Pinkbike Poll: How Long Do You Keep Your Bike?

Mar 20, 2021
by Alicia Leggett  
Raaw Madonna V2 review
The RAAW Madonna V2 is about as close to bombproof as a full suspension bike can be.

From those who cycle through a bike each year to those who build bikes with longevity as the top priority, there are countless approaches to buying and keeping or selling a bike. It's easy to be caught up in trying to always have the newest and shiniest things, but with a bit of maintenance and attention, bikes can stay dialed for longer than we sometimes expect.

Brian Park, Pinkbike's head of editorial, recently showed off his RAAW Madonna V2, which he built with a 10-year lifespan in mind. (Though he admits he won't actually keep it for that long.) There are plenty of others out there, too, who put their retro bikes through the wringer at bike parks all summer. We suspect there are lots of you who pick your parts in hopes that they'll last forever, and we want to hear about it.

On the other side of the spectrum, there are those who get free bikes for one reason or another, work in the industry, or are willing to pay for cutting-edge tech, and we're curious about that, too.

How long do you usually keep your bike?



When you do replace a bike, why?




412 Comments

  • 902 24
 I replace my bike when my wife let's me.
  • 1057 39
 Or replace wife with one with updated geometry.
  • 233 17
 You should consult your bike about replacing your wife.
  • 326 20
 There are a lot of folks on this site that need to work on their adversarial relationships with their spouses.
  • 246 18
 @JC47: Speaking from my own life, my wife is (in the most respectful and loving way) like an anti-depressant to me. Never would nor could I ever replace her no matter how good the new geometry is.
  • 100 9
 @fullfacemike: There are many more who ride nice bikes because they don't have wifes.
  • 39 31
 If you can afford it and she won’t let you within reason it’s time to replace her.
  • 33 1
 @seismicninja: congratulations on being happily married! (Cheers emoji I forget how)
  • 80 9
 @fullfacemike: shut up Mike, you sound like my wife!
  • 16 4
 @seismicninja: wow, that was beautifully said
  • 9 3
 @seismicninja: absolutely agree with you there.
  • 19 3
 Not long enough... I sold imy Enduro bike when my new bike was supposed to get here in October/November because I didn't want to have two Enduro bikes in the garage all winter...

New bikes never shown up so I have NONE Enduro bikes in the garage... dangit... Smile
  • 34 28
 @JC47: what’s the STA on your wife?
  • 29 3
 @seismicninja: Agreed 100 percent!
Plus when I think of an ‘updated geo’ wife I think of all the wasted time dating (finding the perfect new bike) and efforts I’d have to put into ‘customizing’ my new ride. Because there’s quirks the old bike had that we’re JUST RIGHT... which the new bike doesn’t have. I.e. 180mm dropper, silent hub etc. that the new bike most definitely wouldn’t have...

Dang it I love my wife and I need to go hug her... maybe even score. PEACE
  • 22 15
 @seismicninja: even with a boosted rear end?
  • 17 18
 @waldog: Why Boost it when she already got booty ????
  • 12 1
 @JC47: lolol...way cheaper to replace the bike!!
  • 33 3
 @seismicninja: she's looking over your shoulder while you're writing that comment.. isn't she.
  • 63 3
 I replace my bike with one of similar colour and ask how she likes the new stickers!
  • 8 68
flag Isaaccop (Mar 19, 2021 at 20:29) (Below Threshold)
 @seismicninja: shut up nerd
  • 12 2
 @Isaaccop: not sure how I am a nerd...
  • 8 49
flag FUbob (Mar 19, 2021 at 20:39) (Below Threshold)
 Sorry. Maybe she'll give yer nuts back someday.
  • 35 3
 If you always buy the same color bike the wife never knows the difference
  • 11 6
 @seismicninja: she's behind you isn't she?
  • 2 12
flag Narro2 (Mar 19, 2021 at 21:44) (Below Threshold)
 @joedave: did u get to score? Razz
  • 9 0
 @seismicninja: made me smile
  • 9 5
 @BeerGuzlinFool: That WAS her writing the comment for him.
  • 1 0
 @tullie: so so true
  • 3 0
 @JC47: whatever you do, just don't use neopos in chasing bottomless feeling...
  • 2 0
 @tullie: Sure. I agree. But go out and buy some nice murdered black bike these days. I dare you!
You are lucky if you get any bike at all. Those beige bikes included
  • 17 1
 @JC47: My wife's geometry is quite slack now anyway so its all good!
  • 1 0
 this
  • 28 1
 I can’t replace my bike as ‘we’ thought it was a good idea to get a new kitchen fitted
  • 7 0
 @McArdle: If it belongs to "us" then feel free to clean and mend your bike in it Smile
  • 3 5
 @danielomeara: I’d be more curious where she is with the head tube.
  • 1 2
 my wife’s geometry and suspension are soo much better and more progressive than on my bike....
  • 4 1
 You tell your wife???
  • 4 19
flag ajl-mtb (Mar 20, 2021 at 6:48) (Below Threshold)
 N+1 should apply to wives too, even if we're not Mormon!
  • 2 0
 @stiingya: Have my wife’s bike “sold” but haven’t sold it cause their isn’t a bike for her to buy now. Damnit
  • 28 0
 Geez leave it to pink bike commenters to dog a guy for loving his wife. Obviously they don’t know what is like to have a good one. Cheers @seismicninja:
  • 4 0
 @dinosaurmonkey: Serotta usd to paint new bikes in identical paint jobs to their owner previous bikes just for that reason.
  • 1 0
 @tullie: you are a smart man
  • 12 5
 Anyone done the old just buy it, leave it in the garage and hope she doesn’t notice trick?

“Wait, why is your bike orange? Was black before.”

“Oh honey, you so crazy!”
  • 10 3
 @PocoBoho: “oh, I just put new grips on it.”
  • 3 0
 I replace my bike when my wife isn't looking
  • 11 0
 My wife read these comments and was everything from amused to NOT impressed. :-)
  • 8 0
 @dinosaurmonkey: Funny, because I just replaced the frame "stickers" on my bmx bike. Now I need new wheels for the new stickers.
  • 1 3
 @seismicninja: was it good?
  • 5 1
 @waldog: I like superboost rear
  • 7 0
 @dorkbike: I replace my bike when the wife says "we're getting new bikes", it is a dangerous situation but I love that she's taken so fondly to the sport.
  • 32 60
flag eldsvada (Mar 20, 2021 at 11:11) (Below Threshold)
 @brianpark
You really need to start moderating these kinds of comments, at no other place on the internet I visit do I find so much misogyny as the pinkbike comment section. No wonder there's so few women here...
  • 36 22
 @eldsvada: Who lit the fuse on your tampon?!
  • 3 4
 Replace bike with one same colour.. simples... wifey no wiser..
  • 18 35
flag eldsvada (Mar 20, 2021 at 11:54) (Below Threshold)
 @Perra: I'm not sure I understand the question, as far as I know tampons don't have a fuse?

(The string in the end is ment for easy removal, you really shouldn't light it on fire. You could end up hurting yourself badly)
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: Was it a Pole? Took 7 months for mine to show up.
  • 3 0
 My wife is going on the trails as well and we watch DH worldcups together. She just doesn’t drink beer.
  • 2 27
flag likeittacky (Mar 20, 2021 at 14:24) (Below Threshold)
 When your at the top of the list but receive less up-votes than others responding to your post LOL

Kinda like the fraudulent presidential elections, and the winner is ????
  • 20 1
 @likeittacky: fraudulent = my candidate lost
  • 3 0
 @pakleni: I ran into that problem September last year and I came home with 2 bikes so she would feel better
  • 3 2
 Normally just make sure new bike is same colour as the old one, and she's none the wiser
  • 1 0
 @dinosaurmonkey: is that gaslighting tho
  • 1 0
 @hhdh: so close! =)
  • 1 1
 you need a new wife
  • 18 2
 Try finding a woman to marry where the the words "let me" don't exist. She's not your mom.
  • 1 0
 This!
  • 2 22
flag likeittacky (Mar 20, 2021 at 17:42) (Below Threshold)
 @ReformedRoadie: FYI knuckle head, i don't participate and drink the cool aid; i just keep up with the circus of shenanigans. filtering out the non-credible folly and erroneous narrative being propagated, then forced upon society.
  • 9 0
 I replace bikes like I replace drums.

As long as they are the same colour, you’re gold.

DO NOT CHANGE COLOUR !

Unless of course it affects family finances, at which point bikes are of no importance.
  • 10 0
 @likeittacky: Tucker, is that you?
  • 3 1
 @seismicninja: have you tried the new geo?
  • 2 0
 @escy44: As long as the bottom bracket isn't so low that it drags on rocks.
  • 2 0
 That's why my bike is always black. She never knows when I upgrade.
  • 3 3
 @Groov-E: haha. This! My wife didn't notice when my frame went from aluminum to carbon and I doubt she'll notice when the 2018/19 frame becomes a 2021 next month. It's a good thing they continue to make a grey Sentinel.
  • 8 5
 @eldsvada: The downvotes just underline that you're making a valid point.
  • 1 1
 @stiingya: Well, wifey bought a new bike this afternoon. After tax and the money she’ll make from selling her old bike, she’s out of pocket...$234 after what she had budgeted. She kinda had to buy it. Used bikes her size on PB, pretty non existent. New bikes around town, none in stock, all back ordered. Size small, 27.5, one in town that she bought today. Higher spec’d than we/she was looking for but didn’t really want to wait til June for manu’s to possibly start shipping. Plus, when you spread out the cost over the next... at least 4 years she’ll own it, unless she totally hates it which I can’t see coming off a 2012 with 100mm front and back travel, she’ll get her money’s worth. Just didn’t want to keep looking, procrastinating. Thanks Biden!
  • 1 3
 @JC47: beware, as with all new technology or geometry it comes at a higher maintenance cost, but as long as the ride is good and you walk away with a smile on your face and love looking at your new ride it will be worth every cent.
  • 11 3
 Life lessons of a married mountain biking man.

1-When changing a bike out, try to purchase a bike that is of similar colour to the previous bike.
2-if you have a complete colour change, try and hide the latest purchase for a minimum of 3 months. When it’s cover is blown by the good lady, you can state it’s not brand new and more importantly, you can’t take it back....
3-ALWAYS refrain/dodge from telling your good lady what you spent on the bike. If you lie and underprice it, she could well sell it for the RRP you told her
4-NEVER COMPARE THE QUANTITY OF YOUR BIKES TO THE NUMBER OF SHOES AND HANDBAGS the wife owns............

If your wife is a mountain biker as well, be aware you are living in the “unicorn zone” of relationships. You MUST socialise with your wife at as many biking events as possible, just so your friends believe that she exists.
  • 5 0
 @2-1RacingUK: I count myself extremely lucky as my wife and I are both mountain bikers. Only issue is that each time I get a new bike, she gets to get a new one, too!
  • 2 8
flag lkubica (Mar 21, 2021 at 6:13) (Below Threshold)
 @2-1RacingUK: My wife rides mtb and still would be mad if I bought a new bike. Women are simply not gear-centric and can't understand the joy of spending $5k on a bike instead on some nice shoes and bags.
  • 1 0
 @lightsgetdimmer: "after tax".. can you please explain to me this whole tax thing in the US? So, the price that I see online is not the final price? How do I get the final price? How big is the tax?
  • 1 0
 @JC47: and you thought updated bike geometry was expensive...
  • 2 0
 It always pays to find a bike with a similar color scheme as the last.
  • 2 0
 My hand is raised. Tip...try 'Updated geometry is safer Honey.'
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: nope, the price you see online is not the end price you pay. In my town, in Colorado, we pay a city tax. It’s is like.....8.5% of the total price of the bicycle. My wife’s bike was $3,899 US dollars. Plus the 8.6% city tax(this is a rather high % as I live in a mountain town, in the big city’s, not in a mountain town, city tax is more around 5%) the total price to buy the bike was like $4230. The tax was like $330
  • 1 0
 @lightsgetdimmer: So you are saying that people in rural areas are paying more taxes?? I don't know what to say about that.
I thought there is some kind of federal or state tax equal for everyone
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: Sales taxe in the United States vary from county to county.
  • 1 0
 I've only sold bikes cause my wife told me we need the money. We're separated now and she has apologised but I keep them as long as possible. Wish I had my 1982 Mongoose supergoose racing bmx. They are worth a pretty penny now.
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: it depends on the state. Each state has a choice on wether or not to charge sales tax and at what rate. So yeah, after tax...
  • 1 0
 @fullfacemike: LOL! You'd think! While the reality is that a large purchase ($5k+) always needs approval from the spouse.
  • 1 2
 @seismicninja: Totally agree. When I want to replace a bike I discuss it with my wife and budget for the added expense over a period of time like a normal person.
  • 1 0
 @JC47: you could always build a new wife better then the one before
  • 1 0
 @Krzymndyd: I always struggle with figuring out if I should buy the complete build wife, or buy the frame and then get the parts I want on a custom wife. I'm really particular about the parts spec and set up Wink
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: Not all rural areas pay more tax than urban areas. Really, taxes are all over the boards here. It’s a pretty confusing and fuked up situation all around. Federal tax is one thing and state tax is another and both are not the same “rate” if you will. Some states have no sales tax at all and all the other states taxes vary. Oh yeah, there is county tax too! Come on over and try to figure it out! You’ll go blind trying to make heads and tails of it. Hahaha, not funny though.
  • 2 0
 @lightsgetdimmer: Yep. Some states also have no income taxes and sales tax varies from county to county. For many years California people would buy big ticket items in Nevada (cars, appliances, etc) and pay no sales tax. I think the car loophole may be closed somewhat not but when I bought my YT there was no tax bc the office was in Reno NV. When they moved to SoCal we all had to pay sales tax....
  • 1 0
 @korev: haha I’d love to see her face as I’m putting a greasy drivetrain on the quartz tops
  • 1 1
 @likeittacky: You have to remember that this is a website based in a country where you can go to jail for calling your own daughter "she".
  • 2 0
 EXACTLY! no answer can beat this one if you're married....
  • 1 0
 @nozes: There are many more who ride nice bikes because they don't have "NICE" wifes. - Fixed it for you Wink
  • 260 2
 I ride my bike until I meet a newbie to the sport that could use a bike to fuel their fire for the sport. I then give them my bike and use my new sense of pride to justify buying a sweet new rig for myself. It’s not science, but it works.
  • 76 0
 That's wholesome as hell.
  • 22 0
 Respect
  • 39 0
 My wife rides but pretty casually, probably because she doesn't want to go solo and I have a hard time keeping it in her comfort zone. I gifted an old ibis HD to a friend of hers last year and she loves riding so much it gets my lady out more too. Win-win.
  • 11 0
 This is the way. I donated wheels/brakes/almost new drivetrain to a friend so that they could build their first bike. I got to upgrade some parts and I gained a new riding buddy, win/win. If we rode the same size bike he would have gotten the whole thing. This is a *huge* factor when it comes to motivating me toward a new bike, because geo and suspension has become quite good and leaves me not wanting for anything when it comes to the type of riding I do.
  • 5 0
 That is such an awesome thing to do, St Homas.
  • 5 0
 My brother-in-law is just about to get my old rig Smile Can't wait to see the look on his face.
  • 9 0
 @Elbowgrease153: almost out of place in the PB comments
  • 7 0
 This is amazing. My brother is about to give my other brother a really nice dirt bike. A few of us can afford to pitch in for the cause. The receiver is a hard worker and can’t afford much. It will be life changing and I’ll have another riding buddy!
  • 6 4
 I find it hard to believe that you just give your whole bike away to a new rider out of the goodness of your heart. I've given my fair share of new and used bike parts to my young coworkers over the years but I would never just give away an entire bike. I'm a bike mechanic, not a millionaire.
  • 2 0
 That’s exactly what I am doing as well. Benefit Bros!!
  • 2 0
 I am not a good enough rider to notice the difference to justify buy a new bike whenever a new geometry comes out.
  • 3 0
 Shockingly righteous!
  • 4 0
 @seraph: Maybe he is a millionaire ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Idk how true it is but hey it's nice to think there are truly nice/ generous people out there
  • 4 0
 @seraph: I don't know, I have done that as well with an old bike, 10 years old stumpy, and i'm no millionaire. Wouldn't have sold it for more than a few hundred dollars. Thought I'd give to my friend's son who needed a bigger/better bike. Felt better than struggling to find a buyer!
Old bikes are not worth a lot...and I think it is kinda fair to give back when you can buy bike stuff for cheap working in a bike shop Smile
  • 11 1
 @seraph: I've done that, gave my hard-tail to an Afghan refugee who was doing volunteer work with us because our government wouldn't let him do paid work on the bridging visa he was on as an 'illegal' (so-called) immigrant. Guy had worked since he was 12 and didn't know how to be idle, but our government wouldn't let him work because it was politically convenient to label him as a welfare sucking illegal 'boat person' economic refugee coming here to try and steal Australian jobs, despite having invaded his country and leaving his home area controlled by murderous war-lords instead of a murderous oppressive religious regime. He hated taking charity and refused to take the bike until I convinced him it was in return for the volunteer work he was doing for us.
It was an older bike, but top of the line XC race bike in its day, Easton ultralite frame, SRAM 9.0SL shifters, XTR cranks, Hayes mag brakes, Sun DS1 wheels, Answer Taperlite cockpit, Manitou Black Ultimate fork.
  • 87 7
 I sell my bike every year because my LBS gives me good prices because I buy a new bike every year, which means I can sell a good bike at a good price and the changeover cost is less than a new drivetrain, which is what I'd need if I kept it two years. I get nearly nothing for a five year old bike, so five years of minimal changeover is about the same as the cost of a new bike, so I'm not just breaking even financially, I'm getting a new bike every year too. Try it - your LBS will love you for it.

Edit: This doesn't work for high-end bikes. There a few people who want to pay $7k for a second-hand bike, but plenty who will pay $3k for a bike that retailed for $5k for which you only paid $4k (whatever, but you get my drift).
  • 38 0
 Where’s this bike shop?
  • 71 1
 @SHREDWORX: One of those upside down places.
  • 2 1
 @Bob-Agg: I see what you did there
  • 2 0
 Awesome you got the hookup
  • 4 0
 If I had a hookup like that I would 100% do the same.
  • 4 0
 @Canuker: yep, hookups are really well protected in the bike industry compared to other action sports. The bike shops and the manufacturers are tight.
  • 42 6
 I wouldn't quite describe it as a 'hookup', it's just being a good customer. Buy everything from the same shop, wear their jersey, send customers to their store, go on the group rides, and don't ask for discounts. I think buying online is a false economy in the long run and you can't get a brake bleed online. I've never been riding with a website. Obviously this requires cash up front and maybe make a loss for a year or two, but you gotta be in it for the long haul to make it work. It's all about building that relationship. The goal is a low changeover cost for every new bike.
  • 5 2
 similar situation, but I do get the $10k bike and ride it less than a year. You are dead on about reselling said high end bike. You have to break it apart and sell it. I can easily take an 8 month old $10K bike(that cost me $6k), sell all the pieces seperately, and walk away with $7500. as a complete bike, you would struggle to get $5500.
  • 9 3
 Seems like a good deal for you. But I now have my Capra for 5 years. After 7000 km I changed my cassette and the chainring for 80 bucks. of course I used a few chains over the lifetime of the cassette but how do you need to replace a whole drivetrain after 2 years? Do you smash your derailleur into things a lot?
  • 16 6
 @bashhard: you get that some people have $500 cassettes, right? also, plenty of people put 7000km on a bike in a year.
  • 3 0
 @bashhard: It also depends on the conditions you ride in. A mix of bad conditions (wet, muddy) and certain soil destroys the drivetrain.
  • 14 0
 @conoat: It was not mainly about the price of a cassette. He said he needs to get a new drivetrain, which is more than just a cassette, chainring and chain. And I wonder how one has to replace a whole drivetrain after two years if you look after it a little
Also, on a 5k dollar bike, you definitely won't get a 500 dollar cassette
  • 5 1
 @bashhard: got my new Transition Sentinel past August, 8months and I've already done 3200km, and that's because I also use the hardtail a lot. I'm currently on my 4th chain. If you wait to change your chain at 7000km you better change cassette and chainring too. Get yourself a chain length measurement tool and check your chain often, don't let it pass the 0.75. You will get lot more life from your drivetrain if you change your chain more often. That said, I live in Ireland and most of the year we ride in muddy conditions that destroy the drivetrain. I used to live in Malaga, Spain, dry and dusty conditions, I could use a chain up to between 1500-1700km instead of just 1000km here in Ireland.
  • 3 0
 @elyari: That's quiet a lot.
Yeah I do change my chains when they get too long and I rotate between two of them to keep the wear on the cassette minimal. I think I went through 4 or 5 chains with the last cassette.
  • 4 0
 @iamamodel: well at a minimum you got a good shop. I don’t have the money to risk buying new bikes every year with the hope I eventually get a discount. It is what it is, we make the decisions that make the most sense for us personally. Even though I don’t know you I am glad you got the hookup. Just don’t know that you can apply your experience across the board like it is some standard. I think if a lot of people did what you did they would never see a discount. But I honestly have a blast riding my 2014 bike. It was pretty ahead of its time and still works great.
  • 1 0
 @bashhard: I don't get this either. It must just depend on what you ride. Somehow my drivetrains tend to outlive the frames they're bolted to...
  • 4 0
 @bashhard: Fair point. When I said drivetrain, I meant cassette, ring, chain, and of course I'm replacing cables etc. I'd call cranks and derailleur etc. a group. Sorry about the confusion. Please don't nail me on my numbers because I'm being conceptual, but I've been doing this for over ten years and I do the maths too and it works. Generally in a year I'm only up for rear brake pads, three chains, and some tyres. But if I keep it for two years, the costs go up while the resale goes down and it is the loss of resale value that comes with age which makes my method a winner for me, and also makes me a good customer which can be priceless. My changeover cost is generally the price of new parts as the changeover cost increases with the cost of the bike. I had a changeover one year of only $400, and I've had a changeover of about $1500.

My method works well for those companies that bring out year models early, so I can be selling a 2015 model bike in the year 2015. My Santa Cruz Bronson is Mk3 so it became out of date half a year after I bought it. Mind you, I love it and will keep it, it is my XC race bikes I'll churn yearly and I put big miles on them and they don't take as much of a bashing as my enduro bike. I'm also lucky I'm a medium so I have maximum chance of finding a buyer. Someone who is XXL or XXS is going to struggle.

@conoat You nailed it - I'm doing 7k a year and paying $500 for the cassette. Due to COVID, I'm about to spend a grand on consumables I wouldn't normally be buying and will be selling a two-year old bike instead of a one year old bike. First world problems.

@elyari Exactly. I've got four chains that get swapped regularly, and when the ring teeth look like shark fins, the drivetrain is toasted.

@iantmcg Sure, it won't work for everyone. I just wanted folk to know that there's a good chance that they can get, say, a new $5k bike every year but it may only cost them $1k per year. There's a perception on PB that only dentists can afford a new bike every year, but it isn't true. If you have a 2014 bike then you are up for a new bike soon. Once the demand and supply weirdness due to COVID dies down (no-one is doing deals at the moment because demand is high and stocks are low), have a chat with your LBS and see what they can do. Maybe take a few other riding buddies or someone who wants to get in to the sport and see how you go. A bike shop has overhead in putting bikes on the floor and storing them. Imagine how happy they would be if they could sell five bikes at once, and you all know what model and size you want. That's free money for the LBS without the overhead of storage or floorspace or hours of staff time selling bikes. And if you don't want to buy new, I'd start saving your pennies because some of the people who got into MTB due to COVID will lose interest and my guess is that will be a good supply of barely-used second-hand bikes for sale by the end of the year.

I posted not to flex but to give an idea for those of you that think a new bike is impossible. Have a think about it. I'd love to hear from a shop owner too.
  • 3 0
 @iamamodel: I'd also speculate that 66% of riders of the highest-end rigs are on Bro-Deals.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: Bike industry is stuck with the low supply for the next 4-5 years. Many brand are going to change the "new year model" concept for "generation" bike, because they can no longer build and sale a bike within a bike season. So buying and selling your bike the same year won't be so relevant anymore. In my opinion, buying new bike is just for the joy of having it out of the box. A bike isn't new after the first ride. By swapping bike every year for a new one you end up riding stock component of a mid range bike only. The other option is to buy a bike either new or second hand, take good care of it with proper maintenance and doing some great upgrade here and there to ride a sweet bike perfectly tuned to your riding style. But it's worst it only if you can feel the difference between like a TRP Quadriem brake versus a code one, or a Fox performance elite instead of just an Elite.
  • 1 0
 I do 7000 km a year. I also buy close to top end spec every year. Breaking them up is where it’s at. My loss is minimal and any part that I am particularly fond of, I hang onto. My 76mm rise pro taper bar is on its third bike and my galfer 223mm rotor is on its second bike. I’m pretty happy that I got my bikes last year before the full shortage hit. I feel pretty lucky that I got what I wanted. I’m sure I’ll be hanging onto them for a couple of years. Lucky I have enough spares to get me through any of the usual breakages, and even some of the less common ones.
  • 68 2
 Californian here...what’s a bike “season”?
  • 7 1
 As someone who used to live in Florida, I have the same sentiment. It was always riding season the entire year.
  • 31 1
 The 9 months of the year where CA has nothing but blown out dust and chunder and everywhere else gets a couple monthly thunderstorms to keep the dirt good. Then we get excited about 3 months of "hero" dirt if it rains during the winter and everyone else goes skiing.
  • 8 2
 @laksboy: You say that like it's a bad thing...
  • 2 0
 30+ days at Northstar. That'll put a full "season" on any bike
  • 26 0
 Brit here: It's a period dictated by the overall riding conditions. There are three: Dry Season (happens about twice a year), Muddy Season (normal) and Bog.
  • 2 1
 @neologisticzand: same here in Bavaria, we have different conditions however. Sometimes you need to dress up more, sometimes less.
  • 21 0
 @Muckal: What, like sometimes lederhosen, sometimes a dirndl and other times just keep it casual in shorts?
  • 36 0
 @Linkpin: Dirndl usually from April to Oktober for ventilation and Lederhosen for the rest of the year.
What is this 'shorts' you are talking about? Is that suitable for breakfast with Weißwurst and Weissbier?
  • 2 1
 @Linkpin: Got a good chuckle out of that, cheers
  • 1 0
 @laksboy: SLO is that bad, now? I don't belee dat Blatant Localism
  • 1 0
 In California you just skip all the shitty season. Who want to live in Texas?!?
  • 1 0
 @suspended-flesh: I miss real seasons, powder as opposed to cement, good dirt all summer long, and even riding in the snow. But yeah, we certainly don't have it bad here and the locals think there's no better place on earth because they've never been further than Bakersfield. Uncrowded rowdy loose dusty trails for days, always 68-70 degrees F, and a shuttle service! Could be worse.
  • 55 0
 I replace it when it breaks, either a crack or full on snap. The reason is because it's either unsafe or I can't ride it.
  • 29 0
 I replace stuff when it breaks...and it always breaks.
  • 4 4
 Ride steel and you can get it fixed easily and cheaply (I hear the same is possible with carbon).
  • 7 0
 @fartymarty: correct, carbon is very repairable. I've had a few bits patched up and they've been good as new.
  • 2 0
 @fartymarty: but how would you get the late and great then?
  • 3 0
 @Muckal: There's a shop within a two hour drive of me that will update the geometry on a steel bike if you wanted to! Need new rear spacing? They'll do it. Need a slacker HTA? They'll do it! Need a custom fab part? They'll do it, but that part won't be cheap, but repairs and geo changes are
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: I have an old steel hardtail, and the down tube has been replaced. My aluminum and carbon frames have all been warranties with carbon frames. When these are out of warranty, I’m not sure what I’ll do? I certainly won’t be able to afford a new bike...if any are available.
  • 32 0
 Poll options sucked.

Not everyone sells old bikes. Some just keep them and hang them in the garage, or hang just the (often broken) frames in the garage and build off a new frame or sell parts if new frames aren't compatible.
  • 4 0
 Exactly. I only keep the ones I like though and sell the ones I get fed up with. The cx had to go last year.
  • 4 0
 Yeah, there should be a swapping option. I have seen loads of people doing that over the past few years.
  • 8 0
 Selling a bike is a pain in the ass and I grow too attached to them after breaking bones and racing and epic adventures. Would you trade your dog or cat in for a new model?
  • 1 0
 I’ve never managed to sell a bike. Have my first few in a my parents garage and then 3 stashed around the house. But I’ve only had 5 mtbs in 20 odd years and 1 commuter bike going strong for 14.
  • 26 0
 When you're constantly swapping parts (wheels, drivetrain, cockpit, suspension) where do you draw the line for a "new bike"? Does new frame = new bike? If I swap my 120mm fork for a rigid and skinnier tires with a single speed, to me that's a new bike for cheap.
  • 64 0
 The bike of Theseus.
  • 7 0
 @shagolagal: white vision, is that you? You left to go hide in the pb comments?
  • 6 0
 My bikes are also like a revolving door with parts moving on and off it - changing and upgrading until its what I need for what I'm riding. My HT has had so many iterations I've lost count and that's 6 years old and not getting sold.

Plus I don't get why you would replace the whole bike if say only the drive train needs doing. Surely if you like the bike you want to keep it. If you don't like the bike why did you buy it in the first place?
  • 1 0
 @shagolagal: you beat me to it. Absolute gold
  • 3 0
 My bike is like Trigger’s broom, but you’d have to be a Brit of a certain age to get that.
  • 23 1
 I get free shit but I work with brands that are ok with me not replacing stuff just for the sake of it. I'm all for living a sustainable life and the most sustainable thing is to not buy new shit.
  • 6 4
 But isn’t it also sustainable to sell your bike to someone in order to keep them from buying a new bike? Or I guess it’s same/same... either they buy a new bike or you do. Personally I rather it be me with the new bike.
  • 18 1
 I keep trying to get on the in-industry-new-bike-every-year train but I build pretty much all my bikes frame up to be exactly what I want and my preferences don't change hardly at all from year to year. ... and neither do the bikes.
  • 10 0
 I’ve only ever replaced a bike when one was stolen, and its replacement was bought with the insurance money I got afterwards. Otherwise I have a perfect track record of holding on to, repairing, upgrading, and riding them... my main bike is over 25 years old now, and will probably outlast me.

But the question is, if nearly every component on a bike has been replaced multiple times throughout its life, is it still the same bike?

On a related note: To all the companies that still manufacture and sell 26” wheels, tires, quick releases, 1” stems, skinny handlebars, 5 bolt chainrings, 27ish diameter seatposts, forks with v-brake / canti brake posts, cable brake levers, etc., THANK YOU from the bottom of my heart! If you’ve kept a bike as long as I have, it’s no longer just a bike... it’s practically a pet or family member (who still needs love).
  • 14 5
 I am still very happy with my Ripmo v1, in fact I will say it's a better bike than v2. Companies are starting to go too far with head angles that average users don't need. Right now I say my bike is perfect and I hope you all can say the same thing.
  • 34 1
 comon bro you live in aberta
  • 6 3
 For sure. Last summer I pulled the trigger on a 2020 Meta am 29 and I'm really glad I went with the older frame design. It's the first bike I've owned where I genuinely can't think of anything I'd change. To each their own, but the super long and slack am bikes are not my cup of tea.
  • 14 1
 Industry: How much can we increase bike prices?
  • 10 0
 I’m poor and I ride hard so I spend money where it counts and try to get every pennies worth. Been trying to kill my 2013 glory since 2016 and that thing loves every beating.
  • 9 0
 Those were some hard questions.
The answers have changed over the years. I spent 10 years in the industry, allowing access to the latest and greatest tech. Life expands (wife, children...) and budgets tighten. 2020 brought a new bike to the garage that I am stoked about and a tween who wanted to rip with dad. Go back 2004 to the last new bike that I still ride today. It also pulled the kids around in a trailer. Lastly there is the dj bike. This one is real old, 2001 z1 drop offs, profile racing cranks (25+years) and a collection of junk keeping it rolling. New parts have been added over the years when needed.
I would say I am nostalgic there is a Free Agent Rick Thorn Stiletto the boy rides and an original Kona humuhumunukunukuapua'a modded with a rear disc brake for my daughter.
Keep them clean, tinker constantly and they last a long time, " sit down, shut up and peddle"
  • 9 1
 I buy quality used / like-new / new-but-past-season bikes so I can basically get 2-3 bikes for the price of one 'brand new'. Ride them 3-5 years, then donate them to local kids-on-bikes programs and junior racing development programs for kids who want to race but can't afford a bike of their own.
  • 10 1
 The sheep have been sold. It's no wonder the bike industry continues with the gimmicks. Just go ride your bike people. If you're a good rider you shred on any rig....PERIOD.
  • 7 0
 I used to get new bikes every year. It was just a hustle on the used market. Buy a bike a few years old, ride it for the summer, sell it for near what I paid and find something a year or two newer. In 2018, I bought a brand new bike and have been riding it since. I almost sold it last year so I could pickup something newer. Decided the geo is still similar enough to the newer bikes I'm looking at and decided to just upgrade components.
  • 7 0
 I'm still riding a 2013 Nukeproof mega, except that the only original bits of it are the frame and the seatpost clamp. I seem to always be able to replace the part that breaks with a slightly better (more shiny) part, but I never seem to have enough to replace the whole bike. At this point my bike has all of the parts I would want on a new bike on it already. The geometry still holds up pretty well and never feels like it's holding me back. The only thing that could be considered old is the frame and the fact that the wheels are only 26" and therefore completely un-rideable (/sarcasm).
How many parts do you need to replace on a bike for it to be considered new?
  • 7 0
 It's honestly encouraging to see that the vast majority of us keep a bike 3 or more years. The internet echo chamber would have you believe that it's normal to upgrade every year, or two if you're poor... Meanwhile, some of us plan to never buy a brand new bike again! Why would I do that when I could keep the cashflow more manageable by upgrading the components I want over time and replacing the frame only as necessary?
  • 7 1
 I find most bikes are poorly designed and have annoying quirks/issues. Usually I find enough unsolvable problems and then get annoyed and sell the bike and find one that seems like it will maybe have less quirks. I’d love if my bikes lasted 2-3 years, but usually it’s 6-12 months.
  • 7 1
 Have you tried zip ties or e-tape?
  • 9 0
 Why can't Ichose 0,1° steeper head angle?
  • 22 1
 We also need an option for "I don't get enough pedal strikes on my current bike".
  • 3 0
 Or 1/4" wider hub.
  • 5 1
 #1 reason for new frame: i love trying out different suspension designs and different manufacturers

#2 reason for I take immaculate care of my rides but occasionally I break one...or destroy it via dents and or cracks...which sucks I love riding and love my rides so when it happens it's a bummer...

My new to me ride 2nd ride dented the hell out of the swing arm, launched into a rick chutes and caught some rocks bad...was fastest way through by far bit came at a price...I'd do it again...

But I love bikes, love new designs, love trying out new rides and seeing how they fit.my style....
  • 4 0
 For years I did the following both while working in the industry for several years after I moved into other work: rolling upgrades on my build as needed, all top shelf and fairly particular. Every 1-2 years I buy the cheapest carbon model possible at a discount, take the parts off and put them on my old frame and sell it for what I paid for the new discounted bike. My only cost was keeping my build up to date, though I REALLY hate new standards as a result of doing this for a while. I just bought my first all new bike in like >15 years (druid i put together). It was pretty neat to ride something entirely fresh, but also odd.
  • 2 1
 This is the way. Move top quality wheels, brakes, suspension, onto ~slx models and sell after 1.5 chains.
  • 4 0
 I have most of the bikes I've ever bought. By the time I upgrade the old ones are near worthless on the used market. My '94 Kona Cindercone is now an occasional tourer and commuter bike. My 2007 Giant Anthem is my winter training bike. My 2013 Stumpjumper went to my wife. Loving my 2020 Trek Remedy. Bikes are so good these days.
  • 6 1
 I really do not enjoy selling thing online. I don't like packing things to ship. I don't like the post office, UPS, or FedEx shops. So, I keep my bikes basically forever. Now I have too many.
  • 3 0
 I had a 2005 Ellsworth Joker that I purchased from Tony in 2001, broke 5 years later. Tony swapped me out with a new 2005 frame, and gave me a neat cnc'd shock spacer so I didn't have to buy a new shock right away. (the 2005 frames were 7" travel, the original was 6"). I re-invented the bike built on that frame 4 times, or so, Until I got it right where I wanted it. It was a really forgiving but sturdy 7" single pivot bike w/ a 170mm Lyrik - it practically forced me to charge it right through drops I never woulda dreamed of taking on any other of the FS Bikes I had. Just about 2 years ago I let it go to a younger friend of mine, and now he's in the process of turning into a 27.5/ 26" mullet. It should be a real nice change, too.
I still miss that bike, but I know it went to a good home.
  • 4 1
 My History of bikes Raleigh Mustang 1990. Sold Carrera Katalyst 1994. Sold Rock Rapids 1995. Stolen Trek Fuel ex7 1998. Stolen Twister 2000. Given to friend Whyte 19 2001. Still own Ellsworth Moment 2004. Still own Trek 4300 2007. Sold Norco Bigfoot 2010. Given to friend Lapierre Zesty 2012. Still own FireEye Flame 2015. Current commuter BTR Ranger 2018. Waiting for clean up Canfield Nimble 9 2020. Current main bike
  • 2 0
 Might make BTR Ranger my next hardtail. When I have several thousand expendable funds. Years from now. Someday maybe I hope. Nice collection you've had there, some cool bikes.
  • 2 0
 @TheLoamDeranger: Thanks very much, the Ranger is the an awesome bike but I kind of wish it was a 29er instead of 650b. Plus I didn’t realise how heavy it is until I rode the Nimble 9, I’ve just got in from a 28 mile ride and I have no back pains or sore shoulders like I get when I ride the Ranger that far. Of all the other bikes the Ellsworth was the most comfortable going downhill and the Norco was probably my favourite do everything bike.
  • 2 0
 @Heywood165: 29er is good advice, thanks. I've only ever ridden 27.5, so I'd be inclined to go that route, but can give 29 a try.

My list of bikes isn't too impressive, mainly because I tend to keep them forever:

'99 Gary Fisher Sugar 3
'02 Santa Cruz Heckler
'15 Santa Cruz Chameleon (many upgrades, still ride it)
'18 Mondraker Foxy XR

Back in the early 2000s I lusted after those Ellsworth bikes so much, but ended up going SC with the Heckler. Wish I still owned it!
  • 2 1
 @TheLoamDeranger: it’s still a pretty good selection over the years. I’m surprised the Sugar wasn’t 29er, I thought Fisher was one of the main people pushing big wheels even though the technology wasn’t quite there at the time.
Ellsworth get a lot of stick for their advertising but the frames were solidly built.
  • 3 0
 @Heywood165: Ellsworth frames were infamously poorly built. In an era of cracked frames industry wide, Ellsworth managed to leave the competition in the (aluminum) dust. I broke 3 frames.
  • 2 0
 @mobiller: I had no idea about that, you'd never tell from my 2004 frame. It's even an original shape rear triangle with round carbon bridge and level chainstays. Still in the same condition as I got it on eBay.
  • 2 0
 1996 RM Sherpa - gave it to a friend 2003 SC Heckler - sold 2012 Transition Blindside - sold 2016 SC Hightower - stolen 2019 SC Hightower - daily driver
  • 3 0
 I keep every bike I own. I decided I will collect them and at the moment I have a nice collection of about 20 bikes. Most of them are from 90s and newer, but there are a few over 50 and more... The new bikes are always in mind but since I've got kids it is more difficult to get monney for it.
  • 3 0
 I keep all bikes I've owned. During racing in the 90s. I decided I will collect them. I have sold a few and it was a mistake. Still I have about 25. Most of them from 90s and newer. There are few over 50 years old I've bought ocassionally.
New bike is always in mind, but since I have kids it is harder to get monney on it. Luckilly I have opportunity to test new bikes so it helps a lot Smile
  • 3 0
 Used to have multiple horses for multiple courses and swapped several of the every year. Modern geometry however allows for 1 ring to rule them all, so now I have had one Banshee for the last 5 years and I do not intend to buy anything else in the foreseeable future.
  • 3 0
 Working in the industry. You buy a bike for a reduced price and ride it for a year then sell it. Keeping a bike for longer than a year doesn't make sense since you will get the same amount or more for the bike at the end of the season. So its simply cheaper to buy a new one instead of servicing the bike or keeping it for 2 years.
  • 3 0
 I just blame advertising for being too good at filling an empty inexperienced mind with desires.

When I made a choice years ago, I thought about how I could grow into it, but I only took into account a certain amount of personal growth. It's akin to future-proofing. I eventually reach a plateau in progress/growth, and advertising suggests that a new product has higher limits. Sometimes this takes me 1 year to reach, sometimes 2 or 3. I start seeing limits in my old choice. I may be skeptical at first, but hearing testimonies eventually opens me up to the new ideas/products.

To end this cycle, I essentially have to stop chasing growth and find something more down-to-Earth to satisfy me. Something close to home, or close to my heart, that the advertisements don't target... basically, I forego "progress" and settle with complacency, and reprogram myself to be happy with my current level, and appreciate everything I currently have access to as something beautiful. That said, I have tried this before, but I find things start to go downhill when I stop progress. Personally, it feels that maintaining a certain level is torturous on my mind/psyche (stagnation), to the point it forces me to make a choice to continue going up or retire.
  • 3 0
 I haven't been riding long enough to know... I went from a hardtail to a full squish in about 7 months and I've had the full squish for about 2 years now. Do I want a new bike? Yes. Will I sell my current bike when I get a new one? I don't know.
  • 4 0
 My bike is at least 25y/o. It's had 26 new framesets, 25 forks, 25 drive trains, 18 cockpits and 28 wheelsets. 15 seatposts and 18 saddles. Shimano DX spds still going strong....
  • 5 1
 The second question really needs the option of multiple responses or ranking. I don't have a single reason for updating/upgrading. Usually it is for multiple reasons.
  • 5 0
 Multiple answers was an option on that question.
  • 2 0
 Depends on the bike. Ive had bikes that Ive travelled with and made lifelong memories that I won't ever sell. In my mid 30's now, I'm lucky enough to find the bikes that I have the most fun riding so don't feel that urge to upgrade.
  • 2 0
 Bought a Stumpjumper Evo 29 alloy in spring of 2019, some minor upgrades and part swaps to suit my tastes and it's been clicking off miles ever since. Can't find anything with better geometry, and the only new bike that remotely interests me is the Enduro.
  • 2 0
 Back in the day, I’d switch it up when I wanted to.

I’m keeping my bikes for a while now. Even if I wanted to buy a new one, I’m not keen on paying the increases prices. And there’s no stock.

So I’m going to HODL!!!1!1
  • 7 1
 I’m a dentist and I like candy
  • 3 0
 I keep all my bikes and give them to other family members...so my 69 yo father now rides a Cannondale Scalpel 2015 (and a Scott Spark 2010 too), my sister rides a Scott Expert racing 26" and I am happy on my Ripley LS V3 Smile
  • 2 0
 I swap the frame when I feel there's something to be gained by changing. Everything else gets replaced in turn when it's worn out or there's a step up in performance or the cash has burned a hole in my shorts. My current frame is 3yrs old. I want to replace it but no one has any stock...first world problems eh?
  • 2 0
 I'd replace my frames more often if standards didn't change. Looked at a new frame in 2018 to replace my 2016 patrol. Which would require new wheels, new seatpost, and a different headset..... I didn't buy a new frame. Now I just change bikes every four to five years when new bearings just can't make it feel any better.....
  • 2 0
 Well well ... lol.

- I have all of the components (swapped frame) from a Kuwahara Sierra Grande I purchased Jan 1988
- I have a Kuwahara Trial KN (trials bike) with 24" wheels purchased in 1987
- I bought a used Norco rigid frame mountain bike in 1993 for $185 and still have too.

Oh, plus my newly retired 2002 Gary Fisher 4+

I buy good equipment, maintain and treat it well and expect it to last a long time.
  • 2 0
 I keep my old bike, I either hold onto it so my kids can ride, or keep it as a back up for when my daily is down for service. Also nice to have multiple purpose specific bike set ups when I add to the quiver it is to fill a gap.
  • 2 0
 Albeit odd, but seems to work for me. Buy new squishy bike. Ride for 2.5 years. Take off/update all bits. Take old bits and plant on a steel hardtail. Ride both bikes. In another 2.5 years, take all old bits off hardtail and rebuild squish. Take upgraded parts and put on hardtail. Sell old squish with original parts, buy new squish. rinse and repeat.
  • 2 0
 Just buy a nicolai/ geometron bikes frame and your already 5 years ahead of the major brands geometry. In 2015 I brought a G16 and the geometry is still ahead of most other brands. That bikes just been replaced with a G1 29er and that’s going to be good for another 5 years
  • 5 0
 My bikes don't make it out alive
  • 4 0
 Amazing that “I want to upgrade” isn’t an option, I mean what pays your bills?
  • 1 0
 Would been nice to keep the 8 or so bikes in 28 years. The only keeper so far is a 2000 SC Super 8. After that, I was able to give some buddy deals to friends and keep the bikes in the family, so to speak. Now, with a new bike on order, I may just mount the current one on the wall in the living room.
  • 6 3
 Only keeping my current bike because prices and availability are BS lately. If you want my money bike industry, you better sort this shit out.
  • 11 1
 I'm sure the bike industry will fix the GLOBAL PANDEMIC real soon.
  • 4 0
 Get ready for international inflation. Prices are going up
  • 2 0
 @kmg0: yes, I think you’re right. Many are talking about stagflation returning
  • 4 0
 Avg 5 bikes a season.... least my addiction isn’t heated in a rusty spoon
  • 2 1
 Try a stainless spoon, my man. Jeez I leaned that in Junkie 101.
  • 2 1
 I usually upgrade and customize my bikes and then I list them at a price where I make a profit. If it sell cool, I upgrade. If not, I ride it. Surprising how many times people buy used bikes they could get brand new in the same neighborhood price wise. I guess they like I did the upgrades?
  • 1 0
 For those of us lucky enough to have space for multiple bikes, it really depends on the bike. The only complete bikes I bought new I still have: 1991 Trek 7000, and 1999 Trek 2100 (road). You never forget your first... Trail bikes tend to rotate every few years, but mostly because of obsolete standards: 135 QR -> 142x12 -> Boost. Sell the wheelsets and build from frame up. DJ never changes, so I'll keep my SC Jackal forever. Will probably keep my Morewood Ndiza forever, because what could I possibly replace it with?
  • 2 1
 This is a weird article, I want new bikes mostly to try different things. I’m not going to lie looks go a long ways, if something looks cool I want to try it. Sometimes, different goals come into play, downcountry is real man!
  • 1 0
 I bought a bike when I got back into biking. A single quiver bike. +1 yr I upgraded it to something with more travel and better geo because it felt so good to ride. +2yrs, liked riding park so much that I bought a DH bike. +3, keep specializing and adding bikes for specific riding. I go through a drivetrain and tires and brakes in 2500km so ~ every 5 months. So each current bike gets refined and even more fun and quiet.
  • 5 0
 I replace my bike when some rat steals it.
  • 1 0
 I keep some bikes for ages, and others for a season. I've had my old xc race bike for 4 ish years, gonna keep it forever, as a keepsake, I plan on keeping my cx bike for quite a while longer, I plan on making my new dj bike for probably 10 years. I made my last enduro race bike last for less than a year, just got a new one and in plan on selling that and picking up anew one within a year.
  • 1 0
 All depends on the bike? My Kona Unit will probably forever just get upgraded because it’s a simple rigid single speed. Full suspensions tend to get upgraded as a feel a need. Sometimes two years, sometimes 5. All depends on how long the bike continues to suit my needs
  • 1 0
 I keep a bike generally as a front line rig for 3-5 years, and move to reserve status/ available loaner bike till the front line is ready for reserve status then sell unless someone who I know really wants that bike, or sell it years down the road hopefully to someone deserving. If I still had shop deals, I’d sell it every year because then you don’t ever have to fix much. But, generally I either get a new rig because new geometry and technology has improved enough or I’m switching from XC to long travel or vice versa.
  • 3 0
 Needs a before/after becoming a parent option. Replacement rates have dropped significantly since tiny people arrived on the scene!
  • 1 0
 I generally keep bikes until I just want to try something new or the current bike is just kicked. Sometimes that means a year sometimes that means a much much longer time frame. Currently bikes seem so damn good I have been much less interested in changing. The two bikes I am changing this year are both getting replaced due to damage on the old frame.
  • 1 0
 Bikes break, warranty is a pain, you end up waiting a while and if it's your only bike it can be a painful wait. I'd like to think i would keep a bike but when the frame fails i fall out with the bike and end up getting something new. I have issues i think...
  • 1 0
 Still have a giant carbon full suss hand-me-dowm from 04 but I only buy used, bought and sold around two $1000 bikes a year untill I landed on a cheap 2019 mega and a 2019 stanton switch9er.. Now Iv spent so much on new parts I would only switch frames
  • 1 0
 Bought an Enduro. Loved it but frame cracked. Warranty replacement took months, so caved and just bought a new one (no frames available, had to get the whole bike). Warranty frame arrived THAT WEEK so now I’ve got 2. With COVID delays I’m just gonna keep both in case anything breaks. And when you’re 230+ lbs everything eventually breaks ????‍♂️
  • 1 0
 My bikes trickle down. Every five years or so, I’ve bought a new bike, my wife got my old bike, one of the kids got her bike and so on. Now the kids are mid- to late teens, so I’m probably going to have to hold on to my bikes (I ride my wifes bike more than she does) a little longer. They’re so good though, that I have trouble seeing why I should upgrade. It would feel more like dumbing down the trails.
  • 1 0
 This question has to be addressed to the industry (but which web page that earn money from advertising will do that?).

- Are those expensive products that cost a lot, designed to stand the test of time? (designed honestly)
or
- Those bikes that cost a lot & quite above a lot, are designed to fail after a couple of seasons?

This has nothing to do with the evolution of technology. It has to do with how honest your product is, especially if we consider how much a “good” bike costs today.

Reliability, serviceability and ease of maintenance should also be a priority of the modern bike.
  • 1 0
 I used to change my bikes every year. However the last one I kept for 5 years as there was hardly any change in the bikes during that time. My bike was a 1x Enduro rig and the only thing that changed was a bit of geometry over the years. I rode a really high spec bike at a demo day when my bike was 4 years old and it rode 5% better at most so I'm glad I kept it. It cost £2700 at the time and sold it last year for £900 as I look after them so well. I certainly got my money's worth.
  • 2 0
 I normally build my own bikes, or I buy a complete rig and change stuff straight away, so a frame can last a season but a fork or a wheel set can serve on three bikes. No to mention a saddle!
  • 3 0
 5 bikes in the last 26 years. Current one had for 2 years. No need to buy a new bike every year or two. A new bike the now isn't going to make me a better rider.
  • 1 0
 I've only ever bought one new bike in my life, and I owned that for nearly a year and a half, but it was overkill for the location I'd moved to and was robbing me of fun so I sold it. Then I had a fun bike and was 'underbiked' and now I've got a bit of a goldilocks bike for where I live. Owning a bike suitable for where I ride is the important thing for me, but I've moved around the world so the bike has changed more than I'd normally consider 'acceptable', I'd LIKE to own this bike for the next 5 years, but needs will probably change again.
  • 1 0
 I only really have one bike in the stable that I bought for a decent price and she is my fuel. The Demo I got from a friend for free cuz he was tired of crashing, my road bike is my uncle's old Orbea Aqua race bike (again, free), and the commenter was a $100 Kijiji special that I fixed up. I only sell a bike if it no longer suites my riding and always try to sell them for fair prices or simply give them away, helps people get into biking
  • 1 0
 For me it depends on the bike. I have my "first ever MTB" (a 1998 Giant Yukon) just because I still love it. However, I usually buy a bike that is only a bit better than what I need at my skill level. When I feel that I am out-riding it, I buy another. This is usually about 2a -3 year cycle. Sometimes I keep the old bike, even after buying a new one because I have friends who are occasional riders without a bike.

I will also buy a new bike if I branch out my skill set - like my fat bike for snow/mud riding.
  • 1 0
 I used to keep things until the new bikes were vastly different then what I had. But recently I have found from a cost stand point changing every year or every other year to be much more affordable. With the strength of used sales selling a 1-2 season bike can recoup much more cost then a 3 year old bike in my experience.
  • 1 0
 So far, it's been every year for the past three years for me. However, I've been ridding a 2002 giant hardtail, 2013 norco fluid, 2020 GT Sensor, and now a 2020 Devinci Troy is on order. I could have never afforded the $3500 at first and didn't know if I would stick to biking, so I have gotten less compromises on my bike each year. The GT was bought online without a test ride and just doesn't physically fit my weird proportions enough to keep for a long time.
  • 1 0
 Been through 9 bikes in 5 years since I started. Started on the worst of the worst and upgraded as my skill grew or I found a sweet deal. Even bought 2 bikes on pb. Good bikes are hard to come by sometimes in Barbados. I'm on my best bike to date a Commencal Meta AM XX 29er.
  • 1 0
 Would probably do every 3 years. Gets a lot of miles in all seasons for 3 years, I'd say its ready for a change. However, at the moment I will hold on my bike until things flatten out. I've started doing more of my own maintenance so maybe I'll just ride it out longer now.
  • 4 0
 OR WHAT IF YOUR SIGNIFICANT OTHER RIDES AND WANTS TO REPLACE YOU FOR UPDATED GEOMETRY?
  • 1 0
 got a new dh because i outgrew the small geometry and i got a discount on a new frame. it lasted two seasons and it can handle more i just cant stand being so squished on a bike. trail bike has been running smooth and im pretty sure ill end up snapping the frame before i just replace it.
  • 1 0
 I ride a modernized Cannondale Prophet. Why? Because that's the frame I could afford at the time. It actually rides nice despite the old geo and standards. It's got a modern spec and a custom tuned shock so it's not straight out of 2005 anymore. But yeah it's a bitch to find 27.5 x 135mm spacing wheels. The conversion was worth it though.

If I had cash to spare I'd replace it with a GG Shred Dogg and hang the Prophet frame on the wall in my basement work space.
  • 1 0
 So I am on my fourth build on a 2004 Balfa Minuteman frame. It's gotten better with each build. Does it count as a new bike every time I swap components? Not sure myself. Same headset, seattube and seatclamp and of course frame on each build, It's not really a 17 year old bike, or is it? Couldn't be happier.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=JmJ2wVL64LI
  • 1 0
 When I thought about building a "bombproof" set of wheels and tried to follow that theme with other parts of the bike, I could tell that was going to lead to a poor riding experience.

I appreciate these companies that make a performance product with adequate durability (for its intended purpose). I find that failing in a safe undramatic way matters more than not failing at all. Customers just want to be satisfied and be able to afford to sustain a happy lifestyle for a long time. Service can make up for this and also form an essential feedback loop between maker and consumer.

As much as I dislike the waste of consumer-society and the inconvenience of failures, I doubt making parts more tank-like is the way to go. Akin to someone saying cars aren't made like they used to be, implying that the sight of cars crumpling up is bad, ignoring the condition the occupants end up in. I wish it were as simple as pointing to a sweet spot between disposable and made-to-last. People have different reasons behind their choices--I am all for epic adventure while others might for higher performance.
  • 1 0
 There should be a category for .. I sell after less than a season because I got a good deal and its worth more than I paid for it.. just sold a 19 stumpjumper for 800 more than i paid for it.. supply and demand is a great thing...
  • 2 0
 Precisely the reason I'm not interested in buying right now. I'll wait until 2023 if I need to in order to avoid this exact situation.
  • 1 0
 Took me months of searching to find a bike that fits both my riding needs and my unique body type. XXL Tallboy 3 CC. I got a great deal used and ended up with an amazing bike I could never have afforded new. Even though it’s a few years “outdated” a better bike for me does not exist. I will make that frame last forever if I can.
  • 2 0
 I have several bikes that I love very much and I keep them around forever. They never fail to please me even after months apart. We just have that connection so there's no need to replace them. Never married btw Wink
  • 1 0
 Still running my decade old cannondale jekyll (heavily modified with fairly new componentry) but I'm sending road gaps.. and have been taking it down tracks like that for the last 10 years. Getting concerned re fatigue life so...

I have turned it into my second bike now so love taking it out.. the older geo is great for trail riding. The new meta has made me faster and i know its not going to break any time soon..
  • 1 0
 If you have enough different bikes (BMX, dirt jump, road bike, commuter, MTB) the wear and tear gets spread out and they get replaced less often and maybe with more perspective. It helps to realize they all hate you -- they want titanium plates and fasteners for you, not themselves.
  • 1 0
 I keep some bikes longer than others. I rode a 2003 Santa Cruz Heckler for eight years as a 26" bike and then a few more as a 27.5 conversion. Currently have a 2017 Evil Calling which I will keep for a quite a while and a 2019 Patrol which I may sell when I try a 29'er.
  • 1 0
 I replace parts when they brake or are no longueur suitable for my progression. I replace frame when they brake and have the new updated one from my precious life time warranty.
Got a Tallboy3 in 2016, upgraded most part on it and now switch all the parts to a bitchin 2021 Hightower CC ❤️
  • 1 0
 I sold my last bike as the sram eagle drivetrain b tension screwing need that much constant attention drive to the brink of madness. So I upgraded the bike early whilst I had some spare cash for been unable to travel anywhere. Now the lover of a Shimano 12 speed XTR I have adjusted in over 1000km and counting.
  • 1 0
 Well I got my first new bike in 2020 rode it for a season I loved it, but the new model came out and it looked much better so I bought it and sold the older model ended paying 400 more for the new bike, which I figured I would end up spending on the old bike with a tune-up tires wheels, etc. So I personally rather have a new bike for a little more money.
  • 1 0
 In the last 10 years I've bought 4 bikes for myself, 2 for my wife and 2 for my kids. Sold the smallest kid's bike because he outgrew it, 2 bikes were stolen. So far the rest have all been keepers, except for one I inherited from my brother - it was worn out beyond repair so I ended up scrapping it after salvaging all useful bits - and one I won in a website sweepstake. That was an aluminium-framed road bike for which I saw no need since I already had a carbon-framed one that I hardly use except as a winter trainer bike.
So what's this I hear about replacing bikes???
  • 1 0
 I don't sell my bike because I continue to upgrade it all these years. You know you can buy rims, hubs, cranks and other stuff separately. Just saying..

2008: I've bought some 23kg cheap steel full suspension for $200.
2011: new alloy frame;
2012: another frame, wheels and fork;
2013: new drivetrain, bars etc;
...
2020: new 29" frame, fork and wheels (I used my old rear hub because it's good enough)
2021: new drivetrain.
To be continued.
  • 1 0
 I used to replace bikes every 2-3 years get. a good return meaning the bike cost me maybe $500-800 to ride for for each year. I just went backwards from FS to Hardtail built a custom bike that will probably stay with me for 5 years. We shall see .
  • 1 0
 I keep my bikes for several years and replace them usually when the frames either crack or I can't find parts for them, like bushings or linkage. I don't replace my bikes as much as keep buying more except for this year.
  • 2 0
 I tell my wife “this is the last bike I will ever need to buy...”
Then between 2 and maybe 4 years it breaks and I have to get a new one.
  • 2 0
 By summer#3 I've learned all the mistakes I made with my current bike and I upgrade...then Covid comes and you live with your mistakes.
  • 4 0
 You get rid of old bikes???
  • 4 0
 2nd question needs a 'I sell because my bike is out of warranty' option.
  • 1 0
 My bike has a lifetime warranty. When the warranty is done, I will be too.
  • 3 0
 I buy a new bike when I can afford one, being a broke 15 year old. Still on my first real MTB, a 2019 Marin hardtail.
  • 1 0
 Old people don't worry about the latest and greatest, I've had my new bike for 3 years now and have no plans on buying new again, if I could afford an E-MTB I get one, maybe I'll win the lottery too?
  • 1 0
 If I like a bike, it's like a friend, or family. I still have every bike that hasn't been stolen, or I didn't like. That doesn't mean I don't get new ones. I'm building a new one now.
  • 1 0
 Got and aluminum bike this time with a modern geo. I see no reason why I should ever change. I can upgrade and change the head angle by offset bushings, so hopefully It will last....
  • 1 0
 Kept my old XC bike for far too long. But I'm kinda glad I did, if I had upgraded earlier I would have had slightly outdated geo already. My new trail bike has all the modern geo and features Smile
  • 1 0
 I have only sold two of my bikes, and one was a road bike. Every other bike was ridden to destruction, or is still in use. I get a little disappointed if I don't crack a frame every few years!
  • 1 0
 After years of having to sell my last bike to buy my next, it is nice to be able to keep a few bikes for different trails. Selling a bike now happens when a friend needs a good deal or out of space.
  • 1 1
 I don't have a set bike schedule replacement. In 4 years I went through 3 trail bikes. The first 2 I didn't like the geometry and they were really low spec. Ended up with a 2018 specialized Enduro S works. My downhill bike I only replaced because I wanted something with updated geometry. Went from a 2015 gambler to a 2021 supreme
  • 4 0
 Until they're stolen... My '09 Heckler was stolen yesterday :'(
  • 2 0
 I buy a new bike when I fall in love with one. Sometimes you just see one and know you have to have it, financial ruin be damned!
  • 4 0
 I don't sell the old ones. I'm hoarder.
  • 3 0
 You can sell bikes?

I ride them until they die, then put them in the wall in my garage.
  • 2 0
 It took a decade but my bike quiver has stabilized over the last few years. Single speed, full squish, fat bike, hardtail. I think I'm good for a few years now.
  • 1 0
 Depends on the bike. Third trail bike in four years due to a booming resale market and ability to buy a new one. My fatbike has been with me for four years of hard winter riding and isn’t going anywhere.
  • 3 0
 Took me 6 months to track down all the parts to build it. I hope I have it for a few years at least lol
  • 1 1
 Depends on the bike, my 2012 Operator is still solid as I live in Ontario and I only use it once a year either out west or east for trips, my trail bike every 3-4 years and I have a steel frame road bike I think from the 90's with only upgrades to the wheels and drivetrain that I still ride once or twice a month. Bought a fat bike this winter cause skiing gives you Covid according to the Ontario Govt. so will see how long it holds up.
  • 3 0
 I don't sell my bikes, I just increase the size of the fleet every 3 to 4 years or so
  • 1 0
 I am going to replace my Dh bike when it breaks or someone brings out a faster bike!
As yet, I have not tested a faster Dh bike than the old 26er V10.5 (yup, it smoked a commy).
  • 1 0
 I buy an XTR equipped bike every 5 years. I generally ride 8-10,000 miles a year, and usually just replace tires, grips, pads, chains, and 1 cassette/ring over that period, plus whatever breaks, which isn’t usually much.
  • 2 0
 We had a discussion about it. I wanted a new bike, she wanted a new car for herself. So we compromised and got her a new car.
  • 1 0
 1-3 seasons, bike’s tired. Sell it cheap, wear out another one.

Maybe if I had Trickstuff brakes, Cane Creek Cranks and some other fancy parts my bike would last 10 years.
  • 1 0
 I still have my 1994 Fat Chance Yo Eddy and my 1985 Redline BMX bike, both bought new - one owner (me). Both recently restored. I don't sell my bikes, which is why they're piling up. N+1, baby.
  • 3 0
 New bikes never available again, upgrade with parts taken from other abandoned bikes left about the wasteland.
  • 1 0
 I plan on keeping each new bike forever, but then for various reasons: upgrades, breakage, new geo/tech, I end up swapping out a frame or getting a whole new bike on average every 3-5 years.
  • 1 0
 I supplemented the collection (N+1 isn't it...) when the old 'Primary' bike was off the trails waiting for parts!
Got the new geo / tech and wagon wheels, now my older grom can grow into the old bike, Win-Win.
  • 2 0
 I have a 2002 Kona Cinder Cone and a 2013 Yeti SB66 and yes I'm damn Scottish and proud! I'm tighter than bark on a tree with my money...
  • 1 0
 Gonna have to disagree and say that the identiti mogul is the most bombproof, I've 50/50'd on jumps a lot and also been thrown about in the air when crashed and its still got no cracks or dents (from 2012 as well!!)
  • 3 0
 Still in love with my 2013 V-10. I do need a new enduro bike though.
  • 1 0
 I have a: 2005 GT Ruckus Flowta, two 2005 Ruckus 3.0, a 2018 GT Karakoram for XC racing and a 2019 GT Traffic (graveled)... My oldest bike I bought in 2015
  • 4 0
 I just outgrow my bikes
  • 1 0
 I think when a bike has parts or characteristics that greatly reduce fun factor that’s when it might be time to consider a new or even “new to you” rig.
  • 1 0
 Currently riding an 8 year old dh bike and I think it still goes harder than I ever will
  • 2 0
 @Kieranf: that's so true: most of us will never use a bike's full potential, because we're just not good enough, or not willing to take risks (which is a good thing)
  • 2 0
 I buy a bike, buy/sell parts for it, put it up for sale, and then ride it til it sells and repeat.
  • 2 0
 I’ll ride my current bike until it’s unsafe to ride. Being a mid-2000’s free ride bike, it might be a while...
  • 2 0
 I saw more head tubes sheared off and catastrophic frame failures in the mid 2000s than you see today.
  • 2 3
 I just can't be bothered anymore. I still own and all are ride-able...
2014 Enduro
2009 Enduro SX
2006 Enduro Expert
2005 Enduro Comp x 2
2004 Enduro SX
1999 FSR DH

I have ridden most of the newer Enduros too, looks like standards have settled down enough to contemplate 29er. Except the base model Enduro and Stumpy Evo cost double (in real prices) what I paid for my last bike. For average components too.
  • 10 3
 Try buying not specialized, there are great bikes with great components at better prices
  • 6 3
 Good god, those early spesh enduros were trash.
  • 1 0
 Well then, aren't you Special .
  • 1 0
 @DizzyNinja: Not wrong there, Specialized prices outside the USA are ludicrous.

Specialized Enduro Expert costs A$9900 (US$7660). Fox Performance elite level suspension, X01 groupset and alloy rims with a DT360 3-pawl driver.

Compare it to the Canyon Strive which gets you a similar XO1 spec drivetrain with Lyrik/Super Deluxe Ultimate and carbon wheels for $8k (including shipping). You could buy the CFR with full Fox Factory, XTR groupset and DT Swiss EXC1200 wheels at A$9399 (US$7273) and still save $450 on the specialized.

I rode both bikes (4 days in Derby on the Enduro Expert, not a car-park demo!) and preferred the handling of the Canyon enough to live without a SWAT box.
  • 3 1
 Pretty rare I buy a new bike, new parts yes and new frames every 2-3 years.
  • 3 0
 Until the 26ers come back around.
  • 5 0
 This, currently lusting after a Banshe spitfire V3 to replace my HT trail bike because 26
  • 2 0
 I buy a new bike when finally come up with a solid choice and a self-convincing reason why I should.
  • 1 0
 I'll keep my bike until it's 'dead' - or until I find something with more suitable\needed features... I do not buy 'just because' - I mostly buy out of necessity... >.>
  • 1 0
 I hate paying tons of money on a new bike and a couple of months later,I see the new model with just different colours.... Better there wasn't any new model...
  • 1 0
 I update my frame when geometry could be new, parts when damaged or worn out. but now unlikely whole bike. too many good parts on it
  • 3 2
 I buy a new bike every season and have a renewables now sticker on my car, support the new green deal, demand a living wage and drive my dog to the park so it can walk.
  • 1 0
 Hypocrisy is the greatest luxury.
  • 1 0
 Hypocrites unite! Together we are strong!!
  • 1 0
 Sworks 2007 carbon died last year now have new bike. hope it lasts as long!!! although i have broken frame already under warranty
  • 3 0
 Nice try bike industry. I'm not showing you my hand.
  • 2 0
 Until a new bike has changed enough to actually make me a better rider. About 5-6 years.
  • 1 0
 Keep them till I crack the frame, then they go on the wall of "frames". Usually that is about 3 years for a trail bike and about 5 for the DH bike.
  • 1 0
 Never, shed is adorned with old frames and my 2008 diamondback recoil still runs perfect, I only sell bikes to pay for repairs for other bikes...
  • 3 0
 I get new bikes to be able to keep up with friends on the trails.
  • 3 0
 My wife bought my new bike! She's awesome.....wife is pretty cool too!
  • 3 0
 I don't care about the benefits, I just like new stuff.
  • 2 0
 now there's an honest guy !
  • 3 0
 I’m keeping my 2014 sworks enduro forever. 26 or die, I love my bike.
  • 1 0
 There's a sweet spot when you can sell for a good price, or wait too long and take a big hit. It's only expensive if you can't sell it!
  • 1 0
 I recently bought a Transition Spur that I plan to keep for a long time and then will likely only replace with a new/revised Spur.
  • 3 0
 I’m want to die with every bike I’ve ever bought
  • 2 0
 All my bikes end up being parted out and eventually reassembled and gifted to friends.
  • 1 0
 I found out than my dj bike already 10 y old, and park bike 5 yr old;

Nevertheless I prefer to keep bike entire warranty period, or based on wear and tear
  • 2 0
 I typically ride the same bike for 5+ years and then I get too sentimentally attached to sell it.
  • 1 0
 I buy a new for me (second hand) bike when I've finally managed to save up enough money. I always try to buy top quality though which should last a long time
  • 1 0
 When it snaps!! Normally 18months tops! Unless it’s a steel hardtail they just break!

2snapped Vitus sommets

2 snapped nukeproof Mega’s
  • 1 0
 When the is dead lost broken frame with worn ou parts, or the parts are so worn out that it completley bums out a ride - 4 snake bites in one 2 hour ride (true story)
  • 1 0
 Usually do 2 years but this time I love my bike so much I just treated it to new forks and tyres and serviced dropper etc. See if anything can turn me in a years time
  • 1 0
 Some friends I ride with have pretty small bike budgets, and couldn't afford my bike, so would be out of order to replace it every year or two.
  • 2 0
 Y'all forgot the option: I work at a bike shop so I can upgrade at no cost every year.
  • 2 0
 The new bikes are so good that I'm less inclined to update to a new bike. Shit, I just need to become a better rider!!
  • 1 0
 I also form a bit of an emotional bond with my bikes so really I’ll hang on as long as I can. It’s weird I guess but more bikes are better, right?
  • 1 0
 i sell my bike every year because we get everything wholesale and staff price so i make a couple grand everytime i sell my bike then i can get the next model up
  • 1 0
 Ha; I upgrade after 2–5 seasons, intending to sell the old bike, but I rarely get around to selling it and end up donating/giving it away instead.
  • 2 1
 I actually bought my bike to keep at least 4 years but i grow up on it and it's now small for me Big Grin
  • 1 0
 In the past year or so we've had around 11 bikes in and out. Crazy now that the hunt is real.
  • 2 0
 I replace my bike because I outgrow it.
  • 3 1
 I buy bikes. Lots of bikes.
  • 1 0
 Some vintage heavy hitters I hang on to for “ever” some bikes a couple years or until beat down or broken.
  • 2 0
 Need an option on why I buy a new one "to flex in the parking lot"
  • 3 1
 I get a new bike when I can afford a new bike. so not often
  • 1 0
 Old bike goes when something new that I like released.. which isn't very often nowerdays.
  • 1 0
 No matter how good a bike I have, how perfect it is, i always get the itch to change it after 2 years regardless.
  • 1 0
 Every 4 months, right after having my bike stolen (again, and again and again)
  • 1 0
 You don't live in Bristol by any chance?!!
  • 1 0
 Either when it breaks or when the cost of upgrades or repairs outweighs the cost of a new build... no time limit.
  • 1 0
 After 10 years I buy a new one and the old will be the „new“ one for my oldest child.
  • 3 1
 The Madonna V2 that is so bombproof you only get a 2 year warranty...
  • 1 0
 A real bike..? A good bike? Well my 2000 GT Rebound hasnt been beaten by a modern bike yet...so...
  • 1 0
 Of course I want to change my bike every 2 seasons or even faster. But it is too damn expensive. So no.
  • 1 0
 Of course I want to change my bike every 2 seasons or even sooner. But it is too damn expensive. So no
  • 2 0
 Why is there no “I bought a yeti and it cracked” option
  • 1 0
 I replace my bike after the frame's broken. If I'm lucky, I break less than one frame a season.
  • 2 0
 i will keep a bike until death do us part,,, my death or the bikes.
  • 1 0
 ive wrecked two frames in the last 365 days so there needs to be an option for more "I get a new bike every 6 months"
  • 4 1
 Till it gets stolen
  • 1 0
 If my dirt jumper that i had back in 2008 wasnt stolen i would prob still have it hahaha
  • 1 0
 I have a dirt jumper made from so many old parts, from so many bikes that have met their demise. Still have some parts from my 08 kinda stuff on it!
  • 1 0
 I'll keep it as long as it comes from the factory. Kinda hard to change that.
  • 2 0
 Golly, That Raaw Madonna is a gorgeous bike!
  • 2 0
 Where is "I dont sell it, I break it" option?
  • 1 0
 Warranty the frame, then sell it.
  • 1 0
 Buy a 2 year old 5k bike for 2-3k ride for six months then sell for a profit and buy another 2 year old bike.
  • 1 0
 I like to think I keep a bike for 2-3 seasons but last 3 bikes have been after every season. Idk what to believe anymore
  • 1 0
 Seasons??? What's that?? here in the South we ride Aaall yeaar long!!!!!

I keep my bike until it's holding me back!
  • 1 0
 I replace my bikes when they get stolen. Which is every 2-3 years at the moment.
  • 1 0
 I buy a bike when the one I'm riding gets bought out from under me. Happens at around 2 years usually.
  • 2 0
 "I keep my bike until it gets stolen" is missing
  • 2 0
 sometimes i just want a new bike cuz bikes are sick
  • 1 0
 According to my experience I get a new bike when I am stolen the last one. Last 2 bikes stolen.
  • 3 1
 The question should be how long are these bikes engineered to last?
  • 2 0
 If you didn't snap the old frame, you don't deserve a new bike! ????
  • 1 0
 Like how 1% of the answers is “ I sell it after a season because I get free shit”
  • 1 0
 I replace mine every year cause that's as long as I can make a chainstay last
  • 4 3
 I get a new bike when I brake the one I’m riding.
So every 3-4 yearsish
  • 28 0
 You must save a fortune on pads if you only brake every 3-4 years.
  • 1 0
 Frame swap every few years hopefully
  • 1 1
 After about 8-12 months of owning a new bike something breaks EVERY SINGLE RIDE
  • 2 0
 Usually about 470mm
  • 1 0
 Replace on warranty every 6-8 weeks.
  • 1 0
 I usually replace it when I get bored with it and want something new
  • 2 0
 When I outgrow my bike
  • 1 0
 Every four to five years.
  • 1 0
 Currently on year 5......
  • 1 1
 Normally replace every year as work in a shop ( pro deals ) but this year no bikes available.
  • 1 0
 I don't buy complete bikes really?
  • 2 1
 Sell after a season.
  • 1 1
 If your old bike is in one piece then you're not trying hsrd enough!
  • 1 0
 Yeah dude, trying to keep up with those pivot bolts is hard work!

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