Renthal 40mm Duo Stem - Review

May 8, 2014
by Matt Wragg  
Pinkbike Product Picks

Renthal 40mm Duo stem - reviewed 2014


Renthal 40mm Duo Stem

Renthal's Duo stems are unique in that the main body of the stem is manufactured in two pieces. By splitting the stem vertically in this manner, they can machine the interior of the stem to a greater degree than is possible with a standard, front-loading design. The results are compelling, the 40mm Duo stem weighs just 124g, but is strong and stiff enough for whatever abuse you might want to put it through. Renthal also claim that the design and shape of the clamping area puts less stress on your handlebar. Until now they were solely available in a 50mm length, but with the rising popularity of big-wheeled bikes and long front-centers, they have produced a 40mm version, with a ten-degree rise. It is only available in a 31.8mm clamp, as Renthal don't see the need for 35mm diameter bars. They feel their bars are already strong enough and while some companies can decrease the handlebar weight with the larger diameter clamp area, there is a corresponding increase in stem weight that is often overlooked. MSRP: $99.95 USD.
Renthal

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Tech aside, we love how the Renthal stems look and somehow they seem to look good on any bike.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThere are two main groups of riders that this stem will likely appeal to, riders who are looking to run a longer top tube to increase the wheelbase, or riders with bigger-wheeled bikes who want to sharpen their steering. We ended up falling into both of these categories, running it on a bigger-wheeled bike with a longer top tube. In terms of handling, the difference between a 40mm and a 50mm stem is small, but if you follow the logic that a 650B bike is slightly slower handling than a 26" bike, that small difference is enough to make the bike feel sharper. In terms of quality, we simply cannot fault Renthal Duo stems, we have had them in circulation on test bikes and personal bikes since 2011 and haven't had any issues. We do sometimes see reports that people having creaking from their stem, but that is an installation issue and tightening the bolts further fixes it in our experience, although you'll want to be sure not to exceed the recommended torque spec. Greasing the bolt threads should also help to silence any noise. To sum the stem up, it is light, stiff, we love the way it looks, and for a top-end, UK-made stem, the pricing is sensible for this kind of quality. - Matt Wragg



124 Comments

  • + 48
 I had renthal bars and seatpost on my BMX 27 years ago, just wanted to share that little nugget of information. B-)
  • + 24
 Hipster!
  • + 13
 ''Two main groups of riders'' .. what about DJers. I would put this on my DJ bike.
  • + 15
 I'm guessing that according to Pinkbike dirt jumpers are a rare breed?
  • + 82
 PinkBike's "two main groups of rides" Enduro and Not Enduro.
  • + 2
 Is there even any other type of mountain biking?
  • + 1
 Great copy! Its not Renthal though and I doubt they've been tested much haha
  • + 1
 it might not be not stamped with renthal decals but i bet its made in the same factory ,just re-badged and sold at a quarter of the price. go figure eh!!..
  • + 1
 I thought renthal was like hope, all UK made. Nothing a quick Google couldn't fix tbh, but mehhh
  • + 19
 Bigger wheels, bigger bars, bigger this, bigger that.... smaller front axle... 10sp, 11spd, 7sp... enough is enough, I never buy anything according to any of these articles and reviews. I just ride! If I break a part I buy a new one. K.I.S.S.
  • + 1
 Amen.....I'm sticking to what I have since it still works...innovation is moving too fast....or the profit too tempting to pass?
  • + 2
 Agreed. If it isn't broke don't fix it.
  • - 9
flag cbenderusa007 (May 8, 2014 at 18:37) (Below Threshold)
 The thing that's going to change my life is my new job working for a very large outdoor company here in the U.S. that gives me pro-deals on a lot of top of the line bikes and components, not to mention clothing, boating, camping gear, shoes and other stuff that I don't even know about.....Smile
  • + 4
 "i never buy anything according to these articles and reviews" ... Then why did u open the article at all? Some people like to know what options are out there before they drop hundreds of dollars on new parts.
  • + 2
 "Innovation is moving too fast"

It will, and it will get even faster, such is innovations want.

Since we cannot ever hope to reign in the speed at which it operates, it leaves us with only one question: How do I want to respond to the latest innovation?

Choose your time, your reason and your place and all is bliss on your bike.

Case in point, I ride 26, single narrow wide ring, 9 speed. That will change at some point, but not now. Enjoy.
  • + 16
 " By splitting the stem vertically ". Isn't the stem split horizontally?
  • + 1
 I thought that
  • + 8
 Turn your head 90 degrees sideways... et voila... vertical!
  • + 8
 Further tightening the bolt's is wrong if your torque wrench is calibrated properly... what is proper is to use teflon grease between the stem interface and on the bolts and bolt heads.
  • + 4
 What He Said^^^^^^^^^. Tis EXTREMELY easy to overtorque Renthal Duo stems. I wqas gonna comment anyway but xasty has already done it. Pay attention to what he says. He's not wrong. And pinkbike, Shame on you. That was bloody bad advice you just dished out....
  • + 1
 5Nm iirc. Don't want to strip them out and have a $100 ornament!!!
  • + 6
 ^Would make for a cool looking paperweight is my office though.
  • + 1
 It was specifically for this reason that I searched out my instructions before installing the stem again: www.pinkbike.com/photo/9556573. As long as you prep the bolts/stem and install/tighten it in the correct order it's a stem for life. Same for the Fatbars.
  • + 5
 Re-read they sentence. They say not to exceed the torque spec, so one should assume that creaking stems are due to undertorqued hardware, and by "further tighten" they're implying that one should get them up to spec. Poorly worded, but not poor advice.

You should be using anti-seize rather than grease on the bolts, prevents galling, and doesn't break down like grease will over time, whether it creaks or not, you should be using good anti-seize.
  • + 3
 Maxyedor: I disagree with the use of anti-seize on this Renthal stem as it is so easy to over-torque the bolts. Anti-seize can rapidly reduce the friction and over-torque can occur. I spoke to Renthal over the phone and they said just to use teflon grease, which is water/weather resistant (but what is resistant to a water jet, if that's how you clean your bike?) and it fixed my 50mm stem that I have been using for two years now.

"although you'll want to be sure not to exceed the recommended torque spec" - I swear that I did not read that originally and it has been added in, anyway, drama over.
  • + 6
 I have my direct mount Renthal stem, and it's the only reason I haven't upgraded to 35mm bars yet. No 35mm stem actually looks this awesome! Also, it's light and looks more reliable than the 2 separate collars so commonly used recently..Not that I thought they're gonna break off, but this just inspires more confidence in me!
  • + 3
 The new raceface one does!
  • + 3
 Nahhh that's once again that 2 "collar" kind of stem. No matter how much I like the Atlas lineup (I mean, it would match my bike really well being mostly Atlas'd out already), I just really really enjoy the idea and design of the Renthal Integra in comparison to whatever comes out recently :-/
  • + 1
 I really wanted to love the 50mm. However. It is the ONLY stem I've ever had that was not set-and-forget. It collected dirt. It was noisy. If I didn't clean it after a dirty or wet ride it was really noisy. Good looks, poor performance was my experience with this design. The improvement in stiffness when I switched to an Easton 35mm length stem (same clamp diameter, same bar) was genuinely surprising -- and I haven't touched it since I bolted it on 9 months ago....
  • + 1
 I love the build quality and looks of these stems and I have owned the 50mm version and run the Integra dm on my DH bike. While the stiffness of that piece is outstanding I can not say the same for the Duo. It was flexy compared to others. I never had issues with the design however, a little grease on the bolt heads and it was set and forget for me. I only too it off to run a 40mm instead so this new stem is exciting, very light and gorgeous looking. Maybe the shorter one is a bit stiffer. And who doesn't love that color?
  • - 1
 @ReeferSoutherland or an even shorter stem! I run a 17mm and want nothing else! Well maybe a 10mm if I ever get a longer toptube frame... Wink
  • + 8
 What do you imagine that a 35mm bar/stem combo will give you that your current 31,8mm combo cant deliver?
Is it really an "upgrade", or are you just playing straight into the hands of good old marketing technique?
  • + 3
 Yeah I'm not sold on it either. I'm not against it, just not rushing out to replace my current set up. Easton maintains that they could not make the bars wider than 750mm and retain the stiffness they desired at the weight they desired. While I understand that thought process I have used some very stiff cockpits that keep things light and wide. One example would be Truvativ Holtz with a Boobar uncut gives you absolutely no discernible flex. 270g on the bar 190g on the stem. Easton 35 set up, 300g for the bar (800mm not 780mm) and 190g also the published weight on the stem. Stronger? Maybe, but I don't see broken Boobars lying all over the place either.
  • + 3
 @DARKSTAR63, the Boobar in 780mm width is over 340g. They're one of the heavier bars on the market. Also, the Easton Havoc 35 is one of the heaviest 35 diameter stems - both the Race Face Atlas and Chromag BZA are about 165g in a 50mm length. Not that it's a big deal, but the 35 is a lighter set up.
  • + 2
 Good points, but also note that Chromag's Ranger stem is also insanely light and stiff as sh*t. That's the stem I'm running right now and couldn't be happier.
  • + 1
 I have a Chromag Ranger, an Easton Havoc, and a Race Face Atlas, and the Havoc is the lightest by far even though it's the longest. The Ranger isn't that light, although I do like the quality.
  • + 1
 140G on my Ranger 40mm, that's pretty light considering how stout it is. I loved my Easton Havoc, but it's the only stem I ever bent... yes bent, the whole stem twisted, and it's a 35mm!
  • + 3
 I may be alone here but I run uncut protapers on my dh bike to deliberately induce flex. As long as they're not noodles I think some flex in a bar is good. It adds vertical compliance to the bike without inducing horizontal compliance like a bad wheelset or flexy frame. My only issue would be if affects my actual placement of my bike into a line, which it doesn't, so I'm not sure exactly why I need stiffer bars. On my trailbike maybe because I'm leaning into them to pedal? Anyway, 35mm strikes me as a bit of a marketing trick.
  • + 1
 I'm only running it as it what I was given, so not complaining
  • + 2
 I like a stiff bar/stem combo for precision and control. However, some bars ride "harsh" where high frequency stuff comes through more. I really do find that different bars have unique ride characteristics beyond rise and sweep. IMO you really don't want lateral flex in your front end. Torsional flex through the fork can be desirable however. My favorite bar for DH is the Renthal actually which brings us back on topic ... Renthal quality is very good, and they know how a handlebar should feel they have been making some of the best moto bars for a long long time. It's not the lightest, but it's stiff, feels good in hand and does not beat you up.
  • + 1
 ^agree. renthal bars feel comfy in the woods. mtb & moto
  • + 1
 Oversize handlebars makes sense, but oversized oversize bars as the 35mm bars could be described as is over the top. I for one would not want my handlebars to be as big, and maybe even bigger in diameter than the top tube of my frame.
With all that said, I am very happy with my Renthal handlebars, and I am looking to get the Duo stem too sometime in the future.
I do not think that 35mm bars is necessary and I sure do not consider 35mm to be an upgrade.
(A part of me still miss the good old days with the 25,4mm handlebars.)
  • + 2
 I'm pretty sure this thing will change your life.
  • + 1
 Change my life? Hope so. I bought the fat bar lite last spring, and Sat nite I ordered the 50mm and the kevlar grips. My Fuel EX came with a 90mm stem (I think) and a bar almost 3" shorter than the Fat Bar Lite. Cant wait to try the stem and grips and start tinkering with saddle position. I have no idea how this will change the way my Fuel handles, climbs, jumps but please, Dear God, deliver that shit already!
  • + 5
 I couldn't care less about all the clampsize arguments, wheelsize arguments or any of the other tech... This stem is such a beautiful object and such an innovative design. Quality materials, strong, lightweight and UK made. Masterpiece.
  • + 3
 I've got 2 of the 50mm versions, and both are ****.... I must have tried 10 different ways to stop them creaking and nothing ever works... Shame as it looks a good product, but i've had to replace them both....
  • + 5
 Dear Renthal, Please make us a 1.5 version of this niceling! Okayokay, i get that onepointfive is not cool anymore..
  • + 2
 RMB Blizzard, best Canadian steel, with XT 8 speed and v-brakes and good ol' syncros cattleprod 130mm stem .. And I am still faster they 90% of you enduro dudes Big Grin just proven it last weekend
  • + 1
 Whatever. If you can't understand that lighter/stronger/just as flexy must have a downside somewhere then you can't understand my point. I'm telling you. the downside is reduced damage resistance/toughness. Just like session 88 downtubes a few years ago. Just to put this in perspective, I ride a session, and yes it has many dents in the downtube. So I'm not saying these bars are unridable, just that they will be easier to damage than normal unless they are made overly heavy.
  • + 1
 Been running 35/40mm stems on my bike for decades and so does everyone I ride with, didn't realise anyone who rides anything other than those lame overly manicured 'mtb trail centres' actually used the longer ones that always come stock haha. I love how short stems are 'now a trend' because a bunch of xc guys now need them to make their big-wheel bikes not handle like boats.
  • + 1
 But seriously, this turn to non sense... How many handlebar diameters, stem diameters, headset diameters, bb widths, thread or press... How many chainwheel types, how many derailleur types, wheel axles, wheel sizes, seat post diameters..??? Stop this non-sense! I am sick of it...
  • + 5
 Prefer my chromag 40mm ranger instead.
  • + 2
 been using the same direct mount style renthal stem on my dh bike for a year or so. Admittedly I'm a very cautious weekend warrior type rider, but haven't faulted it so far, no cracks, no issues.
  • + 4
 I've had one hooked up with some Renthal bars on my trail bike for a year or so now. Looks great, rides great.
  • + 0
 I've been disappointed with my 50mm renthal stem. Mine creeks a lot and comparted to a four bolt face plate stem like a thomson it is more difficult to take on and off. It does look good and the build quality of it seems top notch. I'm using it with raceface atlas fr 785 bars so perhaps it just doesn't play well with them. Either way, I won't be buying anymore stems of this style.
  • + 0
 The corresponding increase in weight of 35mm clamp stems mentioned in the article should be considered with this. 35mm clamp stems on mountain bikes started with DH and freehill specific products. This made the first wave of 35mm stems heavier than lighter weight options on the market.

However, soon there will be non-DH/FR 35mm stems available. There are some trail/xc 35mm clamp stems just about to hit the market. Easton has announced and will soon be shipping a 35mm haven stem and RaceFace has done the same with their turbine stem. Within a year, we should see many more of the lighter weight stems brought to the 35mm clamp size.

35mm would be better if designing standards from scratch today. It is debatable if switching to a new "standard" is worthwhile, but it is superior from a weight/strength perspective.
  • + 4
 However inferior in a bone jarring stiffness kinda way.
  • + 0
 Or, you know, buy flexible 35mm bars instead of super-stiff 35mm bars. Complicated right?
  • + 6
 Another new standard the mountainbiking industry pushes down our throats.

Because tapered steerertubes, 15mm drop outs, press fit bb's, 27.5" wheels, 29" wheels, etc, etc wasn't enough Frown Frown Frown


Big props for Renthal for not jumping on the bandwagon and creating products that riders actually want! We need more companies like Renthal, and less BS companies that shove their shit down our throats.
  • - 2
 Just wanted add say that I wish the worst for the people behind companies who fuck their customers. A big 'fuck you' to the fork companies that only produce tapered steerertubes, a big 'fuck you' to the companies trying to push 35mm bars and stems as a new standard, and a big 'fuck you ' to Specialized because they are assholes who only sue other companies for no good reasons. Fuck you Mike Sinyard!
  • + 3
 TL;DR: Bigger is moar, and moar is the essence of better.
  • + 1
 Even tho it's not always true, I actually really like that attitude in America Smile
  • - 4
flag sherbet Plus (May 8, 2014 at 10:19) (Below Threshold)
 Someone above this comment is trying way too hard to apply the spec standard taboo to a good new component. Y'all can guess who.

Hint, he uses the M*** S****** word.

35mm is pretty awesome. We have issues with the wheel standards and fork standards as they really limited the second hand market for many other genre's of biking, such as DJ and Street where all headtubes are standard, or at least the vast majority of them are. As companies are already making 35mm bars of all geometries, it's not as if anything is lost by this standard coming out, just a better cockpit.

Please do try to think before bitching about what companies are putting out. Sure, useless tech and needless innovation harms cycling, but progress that is actually beneficial with little to no consequence should be openly accepted into bikes, not cast down in the same sentence as some recent buzz news about a company that isn't even relevant. Rolleyes
  • + 2
 What's up with Mattin? What a crazy rant!
I like it when i can swap parts around bikes, sure. But I don't expect a Suzuki exhaust to fit a Honda or a GM cylinder to fit a RAM truck.
And WTF does Specialized litigation got to do with any of this? You're like the crazy person that used to sit at my train stop and argue with no one at all.
  • + 4
 FFS motocross fatbars are already thinner (28.6mm) than the standard 31.8mm mountain bike size so why oh why do we need 35mm? It can't logically make one iota of difference, and anyone that thinks it can has been drinking marketing kool-aid propaganda. Thanks to Renthal for being honest. If there was an improvement why the hell didn't things go to 35mm from 22.4mm?
  • + 3
 @NickBit: sometimes it feels good to rant a little Smile

I agree I overreacted with my rant, but I'm still mad at companies that screw people over by creating new standards that don't improve anything, but force people to replace several parts when only one part needs to be replaced.

A good example is the tapered forks, if you want to replace your current fork with a new one, you will also have to ditch your current frame that's all good, and spend another $400-3000 bucks just so you can fit that new fork. While 1 1/8" forks have always proven to be strong enough. I might aswell just set that money on fire and watch it burn. Same if 35mm becomes the new standard: if you replace your bars you can ditch your stem aswell and spend another $40-100 bucks on nothing just so you can fit your new bars. While 31.8mm bars and stems have always been working perfectly.
Many pro slopestyle riders even ride 25.4mm bars and huck bigger stuff than pretty much any of us would do.
  • + 4
 Mattin, I agree, from personal experience.......

- hard tail to soft-tail = massive improvement (depending on terrain)
- thin tires to high volume tires = massive difference
- v brake to hydraulic brake = massive difference
- 9mm to 20mm axle = marginally noticeable improvement
- straight to tapered steerer = no/hardly any difference found
- 26-27.5 wheel size = no/hardly any difference found
- Any BB to pressfit = worse

-31.8 bar/stem to 35mm = laughable
  • + 3
 ZMC888 +50
Glad to see there are still a few ppl out there who can see through the marketting crap and actually tell a real improvement from some made up money spinning trinkets.
  • - 4
flag sherbet Plus (May 9, 2014 at 10:50) (Below Threshold)
 So would fox's move to 40mm stanchions over the industry norm of 32 or so be taken as nothing but marketing? They used an oversized diameter to tailor the stiffness of the bar and stem. It's not going to be the make of break it of your bike, like some of you are demanding it be, but rather just a small tweak for someone to make their bike a little more custom to themselves. We didn't give Fox shit for going to 40mm, and we didn't get down on RS for making a new direct mount system that was better than other iterations. Why? Benefits. They may not be massive, but they are there. Bikes are slowly evolving, you can get about the evolution train or keep whining until you eventually croak, because it's not about to change.

Taper forks are a great example. It allowed companies to use larger diameter bearings for longer life and reliablity, it made the forks stronger, I'm sure a few people could give you examples of straight sterrer 2011+ 36's with broken steerers, but the taper ones seem to be holding up. No benefit there? The real issue is frame companies (DJ companies mostly) refusing to get onto the new standard. It's been like, 4, 5 years since it came out? No excuses any more. Catch up with the market. Deity showed shots of a taper cryptkeeper at sea otter. That's where we need to be, not bitching about something that gives a benefit, even if it's small.

TL;DR, you know you don't have to buy 35mm as there are still 31mm options on the table, hell, there's still 25mm options on the table. Complain when it's actually cutting into a market segment, such as taper was for DJ bikes, not when it's a developing standard that has absolutely no bearing or negatives to you.
  • - 4
flag sherbet Plus (May 9, 2014 at 10:50) (Below Threshold)
 Also, as far as the MX example goes, last I checked DH bikes aren't meant to weight 200+lbs with 12"+ suspension. What applies to MX does not apply to DH. It's one of the more daft comparisons out there. An F1 car has four wheels, as does your family corola, but the steering wheel is going to be pretty vastly different between the two. MX to pedal bikes is the same deal, so it'd be really neat if people would stop strawmanning the argument with something not really relevant.

And lastly, 9mm to 20mm was a MARGINAL improvement? What the f*ck planet do you live on buddy? 20mm is a MASSIVE improvement in both rigidity and strength over a QR axle.
  • + 5
 Sherbert nonsense.....so it should be that a heavier bike should have a thinner diameter bar than a lighter bike? Doesn't make sense! All those DH winning riders.....hmm seem to be rather good MX riders too. All those motogp pro riders..weird they love riding mountain bikes if they aren't injured. Sheesh, seems like there is some kind of correlation!

Maybe you hate motos and love stupid box vehicles but ALL the freaking technology that you love so much comes from motos. So if you don't like motos go and throw away your modern mountain bikes. Like hydraulic brakes? Chuck them, just miniaturized moto technology. Also throw way your wide bars, coil suspension, chain guide and tubeless tires while you are there. Oh and those 40mm fork stanchions you love so much......guess where they are from!
  • - 1
 I ride a dual sport and you're accusing me of hating dirtbikes. Good job.
  • + 2
 Yes 40mm is kinda marketting. Its too big tbh. So stiff they had to make the lowers incredibly thin. Hence all the "torn open like a coke can" issues they had. Plus the seals work extra hard when you have such big stanchions. Part of the reason the forks need constant attention and also suck air in through the seals. All so you can have that nice "my fork is bigger than yours" feeling. 36-38 seems about right. Good old 'zocchi

As for the whole "should heavier bikes have thinner bars" question. Yes. Yes they should. Cos then you can have thicker tube walls. Has been my point all along. 35mm flexy bars are fine for an xc bike, and good cos they do indeed weigh bugger all. Just wouldn't like to ride a damaged set...

Yes bikes are evolving sherbet, but not EVERY new thing is an improvement. In fact well over 50% of it is either a downgrade or a sideways step. Some people find it hard to tell the difference which is why its good to come on here and read all the comments, as often hidden in amongst the idiocy, pointless fanboyism and sarcasm there are little gems of wisdom. Often from the most unexpected sources.
  • + 3
 Motorcycle and bicycle components have different design goals. So while it might intuitively seem like heavier bikes need bigger diameter bars, that isn't the case. Dump a dirt bike at even moderate speed and it would snap a bicycle handlebar like a toothpick. They have to be much stronger than bicycle bars. That means increased wall thickness, which is ok because saving a few grams isn't that important. Yet if you increase the wall thickness of a large diameter bar, it becomes ridiculously stiff. They would ride completely rigid with no perceptible damping. Thus a thicker walled smaller diameter bar makes sense for that purpose. Meanwhile, making bicycle components lighter, even a few grams lighter, is a major goal in component design. Because bicycle bars don't have to withstand the weight and force of a dirt bike crash, they are built lighter, with thinner side walls and a larger diameter. Also note that 35mm bars are used on motorcycles. Granted, it isn't terribly common.
  • + 1
 Im running the bars at Fatbars 735mm and a 50mm Duo on my new P.26. Looks and runs mint, feels incredibly strong when installing
  • + 1
 My DH bike has a longer stem. Oh yeah, it's a 26" wheel, so the geo is right and I don't need to compensate for it performance.
  • + 1
 I just picked up a 40mm for my new ride.. Heard they are coming out with a 35mm shortly as well as carbon 780mm bars! Cant wait
  • + 1
 I invented that stem and renthal stole it. But renthal have missed the pupose behind it
  • + 1
 My buddies creaked for a year until I told him to use carbon paste on the bar clamp area. Noise gone.
  • + 2
 Will they make a 1.5in steerer version!
  • + 1
 Wish they made a zero degree rise. I'd be all over it. Not interested in 10.
  • + 4
 could get some lower rise bars?
  • + 1
 Already have the lowest I want at 12mm. I've never liked the feel of rise stems. To each their own I guess....
  • + 1
 Flip it over!
  • + 1
 haha don't like negative rise either. 66-67HA with 0 rise feels great to me. Chromag, raceface, etc. all make 0 degree rises, not sure why renthal is not offering an option.
  • - 2
 I like Renthal but companies and jounros should fo theyre research not just offer opinions!

Weight is relative
Stiffness is relative
Stability is often not duscussed.

I ran Eastons alloy 800x35mm x 35DM stem on 40s on my V10c the Stability gains tracking control on the DH track was massive, Im tslking about muppets rifing DH bikes with plush slow setups on trail bike trails. Proper DH

I now have testing Chromags BZA stem bar combo in 35mm std on my trail/enduro bike and the carbon bar is very good for dampening vibration but stiff and stable as hell it will become mainstream once people pull theyre heads out of theyre arses!

This same BS discussion happened when we went from GHEY mtb roadie 25.4mm 680 wide std to 31.8mm 710mm width stds

If u ride slow plush and flexy is good, full frontal speed requires stabilty!

OTA people. ...
  • + 3
 I have done my research, it included talking to two riders with rainbow stripes on their jerseys.
  • + 3
 Maverick. Do you actually have any idea what you are talking about? How on earth will the clamp diameter of your bars affect bike stability? wheelbase yes. Head angle yes. BB height yes, Top tube length yes. Bar clamp diameter? No. Not really. If you ride slow and plush, flexy will never even come into the equation. If you actually ride hard, you will come to realise how important it is to have a little damping in your bars. Come back in a few years when you've learnt to ride a bike....xx
  • + 3
 sorry. that was a bit mean. i take the last bit back...
  • + 1
 Duo stem and fatbar combo work well together. No issues after 6 months
  • + 1
 Haven't these been out for ages, like years?
  • + 2
 Oh aye, were 50mm, now 40mm.
  • + 1
 "Ribbit!!"




Looks like a f*ckin frog.
  • + 1
 Hopefully they release the new direct mount stem soon!
  • + 1
 Great stem but creeks like anything
  • + 1
 lighter doesn't always mean stronger
  • + 1
 It's now 40mm instead of the old 50mm !
  • + 0
 I have the enduro bars and 50mm duo stem. Great products
  • + 1
 Nice stem, nice review.
  • - 1
 thanks for not replying to my PM bud. appreciate it.
  • + 1
 you talking to me??
  • + 1
 no. the author of this article.
  • - 3
 looks like an abortion
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