Video: Race Face Launches New Ride Pedal & Updates to Chester Pedal

Jun 19, 2019
by Race Face  

PRESS RELEASE: Race Face

Ride Pedal
Don’t be left out of the pedal party, get yourself a set of Ride pedals from Race Face!

No longer do you have to be afraid of the sting and bite of pedal slips thanks to the arrival of the Ride pedal.

Great for new riders, novice mountain bikers, kids ready to get shreddy and everyone in between - these pedals are built for everything from commuting to trail riding. The Ride is ready for action with its thin and concave nylon composite pedal body, rolling on a durable Cro-Mo steel axle with a cartridge bearing/bushing set up that is fully serviceable for legit performance.

Nine molded traction pins per side give you plenty of grip without the risk of damaging your shoes or shins.

The Ride pedal is ready to party in 9 vibrant colours so you can get matchy matchy with the rest of your bike.

FEATURES
• Slim, lightweight concave platform
• Molded pins for safe grip in
• Durable Cro-Mo steel axle
• Tough nylon composite body
• Standard 9/16” pedal thread
• Serviceable internal parts available
• 2-year warranty

MSRP: $34.99 USD
Colours: Black, Blue, Red, Green, Orange, Purple, Yellow, Turquoise, Pink
Built For: Trail/DH/FR/DJ
Bearings: Cartridge bearings and DU bushings
Platform Size: 110mm x 101mm
Axle Material: Chromoly steel
Body Material: Nylon composite
Weight: 320g / pair
Height: 15mm - 18.4mm
# of Pins: 18 molded pins per pedal



Chester Pedal
Same awesome pedals, a few updates, including a new magenta colourway!


Not wanting to be left out of the party, Chester got dressed up with some new traction tread on its slim and lightweight, concave platform to give additional grip to the 8 replaceable hex traction pins per side.

The nylon composite body turns on a fully sealed cro-mo axle with a 100% serviceable bearing and bushing system. Available in 9 colours to match your bike, including magenta!
FEATURES
• Tough nylon composite pedal body with added traction treads
• Slim, lightweight concave platform
• Durable Cro-Mo steel axle on a bearing and bushing system
• Replaceable threaded steel traction pins (8 per side)
• Serviceable internal parts available
• 2-year warranty
• Available in 9 vibrant colours

MSRP: $49.99 USD
Colours: Black, Blue, Red, Green, Orange, Purple, Yellow, Turquoise, Pink
Built For: Trail/DH/FR/DJ
Bearings: Cartridge bearings and DU bushings
Platform Size: 110mm x 101mm
Axle Material: Chromoly steel
Body Material: Nylon composite body
Weight: 360g / pair
Height: 15mm - 18.4mm
# of Pins: 16 SHCS hex traction pins per pedal


Both pedals are now available through your favourite Race Face dealer!


MENTIONS: @raceface




120 Comments

  • + 66
 Goddammit! I just bought a pair of Chester’s and now they have very important traction lines carved in them?! How will I stay on my bike now? =\ WTF RaceFace?! #plannedobsolescence
  • + 37
 No traction lines?! You're f*cked!
  • + 40
 Dremmel time
  • + 8
 Instead of those hacksaw traction lines they should have put two more pins on each side (I upgrade mine that way, helped a lot!).
  • + 7
 I'd like them to make a ti axle option for the Chester pretty sure it would sell like hotcakes. So aftermarket axle makers please make a ti axle for Chester's. Thank you.
  • + 9
 Man I would stay away from your bike UNTIL you buy that new traction lines. Safety first kids !
  • + 10
 @reverend27: Why would you spend a lot of money to make a cheap strong pedal into an expensive weak one?
  • + 1
 @cxfahrer: yes! No more pins on the outside = no updates as this is the only regret I have on chesters
  • + 3
 @Fix-the-Spade: so you are saying all ti axles are weak?
There are advantages to being 140lbs one of them is getting to ride lighter components.
  • + 9
 @reverend27: I've bent enough steel pedal axles that Ti pedal axles are something I've never tried. The disadvantages of being 200lb and riding with all the skill and grace of an excited Labrador.
  • + 5
 @Fix-the-Spade: well from my perspective being able to pick up a ti axle would put them in the 250 gram range and be about $100.

No one does a ti axle for composite pedals because they are considered low end. But I find them better then alloy because they don't get trashed on rocks nor do they hang up on rocks and throw you off the bike.
  • + 8
 Spread a little peanut butter on and let your dog chew on them. Grrrip spots better than traction lines.
  • + 16
 I guess they found the niche market of pedals that intentionally have less traction
  • + 32
 Nah - as it says, "new riders, novice mountain bikers, kids ready to get shreddy...commuting to trail riding."

The Ride would be an awesome commuter pedal - I want pedals that I can wear normal shoes in commuting, even dress shoes. Pedals with pins chew up the soles of my Red Wings. Pedals with pins tear up my kids' legs when they crash. But no "pins" at all makes for a slippery surface and isn't ideal either.

This is a great compromise that I think I'll buy for my commuter.
  • + 6
 @gumbytex: Yep, these are perfect for my 8 year olds who are slip off the stock crap stock pedals that come with bikes, but their little unskilled bodies can get take some nasty hits from pedals with pins.

Wish I knew about these sooner... I just bought them Crank Brothers Stamp One's in "Small" and screwed the pins in a little more than half way... which seem to be working well.
  • + 4
 @islandforlife: Chromag has awesome kids pedal but exspendy.
  • + 2
 @fabwizard: Yep, which is why I went with the Crank Bros Stamp 1 Small. Platform is 100x100... not as small as the Radar, but close, so hopefully they'll be able to use them for a long time. And they're comps so only $67 vs $120... I am definitely not spending $270 (with tax) on pedals for 8 year olds, haha!

I can also get CB's stuff for 40% off... so with shipping, tax and exchange, 2 sets of pedals total = $110... which is still almost too much, but the best deal on quality pedals, that will last, that I could find.

Though I have heard that through the grapevine that there are comp radars coming... which would be a very good idea.
  • + 1
 people who don't want to ruin their shoes isn't really a niche market. pedals with real pins are great with proper bike shoes, but i've completely shredded the soles of my birkenstocks.
  • + 2
 @notatoad: the problem there is probably your choice to wear Birkenstocks... while on a bicycle.
  • + 2
 @gumbytex: Yep, my wife is a very unaggressive rider who is afraid of pins and uses her mountain bike to tow our son in his bike trailer around town/on the bike path. These will be ideal for her.
  • + 1
 @MarcusBrody: just remind her not to step onto the pedals with wet shoes!
  • + 1
 @gumbytex: Come on mate, you know we just like to bitch about things here without actually reading.
  • + 1
 @gumbytex: but they need to make one of these with a 1/2" axle for my kids cranks (1st gen Norco Ninja)
  • + 12
 The main problem with shin gouges is poor shoes, poor foot placement on the pedal, and poor technique. Sure, you'll still get pedal bites from time to time, but reducing the traction isn't the solution. Buying proper grippy shoes is the solution
  • + 14
 But I like doing crankflips...
  • + 4
 yeah bro. Crank flips.
  • + 1
 These will be great pedals beginners and kids. Pedal slips are inevitable at they learn so this will lessen the penalty as they progress to platforms with more bite. I'll also be getting a set for my wife because she doesn't get along with clip-in pedals or spikey flat pedals.
  • + 1
 Grinds man - plastic slides a lot better
  • + 2
 @bogey: so much this. I love my Chester's but my kids are too clumsy for that; and I don't want to deal with cleaning up all their tears and blood so right now they're on DMR V6 pedals. But I'd probably buy these new race face pedals if the kids told me they needed pedals in those colors. I'd put a set on the wife's bike but she only rides twice a year.
  • + 1
 @mallowpufft: My 6 YO has been running the Chomags for two months coming from plastic pedals. So far the the only injuries have been to my shins and a can of beer(bumped six pack against pedal pin and can became a fountain inside our mini van).

He wears 5:10 shoes and loves the grip. His feet no longer bounce off.

I imaging if he crashes wrong there will be tears but so far there have been less issues due to the increased pedal traction.
  • + 0
 shin pads? plastic peddles are kinda retarded
  • + 1
 @quinn3: all the pads we have tried have been to big other than his skateboard pads but they wont protect shins anyway

He just needs to grow a bit more and we will get a full set of pads

Probably about the same time as he graduates to 24 inch wheels
  • + 10
 Not sure why you'd get these over One Up Composite pedals. One Up are lighter, cheaper, and have more pins.
  • + 5
 Also slightly wider I put them up side by side, and aren't convexed
  • + 5
 I've got both and I like both. Options are good. Not everyone will like the same pedal feel. Big platforms are nice, but I have more control with Chester's.
  • + 3
 Colors
  • + 6
 I have both. The chesters' pedal body is spaced further out from the crank. So even though the One Up SHOULD fit my size 13 shoe better, it doesn't because my feet end up naturally falling a little further out so the inside of the pedal is wasted. Then it puts pressure points on the outside. So that's why I use chesters instead of oneups. If I had a little smaller q-factor the oneups would be a better fit. And no, washers won't fix it.
  • + 4
 Haven’t tried chesters but One Ups are amazing. Oen the alu ones and have tried plastic ones on numerous occasions, absolutely fantastic
  • + 2
 @DirtMcGuirk07: I'm probably the minority on this one, but I would actually prefer it if the OneUps were a little narrower for more clearance in tight spaces.
  • + 5
 Yep, I started out with Chester's... then bought OneUp's. Spent about 4 months on Chesters... then 4 months on OneUp's and now use clipless 90% of the time and pull out the OneUp's on occasion.

While Chesters are great pedals... OneUp's slighlty beat them in almost every way: About the same price, bigger platform, more pins, thinner at the leading edges, lighter (basically the same), look better, just as durable (didn't have any issues with either pedal) overall better traction and more confidence inspiring. Only upside of the Chester is they are available in 9 colours vs OneUp's 6... but I use black so not an issue for me.

If you're looking at plastic flats, OneUp's are the way to go.
  • + 2
 I'm running both right now, One up composite on the trail bike and Chesters on the DH, I find I can move my feet a bit more on the Chesters, One Up have been really good too though. I'm a very long time SPD user and I struggle with putting my feet back on the pedal and getting the placement right and having to un-weight the pedal to move the foot. I think I'm just so used to having my feet in the exact same spot each time. Any hints out there?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I like the Chesters. They do pretty good. I put them on my daughters bike. I like that there's some space between the pedal and the cranks. Decent bash around pedal.

Really not sure why you got downvoted for this comment. LOL!
  • + 1
 @onemanarmy: haven't tried chesters yet but my oneups don't have much space between cranks and platform so i don't use 2-4 pins most of the time as i prefer wider stance. Gonna try chesters next...
  • + 1
 Not sure why you'd get the OneUp's either when RockBros composite pedals are even cheaper.

I get mine from ebay for under $30 CAD a pair, delivered in 1 week to ten days range from this seller

www.ebay.com/sch/m.html?_odkw=&_ssn=gobike168&item=273857657753&_osacat=0&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_from=R40&_trksid=p2046732.m570.l1313.TR11.TRC3.A0.H0.Xpedals.TRS1&_nkw=pedals&_sacat=0

Or I can pay $35 CAD on Amazon and have them the next day thanks to being a Prime member.

www.amazon.ca/s?k=rockbros+pedals+nylon&ref=nb_sb_noss
  • + 1
 @deeeight: wow ...3.80$ at the moment ...thats a catch !!
  • + 1
 @themountain:

I usually win auctions for them around $8-10USD
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: they are great but their pins are sharper than most. they've left me with some nasty scars but blame is all on me for being a squid.
  • + 1
 @wmelton14: should try tmac pedals.
  • + 1
 I have one ups on one bike and Chester's on another, the one ups do have a bigger grippier platform for sure. The only area the Chester's beat the one ups is in snow. An Ice ball forms under the outside of your foot where there is bracing running to the axle. The Chester's don't have that problem. Worth mentioning but hardly a deal breaker. One ups take the cake in my book.
  • + 9
 I think the Chester pedals singlehandedly keep my bike shop in business.
  • + 3
 @ericca. Why, from sales success or service issues?
  • - 4
flag freeridejerk888 (Jun 19, 2019 at 9:39) (Below Threshold)
 Service issues for sire@Triza82:
  • + 6
 @Triza82: All sales. I’ve only seen one Chester break, and the guy hit it so hard it bent the spindle.
  • + 5
 @eicca: Glad to hear you are doing so well with those awesome Chester pedals!!
  • + 2
 I’ve run Chester’s for 3 years and loved them. Had to replace them a couple times due to the bearings getting shot. But last month, my pedal fell off when riding because the stud that holds the pedal onto the crank split in half just inside the pedal.

Happened on 140mm trail bike and I weight 175lbs. Anyone else have that happen?
  • + 1
 Cant say I have man. Sounds like a rare occurrence. This coming from a guy who weighs 205 and has them on a 26 inch wheeled TR450 dh bike.
  • + 2
 The Ride pedal is a great pedal for the cycletouring-crowd. Concave plastic pedals with a relatively big platform let you run your bike with any shoes, and the lack of metal pins makes shure you don't bash open your shins while pushing up the bike a steep gravel road.
  • + 4
 As the Rides are aimed at noobs and kids, how about a smaller platform for smaller feet? They'd make a bleeding shin free upgrade to my daughter's Orbea then.
  • + 5
 Or maybe two sizes. I could see myself outfitting my wife's and my commuter bikes with Rides as they will be good enough for the commute and gentle on my office shoes. But as you suggested, they'd also make a great upgrade on my kid's beginner mtbs if they were available in a smaller size as well.
  • + 2
 I think they'd be great for my cross bike, which I still run flats on. Having giant pins on a bike I commute on feels a bit extra. I can colour match them too :>.
  • + 2
 I've been very happy with Tioga Dazz Lite Pedals for my shrimps. Flat pedal, narrow platform, molded pins, lightweight, cheap. tiogausa.com/main/products/pedals/dazz-lite
  • + 0
 SDG Slater 90 pedals have smaller 90x90mm profile and blunt edged replaceable pins. Plenty of grip, but less likely to cut up shins for those learning.
  • + 3
 I just bought Crank Brothers Stamp One's in the "Small" size for my 8 year olds. Awesome upgrade!! They do have metal pins, but you can screw them down to reduce the chance or damage from strikes... seems to be working well for my kids.

My kids also wear knee pads when riding which tend to cover the striking area of the shin, so that helps.

Protip: Adult elbow pads = awesome kid knee pads.
  • + 1
 @clapforcanadaa: ooh, they look good, and they come in matchy matchy cyan for my daughter's bike. Shame they cost more than my own one up composites... But maybe they're just good value.
  • + 1
 @SpillWay: those are good value - white kinda looks 3d printed!
  • + 1
 @islandforlife: my kids been using elbows on the knees too. Wife gets the credit for figuring that one out! Trying to sort out pedals for him now.
  • + 1
 I have a set of Chesters in black on my commuter/adventure bike. They are a nice size and have been bulletproof so far. The only service I've done is tighten the outer axle allen key on each pedal when they developed a bit of play. They spin smoothly and have good grip. I wear 5/10s and Giro Jackets with them most of the time with an occasional pair of Nike SB Blazers thrown in the mix. Thinking about getting a couple of pairs in Purple for the tandem for the wife and I. She loves purple anything, including our tandem. 3
  • + 1
 I like the idea of the Ride pedal but wonder what the grip will be like in comparison to pins?
I've not checked for any patents patents so I may be shooting myself in the foot (foot protectors anyone?) but why don't Five Ten produce sticky rubber pedals and then sell shoes with replaceable pins in them? These would be great for pushing back up to the top of slippery slopes and would be less of a risk to your shins, calves etc The only downside I can see is that you couldn't walk into a stately home whilst wearing them and not incur the wrath of the owner with a room full of shotguns.
  • + 1
 "including a new magenta colourway!"
what are you talking about here, unless they just made the purple a different purple, there's no new magenta. all the colors here and on their site look exactly the same as the original colors, including purple. is the magenta one not shown yet orrrr?
  • + 1
 Magenta = Pink . That is the 9th colour added to the 8 'original' colours.
  • + 3
 I like RF products and would rather support a decent mtb company than buy crap Chinese products, i can save a few bucks here and there through other avenues.
  • + 3
 Might have to order (2) set of RF Rides for my kids, their only gripe about biking is pedal bite.
  • + 3
 Looking at the pictures make me happy to be clipped in Smile
  • + 1
 So now instead of running decent pedals and never having a problem you can slip on plastic pedal pins and smack shins all the time
  • + 1
 Hope they follow up with the whole Chester line. The cranks were badass. One of the only aluminum cranksets around with steel inserts.
  • + 1
 Chesters feel alright until you try something like Diety Tmacs with a proper concave shape, then you never go back
  • + 0
 RIP OFF!
How do they justify $35usd for basically a shitty BMX pedal with no grip.
Comparable BMX brands cost between $10 - $20usd, and ones with metal pins from $30
  • + 2
 Wow... Looks just like the free Welgos we give away at our shop...
  • - 3
 Serious question, any of you who ride with Chester pedals or similar plastic pedals notice that pedal strikes are more harsh and likely to cause you to crash compared to their aluminum counterparts because the plastic bites into rocks whereas the aluminum deflects it?
A friend of mine who was getting back into riding asked me the pros and cons of different pedals. I haven't had much trail experience with plastic pedals, but that's something I thought might be a con to consider.
  • + 18
 I’ve noticed the opposite. Pedal strikes are less harsh than alum due to the plastic deflection and absorbing the strike.
  • - 9
flag gtill9000 (Jun 19, 2019 at 7:44) (Below Threshold)
 my rule of thumb: if you bash into rocks more, aluminum is better, if you bash into roots more, composite is better.
  • + 6
 I'm with @Elkulp on this one, I've noticed a difference with the composite pedals not hanging up on rocks as much as the aluminum ones.
  • + 4
 I ride Chester’s 2018 and they are far superior to aluminum! Less harsh and if you do bash them up and f*ck them up!they are easy to fix and add pins. I ride at trestle bike park 60+ days a year and love them.
  • + 4
 Opposite.
In both cases he pins will crave rocks and slow the bike a little.
But composite seems to "absorb" the impact better, or something.
Also, when it goes too far, aluminum pedals tend to crack or break, whereas composite bend.
  • + 2
 Opposite for me on my synth plastics.i wish I woulda got the one up plastics to get another pin but they are hard to find in store in stock.strikes seem to be less of an issue than my last metal pedal. Either way I’d rather save money on pedals since the plastic variants are really nice these days
  • + 1
 I'm the opposite to masonstevens. My composites seem to get hung up a lot less.
  • - 1
 opposite, on superstar ElPlastiques, feel much softer to crush against hard stuff
  • + 2
 It's actually the opposite that is a significant benefit of comp pedals and why lots of people use them. Aluminum tends to stick to rocks while comps tend to slide easier. Comps are also the same colour all the way through vs. aluminum where the colour gets scratched off. Comps don't look as beat after a season of riding. In my experience, the same hits that break a comp pedal will also break an aluminium pedal so the replacement cost is much lower. Internals are the same while the price is much lower... in my opinion and experience, if you're running flats there's no reason not to use comps unless you just like to spend more cash.
  • + 3
 Thanks for the info, fellas. appreciate your input.
  • + 1
 You got it backwards. Aluminum bounces (and makes an ear piercing sound) while composite slides quietly off. I love my DMR Vaults but I actually prefer composite pedals, both for flat and clipless.
  • + 2
 @Blackers: Yup, I've bashed OneUp Composite flats off of rocks more than a few times. It's a quiet hit and I go about my business. They are a little deformed (minor) but still function perfectly after 2 seasons. I have pins on there that wore down from scraping rocks. Metal-on-rock makes me cringe, but it probably sounds a whole lot worse than it actually is. The plastic pedals do seem to absorb impact a little better, instead of deflecting like Al or Steel.
  • + 1
 hate to be one those in wet weather and bad shoes
  • + 1
 Flat out pedal coming soon
  • + 1
 Deity, please make an inexpensive composite version of your TMAC pedals!!
  • + 1
 Their plaztik Compound pedals are pretty good, actually.
  • + 1
 Make some chester smaller pedal for kid! Kid need traction!
  • + 1
 so... bmx pedals?
  • + 1
 hahaha amazing
  • - 1
 Looks exactly like the pedals on AliExpress for $3.99
  • + 0
 Honestly, I have a pair of “Rock Bros” pedals that are Chester knock offs. In the end, the Chester is a better pedal but not for the price. I paid 16 bucks for mine last October and have opened them once for a re-greasing. But I ride the heck out of them and run my sag on the lower end so have pedal strikes more often than the average rider.
  • + 3
 We designed the RIDE and Chester pedals in-house out of our Vancouver, Canada offices. Production of the pedals occurs in Taiwan. Any bike products that looks like a Race Face product on AliExpress is pretty much guaranteed to be a counterfeit product that will be of a lesser quality and not tested to the same standards as a legit RF product.
  • + 0
 @raceface: imitation is the ultimate form of flattery
  • + 0
 @oldtech: Sometimes ofr sure! But not when inferior products are being sold as 'Race Face'.
  • + 1
 @raceface: I totally agree. I had a pair of Chester’s and loved them! My issue is that I live in Asia 10 months of the year and RF products are pretty expensive over there. So I opted for an imitation pedal that so far is working good for me but does not compare in quality to the Chester.
  • + 0
 @RyanVars: Makes sense.
  • + 0
 what are weird add lol
  • - 1
 Or get a pair of Fooker pedals for $22. Same pedal. Different name.
  • + 2
 But made in a shady Chinese knock-off factory, instead of the legit factory RF uses...
  • + 1
 @clumpster360: They come from the same molds. I've compared both, even cut them in half. They're the same pedal. I'm all for quality products, but marketing spin causes people to spend far more money than is necessary. Labels mean everything to some people. It's been studied to death. People will simply pay more for 'perceived' quality based on a logo. Slap a Gucci logo on a budget bag and people will spend hundreds more for it. Payless shoe company opened a store called Palessi and promoted cheap Payless shoes for $100s of dollars in a storefront modeled to look like a high end Italian brand, and people raved about the quality of the designs. They were $20 shoes. The Honda Accord in Europe was the Acura in the US. And more expensive. The product means nothing unless there's a logo to accompany it. I worked in marketing for 20 years. I've moderated focus groups. I know of what I speak. There's a reason marketing budges often outstrip production costs. The average consumer will buy what they 'think' is the best product based on the logo.
  • + 1
 @iangillies: I think it’s more than this. It’s knowing that RF stands behind its product with a good warranty and the ability to dialogue with them about the product plus, it was RF who designed and tested the pedal specs. The Fooker is the same pedal but good luck with a warranty or feed back if you ever need it.
  • + 1
 @RyanVars: Exactly!!!
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.076782
Mobile Version of Website