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Sunday Randoms: Weird & Wonderful Machines - Eurobike 2024

Jul 7, 2024
by TEBP  
The European Bike Project is one of our favorite Instagram accounts because the feed is constantly updated with everything from tiny manufacturers to inside looks at European manufacturing. During Eurobike 2024, Alex is tracking down the most interesting products for you.

Wintersteiger

Eurobike 2024
Wintersteiger Velobrush

A few weeks ago I stayed in a hotel that said it was a "bike hotel" and that you'd find "everything you need to work on your bike in the dedicated bike room". In the said room I found a cheap pump and a tube. Needless to say I was a bit underwhelmed. When it comes to cleaning your bike, many bikeparks and hotels still think that providing a garden hose (or nothing at all) is good enough, but honestly I really think it's not.

Wintersteiger is a company from Austria that makes bike cleaning systems, such as the Velobrush and the smaller Veloclean Pro (not pictured). The Velobrush is a durable stainless steel construction with a 400 liter water tank. The water is cleaned by three different filter systems and should be changed after 7 to 10 days. Wintersteiger also sells their own biodegradable cleaner - 100 ml is enough for the 400 liter water tank. It's not a degreaser though, so the drivetrain will be cleaned, but not degreased. With the shortest cleaning cycle you can clean up to 25 bikes per hour.

One of these units sells for roughly 60,000 Euro and it comes with an integrated card terminal. Of course it's up to the hotel / bikepark / shop / race organizer whether and how much they want to charge riders for cleaning their bikes.

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Unfortunately Wintersteiger had no bike in the Velobrush system when we were there, but this Instagram video from Bründl Sports in Saalbach gives you a really good idea how it works.




X10

Eurobike 2024
X10 work stands can be ordered with clamps from Feedback Sports, Unior, VAR and Parktool

Bikes are not getting lighter, so it's no surprise that we see more and more beefed-up & electric repair stands.

German manufacturer X10 (formerly montagestaender.bike) brought their new range of stands to Frankfurt, including the Base Assistant and the Mobile Assitant.

The Base Assistant is mostly aimed at shops and enthusiatic riders. It can handle loads up to 40 kg, weighs 65 kg and the clamp can be anywhere between 40 and 185 cm above the ground.

As you might have guessed, the Mobile Assitant is the more compact and foldable little brother of the Base Assitant. It's made for bikes up to 30 kg, weighs 15 kg, comes with a trolley case and a battery (opposed to the Base Assitant that needs a 230 Volt outlet). Due to the smaller motor, the clamp goes up and down at 40 mm/s, while the Base Assitant is faster at 75 mm/s.

X10 also offer a cargo version (up to 220 kg load), a wall mount version and a scooter version.

Eurobike 2024
The X10 Base Assitant...
Eurobike 2024
... and the Mobile Assitant

Eurobike 2024
Eurobike 2024

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X10 Base Assistant at 75 mm/s.




Laba7

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Dynos, vacuum bleed pumps, spring rate testers, bushing sizing tools, fork clamp sets, runout measuring tools: Laba7 has it all. This Lithuanian company offers almost everything a good suspension shop should have and many enthusiats dream of.

The Dynos (developed & built in Lithuania, including the circuit board!) come in different sizes: Featherlight, Light, Mid and Heavy. The main differences are the speed and load they can generate, which obviously depends on the motor (3 HP to 10 HP). Every suspension shop should have a dyno, the Laba7 representative told me. "It's the most important tool to have. You need to be able to show your client the changes you've made to their suspension, no matter whether it's an mountainbike or a Dakar Rallye truck."

Laba7 is working on new electromagnetic Dynos too, these should be able to go from 0 m/s to 7 m/s in a split second.

Eurobike 2024
Spring rates can vary a lot, so if you want accurate information, you'll need a spring rate tester.
Eurobike 2024
There's an optional electronics upgrade for the mtb shock tester which can send information to the Laba7 app.


Eurobike 2024
The "Module" vacuum pump is light and small, so you can put it in your race van.
Eurobike 2024
Bushing sizing tools from Laba7




Sinter

Eurobike 2024
The Sinter Smart Bedding Machine

"Sending a customer out the door with pads that are not properly bedded is simply unsafe." the team at Sinter says. That's why they've crated the Smart Bedding Machine which is mainly aimed at bikeshops.

The aluminium rollers accomodate wheels from 20" to 29" and between 1" and 3" wide. When changing between the front and rear wheels, the direction of the rollers can be changed with a wave of your foot, thanks to the touchless sensor. The machine will walk users through the process, so it's a safe and consistent standard. It weighs 24 kg and generates a speed of up to 25 km/h.

Eurobike 2024
The smart bedding machine will walk users through the process and tell them when to brake.
Eurobike 2024



Dangerholm X Scott X Monē

Eurobike 2024
One of Dangerholm's latest creations: "Wasteland"

Blurring the lines between bike and machine, this "Wasteland" creation by Dangerholm is an absolute gem. The frame once was a Scott Solace eRide that got an extra tube and the fork was made by New Mexico-based framebuilding guru Cjell Monē. I guess we can all agree that we'd be disappointed not to see this bike in a post-apocalyptic Hollywood movie anytime soon.


Eurobike 2024
The motorbike-inspired fork from Monē
Eurobike 2024
Inlcuding rotor guards that you usually only see on bike polo bikes. Certainly a good idea on this bike.

Eurobike 2024
A weathered Brooks saddle...
Eurobike 2024
... and some more patina.

Eurobike 2024
Eurobike 2024


Author Info:
TEBP avatar

Member since May 15, 2020
47 articles

55 Comments
  • 43 1
 Take my monē…
  • 5 0
 Count De Mone'
  • 3 1
 @scottlink: wait for the shake
  • 26 2
 I know Dangerthighs is sponsored by Scott, and I get why he does things as he does, but working on some other brands' bikes would be so much more satisfying at this stage for all of us mere regular leg sized people.
  • 24 2
 Way to go. Promoting a bikewash station without actually having a video of it washing a bike. 60k for such a machine? I don't think it will beat the usual hose and sponge cleaning you can find at some hotels and bike parks.
  • 33 2
 I really hate washing my bike so I'm applying for a loan as we speak
  • 17 2
 Nope. But it'll be hilarious to see everyone leaving the bike park without any brake lines and derailleur cables, cuz they're all hanging on those flappy spinning brush thingies.
  • 16 1
 Sometimes human beings like to waste their time at creating meaningless things that are already useless before using them.
  • 7 0
 I wonder how much you have to charge per wash to make a worthwhile return on your €60k (plus ongoing costs and maintenance) "investment".
  • 9 0
 @boozed: €500 a wash seems very reasonable.
  • 7 1
 @boozed: that's a good question that's also applied to how much you have to charge for suspension service to make a return on your investment for Dynos' that cost 16-20k that "every suspension shop should have"
  • 9 1
 Seems like a 1 way ticket to contaminating pads and rotors.
  • 2 1
 I bet my Demo do not fit there. It would trash that machine in 2 washes at any muddy day at any bike park. That is for mamachari bikes,ugly plain city bikes so cover in city stuff you do not know what color is it. City bikes are the dirtiest bikes around by far.
  • 6 0
 @SwampThAAng: that’s why you get headset routing and wireless
  • 2 0
 @boozed: it's pretty interesting thought. The local carwash always has a long que with people happy to pay something they could easily do themselves. I wonder if you plonked one of these things in front of Longhorns at whistler how much use it might get.
  • 2 0
 Mind you this was specifically designed for Swiss bikeparks Big Grin
  • 8 0
 Never once expected to see Wintersteiger on pinkbike. I have only known the name from seeing their farm research plot equipment at Ag field days. Since that equipment usually goes to government entities paying for things with other people's money, I now understand where they came up with their pricing on the bike wash!
  • 3 0
 Same here I used to run one that had six vertical saw blades that could cut flooring planks, but we used it to cut guitar sides. They also make ski tuning and repair equipment.
  • 6 0
 They're also the dominant manufacturer in ski and snowboard tuning equipment. Not quite up to Ag pricing on stuff, but still extremely spendy.
  • 3 0
 @monkeynaut: can spend a million pretty quick with wintersteiger for ski tuning stuff. It’s awesome.
  • 10 0
 I was looking for an easier and faster way to ruin my bike’s bearings, but $60k is a bit steep.
  • 6 0
 "Wintersteiger is a company from Austria that makes bike cleaning systems"

That's like saying "Lamborghini is a company that makes SUV's"

Wintersteiger is one of the leading ski tuning machine companies and does a WHOLE lot of other complex machinery.
  • 2 0
 I thought I recognized that name! We had one of their machines in our ski shop, things was super dope for basic tunes.
  • 2 0
 Came to say this. They make such quality machinery, the bike wash is probably incredible for fleet maintenance and resort hotels.
  • 1 0
 @Takaya94: Yeah there is a lot of "basic" machines in American shops, along with Montana. The huge resorts that have the fully automated machines where you just throw rental skis in and out pops an edged and waxed ski are damn impressive.
  • 1 0
 @NorCalNomad: Well.. thats all I used it for because I was afraid I would screw it up and botch someone's skis. So I did most my work by hand. The thing had a million settings though and could grind, bevel, wax, you name it. I guess it cost the shop bout $650k (there goes our Christmas bonus)
  • 5 0
 Looks aside that Dangerholm Apocalypse bike kinda loses it's charm / practicality when you realize it's an ebike with wireless drivetrain. Are we expecting the zombies to keep the powerplants running now?
  • 2 0
 Can the X10 move up and down at a much faster rate than 40mm/sec?

Can it also be programmed to move a pre-set distance repeatedly, say 6"? Only needs to do so for about 4-7 mins (depending on time of day).

Oh, asking for a friend
  • 1 0
 the 40mm stroke is prolly just fine for most, this guy, trying to impress the lads on PB....
  • 1 0
 Are dropper seatposts actually designed to hold heavy eeebs?
  • 3 1
 Am I the only person disappointed in the Dangerholm bike? I really like most of his builds, this one seems pointless (unless the point was to appease your sponsors). The only bike that makes a shred of sense in a post apocalyptic world is a mutated fat bike. Scott don't make fatbikes anymore, but getting an old Big Jon or Big Ed and having some fun with that would surely yield a better result than this?!?
  • 3 0
 Can't wait for Laba7 to introduce the following product lines: the Vu7va, the Ov8ry, and the Cl7toris. Oh, and of course, the 9-spot.

(I am genuinely excited for a new lower cost manufacturer of sophisticated tools)
  • 2 0
 That is funny. I actually laughed Big Grin
  • 4 3
 Bikes Are getting so heavy I’m a bit dubious about the single clamp on the seat post that most companies are sticking with. There’s a few options for work stands where the bike sits on them but most are from small shop / companies.
  • 6 3
 *mopeds are getting so heavy (fixed that for ya!)
  • 2 1
 That dyno comment is interesting. Those Lab7 dynos start at €50k euros. The cost to buy one of them and amortize them across bicycle servicing is comical. Makes sense at a Motorsport shop, but on a $250 suspension service, a 50k tool isn’t feasible. Take a decade to make that thing pay. Especially considering the vast majority of customers don’t have a vague idea of what a dyno chart shows them.
  • 3 0
 The Featherlight Dyno costs 7950 €
  • 1 0
 When "doing your own research" goes wrong Big Grin Dyno graphs are pretty self-explanatory. Average riders can easily understand that distorted graph - bad, and nice and smooth - good. Just show them before and after. Most often differences are quite drastic. That will speak volumes about your quality work.
  • 1 0
 @medzioklinis: This is laughable. I'd agree it's nice to have before and after data. But the average customer has no idea how that translates to their ride. Other than the line has changed. Nice to have data but doesn't translate to customer perceived value.

@TEBP that's fair enough. The email I got about their new Ema dyno (The same day this article was posted) says it starts at 50k, my bad for skipping over that critical detail.
  • 5 0
 Dangerholm goes so hard.
  • 2 1
 Springs are varied indeed, this one was rather cold and rainy, to get a better idea of future springs and rate them for a personal list of best Spring ever I consider to get this spring rate testing machine.
  • 1 0
 If I was riding that wasteland thing, reckon finding salvagable brake pads might be an issue,
considering a warped sawblade would bed them in and eat em long before I get to the bullet farm : )
  • 4 1
 I don't trust anyone that puts a bike in a rack the wrong way round. Same goes for people with super tight shoe laces.
  • 3 0
 Most cyberpunk feature of the Wasteland bike is the wired brakes.
  • 3 0
 Cha-mone! Props for beartrap pedals
  • 1 0
 About time someone invented a scratch 'n shine for bikes I found another perk of ebike ownership a few days ago. Bedding in brake pads is practically effortless
  • 3 0
 That fork - wow.
  • 2 2
 I get why he does things as he does, but working on some other brands' bikes would be so much more satisfying at this stage for all of us mere regular leg sized peopl
  • 1 0
 I was looking for an easier and faster way to ruin my bike’s bearings, but $60k is a bit steep
  • 2 2
 Dangerholm is simply the best! Always looking forward to seeing any new creation from him.
  • 1 0
 The “Smart Bedding Machine” was not what I expected.
  • 1 0
 my favorite part about the scott is the fly reuben grips
  • 1 2
 I get why he does things as he does, but working on some other brands' bikes would be so much more satisfying at this stage for all of us mere regular leg sized peopl
  • 1 1
 a bedding in machine..... otherwise called... a file
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