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RAAW Launches On-Demand Program for Bike Shops Worldwide

Jun 17, 2024
by RAAW Mountain Bikes  
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PRESS RELEASE: RAAW Mountain Bikes

At RAAW we've been offering our products directly to customers for the past seven years. Being a small company allows us to offer a direct link between you and the team that designs and works with the bikes day in and day out.

However, we understand that direct sales aren’t for everyone and we also value the contribution that bike shops make to local riding communities. The service that a local bike shop provides is something we can never replace.

For some time now we have been offering our Bike Build Cash Back program as a way to support having a RAAW built up at your trusted local bike shop. But now we're taking it a step further.

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As well as being able to order all RAAW products online, it's now possible to order directly from your local bike shop. In an effort to make it as easy as possible, any bike shop can register with us and, once approved, have access to favourable purchasing conditions that cover labour and costs.

If you're a bike shop and interested in RAAW On-Demand, simply fill out the form on our website and we'll get back to you with all the details.

If you're a customer and interested in buying a RAAW through your local bike shop, simply go to your local bike shop and ask if they are part of the On-Demand program. If the shop is already part of the program, you’ll be able to know more about how it works directly from them. If they aren’t part of the program yet, the shop can connect to us and we’ll start the process.

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As always, we’re here to help. If you have any questions about the On-Demand program, or anything RAAW related, just send us a message.




For all things RAAW, head to raawmtb.com.

Author Info:
RAAWMountainBikes avatar

Member since Mar 27, 2018
33 articles

51 Comments
  • 16 0
 Sounds good. The main thing that puts me off ordering a RAAW is import duties
  • 17 2
 Same here that's Brexit at work.
  • 1 0
 i paid about £500 import duties on a frame only recently. Its easy to work out a cost, then you just weigh up if its worth it or not. My frame with RS SDU coil came it at about £3000. Not cheap for an alloy frame, but its a thing of beauty and not something i think i will be getting rid of anytime soon.
  • 1 0
 @v7fmp: this is good to know, thank you. How do you work out the cost though?
  • 3 0
 @motdrawde: I believe it's an additional 14% tax on bike imports, plus vat (@20%)

DISCLAIMER: this does not constitute tax advice nor am I qualified to give such advice
  • 6 0
 @hgardner: I’ll take your word for it, consider it gospel
  • 1 0
 @motdrawde: 20% VAT, 4% import duty (thats the rate for a bike frame) then about £12 for the honour of ParcelForce sending you a letter.

I did try and pay for it sans Tax, then go and collect it from Germany (an excuse for a road trip), but Raaw needed proof of import fee's being paid to be able to sell it to me without either UK Tax or local German Tax. So no real workaround that i can tell.
  • 1 0
 wait until CBAM hits, the tax will still increase for a number of years
  • 2 0
 Picked up a second hand frame last weekend to avoid all that!
  • 5 0
 Yes please. I think this is a very good thing.
  • 1 0
 YESSS, what a great news for them and the industry. RAAW is one of the rare brand i want to encourage AND designs very good bikes.
if the price dont go up 500/bike that will be great.
big up
  • 1 0
 How do these bikes ride and handle? How is the rear suspension design?
The large pivot bearings are attractive!
  • 1 0
 @jckaspar: ask Kazimer. He loves his Madonna. So do I.
  • 2 2
 I hope that current "crisis" will make bike brands a bit more proactive. I already had a chance to demo Santacruz this year, Trek is doing demo next week. Before that they would reluctantly borrow me a bike with a 700eur deposit ...
I would love to try Raaw but most probably they are too small to make a broader test program. I would love companies to lend or sell test bikes to shops with a proper discounts. But this would work only if the shops can have some margin afterwards.
  • 3 0
 The demo programs "vanished" because these days there are too many options of bikes to choose from, too many brands and too many retailers. People will try a bike, enjoy it, overthink it and then buy something completely different from another brand and retailer.
  • 1 1
 @Amukinado: I think it depends. If you find a bike that rides really well than buying something you did not try is risky and honestly a bit pointless. Unless it is pricey as hell like a Santa, then you do not buy it even though you liked it.
  • 2 0
 @lkubica: the majority of people don't think like that. They buy bikes because it's the bike they want or because it was a good deal. I sell bikes for a living and from the hundreds of bikes that I have sold so far, I would say less than 10 people actually tried the bike before buying. On the other hand, I have conducted more than 100 demos.
  • 1 1
 @Amukinado: Maybe they just buy what they like because in 90% of cases there is no way to try it. I am aware that this way is simpler for bike brands, but it is worse for the consumer. So as I said, I hope shops and brands will be forced to act in a different way and actually do some demoing. What Raaw does is just service for people who cannot hold a wrench, I would argue not that many such people would want a boutique aluminium enduro bike ... I on the other hand will be searching for new bike, but I am kind of tired of buying stuff blindly.
  • 1 0
 @Amukinado: That's been my experience too (a brief time working in bike shops in my youth, followed by years of participating in demo days.) Sure I'll go ride a bike at a Demo, and probably learn a thing or two, but when it comes time to buy, i end up choosing what I want based on the geo, specs and the deal.
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: trust me, as the bike industry stands, demos are no longer viable. Demos are viable for cars and motorcycles because they are a much larger industry with few less options. You want to buy a motorcycle, the options are black or red. You can buy it at the closer shop or you can drive 100 km to next shop where you will find said motorcycle for the same price. Or you can wait 2 years and buy it used for 10% less. The demo motorcycle sells 10 or 20 of the same and then is sold with 5% discount, therefore the system works. This does not work with bicycles. You demo the bike you like at the closest bikeshop and end up buying it 20 minutes away where it's cheaper, because they don't "waste" money on demo bikes. The bike industry is complete anarchy and everyone is just trying to survive.
  • 1 0
 @gtill9000: exactly my point. Sure people will go and try the bikes. But the chances of actually spending the money are very very low. The Demo bike system was designed around an industry that stopped existing 20 years ago when Canyon started selling bikes.
  • 1 0
 @Amukinado: This way probably, but for example the Santa test fleet I used was provided by the distributor, not a shop. The shop of course needs to put some resources for it, but it also has multiple people coming and visiting. So it's kind of win-win for the distributor and the shop. Bikes travel the country, two weeks in every sensible place. Believe me, they had all bikes booked for every single day, Monday to Sunday from 10 to 20... and they were not even trying to spread word about it.
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: I think you gave a bad example because earlier you mentioned Santa Cruz were pricey and you wouldn't buy one even if you demo one. And that's kind of my point... There is no longer customer fidelity to justify that sort of investment. People will go and test a Santa Cruz to later on decide they don't want to spend the money and instead buy something cheaper. For company to justify having a demo bike, each bike would need to sell at least 4 other bikes. And that is never the case.
  • 2 0
 @lkubica: its adorable that youre trying to explain to someone who sells bikes, how a "demo" fleet works, and not actually taking in the info that they are trying to give you.

Demo fleets/programs are a bit of a nightmare for those involved, and the info that @Amukinado is relaying is pretty accurate.
Demos are costly, and dont have the ROI that you might imagine.

If youre interested in buying a new bike, invest the time and resources to appease your requirements. That might require renting/paying for a demo from a shop, which should be a pretty small investment based on the overall purchase price.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: exactly. It's a sad reality that most people do not acknowledge. The market is always evolving to fit the customers needs and if demo bikes are no longer viable, it's actually because the end customer deemed so.
  • 2 0
 @Amukinado: can confirm, I tested over 11 bikes from 5 brands (some of those 11 bikes again in different sizes) for free on a couple festivals in a bikepark. Found out which geo stats I like and what I didn't like about each of the demo bikes. Then I bought from another brand I haven't tested once. And neither did I buy from a local shop nor from the brand directly, but from a distributor that offered it for nearly half the price.
  • 1 0
 @Amukinado: Of note, brands like Transition have great demo programs where you can turn up at the "Outpost" in Belligham, "rent/demo" a bike and pedal to Galbraith to ride some great trails.
They discount the price of the demo/rental off the purchase price if you buy a bike, then sell off the bikes at the end of season for a pretty good discount (you can get a medium carbon Spire RS GX for under $5k right now)
This model works great at their HQ, cause they are fostering a community spirit around their home trails. So if you live close by, it works great.
Of note 75% of the bikes in the Galbraith parking lot are Transition bikes.....
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: Yeah, someone from bike industry which was lazy and got in trouble bacause of this. Very adorable. In my opinion bike industry got away with this kind of attitude bacause of the good times for them. Those times are passing.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: It's a good example of how a Demo could work. There are other brands from Bellingham/Seattle which you barely see on the trails there because they don't do that. But then again, if someone can (should) do it, it's the brand itself or the distributors. Shops always get the short end of the stick.
  • 1 0
 I wonder what the dealer margin is for a shop sale. Most of the time I think click and collect is about 20% to the dealer - curious if this will be similar.
  • 2 0
 "labour and costs" sounds like less than 20.
  • 2 0
 Commencal has something similar for a bit longer. they give the shops a 10% Discount on the bikes.
  • 2 0
 which is honestly awful after you figure the shop labor to build, tune, and set the bike up for the customer. It's dollars but it's not margin. Dollars pay the bills, margin lets you grow and hire.
  • 2 0
 @GTscoob: Making 10% off a $2500-6000 bike for 1.5h of work is not bad. Of cause youre not getting the margins like usual, but you also have 0 risk and 0 tied up capital.
  • 2 0
 @GTscoob: or it's been minimal sales effort and you have a captive customer who will be back for repairs upgrades and servicing. Plus if the bike is frame only, there's the margin on all the components
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: that's laughable that you think a DTC customer will come back and buy upgrades and MSRP. Saying this as a guy that launched a DTC MTB brand and has spent years at IBDs.
  • 1 0
 Max Commencal is cheap and his bikes are not worth spending the money they cost.
  • 2 0
 So just to clarify, this won’t get around the uk import tax fiasco?
  • 1 0
 Liam if you're reading this, go back to work and stop drooling over the Madonnas...
  • 1 0
 Pinging our shop manager about this now, this is pretty cool.
  • 1 0
 What does the VAT end up being for a frame to the US? Does anyone know?
  • 2 0
 VAT would be 0, because that's collected only when sold in EU.

Customs/import duties is a different thing, and it depends on how lucky you get. I believe the duty rate for frames is 4.7%, but you may end up paying nothing if post office just lets it go. I bought jibb frame last year and didn't have to pay anything
  • 2 0
 For my Madonna V3 I received 5 weeks ago it was $0 in extra cost over what was paid on the site at checkout. There is no VAT in the US, one of the few taxes we haven't been enslaved with yet to deal with our out of control spending. The bike is the best thing I've ridden in a long time. Ditched my Specialized Enduro and Santa Cruz Bronson for the Madonna. It is the perfect all-arounder for me.
  • 1 0
 @misterkslays: thanks for the reply! Appreciate it. I’ve been thinking about getting a Madonna for long time….
  • 1 0
 @Bociancz: thank you!
  • 1 0
 @obpcarpinteria: get a Madonna. You won't be disappointed Wink
  • 2 0
 @danstonQ: ordered ... hahaha Looking forward to building her up!
  • 1 0
 @obpcarpinteria: testing mine for 1 month since I built it. This bike is an addictive beast. The rear suspension is so forgiving, it corners stupidly well, and it's excelling on fast and rough descents. The geometry is perfect, as well as every detail. Only drawback : its weigh. But it pedals well nonetheless. Enjoy yours buddy as much as I enjoy mine. Cheers from France Wink
  • 1 0
 @danstonQ: Thanks for the feedback! Looking forward to it!
  • 1 0
 贵公司还招新员工吗?我想求职!^_^







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