Race Face's New Stash Hip Belts - Pond Beaver 2020

Apr 8, 2020
by Sarah Moore  
Race Face has introduced two new hip bags.


It's been a busy Spring for Race Face, with the Canadian brand launching the T2 tailgate pad, the Stash Gear Bag, and two new hip belts, the Stash Quick Rip 1.5L and the Stash 3L Hip Bag. Both of the bags are simple at first glance, but there's a lot going on under the stealth black exteriors.

The smaller of the two hip bags retails for $67.99 USD, while the bigger version retails for $99.99 USD.


Stash Quick Rip 1.5L Bag (left) and the Stash 3L Hip Bag (right)

Stash Quick Rip 1.5L Bag:
• Ripstop nylon, 3D mesh backing, stretch belt
• Reflective logo, lower carrying straps
• Waterproof zippers
• Single-sided stretch belt adjustment
• 2 pockets + phone pocket
• Neoprene bottle holder
• Comes in black / One size fits all
• MSRP: $67.99 USD
www.raceface.com

Stash 3L Hip Bag:
• Ripstop nylon, 3D mesh backing, stretch belt
• Fold-out main pocket, reflective logo
• Waterproof zippers
• Single-sided stretch belt adjustment
• Main pocket, side pockets, phone pocket
• 1.5L bladder, water bottle holder
• Comes in black / One size fits all
• MSRP: $99.99 USD
www.raceface.com

There's enough room for a tube, spare layer and/or snacks in the Stash Quick Rip 1.5L Bag

The water-resistant phone pocket is right up against your back.
The 5cm wide hip belt is stretchy on the right, padded on the left.

Pull the straps out of their hiding holes and strap on your knee pads for the climb.

Stash Quick Rip 1.5L Tech Details

The Stash Quick Rip 1.5L bag is designed for rides where your pockets won't do the job, but most backpacks are overkill. Plus, didn't you hear that backpacks are so two years ago?

The smaller of Race Face's two hip bags fits a spare water bottle, a couple of bars or gummies and some essential repair gear. For most people, it's suited to the gear that you're likely going to want to carry on most rides. If you're looking for a bag that holds your mid-ride sandwich or a more in-depth range of tools for an alpine adventure, keep scrolling down to read about the Stash 3L Hip Bag.

There are two decent-sized pockets that could fit a large tube or small windbreaker on either side of the neoprene water bottle sleeve, and then a third padded, water-resistant pocket up against the back for carrying a phone. Race Face has used a 3D mesh backing for the section of the bag that is up against your lower back, which they say helps provide comfort and airflow.

A nice feature for a smaller bag is the two lower straps that remove some of the size limitations. Race Face suggests you use them to secure your knee pads, but you could also roll up a spare layer if it ends up being warmer than you expected once you get out riding. The straps tuck up neatly into the bag if you're not strapping anything extra onto the bag.

The Stash Quick Rip 1.5L bag has a 5cm wide stretchy one-sided soft elastic belt so that, while it feels secure, the bag doesn't feel constrictive against your waist. That being said, it is a bit irritating to only be able to tighten the bag from one side and if you're on the skinnier side, you're going to end up with the buckle way over on your right side.

bigquotesThe advantage is that an elastic belt offers ‘give’ when you wear the bag. That is a big reason why we went with the elastic material instead of the usual and non-stretch nylon webbing. The elastic allows the strap to find a comfortable home on your hips and breathes with you while you ride. Traditional nylon webbings has no give and has a hard time finding a sweet spot on your hips throughout a ride, not to mention it doesn’t accommodate for how hard you might be breathing.Race Face

Other details include waterproof zippers and a reflective logo.


The Stash 3L Hip Bag comes with a removable 1.5L hydration bladder.

There's a magnet at the front of the hip belt to secure the hose.
You're less likely to lose bits and pieces during on the trail repairs with the bag's tool bench.

The hydration bladder has a removable hose, but the twist-on connection is not one of the better ones we've seen.
There's a large mesh pocket in front of the bladder pocket. And the hose fits neatly through the designated hole.


Stash 3L Hip Bag Tech Details

There are lots of options for hydration on extended rides with the Stash 3L Hip Bag, starting with the 1.5L hydration bladder included in the main pocket. When riding with the bladder, you can poke the hose through the designated hole in the bag and then clip it onto your waist using the magnet. It's easy to remove the bladder entirely for shorter rides and there's a mesh holder with a security strap for an extra water bottle on the Stash 3L if that's how you prefer to roll. There is also an option to remove the magnetic clip if you choose not to ride with the hydration bladder, although that really just seems like a great way to lose it and never see it again.

Often, companies use hydration bladders from brands that specialize in hydration like Hydrapak or Platypus, but Race Face has chosen to source their own hydration bladder in this bag and it's less than impressive. While the hose does disconnect from the bag, it doesn't have a gasket to stop leakage when it's undone and it's such a fuss to twist it undone that it may as well be secured to the bag. The opening to pour water in is on the smaller side, but fine if you're filling up at a tap and not a mid-ride water fountain. That being said, many riders will choose to run their own hydration bladder or just carry a spare water bottle in the provided pocket.

bigquotesIn development, it seemed individuals had strong choices on bladder preference. We could have spent the money on a branded bladder and still not have satisfied a majority of the market. The included ‘non-brand’ 1.5l bladder gets the user into using the bag and then over time, they can choose the bladder of their preference if they feel ours isn’t performing. If we didn’t include a bladder we felt people would pass us over for bags that included bladders.Race Face

There are five zippered pockets on the Stash 3L Hip Bag, so you can keep more than just your emergency cash in a safely zippered pocket when you're out riding. There's a pocket on each hip so you can have easy access to on-the-trail snacks without needing to twist the bag around to the front, a giant padded, water-resistant pocket right up against the back that fits a phone, and a pocket on either side of the main opening, a mesh one on the interior and a nylon one on the outside. Interestingly, the key clip is in the larger compartment, not one of the smaller pockets.

A cool feature is that the main opening on the Stash 3L bag folds out entirely to make what Race Race calls a "tool bench" for trailside repairs. That large flat piece of fabric, combined with the large mesh pocket inside the bag means that you're less likely to lose bits and pieces when you do have to swap out a derailleur hanger or change a flat mid-ride.

The Stash 3L Hip Bag has the same wide stretchy one-sided soft elastic belt that the Stash Quick Rip 1.5L has, waterproof zippers, and a reflective logo.

Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020






109 Comments

  • 76 1
 I'm gonna start wearing my hip pack over my Camelback AND have my 3 water bottles on my frame...
  • 14 0
 Hydration is everything!
  • 20 0
 With that much bottle capacity, I'm thinking you could become the Trail Cocktail King!
  • 12 27
flag carlostrancex2 (Apr 7, 2020 at 17:48) (Below Threshold)
 Real MEN-tain bikers wear full packs!
  • 10 0
 How many pairs of goggles will you wear strapped to your helmet? Enduro trend followers need to know...
  • 3 38
flag RedRedRe (Apr 7, 2020 at 19:35) (Below Threshold)
 Nobody needs more than 1 Liter. Unless you are in the desert or in a place far away from civilization or above 3000 meters.
Hydration starts one-two days before. Drink half glass of water every 30 min. So your body is hydrated when you ride.

Pro road racers, that ride 7 hours a day for three weeks, rarely use more than a liter/four bottles. And some of that water is used to cool off head and muscles or wash dirt. Pro XC probably drink less than 1 bottle.
  • 5 0
 Gotta stay hydrated, homie.
  • 10 1
 @RedRedRe: water is one of those 'have an not need things' than need an not have. Like a basic first aid kit
  • 12 0
 @RedRedRe: also, we all know the reason Pro road racers 'probably drink than 1 bottle'
  • 6 1
 I'm moist just from reading this
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla:
I always think basic first aid as last aid. There is nothing in a first aid kit that will do anything to save your life. Whilst I carry one. I would always have a tourniquet, Israeli bandage, sam splint, whistle and medi blanket, all of which take up hardly any space in my hip bag. I’m not not worried about having a cut on my knee and needing a plaster. I’m worried about fatal scenario on the hill on my own or coming across someone that has. MRT can take a while...
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla:

But your are right, it’s better than nothing
  • 2 0
 @Small-Tales-Epic-Trails: true but. I have seen a few hefty cuts an shin gashes
  • 4 0
 @RedRedRe: Mate, you clearly never biked in the tropics. In Singapore I went through a 3L Camelback within 90 minutes, and still on my ride home had to hydrate with a few extra sports drinks.
  • 1 3
 Classic shit hahahahaha, hip belts , hahahahaha!
  • 1 1
 @ctd07: you never know what can happen !!
  • 2 2
 @MTB-Colada: I said, except unusual conditions... like tropics as well.
I am referring to all the people I see in local trail loops with 3L hydration packs for a two hour ride.
  • 4 0
 @RedRedRe: @RedRedRe: How long are your rides? Try going on a 3 hour ride here in Colorado with 1L. You'll suffer and realize bringing water is a good thing
  • 2 0
 @goldencycle: for real! Honestly, its nobody's business how thirsty I get during a ride. If I use 2 bottles who cares?
  • 2 1
 @goldencycle: My average rides (worth calling such) are 5-6 hours, 20-40 miles, 5k elevation.

For rides under 3 hours, I don't even carry water unless it is summer or I am riding with others and pushing it.

THE POINT IS... bring the water you think you need.... but you may not need that much water if your body is well hydrated to start with. The water is already there.

If you are in remote or particular places carry more than you need.
People just look like dorks with 3L water to ride ten miles loop back to their cars.
  • 4 0
 @RedRedRe: Again, here in Colorado, that won't cut it. The elevation, dryness, and heat in the summer means you need more water. If you rode 3 hours here with no water, you'd be a class 1 idiot. My point is don't paint your personal ideas to every riding situation and every person. And DEFINITELY don't advise people to not bring water if they are wondering if they should. I'd 1000% of the time rather bring extra water and not become dehydrated/unsafe and maybe look like a 'dork.'
  • 1 1
 @goldencycle: Compare to where I live, Colorado is flat and tame riding.
You are new to cycling... maybe if you listen you learn.

And learn how to read and understand what other people say – otherwise the future does not look bright.
  • 1 0
 @RedRedRe: you are arguing about a theoretical water bottle, your future isnt looking very bright either.
  • 29 0
 Pond beaver is the shit!!
  • 4 33
flag MrDiamondDave (Apr 7, 2020 at 17:30) (Below Threshold)
 Dick Pond Beaver or Dick Pound Beaver or Beaver Dick Pound ??
  • 8 1
 @MrDiamondDave: Just get on a porn site and search "dick pound on pond beaver". I'm sure what you're after will come up...
  • 1 0
 @dexterfawkes @mikelevy I must've missed it somewhere along the way. WTH is Pond Beaver??
  • 3 0
 @pdxkid: do you know what sea otter is? pond beaver the online version of sea otter because sea otter cannot take place due to the rona...
  • 1 1
 @dexterfawkes: Thank you. Yes I'm aware of Sea Otter. Somehow I didn't connect the dots
  • 25 0
 see theyre creeping back up to full packs again. 80s>90s>2000s>. little taller, see what they can get away with. next thing you theres a shoulder support option, then bam! my 35l pack is back in fashion
Jordache bro
  • 2 0
 Shhh it's too early to talk about the 2024 models.
  • 26 10
 Not a fan of the fanny packs.. tried a couple different kinds and when they are full they are annoying to jump with.. for me 1-1.5 hr rides water bottle and tools on my bike, for longer good ole hydration pack.
  • 35 8
 For me they are 100x better to jump with than a backpack. Doesn't restrict breathing and also a Lower center of gravity. I have a raceface ribstrip btw
  • 14 0
 The evoc ones are good
  • 10 0
 I have the Bontrager Rapid Pack and love it. I never liked hip packs much because when they get super full the weight is weird. But the bontrager, and the 1.5 here, are a lot more ergonomic and sit close to your body pretty well. I essentially never use my backpack anymore except really long rides.
  • 15 1
 I prefer a Lycra Jersey and use the pockets. When it's hot as hell I have more breathability and full front zipper to vent, Also 2nd bottle in middle pocket no issues #morelycra Wink
  • 3 1
 Agreed on it feeling way better than a backpack, even jumping. Backpacks are for 40 milers
  • 4 0
 They don't work for me either. Rides up on me and then feels like a clamp on my stomach. Hydration packs much more comfortable.
  • 1 0
 I bought reluctantly a Norrona 6 Liter hip pack and it is been fantastic, way more comfortable than a backpack for me. I dont even felt it, it is secure on jumps and chunky terrain. Plenty of room to store stuff, i have done 25-30 miles with it and it is been great. You wear what you are comfortable on, plenty of choices out there.
  • 6 0
 @ibishreddin: strange. I've had literally zero issues jumping and doing drops and wheelies drops with a Camelback and dakine pack.
  • 2 0
 I try to keep mine fairly empty. Co2, first aid, snack, keys, sometimes other odds and ends. But it doesn't amount to much weight.
  • 2 0
 I've been riding with a wingnuts 2.5 pack for about 2 years now and it is the best of both worlds. Want low slung weight? yeah, it's got that. Want shoulder straps so you don't have to cinch it like a girdle? Got those too. Want to reach stuff without taking it off? Got pockets for that. Basically I can carry way more than my old MULE, have the weight low, a cooler back, and breathe.

These other bags are just inferior.
  • 1 0
 @slickwilly1 Come on. Bottle on the bike and one in the bid and we can head out for three plus hours.
I do agree, not fun for jumping.
  • 1 0
 Don't call it my Fanny.
  • 2 0
 @endlessblockades: Is that where MrDiamondDave's "middle pocket" is located? I dont know how these pocket things work....fanny pack...middle pocket....its confusing...
  • 1 0
 @ibishreddin: absolutely! So much better to jump with than a pack. No benefit to a pack unless you're out for an all-day-er and need spare clothes/outerlayer and extra food etc.

I was rocking a 'hip pack' back in the late 90's along with single ring setup, chain guide, AND water bottle on frame and people would have you believe this is some new enduro branded setup!
  • 2 2
 Same here. Have a Rapid Pack which is supposed to be one of the most comfy and out of the way hip packs but its not great. I notice it constantly, have to chinch the strap uncomfortably tight to stop it from wandering and getting stuff in and out isn't the best either. I With a small, light and well fitting backpack, all those problems vanish and i don't notice it at all, even after hours of riding.
  • 1 0
 @Shredtheduck: tell me more about the duck...is he ok?
  • 1 0
 @MrDiamondDave: Same here. Gettin tough to find 3 pocket MTB jerseys. No more TLD Ace, Royal hasn't made one in years, and most of the euro road brands look like euro road brands. Chromag had a good one but I think it is now no longer. Any you like that are still available?
  • 1 0
 The smaller option has pockets that are of a useless size for either tube or rain jacket. You'll save money on the hip pack but have to spend big money on a super thin, typically more expensive packable tiny jacket & you'll have to put a tiny, more costly tube in it b/c no way a basic rain jacket OR an off the shelf shop tube fits in either of those pockets. And you're gonna feel your phone pressing on your spine with that unpadded mesh back.

Then you look at their 3L pack and they're charging comparable to brands like Osprey, Evoc, Camelbak & Dakine & you get a far inferior bladder?

As I've said before, if you're going to try a fanny pack, start inexpensive with the the Osprey Savu for $55. Has no bladder, holds 2 water bottles of any size, has a padded, vented & mesh bridged back, 2 forward pull straps (side pull straps are frustrating), easy access pockets on each hip, room for a full size 3 layer rain jacket or tube, a full size cell phone pocket buffered by the contoured pad and that pad gives the pack support. Throw 1 tiny bottle in and go or lug 2 full 750ml bottles. If you find you need more room, you've spent very little trying it out and someone smart will buy it off you in a heartbeat and bump up to a bigger pack.

People get frustrated with the weight of these things b/c the first thing we all do is load them down with as much water as they'll carry and then try to strap them on. Load the Savu (or any of these really) with just the gear & leave the water out, adjust it, pedal around for a bit, then once you've got a starting point for adjustment, add water.

I was gonna throw the Savu out the door when I tried to first adjust it with 2 small, but full bottles. Took the bottles out, cinched it, popped the bottles back in and could put it back on loaded down from then on.
  • 12 2
 The Race Face Loaded Diaper Belt
  • 2 2
 I just spit on my screen. "thanks.."
  • 10 1
 Race Face "Look at our hip pack!"

EVOC " Hold my beer"
  • 1 0
 It all started with the enduro sash on April 1st 2014.

www.pinkbike.com/news/exclusive-first-look-prototype-enduro-sash-2014.html
  • 4 1
 My frame does not have water bottle mount’s, and i like to drink, however i found even with hip pack/ water bottle solution you have up to 750 ml of water which it super small for summer bike park days, so backpack or trails with water supply on the top or bottom(which are rare)

Hitting jump line is equally uncomfortable with hip/backpack;
Next frame be will definitely spech / trek/ whatever manufactured with swat + water bottle
  • 4 6
 Sell out ;-)

LOVE swat and bottle cages
  • 1 0
 @RoadStain: as soon as covid lockdown will be over
  • 3 0
 but you're at the bike park.... why do you need a pack? just grab water at the bottom then catch the lift back up.
  • 1 4
 @patch92: in my bike park, out and back is just over 60mi, more if you want.....
  • 3 0
 @RoadStain: in that case.... you need a camel to follow you!
Thought you were talking about basic bike park laps at a DH track.
  • 7 0
 Falling on the water bottle looks ouchie
  • 2 0
 2 questions R.F.; is it easy to clean after getting into direct fire of all the mud slinging off your rear tire? Why not a brightly colored magnet housing for that hose so that you can easily secure the hose while riding? N52 grade magnet would be sweet as well to maybe even prevent the need to look down.
  • 5 0
 Wow! Can't believe my Mountain Smith fanny packs from thirty years ago are back in fashion!
  • 4 0
 Haha, Mtn Smith. Careful your age is showing!
  • 2 0
 why not go for the EVOC? same price with protector as well.Was it so difficult for RF to put a protector?.I really don't understand it.The same comment goes for Deuter as well.They are selling Hip Bags almost the same price like EVOC but with less feautures.
  • 1 0
 Also the EVOC has that amazing wrap belt instead of a huge buckle. The EVOC is by far the most comfortable I've tried - leaning forward on a big pinchy buckle sucks.
  • 6 1
 Looks exactly like a less comfortable bontrager rapid pack
  • 3 0
 Looks like a solid contender, I really enjoyed the build and material quality of the camelbak repak LR for Lumbar packs. I'll consider something from Raceface
  • 4 0
 I'm going to go full indoor-o and wear this and a pair of goggles while I ride Zwift for the next month.
  • 2 0
 My REI dual bottle fanny pack was a good 30 years ahead of it's time. Now I just gotta see if it's still in the garage, and if so, what species' of life have colonized it....
  • 1 0
 Fanny packs are dumb, soon enough the industry will be telling us we need backpacks again . I mean they hold more stuff which means we’re buying more bike related trash to put in our packs . Never go full enduro bro. I’m guessing all the fanny pack fan boys have never really needed anything out on the trail besides water. Shit goes wrong , weather changes quickly up high. Never know when you might need the kitchen sink! Jus sayin.......
  • 1 0
 Just as a little counter to this. Backpacks kill my back so I always looked for something better and after riding a goodwill 4 dollar fanny for 2 years I'm way sold. I still do big back country rides with tools, extra water bottle, tube, pump and lots of other goodies. Unless you're filming or something a pack is just too much unnecessary space. A good fanny pack does all you need (and saves my back)
  • 1 0
 That bladder is 100% the same as cheap chinese bladders from wish/aliexpress. Best one imo is Source, feels high quality and absolutely no plastic taste, camelback feels a little cheaper for me, but plastic seems as good. Most of the other bladders are absolutely horrendous, including this one by the looks of it.
  • 1 0
 I've been using a Camelbak Dulaney runner's hip pack for years... It holds a bottle diagonally across your back so it's easy to access while riding, and can carry a multi tool / CO2 in the front pocket. Between that and a bottle inside the frame, it's been perfect for me so far...
  • 2 0
 Especially with the bottles in there, it appears much less comfortable to crash and roll out on than with a regular and flat full length hydration pack.
  • 2 0
 I go over the bars at least once or twice a year and land on my back. My pack has saved me many times. I can't imagine landing on a hip belt. Ouch.
  • 1 1
 Having a hard object like a water bottle right up against your spine is the stupidest design ever! Can take a little fall and turn it Into a serious spine injury. I would never wear a hip pack with the bottle in that position.
  • 3 0
 No updated beer bandolier? I wanted to fit a case!
  • 2 0
 The Fanny packs have made a return... you know its official when RF even makes their own!
  • 2 0
 Might as well just use a normal hydration pack, by the time you've finished messing around with all this
  • 2 0
 Am I the only one that is concerned about slaming on your back with a water bottle attached so close to your Spine?
  • 1 0
 same here
  • 1 0
 How secure is the bottle holder on the smaller one? Will it come out on bumpy downhills?
  • 1 0
 Stash Hip Belts
(picte rick, morty and the other alien thing)
sounds like a backpack with extra straps...
  • 1 0
 CamelBak Podium Flow belt. Better bottle placement. Better phone placement. Better price.
  • 1 0
 Yo, we hear you like fanny packs, so we put a fanny pack on your fanny pack.
  • 1 0
 Seems like the center mount bottle on the small one would hit the riders back...why not offset this bottle area?
  • 1 0
 Fanny pack, hip belt or bum bag? You decide
  • 1 0
 Ass-bag is what I've been using for years.
  • 2 0
 Too hip to be square.
  • 2 2
 We used to call em "For Additional Gear bags" ...

Anyone seen my chapstick?
  • 3 2
 hip packs are the best for me I hate backpacks
  • 1 0
 these are not fat kid friendly
  • 1 0
 Not sure my OCD could handle an asymmetric waist strap
  • 1 0
 Gotta a call em what they really are. Fanny packs. I'm fully on board tho
  • 1 1
 I will not go away until somebody answers my question. What happens when you fall and you land on your back?
  • 1 0
 It hurts and you lay on the ground.
  • 1 0
 Fanny life 4 lyfe
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