get the idea in your head the police will help you recover it.
  • 1 0
 Or, lock the bike, hide, and wait for some MF to turn up and steal it. Then give him a clean headshot. Job done. Nobody misses those loosers anyway.
  • 2 0
 Write your ID with UV pen on your bike or engrave it
  • 1 0
 Useless, still worth it to steal the bike and sell off the components without the frame.
  • 1 0
 check the locksmithlaywer on youtube, locks are just to keep the thugs away. but if someone wants to have it, he gets it
  • 1 0
 Those guys left the best bike still hanging on the wall - it's the one closest to the camera - bunch of idiots! LOL
  • 7 9
 The western world has become soft on crime.

If you stole something 40’s years ago most places on earth you still lost a finger or hand. While most just did jail for robbery now the police don’t even care unless someone was hurt.... too many hippies in power. It’s just property mannn let them have it they must need it crowd.
  • 7 0
 What on earth? I would say the same penalties are in place. As a 46 yr old, I don't recall there being much difference.
  • 1 3
 @noplacelikeloam: Spain in the 70’s comes to mind
  • 2 0
 Where is the labradoodle dog?
  • 1 0
 Unfortunately, many of us do not have room in the house for 5+ big ass bikes!! Frown
  • 1 0
 Nobody will steal your bike if it sits in your bedroom when you are not riding.
  • 2 0
 Thought it was gonna say buy a dog and tie your dog to it. Disappointed.
  • 1 0
 In the UK they would likely steal your dog as well. Worth more than high end bikes now and they are getting stolen just as much.
  • 1 0
 Today I learned just how easy it is to steal a bike and exactly how to go about it. Thanks, PB! lol
  • 2 0
 I came to see the dog. Where’s the dog?!?
  • 1 0
 I put my name and phone inside my hollow crank bolt
  • 1 0
 i put my name and phone inside the headset tube
  • 5 0
 I'm a Canadian guy living in Switzerland for the last few years. I used to work in this suburb of Zurich called Dietikon, which has one of, if not the sketchiest train stations. One morning I noticed a Scott genius unlocked, just sitting there. Having moved to Switzerland from Squam, I figured it had about 25 seconds.... I came to grab some lunch, it was still there. I came to catch my train at the end of the day, it was STILL THERE! Now I realise it was a fluke, bit it blew my effin mind! XD
  • 1 0
 as I'm too broke to have a dropper, I put it in my seatpost.
  • 2 0
 @tonydeluxe: I lived in Switzerland as a kid, that doesn't surprise me. I was riding down the footpath once with some friends, and being a distracted 8-year old didn't notice a lamp post until I nearly hit it - I chose the softer option of riding off the kerb into a very new and shiny BMW instead, leaving a 10cm long scratch across the door. Like any good Swiss kid, instead of riding away before anybody saw us, we parked our bikes on their mandatory kickstands and went into the nearby businesses to find out whose car it was! Turned out to belong to the local bank manager. My parents were horrified at the CHF800 bill (it was the early 1980s), but very happy to discover it was covered under the insurance that came with the bike registration fee.
  • 1 0
 Sleep with your bikeWink They'll have to go through you to get it
  • 1 0
 I have the New York Lock/Kryptonite setup. That thing is bonkers
  • 2 0
 Step 1: Hire a sniper...
  • 1 0
 Protect your bike with a baseball bat
  • 1 0
 I bought a van. Bikes go inside. Problem solved.
  • 1 0
 Lock it next to a more expensive bike with a better lock !
  • 1 0
 www.skunklock.com
And hiplock for the front wheel
  • 1 0
 Never stop riding your bike.No one will steal it if you're riding it.
  • 1 0
 Unfortunately bike hi-jackings happen as well.
  • 1 0
 NOTHING WORSE THEN A THIEF!!!! LOWLIFES!!!
  • 1 1
 Any of you ever watch American History X?
“Put your teeth on the curb!”
  • 1 0
 I have a Belgium Malinois that protects my bike. Have fun Thief
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