Revel Bikes Introduce the Ranger Trail Bike

Jun 22, 2020
by Revel Bikes  

PRESS RELEASE: Revel Bikes

In keeping with the tradition of making the bikes we want to ride, we are thrilled to announce the new Revel Ranger!

This bike is made with one thing in mind- to enjoy the ups as much as the downs. We love the Rascal but we wanted something a little lighter and faster. So we took the legendary CBF suspension platform somewhere it’s never been. Think XC light, XC efficiency, with the extra-high punch of that bottomless CBF feel. It is over a pound lighter than the Rascal frame and tough enough to inspire confidence on the descents. The result is a mountain bike that is right at home at the start line of a race, all day in the mountains or simply rallying the local trails after work.

The Ranger has 115mm of rear travel, 120mm up front, and 29er wheels. The head angle is 67.5 degrees with a 75.3-degree seat angle. Combined with reasonable-yet-modern reach and chainstay numbers make this bike feel ridiculously well-balanced climbing, descending, and especially cornering.

With a name like the Ranger, we had to make at least one bike forest green colored and it's aptly named "Johnny Green Jeans." We also have a bit more timeless graphite black option we like to call "De La Coal.”


The Ranger has fully encased internal cable routing like our other two bikes and includes routing for a rear shock lockout. There are water bottle mounts on the top and bottom of the downtube. We also included a set of mounts towards the font of the main triangle to mount accessories. The Ranger also has ample tire clearance for any 29x2.6 tire.




Rangers are available for pre-order now at Revel dealers and distributors and directly from RevelBikes.com. Pre-orders are secured with a $100 refundable deposit and bikes will be shipped in order of deposits placed. Bikes will begin shipping early July.
The Ranger is available as a frame only for $2799, a GX kit for $4999, an X01 kit which included Revel’s RW30 Fusion Fiber wheels for $7199, and a full AXS kit for $9999.






Ed. Note: We have one of these on test in our upcoming XC Field Test (in the downcountry category). Stay tuned!


205 Comments

  • 54 10
 Now do a ~130r/~140f, 27.5 play/trail bike. I've demoed three of these kind of bikes recently and they are so much fun! Do a loop, hit the pumptrack, shred some jumps... My perfect stable would be a short-ish travel 27.5, A bike like the Ranger here, and a full on enduro/park bike.
  • 17 13
 Exactly, they are so much fun. I have the new Transition Scout being shipped to me currently 140r/150f and I can't wait. And please fix the cables routed under the BB, people want that like they want press fit bottom brackets.
  • 43 15
 @dirtberms: the cables under the BB pose zero problem.
  • 22 11
 @addatx: I cut my rear brake hose clean on a sharp stone a the top of a steep rockgarden (black rated trail) and I still don't know how I survived the crash. Now routing under bb is a deal breaker for me. I would trade water bottle inside front triangle everyday if necessary...
  • 9 1
 I sooo want a 650B version of the Norco Optic. Or a Calling with a steeper seat angle (and slightly slacker headangle)
  • 3 1
 @freebikeur: braided hose
  • 11 2
 @addatx @dirtberms: I've been on a Rail for over a year now and initially I was pretty worried about the cable routing under the BB, but have had zero issues despite searching out the roughest/rockiest trails I can find.

Just one anecdotal testimonial here, but it turned out to not be a factor for me. I have seen a few other riders slice a brake line with similar routing from other brands, but I think it would be a very rare occurrence. Considering this is more of an XC focused or "trail" bike, I imagine most folks will be seeking out less technical terrain relatively speaking.
  • 7 0
 @DMoneyBike: I had a Pivot Mach 429 trail that had the derailleur cable routed underneath like this. I used to put the exposed section inside a small length of vinyl tubing for extra protection.

The routing is not ideal, especially for a brake line. It can be mitigated with $0.50 and a trip to the hardware store if this routing is the only thing holding you back from a bike that checks all the other boxes.
  • 15 3
 Unfortunately, the truth is that short travel 27.5 bikes don't sell very well.
  • 8 1
 @cpobanz: This is true and unfortunate. They are a blast to ride. I'm sure the next bike will be a 29er Enduro-barge, they're so hot right now.

Back in the day the Transition Bottlerocket took the market by storm because it focused on fun with some capability mixed in. I have the feeling we'll see a resurgence of that kind of bike. We just saw the new 5010 released and after demoing it I'm happy to say that it gave me the same "jump everything and schralp every turn" kind of perma-grin that the Bottlerocket did long ago in a galaxy far, far away. These kind of bikes might not be the most popular on the market (because strava) but they hold a special place in my heart.
  • 14 4
 Downvoters wear lycra on the outside ;-)
  • 9 1
 I was disappointed to see the lowest build is up there in the yeti range.
  • 1 0
 @dirtberms: I'm still riding the first gen Transition Scout. I bought an '18 with the SBG geo and couldn't find that same magic, so I sold it and keep riding the old bike which I've cracked a few times. When I can I'm going to scoop up another older Scout so I've always got one to ride(or until I find another 27.5 bike that gives me the same level of happy!)
  • 4 1
 @NotSorry: I rode the bottle rocket for years and now have been riding Sentinels since they came out. The Sentinel is better in every way and is no way less fun or less playful. I’m not hating on the short travel 27.5, they’re great. But a 29er with proper geometry is no less fun, especially if you’re a larger rider (I’m 6’3”).
  • 1 0
 @SkipSkovhugger: Werks headset might do the trick on the Calling.
  • 7 5
 @dirtberms: I want a press fit BB (with accurate tolerances rather than that heavy chunk of threaded aluminum that’s bonded into this carbon frame. Requiring a threaded BB cup with a pressed in bearing to be installed in it. That’s just insanity.
  • 6 2
 @BiNARYBiKE: Man they handle completely differently. I have to disagree with you. I'm shorter than you and have ridden plenty of proper geometry 29ers including Transitions and they just don't feel like a good 27.5.
  • 3 1
 @dirtberms: 100% agree on the cables. Not because they might get smashed, but because I have now helped 3 different people (on 3 different bikes) push their cables back up the downtube after they had inchwormed down and made the front loops way too small!
  • 2 1
 @addatx: No problem for damage initially, yeah, but, on many bike, the cables tend to migrate down and the loops get bigger until they do start hitting things
  • 6 0
 @NotSorry: I’ve ridden a variety too. And not casually. Yes, they’re different (and again I don’t have an issue with 27.5) but the idea that modern mid-travel 29ers aren’t playful and are only for plowing? Way overblown.
  • 1 0
 The Marin hawk hill is due for a refresh. I would bet they increase the suspension travel into the 130-40 range. Plus they usually do a good job on geo numbers. That would be a fun budget bike.
  • 2 5
 Just buy a Evil Calling you will like it better.
  • 3 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: I'll concede on that point. They definitely aren't just plow machines. I dig the newer crop of short and mid travel 29ers too. This is why 1 bike is never enough!
  • 2 3
 @SkipSkovhugger: Offering can run 27.5 x 2.6-2.8.
  • 1 0
 Good choice
  • 1 7
flag sriracha (Jun 22, 2020 at 9:27) (Below Threshold)
 140mm 27.5 play bike is fun, but you can easily bottom out just bunny hopping in a parking lot. The Canfield Balance is 160-ish 27.5 and all the playful you want. Plus, it pedals like an XC bike. I prefer the added confidence of 160mm over 140mm, for romping.
  • 1 7
flag conoat (Jun 22, 2020 at 9:28) (Below Threshold)
 @freebikeur: if you crashed because you lost your rear brake, you aren't riding/braking properly.

now, if you lose your front brake at the beginning of a steep descent, may god have mercy on your soul.
  • 4 1
 @NotSorry: Guerrilla Gravity Shreddog. You can get that and turn it into long travel 29er at some point if you feel so inclined.
  • 4 0
 @just6979: a few turns of some electrical tape on the cable housing/lines, before they enter the frame, would easily solve that.
  • 1 1
 @addatx: to you. Plenty of other people that have had issues.
  • 2 1
 @Paddock22: If the impact is enough to cut a line, that little extra vinyl isn't saving it.
  • 5 2
 @BiNARYBiKE: But a 27er is MORE playful and LESS plowy than a 29er. It's true that many people are willing to make that tradeoff, but it IS a tradeoff, and other people don't want to make it. They're fast enough and/or don't aim to plow everything*.

*Isn't this the same argument for short-travel or hardtail 29ers (with shit tires, too, if you're Mike Levy)? Because it makes boring trails exciting even at lower speeds.
  • 3 0
 @conoat: losing either brake can cause a crash, you don't know where he was riding, maybe he was expecting to use the rear brake to help slide the wheel around a tight corner or to avoid something. if _anything_ on a mountain bike fails _suddenly_, it could cause a crash.
  • 3 1
 @hllclmbr: Yes it would, or zip-ties pulled really tight. But that's extra stuff to do and looks silly and could be completely avoided with better cable/hose routing. The point isn't "can we fix it?", because usually we can, it's that we shouldn't have to fix it, especially for no gain. I have yet to hear a good reason for under-BB cables that is worth the tradeoffs.
  • 2 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Actually. yes, it is. More material will take more force to break through. Yes, you or anyone could hit it hard enough blast through the extra vinyl, but that will absolutely take a higher impact than an impact to break the hose or cable alone.
  • 1 0
 @freebikeur: Yeah, I have a Rocky Mountain Instinct, and I swore I would never buy a bike with under cable routing. I loved the Instinct so much I caved in. I still hate that the cables run under though. It hasn't happened..
but it could happen.
  • 3 0
 @freebikeur: I had the same experience in another trail... steep rockgarden without rear brake... still don't know how I survived the crash. The first thing I saw on this frame, was the 'fatal' cable routing!!! I totally sympathise with you here!
  • 2 0
 @SkipSkovhugger: i'm running a Calling with a -1 wroks headset
150 front , 140 rear ( up'd shock stroke to 55 instead of the 50)

couldn't agree more on the seat tube angle ... running a 40 mm stem and seat slammed forwared on the rails to improve on pedalling position

love this bike soooo much
  • 1 6
flag diego-b (Jun 23, 2020 at 7:25) (Below Threshold)
 27.5 is dead
  • 21 0
 Should have called it the RevelStoked
  • 2 0
 Warning: Riding this bike for too long or reveling all night is not conducive to a productive next day at work. Oh well...

Looks like a nice bike. That CBF suspension design sounds like it would be a great bike to ride, but agree, re-route those cables below the BB, it's 2020.
  • 19 1
 Small sizes should have mullet options. Stop the rubber enamas for the vertically challenged!
  • 14 1
 Am I one of the few, that thinks the AXS dropper looks like shite? Aesthetically speaking but having a black square box underneath the saddle looks off? I'd rather stick with PNW
  • 6 5
 No, it looks so clean and refined with one less cable! /s
  • 2 0
 I had a magura vyron and broke it twice when I bottomed out and the piece in the back of the saddle. I love the idea of no wires and it worked great. I just won't be running one or axs as I don't want to worry about knocking that piece off on a bottom out.
  • 3 0
 No, I agree, that battery hanging off the back of the AXS dropper does not look great. However, the cockpit with 1 less cable does look better & less cluttered. Looks to be a tradeoff, the dropper looks worst but the cockpit looks better. Also you have to remember to charge the battery or have no seatdrop part way through a ride. The biggest deal breaker for me though is the ridiculous high price. Maybe when a dropper manufacturer designs one with a more discreet battery and a much lower price. For now, I like the one up droppers.
  • 1 0
 @RowdyAirTime: One up for OneUP! They smash prices and I love it. Have a v2 dropper in 180mm for a year now, needed air once, which is no hassle. A friend has the 150mm, also still working smooth. We have lots of bad weather and mud here, and the bikes get hosed off often. Good product, rate 5/7.
  • 11 0
 The water bottle brigade should be satisfied with this.
  • 6 2
 This is really exciting. A short travel, more moderate geometry, big tire, carbon, CBF bike is basically the dream machine. I'm a former Riot owner, and I live in the flat lands. My only reservation would be stiffness... I'm always afraid, especially with the claimed weight loss, a bike like this might be a bit wimpy for a 200 pound ex-BMX/freeride guy. This or a new following...and this doesn't need super boost...
  • 13 5
 There's some irony in you wondering if this bike will be stiff enough for you, and simultaneously avoiding 157.
  • 2 1
 @thegoodflow: Hook, Line and sinker.
  • 3 4
 @thegoodflow:

Whoosh inception.

There is no irony in not wanting to replace a brand new, expensive, light and stiff as hell carbon I9 boost rear wheel when I get my next ride. Particularly if that flex is in the frame versus some marginal wide hub benefit. Great case study would be my old Riot...super boost, mega boost, hyper boost won't stop that (otherwise wonderful) bike from twisting longitudinally because the upper 'link' is actually two independent and almost 2D structures.
  • 3 4
 @thegoodflow: You fell for it. Stiff bikes without 157 flexy bikes without 157.

It ain't the hub that makes for a stiff frame, no matter what the marking says.
  • 3 1
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Triangles with a wider base are indeed laterally stiffer. That's physics, not marketing.
  • 4 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: you conspiracy theorists are such dorks. Stick to 135qr.... everything after that is just marketing.

A 157 hub makes for a stiffer/stronger wheel. Boost is plenty strong in most circumstances, so maybe it's a bit overkill... but there's almost no drawbacks. And of course the hub doesn't make the frame stiffer... it allows for a stiffer frame to be designed.

I own 148 and 157 bikes. Both work great. I kinda prefer the 157 at this point, because it's a better design imo, but neither standard would keep me from buying a new bike I wanted.
  • 2 3
 @thegoodflow: So try and follow the conversation if you can. The reply to Glenngineer's worry about frame stiffness mentions 157. As you mentioned 157 makes for a stiff wheel, but it's not what makes a frame stiff or not.

I can honestly say I think I'm one of the few who can say they've ridden the same frame with both 142 and 150 wheel and the frame was just as stiff either way.
  • 1 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: ok, thanks for the explanation. I've been duped!
  • 4 0
 No mention of weight, which is a valid concern of any bike trying to use the label "XC Light". Revel has put some of their bikes under long distance bikepackers (the Rascal set the AZT750 record under Liz Sampey) so it makes sense they leveraged those riders to make a lighter, more efficient, more frame-pack friendly bike. Being able to hit that 26-27lbs area without carbon wheels would be very competitive.
  • 2 0
 For sure. Supposedly the frame is a pound lighter than the Rascal, combine that with lighter duty components (forks, brakes, etc) I'm thinking they should hit 27, 28 pounds pretty comfortably?
  • 2 0
 I put my deposit down. If it’s in the low 6 pound range, I’ll be stoked.
  • 3 1
 @roma258: I would hope lighter than that. My Ripley LS was just under 25, size L, with a MRP Stage on it.
  • 3 1
 Yep. Amazing that "XC light" is now in the mid-to-higher 20's after years of trying to get them into the lower 20s. Progress must progress (or mortgage the first born).

Granted, frame weight is not the only metric for XC bikes but when a manufacturer doesn't specify a weight (or even a projected weight), my first thought always goes to, "heavy for it's intended application." Also, just because it has a "2" as the first digit, a 29.75 lbs (13.52 kg) weight won't cut it.
  • 3 0
 @Dopepedaler: Even if the frame with shock is 7 pounds in a large, I can get it under 25# with xtr 9100 and carbon wheels with 400 gram rims, that will work everyday, and for the occasional race, and that's light enough. I mainly enjoy riding big miles in the mountains (amongst other things) , but I do Xterra tris a few times a year, but I just shoot for the podium in an old man class. A pound or so isn't a big deal

I only have to sell one child, and I have 2 :/ Boy is she gonna be upset, since she's 24.

I will note that top end WC pros bike's have gotten heavier, but more capable too. 30mm rims, 2.4 WT tires, 120R/110F bikes w/ droppers are simply heavier, but modern XCO courses are making that variety of bike the fastest way from point A to point B.
  • 3 0
 @hllclmbr: My point was, it'd be nice if we had more options that didn't require XTR 9100 and carbon wheels to hit "just" 28lbs.

The Ripley is 27ish without all the carbon. The new Top Fuel is similar. Even the YT Izzo is 27ish in the $3800 "Pro" model.
  • 1 1
 @PHeller: Ultimately, aren't you just asking for less capable and/or durable bikes? I mean, if your Ripley is 27 pounds, then an Ibis DV9 would be 23.5 pounds with the same parts, but it would also be a hardtail.

As they say, there's no free lunch...
  • 3 0
 @hllclmbr: It had better not be 7 pounds...that is beyond curvaceous for an XC-billed frame.
  • 1 0
 @Dopepedaler: I suspect low 6's in a large. Probably like the Ibis Ripley, but a bit heavier than a SB100
  • 3 0
 @hllclmbr: You're totally right - I would be asking for a less durable or capable bike - but I'd know that because I want a 26lbs XC/TR bike, not an Enduro bike with 170mm of travel. Part of this is because manufactures hate playing the warranty guessing game of "did you use your bike outside of its intended application?" They would much prefer the consumers stop worrying about weight so they can overbuild bikes and never worry about warranties.

It's just hilarious that when PinkBike Reviewed the Made-in-USA Guerilla Gravity Trail Pistol, it got knocked for being heavy (30lbs) with 120/130mm travel (although most owner run them in Pistola form with 130/140 travel). People felt like that was portly for a bike intended to be a trail bike. Yet, people rush out to buy bikes (that are made in Asia) that weigh the same amount, with the same travel, and no ability to be converted into a 160/170 29er brawler that is the Gnarvana. The weight of GG's front triangle is a compromise to make it durable in far longer travel variants (by swapping chainstays).

As an owner of a Trail Pistol, do I wish it were lighter? Sure! Nobody is going to complain about having less mass to pedal around, but would I trade that less weight for less versatility? Probably not. If I had a bike that was my "one bike" that I never intended to run as anything other than an XC/TR (like the Revel Ranger) I'd definitely want it to be lighter.
  • 1 0
 As per Revel - 6.1 pounds for medium with shock.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: Here's what I'd rather do. Keep riding my bike. I'd prefer not to have warranty issues because it's a pound lighter, and those warranty claims rarely go smoothly, and often result in weeks/months off of the bike.

If I keep riding, I'll be strong enough to pedal that extra pound around, no problem.

Now, one could use engineering and material science to make a bike frame that's both lighter and stronger, but guess what? It's going to be even more expensive.

Again, no free lunches.
  • 1 1
 @PHeller and others: From what I see, it depends how much "more than 1lb" really is as its referring to the weight compared to the Rascal frame. It looks like a large Rascal frame is 6.7lbs, so 1lb less would obviously be 5.7lbs. Compare that to a Large Ripley frame for at 5.2lbs. So we are guesstimating here but I wouldn't expect the Ranger to be super light unless "more than 1lb" turns out to be 1.9. Judging by most Ripley builds, if the Ranger is .5lbs more we'll see alot in the 28lb range unless built up with super-light components and tires then you'll see the 26-27 numbers. Another comparison is my Mach 5.5 which has a similar 5.6-5.7lb frame weight. I have it built very light and its around 28.5lbs but thats with a Fox 36, not a SID.
  • 2 0
 @yupstate: Ripley V4 is 5,2# without a shock, Revel said about 6# with shock, so that's really only .3# more, which is pretty negligible.
  • 2 0
 @hllclmbr: Thanks. Certainly not a featherweight, but probably not meant to be. But I'm also sure the SID is lighter than that Fox 34 most folks have on the Ripley (for comparison again). Didn't look up specs but I'm sure it's a safe assumption.
  • 3 0
 @yupstate: That Sid is very light, 2/3 pound lighter than a 34 with a maxle.

I’m getting some lighter wheels built, but I’m moving most of my parts off of my current bike to my Ranger. It’s gonna be just under 26 with my xt/xtr, in everyday guise, and I’ll be able to drop over a pound for races with the little xtr pedals, xtr cassette, a lighter shorter dropper, and faster tires. 24 1/2-3/4 is plenty light
  • 5 2
 I wonder how this compares with the Pivot Trail 429. The numbers read similar. I had a hard time getting rowdy on the 429 above a modest downhill speed, which would be my concern with this. Quite a bit cheaper for a frame, though!
  • 4 2
 Trail 429 is a fantastic bike, but this seems much more comparable to a Scott Spark. Trail 429 is a capable machine.. not XC oriented. I would not pick it for a marathon trail race
  • 6 0
 I would agree I demoed a 429, and maybe the fork wasn't setup well, but I felt like it didn't get up and go with any real authority, and yet was always running out of travel.
  • 3 1
 @rclugnut: I demoed a 429 trail and felt the same way. Didn't have the agility, sharpness, and playfulness a short travel bike should have. Handled like a full-size enduro bike, but didn't have enough travel to back it up. It was stuck in a weird middle. A longer travel bike would be more capable and climb just as well for all-around trail use, yet I would prefer something with snappier handling for tamer XC trails.
  • 1 0
 I owned the trail 429 for 18 months, it is an agile, sharp, precise bike. It could rail corners, and had stiffness that this ranger won't be able to match. But it was also much heavier, and for my 150lbs I don't need a super stiff bike. I've put my deposit down on this bike.
  • 10 2
 Shimano kit not offered.
  • 2 1
 Most OEM deals are done months, if not a year in advance. Shimano most likely hit up the larger players first as well with their new kit. You will see more Shimano OEM next year most likely.
  • 2 1
 Buy a frame, build it up, get a better bike for less.
  • 9 1
 @TheR: Not really... with many $5000ish bikes, compared to the $3000ish frame only (or even frame and shock) option plus aftermarket parts, you basically get a free cockpit and drive train and more:

2800 frame & shock + 800 fork + 1000 wheels + 200 dropper + 200 brakes= $5000*

(* and that's with lots of good deals)

and still need: tires, entire drivetrain including cranks & pedals,entire cockpit including saddle
  • 9 2
 Revel in the dent it puts in your walley
  • 2 0
 And down tube (no protection???)
  • 2 1
 Speed Dents
  • 6 2
 Revel is killing it. Bet they'll sell these by the boatload, since it's a perfect bike for the kind of trails most of us have access to. Wonder what the weight on this rig is.
  • 3 0
 If I could justify two FS bikes, I'd get this and a Transition Sentinel since my riding area has a mix of more xc trails and some legit downhill. Oh well.
  • 2 0
 @HB208: That would be perfect. My current trail bike is a Transition Smuggler, but something a little lighter and more efficient, while keeping the geo would be perfect. And the give me a big hitter for bike park/enduro stuff.
  • 4 1
 @roma258: stay tuned to Transition, something’s coming...
  • 4 2
 @BiNARYBiKE: Unless they completely revamp their suspension design, there's nothing to "stay tuned" to. It will still be a Transition, and pedal like a wet mattress.
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: New Smuggler or....
  • 1 0
 @roma258: that’s the word on the street. Supposedly much more XC.
  • 2 0
 @LeDuke: weird, mine pedals fine. But I haven’t spent much time on wet mattresses for comparison. Wink
  • 1 1
 @BiNARYBiKE: That would genuinely surprise me. Every new Transition is lower, slacker, longer, the usual...
  • 1 0
 @roma258: prepare to be surprised
  • 1 1
 It is funny to see how a few month ago the Canyon Neuron was hated here for having the exact same philosophy and geometry.
  • 3 0
 Great to see that companies are still making ~70/30 XC/trail bikes. Recently, the demand has seemed to shift towards trail bikes, and a lot of companies have gone away from this style and skewed more towards trail bikes (SC Tallboy, for example). I'm excited to see what other bikes will be in the XC field test.
  • 7 1
 HOTNESS! I'd enduro that.
  • 8 24
flag Dropthedebt (Jun 22, 2020 at 3:34) (Below Threshold)
 Said you're Mom...
  • 7 3
 @RevelBikes @BTRfabrications have been producing the Ranger frame for quite some time now... www.btr-fabrications.com/products/ranger-frame/#frame-options
  • 3 0
 Shhh, stop snitching.
  • 6 0
 I can see how people could get them confused with each other...
  • 2 0
 Well, I put my $100 down. This is pretty much the exact bike I’ve been looking for, and Revel bikes have been getting rave reviews.

Off to buy a torque wrench for my 1000 pivots...
  • 4 0
 My Ranger is green too Smile .
  • 3 0
 The Evoc bike bag they ship in is unfortunately much less of a perk for the foreseeable future.
  • 3 1
 Oooooooooo! It’s beautiful!
  • 18 17
 The prices of some new bikes continue to be crazy ridiculous. $7,199? $9,999??? Come on. Really?
  • 39 2
 Surprise surprise... It's made for those who buy it, not for those who don't.
  • 6 1
 It’s $5k - $10k they have a lower end kit. And they also have the frame set.

Also one of the few frame manufacturers that give you a life time warranty that happen to be direct to consumer. Also shop the bike in an EVOC bike bag.

But they don’t have shimano in any kit, if you are a fanboy of them. I don’t own any of their bikes, but it’s a pretty good bargain for CF bike. But since Canfield bikes re awaken, I would rather go straight to the source for their kinematic design. You also get different suspension versus the typical.
  • 8 2
 @Happypanda1337:
The source of CBF is the brother that left Canfield.
  • 7 1
 $2800 for a frame/shock with a lifetime guarantee is pretty freaking competitive. Buy the frame and use the deeply discounted online retailers for everything else. That's all ive done for almost a decade.
  • 8 1
 People continue to be surprised by this? Sun rises in the east, sets in the west, and small, boutique companies sell expensive bikes.
  • 3 1
 @TheR: seriously. It’s a lot of money but The nicest bikes having been hitting these numbers for years. No surprise.
  • 1 1
 if i could buy it for that price as frame and fork combo here in europe without massive dutties i would order it right now
  • 2 0
 @Happypanda1337: I don't see Canfield coming out with a XC race bike on their own though. Perhaps if you're looking for a long-travel 29er like the Riot, you would go Canfield. Revel seems to be focusing more on Trail and XC.
  • 1 0
 @TucsonDon: Is 140 considered long travel?
  • 1 0
 @rwrusso: It was considered long-travel for a 29er a few years ago. It seems like most bike companies that have both 29 and 27 in one model consider a 29er with 140 to be about equivalent to a 27.5 with 150mm, which is on the longer side of travel. Most 29er race bikes are 100. 29er aggressive trail are about 130mm. Heck over 140mm, like 150mm in a 29er is considerd full-on enduro, like an SB150. So I'd consider 140mm on the longer side for a 29er. Not DH long, but a lot longer than needed or desired for typical XC/Trail.
  • 3 1
 This gonna be in the upcoming xc field test?
  • 22 0
 Yup, I've been riding it for a few weeks now Smile
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy: and the Transition Spur?
  • 2 0
 I've got an Ibis Ripley on order, but now... I'm super intrigued by this thing. There's some things I don't like, the BB cable routing, and surprised they landed on 67.5 HA but this could be a killer.
  • 2 1
 Beautiful colour. Like a more muted, forest-y version of Yeti's Turquoise. Love it.
  • 2 0
 These bikes are finished so well. They are really put together well.
  • 3 1
 $9,999. Come one, you're only a buck away. . .
  • 4 0
 They surely must have been cutting putting on some lower spec stuff etc to keep the price down.
  • 2 0
 plus sales-tax/VAT and it'll break 10K easy, but allegedly pricing things at whatever-ninety-nine dollars or cents creates more sales. i don't get it, because I just round up or think about sales-tax and would already consider that as 10 grand.
  • 4 0
 @just6979: it’s a time-tested sales gimmick. The brain sees and accepts the first numbers and we subconsciously see the 9 not the logical 10 that it’s much closer to.
  • 2 0
 @jeremiahwas: i know, that is what i said. except not "we". I automatically round up, and it confuses people: "what do you mean _five_ grand? it says _four_ thousand nine-hundred ninety-nine."
  • 1 0
 @just6979: Well yeah, we don't necessarily round up or down. We just round off to the closest round number (of which "round" can be tens, hundreds, thousands etc). Rounding 9999 off to 9000 is silly.
  • 2 1
 This is a bike that might have me excited about riding a FS again. Looking forward to some reviews.
  • 7 1
 Been on it for awhile now. Video review soon Smile
  • 1 0
 sadly no canadian retailers though.. and a horrible exchange rate is keeping the rail out of my reach Frown
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: Looking forward to the upcoming "downcountry" field test! What bikes are included? Interested in seeing a shootout between:
1. GIANT Trance Advanced Pro 29
2. Yeti SB115 (upcoming release?)
3. Revel Ranger
4. Transition Smuggler (upcoming refresh)
5. Ibis Ripley v4
6. Pivot Trail 429
7. Santa Cruz Tallboy
8. Guerrilla Gravity Pistola
9. Orbea OIZ M10 TR
10. YT Izzo

etc etc... what'd I miss? lol
  • 2 0
 @opetruzel:

You missed the Banshee Phantom and the Evil Following... :-)
  • 3 0
 @opetruzel: Scott Spark XC and trail versions.
  • 2 1
 @opetruzel: I'd say more than half of the bikes on your list don't fit the "downcountry" category at all.
  • 1 0
 @LeDuke: The Smuggler may or may not fit the bill with the refresh -- not sure yet, but you're probably correct about that one.

I meant the GG Trail Pistol, not the Pistola. (Mixed them up)

I think everything else on my list is 115-130mm, so I'd argue that they all qualify as "downcountry" or short-travel 29ers.
  • 1 0
 @DutchmanPhotos: Can't believe I forgot that new Evil The Following, as I've been drooling over it since March.
  • 2 0
 @opetruzel:

How about the Nuke Proof Reactor ST..?
  • 2 0
 @opetruzel: Knolly Fugitive
  • 2 0
 @opetruzel: the new transition ain't gonna be a smuggler.
  • 2 0
 @opetruzel: the new Kona Hei Hei and Spot Ryvve seem to be strong contenders in this field. Wonder when Giant is updating their Anthem bikes.
  • 1 0
 @opetruzel: Short travel isn't really the only defining characteristic. Here, read it again: www.pinkbike.com/news/what-the-heck-is-a-down-country-bike-opinion.html
  • 3 0
 @DutchmanPhotos , @PNdubRider , @roma258 , @billreilly @DutchmanPhotos - All good additions!

Using 115mm - 130mm range limits for both front and rear suspension, here's my updated "downcountry" or "short-travel 29er" list:

1. GIANT Trance Advanced Pro 29
2. Yeti SB115 (upcoming release?)
3. Revel Ranger
4. Transition Smuggler (upcoming refresh)
5. Ibis Ripley v4
6. Pivot Trail 429
7. Santa Cruz Tallboy
8. Guerrilla Gravity Trail Pistol
9. Orbea OIZ M10 TR
10. YT Izzo
11. Scott Spark XC/Trail
12. Banshee Phantom v3
13. Evil The Following
14. Specialized Stumpjumper ST
15. Jamis Portal
16. Canyon Neuron
17. NS Synonym TR
18. Spot Ryve 115
19. Whyte S-120
20. Knolly Fugitive
21. Nukeproof Reactor 290c ST
22. Kona Hei Hei
  • 1 0
 @roma258: Not sure about the Anthem refresh, but their Trance Advanced Pro 29 already does a pretty damn good job in this "downcountry" category with 115/120mm travel. I demo'd it twice last year and walked away smiling both times. Came very close to selling my Mojo3 to buy one, but decided to test (or at least wait for reviews on) as many as possible first.

In fact, the Trance is the very reason I'm interested in this entire category -- just wish the darn virus wasn't preventing me from demoing more of the listed bikes.
  • 2 0
 @LeDuke: I realize this is a silly debate given the tongue-in-cheek nature of the "downcountry" label in the first place, but which bikes in that list would you say don't count as "downcountry?"

Given Mike's definitions, I'm not sure which bikes wouldn't count.

"I'm a huge proponent of all-around short-travel bikes that are built to cover ground quickly while also being able to take some abuse, which is exactly what I'm getting at with this whole down-country spiel."

"They're short-travel, quick handling rigs with a large majority of their DNA coming from the cross-country family but with a clever component spec that adds to their descending and technical abilities without also adding too much weight."

"I propose the silly down-country label only to mock how two-wheeled world tries to be neatly classified."
  • 2 0
 @opetruzel: Good point about the trance. I do think the "downcountry" category label is slightly misleading. You have the short travel bashers like Knolly, Evil and GG, and you have the more lightweight bikes meant for pedaling that can still get down, but not really meant for the steeps (I think the Revel falls in that category) like the Kona, Spot, Trance, etc... Yeah, yeah market segmentation Smile
  • 4 0
 @bbrowne23: Knolly. Spec Stumpjumper. Izzo. Tallboy. Smuggler. None of those come even close to feeling/pedaling like an XC bike. They don't cover ground quickly.
  • 4 0
 @LeDuke: Got it. Sounds like your argument is that a "true downcountry" bike is more "beefed-up XC bike" than "slimmed down trail bike."

Still funny that the "downcountry" label was originally meant as a cheeky label to poke fun at how we categorize bikes, and now we're all debating which bikes deserve the label and which don't Smile
  • 2 0
 @opetruzel: The Trek Top Fuel, new Cannondale Scalpel
  • 2 0
 @opetruzel: Forgot two more: the Spesh Epic Evo and the long travel Canyon Lux. The Neuron is more "neutered trail bike" than "XC bike on steroids".
  • 2 0
 @opetruzel: Sniper T.
  • 1 0
 @crysvb: re: Canadian retailer, there is livoutside.ca
  • 2 1
 Well hello beautiful!!! This is exactly what I've been waiting for! Take my money!!! I even like the colorways...
  • 3 5
 It’s got a steep HTA, a longish RC, a longer reach, it’s expensive, it’s heavy, and it’s short travel. They got the reach right, so that’s one out of six.

The less travel you have, the less important the suspension design, so I’m left scratching my head on the potential value of this bike and quite honestly “what the hell were they thinking?”

This is not a Riot replacement Frown

In contrast, look at the Guerilla Gravity Pistola, great geo, fair price, durable, not crazy heavy, and it rides like a dream up and down. Oh, and it’s made in Colorado!
  • 3 0
 I mean, Pistola weighs 31 pounds for the GX build. It's a short travel basher, while this is more of a quick handling light-duty trail bike. Just different targets altogether.
  • 6 0
 Not everyone rides out west. You don't seem to grasp this isn't a Riot replacement, that would be the Revel. This is what a lot of us former Riot owners had hoped the Brothers would have put put.
  • 1 0
 You don't need a 60 degree HTA on a XC bike. Suspension design is still important for balancing traction and efficiency. It's interesting for me to see the optional lockout as opposed to other brands who basically recommend using the lockout more often that shifting.
  • 2 0
 Damn I regret buying my Norco Optic instead of waiting for this.
  • 1 0
 Nothing quite says "I only ride buffed trails and only when it is dry" like a Dissector front/ Rekon rear set up.
  • 1 1
 Now Spe new Epic Evo is Slacker than this XC/Trail bike!! What a time of changes!!!!! Soon The Grim Donut will be old fashion geometry!!!!!
  • 4 4
 That amount of linkage looks terrible for the mud of the UK. Nevertheless, it is still a cool looking bike.
  • 4 1
 To be honest I can't really tell a CBF from a Maestro from a DW-Link linkage. I thought these linkages aren't uncommon over there, are they? There is only the small extension that decouples the shock from sideways loading so even though it adds two more bearings, these actually preserve the shock and make it last a little longer.
  • 6 1
 So nobody in the UK had a stumpjumper in 2018? Those frames and other big S bikes had 4 more bearings than this design. The real difference in the suspension design isn't how it looks, aesthetically. It's how their leverage ratio curve looks on a graph. I know.. it's not very exciting.
  • 2 6
flag slimjimbikes (Jun 22, 2020 at 7:17) (Below Threshold)
 @Ron-C: I don't really have much clue about rear suspension systems, I just saw the amount of pivots and thought of all the mud that could get stuck there. I have never ridden a full suspension bike myself though, and haven't ridden a proper mountain bike since 2013. I do ride my local trails and pump track on my gravel bike though.
  • 2 0
 @JaiB1: The bb, headset, hubs etc all have bearings too (and some in the rear mech and shifter if you have those) and typically these keep up nicely. Something similar would go for other bearings on the bike. Nowadays most stuff is quite good. Attempting to clean them usually causes more damage than neglecting them Wink . I have never ridden a gravel bike but if these is one thing seizing, it is the old ACS freewheel on my BMX. Then I'll soak it in oil, spin it a few times and I'm good again Smile . On my first mountainbike, sometimes the lower headset cup would seize after a particularly muddy ride (with the front tire shooting mud at the poor bearing). Eventually I solved this by applying a particularly thick layer of grease on the outside of that lower cup, which worked as a barrier. So yeah, if you're worried about your bearings not keeping up in the mud, cake them in grease and you'll be good Wink . I read somewhere that Middleburn actually used to have wheel hubs that constantly seeped a little oil, making it impossible for contaminants to enter whilst being incredibly smooth. Downside there is that obviously they couldn't use those on bikes with disc brakes.
  • 6 1
 @vinay: the rear yoke doesn't decouple anything. It only extends the lever arm on the shock as a whole. The front shock mount still only has one degree of rotational freedom, so lateral loads are present and amplified. Specialized have learned this lesson the hard way through the past 10 years of prematurely failed shocks. If in mtb, like in virtually every other suspension application, the shock were truly, fully isolated rather than being a structural member of the frame, we would see new levels of shock durability and performance. Ohlins have mentioned this many times during their mtb product development.
  • 1 0
 @Ron-C: 2018+ Stumpy has 10 bearings, same as this. Even has the same one solid shock mount and one bushing pivot shock mount.
  • 1 3
 @grizzlyatom: "The front shock mount still only has one degree of rotational freedom"

What does that mean? It's a normal pivot with a bushing like any other shock mount. It can rotate until the shock hits the frame, which is much more than 1 degree.
  • 4 0
 @just6979: "Degrees of freedom" is a technical term: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Degrees_of_freedom

It doesn't mean the number of degrees in an angle.
  • 3 1
 @just6979: I'm just referring to the fact that the front shock mount can only freely rotate around one axis. If you apply a side load, which we all do every time we ride a bike, the shock body is put into bind/bending stress. This will result in excess strain and cause the internal bushings and seals to fail prematurely. This is amplified by the "shock extender" yoke used by several bike brands.
  • 2 1
 @grizzlyatom: 100% Agree. yoke mounted shocks are bad news. Basically lengthening the shock shaft as a lever, increasing side loads. Your shaft seals will wear out prematurely. Ibis does this too. Its a bad design.
  • 1 0
 @grizzlyatom: I think it depends on how that yoke is implemented.
If it was such a big issue why aren't there dozens of posts about premature shock failures on Ibis forums.
  • 2 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: The newest super deluxe and X2 series shocks were designed to address this very issue for the large frame manufacturers. Hence, the trunnion shock. The game was to improve seal durability or die for the big suspension players a few years ago. Ohlins was one of those players that had to adapt quickly to very specific demands. Now, most of these high-end shocks can handle about one season of good thrashing, depending on the frame. It's incredible they do that well considering the diverse load scenarios they see. This added stiffness/durability comes at a cost, however. More expensive materials used, ultra-tight manufacturing tolerances, and tighter sliding interfaces mean more friction and lower ultimate performance at a higher monetary cost. These are the prices we all pay with our wallets and our suspension performance due to the yoke and other poor frame designs.
  • 2 1
 Such a badass bike! Perfect for the trails we have here in SoCal!
  • 1 1
 Jeez couldn't stand reading stupid jibberish...the answer is called a frikin bash gaurd for f--- sakes
  • 1 0
 Process 111. Just saying....
  • 1 0
 Almost the carbon Riot everyone was waiting for.
  • 2 0
 Stranger Ranger Danger.
  • 1 1
 My money was on Revel Ripper!!
  • 1 1
 looks like a 2016 Stumpjumper ngl
  • 2 3
 What about a long travel 29 er? That's what I want.
  • 3 0
 Unfortunately you'll just have to look at one of the other 4000 long-travel 29ers released in the last couple years. Tough times we live in for sure!
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