The Insolent DH Bike Uses a Fox 40 Stanchion Tube as a Shock

Dec 1, 2017
by Mike Levy  
Resistance Bikes


Pop quiz: how many bikes employ a Macpherson strut rear-suspension design these days? The answer is not many, but the French Canadians at Resistance Bikes are working at bringing a new Macpherson strut design to the market, and it's a downhill bike no less. But wait, that's not its only trick... The Insolent features an integrated shock that's located inside its carbon fiber toptube. Oh, and there's a belt-driven Effigear gearbox bolted to the bottom of the frame.

You know the bike is interesting when its rather exotic gearbox is only a sidenote.


Resistance Bikes

As others have already pointed out, the bike's shock appears to use part of a Fox 40 stanchion tube, which is quite clever when you realize that the integrated shock is much more of a load-bearing element in the frame than if it was activated - and protected from side loads - by a rocker link of some sort. The 40mm diameter of the stanchion no doubt helps matters, but I hope those carbon chainstays are thick and beefy to assist in minimizing the side-loading of the shock. Hey Fox, how do you feel about a 40's stanchion tube being diced up and used for a shock?

If you're wondering about the large swept area of the 40mm stanchion and the added friction that would come from that compared to a standard-sized shock stanchion, I can't see it being an issue.
Resistance Bikes

Afterall, a Fox 40 obviously uses two stanchions and a one-to-one ratio, so I doubt that the friction from a single, short 40mm diameter stanchion would be noticeable when you factor in the bike's leverage ratio that's probably somewhere in the neighborhood of three-to-one.


Resistance Bikes


While Resistance Bikes doesn't supply much information about the design on their webpage yet, it looks like the shock itself is actually a thin aluminum body that's pushed up inside the toptube and then threaded into a cap that serves as its forward mounting point.

There are no non-drive-side photos of the bike, but you can see what looks like a single-sided bolt hole and two air valves if you look closely at the renderings, with an air piston dividing the chamber into two sections.

To support the shock, Resistance Bikes has manufactured a large bushing and sleeve that's either pressed or threaded into the back of the seattube, shown in the photo to the right.

The Macpherson Strut layout requires the seattube to sit well forward relative to the bottom bracket, so it's at quite a relaxed angle to have the seat in the right spot. No word on what they're using to control the stroke, although it looks almost like a shrunk down fork damper has been fitted inside of the shock body. With no traditional link to control the rate curve, we're eager to see some suspension graphs. We'll keep you posted on that one, but Resistance Bikes could be using something off-the-shelf or manufacturing their own damper.
Resistance Bikes

There's no denying that this thing is cool looking and extremely interesting, but I also have to ask "why?" Translating the French on Resistance Bikes' website reveals that they've gone this route because ''the integrated structure of the Resistance Bikes frame reduces the amount of material required to achieve satisfactory rigidity. The direct line between the handlebars and the rear wheel transmits forces optimally.'' In other words, they're saying that the Insolent doesn't need links to achieve the rigidity that they're looking for.

What else? Well, there's that belt-driven Effibox gearbox hanging off the bottom of the bike, and slotted dropouts at the back to tension the belt correctly. It's a single-pivot design, and the main pivot is at the gearbox's output, so there's no tensioning roller required, either.


Resistance Bikes


Resistance Bikes doesn't quote any numbers when it comes to weight, geometry, or travel, but the Insolent likely sports somewhere around 200mm of travel and, because it's a prototype, is probably built heavy enough to brush off any testing abuse.

Of course, this isn't the first bike with a hidden or integrated shock, but you have to admire the sleek lines of this garage-made beauty. There's no word on pricing or availability, but here's hoping that this isn't one of the many one-off prototypes that drop jaws only to drop away into the ether and never be seen again.




Photos from Resistance Bikes


264 Comments

  • + 435
 I felt dirty after watching that ????
  • + 23
 Came here looking for this.
  • + 33
 It’s a porn clip.
  • + 97
 Well for all those who wanted to see a carbon fiber frame getting rammed in the ass....

Seriously though how would you, or how did they service shocks with that design without taking the whole rear end apart?

Frig that sounded dirty also.
  • + 11
 on a sidenote i dont think fox can sue as it is not mass produced, YET. Resistance probably figured out Kashima brings in the dough to get enough attention, and then just using good-ol' hard ano coating after
  • + 4
 @viatch: I know haha soo erotic!
  • + 0
 Work it baby. Work it
  • + 15
 @viatch: technically once you buy the fork you can do wtf ever you want with it. But using kashima to market.... that they can get sued for.
  • + 4
 I haven’t laughed that hard in awhile 10/10
  • + 15
 It needs lube on it
  • + 20
 @Mhoracek: Will KY Jelly work better than Kashima?
  • + 40
 Maybe they can use the same system at the front and call it the spit roast.
  • + 15
 This bike brings back many fond memories from St. Catherine in Montreal.
  • + 3
 many dirty things could be said about this...

Great f*cking markting though
  • + 58
 I heard the official name when launched will be #Goldfinger
  • - 5
flag kilazilla (Dec 2, 2017 at 5:23) (Below Threshold)
 @IrishTom: U mean, #GoldDickker?
  • + 12
 @Mojo348: If there are three stanchions in total is it airtight?
  • + 2
 @scott-townes: True, you can't exactly take the rear suspension unit off and sent it off for a service and tune up
  • + 4
 @joni0001984: were you a choir boy?
  • + 4
 Oh my goodness - yes this bike is all things awesome
  • + 3
 Some seriously graphic shit on PB these days.
  • + 3
 12 seconds? So what!
  • + 11
 @onemanarmy: How could they get sued for using Genuine Kashima?? It’s not a knock off. It’s no different than them specking the front end with a fox 40. There are aftermarket damper companies, it’s really just utilizing a part. No differant than if they literally made their own. Smart if you ask me. If it was their own, I could honestly say I think half of the people of interest currently, would probably hate on this. Personally I’d love to give this thing a go. Looks like a promising start. But who’s to say. Larger diameter Stanton = more friction. Add in the inherent torsional load and that will add to the factor. Then again this could be the greatest idea ever. The reality is all anybody can do is speculate at this point. At the end of the day, hats off to some real innovation, rather than joe shmo bike company off to create “new newest greatest” clone of what’s already.
  • + 6
 @drjonnywonderboy: sure you can. The whole assembly threads in AND out of the top tube. Should be just as simple as removing a bottom bracket.
  • + 1
 @buildabike: more like watching that porn interview and a chic about to Do Something new for the !st Time ...LOL
  • + 5
 Im sure that the prototype was made in Leeds UK by a company called Carbon Wasp. They make seriously impressive stuff
  • + 2
 @onemanarmy: Kashima isn’t owned by Fox is it?
  • + 0
 It’s sexual and violent
  • + 2
 looks like a Brazzers
  • + 1
 @jomacba: He didn't say they would get sued for using it, he said they may get sued for using Kashima to market the bike.
  • + 1
 @RichPune: I’m aware that’s what he’s saying, as you couldn’t market with it unless you used it. My point being that there is no infringement by marketing with the real thing. What I’m trying to say is, if they made their own stantion, then had their own coating made using the kashima name, that’s infringement. There are no rules or laws broken here. No design, or makeup knock off.
  • + 0
 @jomacba: false. They are using a fox product... with no agreement to purchase for resale. If a manufacturer wants to sell a bike with fox on it theu buy them from fox... and sign an oem contract. These guys arent doing that. So if this went into production theyd need to source their own tubes or sign wirk with fox on a one off solution.
  • + 1
 @NotDannyHart: Miyaki Company owns it. Fox has exclusive right... for now... i think.
  • + 1
 @onemanarmy: still a fox stantion
  • + 1
 @jomacba: pretty much my point
  • + 1
 @onemanarmy: Still this is not illegal to sell a product without signing an oem contract. Fox or its distributor can just refuse to sell them the forks. They perfectly know such a production can't scale if the company has to order the forks through consumer direct means to get the product.
  • + 162
 That thing is sexy af.
  • + 55
 Agreed.
  • + 20
 @mikelevy: it looks f*cking awesome. After years of session looky likies, I am loving this spate of our of the box designs were seeing this year
  • + 5
 I felt it move! This is The future @mikelevy:
  • + 4
 @jaame: think enough people in the know just got sick of the same old s*it.
  • + 17
 I love that there is not only a gearbox but a clean gearbox design without those horrible pulleys squeaking and rattling and clogging with mud. More of this type of design are needed for sure!
  • + 16
 So sexy it shags itself!
  • + 1
 @jaame: looks like a "Y" bike.
  • + 103
 Technically its not a mac-strut, its a monoshock. Mac strut bikes have the seat strut rigidly connected to the shock body which then pivots off the main frame, with another pivot between the chainstays and the bottom of the seat strut (whether it be a horst-link like on an Amp, or a seat stay pivot like on a Pro-flex or Turner Stinger/K2 Razorback doesn't actually matter). Pivots between the shock and seat strut, with the shock rigidly attached to the frame are considered mono-shocks in terms of suspension bike designs. Examples of Mono-shocks include the Boulder Gazelle, Intrepid and Starship, the Monolith Rebound and the Santa Cruz Tazmon. Whether the shock is internal to the frame (as with Monolith and Boulder) or external (Santa Cruz) doesn't matter.

THESE are mac-struts...

www.retrobike.co.uk/forum/download/file.php?id=97856

www.pinkbike.com/photo/13554773

www.retrobike.co.uk/forum/download/file.php?id=164133

THESE are mono-shocks...

blog-imgs-55.fc2.com/l/u/c/luckymotors/2012091001204288b.jpg

i.pinimg.com/originals/f3/30/2d/f3302d44936b22c0161d4f08f3181881.jpg

forums.mtbr.com/attachments/santa-cruz/635757d1359601749t-tazmon-roll-call-tazmon7-copy.jpg

i.pinimg.com/originals/5f/36/5a/5f365a52b7a8da0302dbc3f5d9666e1e.jpg

I KNOW i've made this point before... when doing reviews of modern spins on old technology...please turn it over to RC... as he was actually a frame builder/designer in the heyday of these designs, and produced mac-struts himself (Mantis Profloater) and thus won't get the design terms wrong.

www.mtb-news.de/forum/attachments/img_8842-jpg.511421
  • + 40
 Thanks for being pedantic so I didn't have to. :thumbs up:
  • + 7
 I want to see a live axle bike. Both wheels connected to each other, with a knuckle for steering. It has to handle worse than a solid axle vehicle, but it'd be funny.
  • + 4
 I'd like to see more usage of torsion bars myself.
  • + 1
 @feldybikes: And I'd like to add thanks to deeeight for mentioning the Boulder bikes. Droppin knowledge bombs son! Back in the day, I wanted a Boulder, big time. In particular, Myles Rockwell's bike that had an Actiontec head tube mounted shock rigged on top of an RS-1 crown.
  • + 1
 @Ron-C: Like this?

images.singletracks.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/muddy_fox.jpg

I'm a bit lost on the whole Mac Vs Mono thing though. With a Macpherson strut on a vehicle, the shock is mounted solidly to the main frame / chassis, yet on a bicycle, the term is used for when the solid mounting point is at the bottom of the shock? It's not hard to see why the author got it 'wrong' unless I am missing something here?
  • + 3
 you forgot this one
the Kestrel Nitro. www.flysfo.com/museum/exhibitions/3060/detail?num=7
this thing was built in 1988 way ahead of it time
  • + 4
 @wallheater:

Yep... but that's how the creators of the design (largely Horst Leitner and the other brains at Amp Research) named them in ohhhh..... 1992.... so 25 years ago and thus establishing the naming convention/design criteria to qualify as one for everyone that followed. Mono-shocks had already been "invented" and named as well, and popularized by Boulder. The name was derived from a motorcycle suspension design though again...this was a matter of adopting/borrowing from an existing name that consumers might be familiar with. It was chosen to set itself apart from cantilever/walking beam bikes (and yes with few exceptions, every mountain bike has used a single rear shock) like Brian Skinner's Descender.

forums.mtbr.com/attachments/vintage-retro-classic/273744d1182465882-brian-skinner-descender-completed-descender_01.jpg

I didn't also set out to cite EVERY example of a mac-strut or a mono-shock. I simply picked more well known ones that were likely to be familiar enough to pinkbike's younger demographic (likely because their dad still has his in the basement). The original specialized Ground control A1 rear suspensions for example, were mac-struts also designed by Horst Leitner as a "cheaper" to produce model than the Stumpjumper FSR he'd already designed for them.

forums.mtbr.com/attachments/specialized/365709d1212463884-1996-specialized-ground-control-a1-comp-a1.jpg
  • + 2
 @retrofred: That was a 1988 show bike only. They built a total of ONE of them.

Kestrel later had another full suspension bike though which did see production, the Rubicon which was a walking beam linkage.

Kurt Stockton's DH version and the Rubicon Pro employed twin shocks but they were also available in a single shock version.

ep1.pinkbike.org/p5pb13761429/p5pb13761429.jpg

forums.mtbr.com/attachments/cannondale/772971d1361156688-gosh-i-hate-right-all-time-kestrel_rubicon_sml.jpg
  • + 1
 @deeeight: It hurts trying to wrap my brain around how that dual shock version works!
  • + 2
 @kabanosipyvo:

Here... read the story on the bike... I had typed out a nice couple paragraphs about the bike including the part how double shocks let them run less air pressure ( a good thing since the Fox Alps shocks were unreliable at high pressures) but also boosted the wheel travel, and the tall gearing and dildo length stem, then remembered there was an article here in august 2016 about the damn thing, as well as the pro's closet also did a write up about it.

One detail changed from the original 1995 bike worth noting is the fork. Judy forks didn't exist in 1995. Rockshox was developing a new fork at the time, what eventually became the Judy model, and it was called the Diablo, and available for pro riders only. They made roughly 200 of the things and the name was taking from the Lamborghini Diablo which was then replacing the Countach as their supercar model. Then Jamis bicycles cried foul pointing out that they'd had a US trademark for the bicycle industry on the word Diablo (as its one of their model names) since the early 80s. So... new name was chosen. Also...the Diablo's all had aluminum thru-shaft cartridges for the oil damping which were reliable. 1996 production forks got a plastic composite cartridge which failed regularly but was cheaper to produce. There was subsequently a recall over them when TENS of THOUSANDS were failing, and they went back to aluminum cartridges.

theproscloset.com/museum/mtb/kurt-stocktons-1995-kamikazi-rubicon

www.pinkbike.com/news/1995-kestrel-rubicon-comp-now-that-was-a-bike.html
  • + 1
 Thank you!! Ive been sat here for blummin ages trying to remember who made one like this in the 90s.
  • + 2
 @deeeight: There isn't enough space on a bike. The torsion bars on the cars are really long actually, in the case of racecars they can be between 10 and 20 cm long. The rocker is for example mounted to the top of the gearbox casing while the bar itself is anchored near the bottom. This is required to get the torsional deformation low enough. You can't do that with ~5 cm or even lesse than that (the frame and rocker anchors(pivot locations take out usable space) that are available inside a bike frame (width wise).
  • + 1
 @deeeight: thanks for the links...I vaguely remember the 2016 writeup, now that you mention it.
  • + 1
 Good call..its not a Mac-strut.thankfully! And also thankfully (for reduced flexure under load) for this style design, its not a horst pivot (true four bar).

My bike company was buying AMP Research rear suspension kits from Horst at AMP for our prototype frames back in '93.

The shock unfortunately was a "stressed member" (rigidly attached to seat stay) causing multiple shock failures due to constant side loading of the shock stanchion/bushings/body.

As the bike had the horst pivot (chainstay/dropout) we got the lovely active feel and controlled braking in the chop, but the length of the mac-strut was insane (from forward shock mount on downtube to rear pivot) and super flexy. We built our own version with seatstay pivot to explore, which solved much of the flexure but the suspension feel was more constipated.

We switched from AMP's coil/oil shock to Noleen's with much better success but still saw accelerated wear on the shock parts due to Mac-strut. Our own design (never made it to production) used our own 4-bar swinglink with horst pivots.

AMP then switched to the B-3 design with the seat link and seat tube mini tower (to accomodate shock) which soon led to the FSR deal with Specialized.

Thankfully this new design is decoupled with a pivot, which should help no doubt
  • + 72
 does it sound like a normal bike or does it just groan
  • + 2
 Ahahaha Big Grin
  • + 63
 They should call that design something creative, like the “doggy linkage” with its major advantages being supreme stiffness while still providing a natural feel of the terrain
  • + 17
 Resistance Bikes: for those who like to ride it doggy style.
  • + 10
 Magnum link
  • + 10
 ''The Shaft'' suspension.
  • + 42
 With Active Neutral Anti Linkage technology also known as A.N.A.L.
  • + 5
 "Raw Dawg"
  • + 0
 Except supreme stiffness can't be a major advantage here.
  • + 4
 Their next model will be named Steezy Merde (S&M) and will feature maximum chainslap.
  • + 43
 Will it come in white?

ahem... will it be available in white?
  • + 68
 Is the 40 with a black stanchion any bigger?
  • + 2
 @freerideglory: oh man...
  • + 17
 @freerideglory: So you're saying there is going to be yellow XC option?
  • + 1
 That stanchion made me remember this quote
''Pawn Shop chronicles''
Alton: You calling me a racist?
Johnson: Well, you don't like black Santa Claus. And last week, you told me you don't like black porno.
Alton: Now hang on a damn minute. Now that's got nothing to do with racism. I like black chicks in porno movies. I just don't like 'em with the black guys in them, that's all.
Johnson: Why come? They make you feel inadequate?
Alton: No. Because their di***s are so dark. They get to f*****g, their di***s get wet, they get glisteny and shit, and it's hard for my eyes to unfocus off it. Make me sick.
Johnson: Eh, well, I guess you got a point.
  • + 0
 @harryhood: now that myth is true
  • + 1
 @harryhood: for f*ck sake ???????????? that’s brilliant
  • + 1
 @harryhood: edit - the ?’s are a laughing emoji
  • + 2
 @freerideglory: On pinkbike, you gotta do 2 colons with lol in the middle. So like : lol : but without the spaces, and it turns into lol .
  • + 29
 The hardtail is the most idealized truss design for a bicycle in terms of having the least amount of tubing to get the job done. Full suspension bikes have always been heavier because they require extra overlapping parts. This is as close to a hardtail as you can get. It has the potential to be the lightest full suspension bike ever, minus the gearbox.
  • + 2
 Good point
  • + 2
 One could argue this was a close second: www.vintagemtbworkshop.com/1993-answer-manitou-fs.html
  • + 2
 And one of the least stiff at it as well!
  • + 28
 Hands down one of the coolest bikes I've seen in a while. Would love to give it a try.
  • + 11
 That Effigear gearbox needs to be tested and reviewed here. All these post covering Pinion but not a thing about this one. Fun facts about it #1 Lighter than Pinion #2 Uses a trigger shifter. 2 complaints about the Pinion that the Effigear covers but still no real reviews or media on it. Also I personally think it looks way better when paired with the right suspension design and run with a belt with no tensioner like this bike, @mikelevy
  • + 11
 I wonder how much heat that cut fox 40 would make after a rip down some brake bumps. Would the carbon frame take the heat that's built up? Will that stanchion get peppered with rocks? What happens of you bottom out? So many unanswered questions!
  • + 3
 well...carbon is really bad in handling heat...so there is the first problem. Aluminium in contact with CFK is another issue .
  • + 4
 @themountain: Bad at dealing with heat? Therese are literally breakdiscs made out of carbon..
I agree on the contact part though
  • + 1
 @mazze: those rotors are made of carbon ceramic. That's a very different material than carbon fiber. That said, there are high temperature epoxies that could tolerate the heat, and depending on the leverage ratio, there might not be much of it.
  • + 1
 Don't think heat will be an issue. It looks like about 90-100 mm stroke and if the damper layout is done right there should be lots of surface area on the slider to disapate heat (and lots of oil which helps too).

Epoxy can be an issue at high heat, but I doubt this will be a problem at the kind of temps coming off a shock (brake mount temps are more of a concern).
  • + 1
 @mazze: well brake discs are suppose to do different things not being structurally rigid under heat ? Besides that most of them contain basalt fiber...other animal. Wink
  • + 14
 Put a condom on that thing... Geez louise!!!
  • + 15
 Maybe I should just kashima my own dingaling.
  • + 15
 @nwtoney55: #goldmember
  • + 13
 if you snap your frame right there while the shock is compressed you're fucked
  • + 38
 Literally
  • + 3
 @kimbye: oh yeah.
  • + 15
 @kimbye: you rang?
  • + 10
 That went in wheely deep. Motherforker of DH bikes. Should be named Donkey Stroke.
  • + 9
 Anyone remember the BALFA Bel-Air???
  • + 4
 I loved the look of that thing. Who can name more bikes with integrated or internal shocks?
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: Boulder defiant!
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: Kestrel...going way back.
  • + 4
 Oh that's the mono-shock I forgot to mention in my response... I knew Balfa had one but couldn't remember the model name to look up a picture link for.

www.balfa.wooyek.pl/Belair/balfa-belair-frame.jpg
  • + 4
 @mikelevy: lol you sound like a teacher; "who can name other things that are green?"
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: i saw one recently.
  • + 1
 @deeeight: that's not a monoshock, it's a simple swingarm with the shock mounted inside the frame.

The swingarm shock mount moves in an ark, not a straight line. For this reason, the shock has room to move for the radial swing of the swingarm. If it was mounted rigidly, there would need to be an additional pivot(hence why the design in this post has two pivots)...
  • + 4
 @mikelevy: Maverick, always think that bike was ahead of its time and didn't get the attention it deserved.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Moots has had a few variations over the years.
  • + 8
 where is the enduro version????
  • + 8
 Seatpost?
  • + 7
 Looks like an ultra low ratio design, probably 2:1. Should be interesting.
  • + 6
 Totally. I'll do a follow-up with more information.
  • + 4
 honda please come back and save us from this carbon and overly complicated gearbox hell !!! just bring back the rno1 with slighltly slacker lower bb ....remember thows showa forks!!!...,save the whale for the love of god!! shheet forgot you lot hate whales anyways :/
  • + 4
 Great outside of the box thinking and it looks amazing! It needs some sort of shield to keep the dirt from the back wheel away from that stanchion though. I also am curious on how fast the seal wears.
  • + 3
 So you mention the possible problems caused by sideloading the shock in the article, and how they could be avoided with stiff chainstays. However....pause the video of the suspension going through its travel when at full bottom out. Sideloaded as fuck, just in the vertical plane. A rocker would make this design much much better, while adding an insignificant amount of weight. Silly design...
  • + 7
 A rocker link would make it explode.

A link requires that the shock be able to move around a pivot of it’s own.

Also, essentially every impact a normal 40 (any fork) takes is sideloaded as f*ck as well.
  • + 1
 @ciszewski: "Also, essentially every impact a normal 40 (any fork) takes is sideloaded as f*ck as well."

a 40 has a dual crown and and that arch on the lower to help with side loading.
  • + 1
 It's not a silly design, your forks take a huge beating for years without any bushing problems. This will be fine. The forks crown and arch are irrelevant as this is basically just a stanction sliding into a leg.
  • + 2
 @ciszewski: When I suggested a rocker, I was also suggesting the required pivots be added at either end of the shock. I was basically saying that a traditional rocker design is just a better design than this. The only advantage to this design is a fairly insignificant weight saving.

A fork does take sideloads yes. However a fork has two stanchions and two bushings per stanchion spaced 3 or 4 inches apart. Two features not included in this frame design. Furthermore, even with two stanchions and four widely spaced bushings, forks still suffer from huge amounts of stiction compared to a traditional rear shock setup...
  • + 1
 @Messy: " your forks take a huge beating for years without any bushing problems."

I think you will find that a fork that is ridden hard needs its bushings replaced after a couple of years max. Put all that load through a single bushing as in this design and its gonna last a couple of months max.
  • + 2
 @gabriel-mission9: Fair enough.

I do also agree that forks do suffer from stiction, but think it is mostly due to the 1:1 ratio. And bushings in forks absolutely do take a beating as you suggest below.

I think the fact that there are more bushings and stanchions in a fork matters, but it is needed much more in a fork. The side loading is far greater simply because the force is applied at the bottom/front of the wheel, some 27" away from the seals and upper bushing. (I'm really talking the wheel taking impacts from the front, not actually from the side. and as such the arch doesn't really do anything as mccracken suggested)
  • + 2
 @gabriel-mission9: The only advantage of this design is that it's something 'fresh'. Which doesn't automatically mean it's a good design.
  • + 1
 @Bigernmcracken: Dual Crown and Arch do nothing to mitigate the load on the busings. @ciszewski is right in his post below the lever arm and angle of impact on forks mean the bushings are loaded AF when the fork is cycling through it's travel. The loads on this will be nothing in comparison and if they size the bushing carefully they can take care of the friction issue easily.

It still doesn't help the fact this bike is going to have a shitty leverage ratio at end of travel.
  • + 5
 Needs a fender or that shaft is going to look as pockmarked as a teenager on Accutane.
  • + 4
 How do you set the air pressure(assuming this based on there being no coil spring anywhere in the pics) sag, and adjust compression and rebound damping?
  • - 1
 THIS!!!
  • + 2
 "There are no non-drive-side photos of the bike, but you can see what looks like a single-sided bolt hole and two air valves if you look closely at the renderings, with an air piston dividing the chamber into two sections."
  • + 1
 Tech question about the frame:
The frame has horizontal slots in place of traditional dropouts, but in the first photo they appear to be filled with form fitting alloy 'washers' when the rear wheel is in place. Is this because the slots are necessary to install the rear wheel into the belt but then will always be in the same place? Assuming since it has a gearbox the size of the front and rear drive cogs or the belt will never change so the rear axle will never require any type of micro adjustment for proper fitment?
I am curious and have no experience with belt drives or gearboxes. If it was explained in the video I apologize, I am on a limited connection.
  • + 1
 I just wonder, how good it feels, if the saddle get ripped off because it touches the rear tire, every time the suspension bottoms in. That's how it looks like on the vid.
Hope i'm wrong, cause i really like the design(although the frame is made of plastic;-))
  • + 6
 Poutine
  • + 1
 That is really slick. Another great step in the right direction. A new golden age of boutique production is upon us.
This idea isn't new www.bikeman.com/images/stories/Museum/boulderdefiant1B.jpg but this is a really cool evolution. These are the kinds of ideas we should be exploring.
  • + 2
 You're doing really great, Resistance.
Now I want you to get really kinky and build one with a linkage fork.
www.pinkbike.com/news/structure-cycleworks-linkage-fork-crankworx-whistler-2017.html
  • + 4
 First time that the kashima collor of shock and fork match!
  • + 1
 All new DH bikes should carry integrated transmission allready. Is so much improvement in suspension it makes no sense to not build this mandatory on DH rigs... I woulnt buy DH rig without integrated transmission for sure.
  • + 3
 That vid needs this as the background musicWink

www.youtube.com/watch?v=psbxL7o-6ZA
  • + 1
 Love it. But it seems that the lad from ARBR is wondering how inconsistent the Pinkbike audience can be... kick the last sht out of his bike yet give this one a pass. Autoerotic habits took over I guess Big Grin
  • + 2
 I really like the ARBR now. Its taken a while but it has definitely grown on me. Maybe it was the photo in Dirt with the seat down and a little dirty that made it look better.
  • + 6
 I for one don't really like how "belligerent" the PB audience is, thrashing (or should I say trashing ?) most things that look a bit different, without the commercial varnish layer.
It often happens with garage-made products which may have good ideas but limited resources, though it also happens with "big" products (it happened with the first picture of the Nomad 4 with the shock in low position and long rocker link or whatever it's called, then everyone liked it when it was officially unveiled with nice colors etc).
On the other hand, it may be a crude clue that a product still needs refinement.

The ARBR may be technically awesome, I find it too intricate, as if the designer kind of lost his way throughout.
There's a saying that goes along the lines as "what is clearly thought is clearly expressed".
Though I must say that it looks a bit like a carbon version of the Commencal Supreme SX.
Maybe those long travel enduro bikes technical specificities are taking the design out of our "confort zone".
Many thought the longer/lower/slacker bikes looked weird at first, if not ugly, but it slowly established itself.

This one, despite its shock design prone to garner a lot of 8 y.o. jokes as demonstrated here, seems quite refined, to the point. It's clearly expressed and maybe it means that it's clearly thought.
I just wonder, while I'm no engineer, if the seatstays/toptube alignment shouldn't rather happen at SAG, under load, than as it is now, without load.
  • + 5
 Typical cycling phenomenon.
The ARBR is a fantastic design function wise, but its looks aren't for everyone: Gets trashed.
This Insolent bike on the other hand is a terrible design function wise, but looks kinda cool and gives people an easy excuse to make dick jokes. People lap it up.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: Gotta say, on second look, it looks better. The one with half of it painted white looks quite nice.
Just that front triangle still looking a bit too bold.
Maybe it's just straying a bit too far from the "bike made of tubes" design we're all used to.
Everyone may have praised it if it were a bit more smooth and hollow à la Ibis Mojo.
  • + 3
 Hey as long as bottoming out hard doesn't shoot the stanchion straight into the headtube at mach six I'd give it a go.
  • + 4
 Looks like a modern Maverick right there.
  • + 2
 Reminds me of that bike Aaron Chase was riding with a lefty fork leg as top tube.
  • + 3
 This thing is going viral.
  • + 2
 Well, it certainly may catch a virus or two...
  • + 1
 I’ve always loved the look of hardtails where the seatstays carry on the line of the top tube. And now a full sus version. Love it looks so clean.
  • + 3
 reminds me of old Boulder bikes. great looking rig !
  • + 1
 I love the idea. But I don't even want to think how the frock you service that rear shock. That'd be such a bitch to work on!
  • + 6
 Looks like all you have to do is unbolt the seatstay mounting, unscrew the collar holding it into the toptube then remove. Then you have a home serviceable half of a fork.
  • + 2
 @DaMilkyBarKid: sounds easy... but just wait for the bike industry to come up with 'press-fit shocks'. ;-)
  • + 1
 Whilst it looks incredible, I don't see room for a dropper on there... Still I suppose sacrifices must be made for greatness!
  • + 1
 Well it's a DH bike so it doesn't really need one.
  • + 1
 @FourthOf5: I’d rather have one anyways for when I’m Pedalling the ups... but maybe that’s just me Wink
  • + 1
 That bikes ganna be a nightmare to service, no thanks, I'll stick to my *Normal* shocks and Forks Big Grin , least I can service those myself o.O.
  • + 2
 This article should have come with a NSFW warning. That rear triangle is going whole hog on that seat tube. Jeez
  • + 2
 This.
  • + 2
 looks like a session..... wait, it actually doesn't!!!
  • + 1
 This is one of the big reasons I really love mountain biking it keeps on getting better.
  • - 1
 This is a great example of just because can do something, doesn't mean you should. I love the gearbox on a DH bike, makes a lot of sense but the rear shock is problematic for so many reasons.
  • + 0
 So French to have your freaking website just in French....I guess it’s an insult to add eniglish button to their web page.

Still cool machine, hope it get to production
  • + 1
 There's a very good chance they don't trust their English enough or haven't even thought of it. Not very clever, but very Latin.
  • + 1
 Woops they're Canadian! Even Frencher than the French and definitely saying f*ck you to the English (and French) language. Tabernac!
  • + 1
 @BenPea: TabArnak...... Wink


Maybe they just didn't have the time to translate everything yet.... The bike is supposed to be available on summer 2018 so I'm pretty sure they are still working hard on the bike and everything else and then they will take the time to do an english version as well!
  • + 3
 No seat post required.
  • + 2
 “My bike keeps f*cking itself over”! Wtf?!?
  • + 2
 Uuuummmm doesn’t look like a session.
  • + 2
 Ummmm.... they didn't name it the "Heinen-Shtupp" because...?????
  • + 1
 as an engineer i applaud this project, but there are well know limitations.
  • + 1
 Use this mono shock in the top tube. Have chain stays that flex with no pivots and you have a very light xc dual sus bike.
  • + 1
 If ever I get the chance to ride it, I will put a sign that says "This is not my Bike!". :-)
  • + 1
 you could build a pretty awesome slopestyle bike off this platform somewhat like Matt Macduff's bike
  • + 2
 Looks definitely not like a session!
  • + 2
 I was waiting for the money shot, a blown seal.
  • + 1
 Dkerf .....durka durka...make it from dolphin bones or I ant buyin one.....
  • + 1
 Watch the video again, but play this in the background first.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fYfdlKIon4
  • + 1
 Kinda like this thing, just run me through the rebound and compression again......
  • + 1
 Edit: just looked at the pictures again. Lowspeed-Adjusters are present. Good thing.
  • + 1
 Clearly someone has no idea what a mcpherson strut is...PB Non the less a frame integrated quality damper isn't bad at all
  • + 1
 I showed it to my wife to see what she thought. She only smiled, so I guess she liked it.
  • + 1
 Absolutely brilliant design. Bet there is alot less stiction than most shocks! TAKE MY MONEY
  • + 3
 10/10 Would ride.
  • + 2
 damn, that's an amazing looking DH bike in my opinion
  • + 1
 Man that’s rad! Hope this turns into a trail bike one day, what a neat design
  • + 2
 reminds me of the six months in county jail!!!.........lolololololololkol
  • + 3
 Mind kinda blown.
  • + 2
 Same.
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: Mark my word, we are going to start seeing a ton of integrated fork/shock designs with creative linkages (or lack of) as materials and composite manu processes become much much better. We are just starting to see movement from traditional patents that were limited by the tech associated with frame designs.
  • + 3
 @Soilsledding: Integrated dropper posts, please.
  • + 6
 @mikelevy: Will the model with an integrated dropper post be called the "Gangbang"? Wink
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: Can you tell me why you want integrated dropper posts that bad? It's coming but I'm not really happy with it..... makes me wonder if I'll look for other brands with normal seattubes. Frown We have some very reliable droppers on the market right now and what do we do if your integrated one break? Do we have to keep a second dropper just in case AND can we even install a normal dropper with a super big shim?
  • + 2
 Looks like a falling rate...ouch
  • + 1
 Falling rates are progressive. Common misconception.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: I can confidently say you are wrong. Falling rate is regressive, easier to blow through the end of the travel.
  • + 1
 @tomcat: So you would think a rate that rises from say 2.5:1 to 2.8:1 would be progressive?
  • + 2
 @jclnv: No it wouldn't, but what are describing is a classic falling rate. We're actually agreeing (you are mixing up leverage ratio and wheel rate. They are inversely related - so rising ratio means a falling rate). When someone says ralling rate they are actually talking about the wheel rate (or motion ratio).

Take a look at the labels on the chart Steve at vorspring put together for their Tuesday Tune on leverage ratios.
www.pinkbike.com/news/the-tuesday-tune-ep-12-leverage-rates.html
  • + 1
 @tomcat: All I'm talking about is leverage rate or instantaneous ratio. If the values decrease (falls) as I quoted above and the line on the graph points down (falls) the suspension (ignoring shock characteristics) will be progressive in 'feel'.

I've never seen anyone lable a rate graph like that guy in the video did I and I personally think he's needlessly confusing people. I'm all about simplifying and standardizing this stuff so the public can cut through the marketing BS and make informed decisions.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: Do you realize that by getting the terms backwards and using them incorrectly you are confusing the issue? I agree that it confuses people that those terms are based on wheel rate, but we generally look at graphs of leverage ratio and so people (like you) get it mixed up. But you don't get to pretend standard terminology is backwards just because you don't know it.

I laugh when you try to dismiss what Steve puts out when it's the standard terminology that you just don't have a clear understanding of. He's the one person doing more than anyone to educate people on here about suspension and cut through the BS. The terms rising rate and falling rate have been around forever and have always had a consistant meanings.
  • + 1
 @tomcat: Guess I just forget about the terms rising and falling rate then. I have zero understanding of what value needs to increase to give more progression or what value needs to decrease to give more regression.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: It's an interesting challenge. It's cool leverage curves and other info are getting into the public eye but none of the nomeclature or presentation has been created in a way that focuses on simplifying and clarifying things for a non-tecnical audience.

Have you checked out andrextr's youtube channel and info on vitalmtb? He's done the best job at presenting info on how progressive suspension is in a simple way and putting useful numbers to it. I like how he just puts out numbers on each bike for what percentage of progression there is and the bottom out force (based on holding sag % the same on different bikes).
  • + 1
 @tomcat: Yes I have spent some time on those sites. I've just never seen rising rate and falling rate defined as the guy in the video you posted did. It's always been the reverse.
  • + 2
 Insolently proving that length AND girth do matter.
  • + 1
 Or did it get robbed from norbs
  • + 1
 Seems like this set up is better suited for 29rs
  • + 1
 Woudln't hard bottom out with frame breaking be a pain in the ass?
  • + 1
 No active ret suspension?
  • + 1
 Love that clean design!!!
  • + 1
 For second I misread it as " insolvent"
  • + 1
 That damn bike is a very useful tool!!! Fuck!
  • + 1
 Literally: f*ck your self... Smile
  • + 1
 20mm axle, but where do I put my boosts?
  • + 2
 ML super 8
  • + 1
 @mikelevy it's an Effigear gearbox, not Effibox Wink
  • + 0
 Sexy as hell, no idea if it would work well though. would love to see a review, take note pbSmile
  • + 1
 So Nice, love the look of the bike!
  • + 1
 This bike brings back many fond memories from St. Catherine in Montreal.
  • + 2
 I like it
  • + 1
 That is the slickest fucking thing i have ever seen...
  • + 2
 Cam zinks new bike?
  • + 1
 Saw this on Instagram. It looks pretty cool tup
  • + 2
 I'd ride it tup
  • + 1
 That bike looks really penetrating lol
  • + 2
 NSFW
  • + 1
 No kidding.
French Canadien you say?
Lol
  • + 1
 It even rhymes, "French gearbox, ready to hit rocks". I could envision Jean Chretien saying that no problem.
  • - 1
 Looks HOT as hell and I'd like to take it for a spin... Much like a porn star... But I'm not going to marry her.... Might mount her a few times though.
  • + 1
 kinda cool and a much newer version of Boulder Bikes way back in the day
  • + 1
 Manitou did this 30 years ago... Next.
  • + 1
 Ok I'm just going to say it that was fucking hot
  • + 1
 Love it and hate it at the same time
  • + 1
 I'd love it if they were brave enough to call it the intruder.
  • + 0
 I can only imagine my 275lbs fat ass on this thing. It'll bottom out the whole day.
  • + 1
 She took all eight inches like a champ!
  • + 1
 How hot will that top tube get?
  • + 1
 Wait, so the shock threads into an alloy cap that's mated to the carbon?
  • + 1
 looks brilliant
  • + 1
 That's beautiful
  • + 1
 I love it
  • + 1
 Yes, I'll take one.
  • + 1
 lets see it in action!
  • + 0
 What dumb design, on many levels
  • + 1
 tres beau
  • + 1
 Old school Yamaha Tech
  • + 1
 Facky!!! Wauu
  • + 1
 Neat
  • + 1
 That's so cool
  • - 1
 MUD!!!! fail.
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