Rever's Attack and Arc Hydraulic Brakes - Taipei Cycle Show 2019

Mar 27, 2019
by Mike Levy  
Taipei Cycle Show 2019
Rever's Attack two-piston brake costs $95 USD per end.


Rever, an off-shoot of Jagwire, might not be the first name that comes to mind when thinking about brakes, but their mineral oil-based Attack and Arc models appear to be straightforward, gimmick-free options that could make sense.

The Attack is their lower-priced model that sells for $95 USD (without a rotor) and sees a sturdy looking top-end combined with a two-piston caliper, all of which comes in at 235-grams. Rever was refreshingly straight with me - the Attack isn't meant to blow minds with its technology, but simply be a reliable, powerful brake that'll sell for a reasonable price. Up top, you're looking at a left or right-specific design with a split clamp, a two or three-finger lever blade, and a reach adjustment dial that skips the tiny hex key.


Taipei Cycle Show 2019
Taipei Cycle Show 2019
That funny looking orange thing is a vented aluminum extension meant to help dissipate heat, much like the fins on Shimano's IceTech pads.


Down at the wheel, the Attack gets a forged caliper that's home to a set of 22mm diameter pistons. You can also spec their 'Heat Dissipation Cover' Shimano-compatible pads that combine a vented, 0.6mm thick aluminum top panel with 1mm thick steel backplates.

The Arc brake is positioned a bit more up-market than the Attack, with an MSRP of $105 USD (without a rotor) and a host of upgrades over its less expensive brother. The most obvious is up top, with the Arc sporting a much slimmer, pared down perch. Internally, it uses a dual bladder design that said to save weight while also making it easy to run the brakes moto-style or the proper way, and you can choose from a two or three finger lever blade.

The caliper is different, too, although it's difficult to spot. You'll find a set of 24mm pistons in there if you look hard enough, with Rever saying that the larger diameter supplies more power than what's used inside the Attack's caliper. Total weight is about 15-grams less than the Attack, too.
Taipei Cycle Show 2019
The Arc brake weighs less than the Attack and offers more power thanks to larger diameter pistons.



76 Comments

  • + 107
 $95 and comes with a cheese grater for that brick of parmesan I keep in my pack. What a deal!
  • + 7
 Wonder if they do a another version for us Cheddar fans?
  • + 4
 No need for cheese grater here.
  • + 4
 Will those vent holes (AKA Cheese grater) still vent when filled with mud?
  • + 68
 Make America Grate Again
  • + 4
 @the-one1: Donald Cheesehair approves!
  • + 4
 @the-one1: Cheezy!
  • + 12
 This would actually be a fantastic cheese melting machine... you grate it on top, then it falls onto a hot rotor. Just put your lasagne under it - you just need an e-bike to make it effective. Perfect for Surley and Salsa owners on their (fat)bikepacking trips across Alaska, they will get their soy-cheese fondue maker.
  • + 2
 Instead of a cheese grater, I saw one of the old flip-phone style communicators from the original Star Trek!
  • + 6
 Cheese is a kind of meat. A tasty yellow beef. I milk it from my teat. But I try to be discrete. Oh cheese. Oh cheese.
  • + 1
 @HairyLegs: no more than vented disks, or the caliper on any other top loading system would
  • + 2
 Goes great with "la baguette" tire inserts.
  • + 27
 i ruv my brake revers
  • + 1
 Rooby Roo!
  • + 24
 So can you use those brakes wheRever you ride?
  • + 2
 You should be banned foRever for making that pun.
  • + 18
 I’m genuinely curious to know if anyone would make use of the ‘three finger lever blade’ Are there really people out there that use three fingers on the brake lever, while hanging on to their bars with a pinky and thumb?
  • + 6
 Kids
  • + 8
 Kids or if you are looking at taking a trip down memory lane to your Hayes 9 days. Good times.
  • - 1
 Disc brakes are not just for mtbs Wink
  • + 4
 I always brake with only one finger, but somehow prefer a long lever.
  • + 2
 @Zany2410: True, but even the lowest end Shimano brakes on my mums shopping bike work perfectly well with one finger. Some cautious or heavy people might use two, but three is just excessive.
  • + 5
 Grip shift users need them. Most two finger levers are too short to reach comfortably with a grip shifter
  • + 15
 Longer levers provide more leverage.
  • + 2
 @nickmalysh: Nope. Shimano 2 fingers lever is more than long enough for children's 3 or 4 fingers.
  • + 3
 @nozes: yup, a longer lever = more dare I say "leverage"
  • - 4
flag ajaneta (Mar 27, 2019 at 8:29) (Below Threshold)
 @tacklingdummy: that you don’t need because it’s an hydraulic system, not even with guides.
  • + 6
 @ajaneta: a hydraulic system still makes use of leverage does it not?
  • + 1
 I believe it's for people who prefer to use their middle and ring fingers for braking. No manufacturer actually designs brake levers for three-finger braking.
  • + 1
 @ajaneta: if that were true brakes levers would look more like dropper levers
  • + 4
 more rever more reverage
  • + 1
 @SonofBovril @Duderz7: My point is that in the end braking power and modulation is limited/defined by the hydraulic system design not by the lever itself. Then, shouldn't the lever be designed with ergonomics in mind?
  • + 1
 @ajaneta: absolutely the hydraulic system plays a major part, but so does the lever. If you're still thinking it does not matter you could try bleeding in a couple reverb push button remotes and see how it works. I'd love to be printed wrong on this one.
  • + 1
 @Duderz7: well, this is pointless now...
  • + 8
 Well the first problem is that they look a bit garbage. Don't kid yourself, we all know that matters. Secondly it's tough to compete with budget trickle-down tech of the big boys. Kudos for trying though. Competitors are always welcome.
  • + 7
 There are more and more options outside of 2 big S for a reliable and affordable product. I would love to see modern mtbs packaging everything together for a sub $1k bike. I bet it would come really close in performance to much more expensive option.
I reckon it would do much more to grow mountain bike as a sport and a business than any UCI/RedBull TV tricks.
  • + 2
 There are already some good deals near $1300. Much better brakes, drivetrain, wheel/tire, and cockpit and more progressive frames than the x/c-ish stuff from 10 years ago. I think if they stayed under $1500 and went super reliable it would allow higher tech at the $4500 level (which is where I see best value for tech)
  • + 4
 I dunno it’s pretty difficult to beat the price:performance ratio of SLX brakes and drivetrain when they go on sale at jenson every year.
  • + 4
 The lever on the Attacks looks *exactly* like the Formula Cura levers (which can only be adjusted with a tiny hex even though they also have the knurled adjuster) and the master cylinder of the Arcs looks like a bad copy of the Curas.
  • + 1
 I thought exactly the same. That is a shameless copy if I ever saw one.
  • + 2
 +1 These look like a mix of Formula/SRAM...

For the money I'd just get the real things, and by that I mean Formulas because SRAM.
  • + 3
 Never heard of Rever but I am super happy with my TRP Slant T4, cheap brakes speced on my GT Force and Fury, haven't missed a beat, plenty enough power with the right pads. Touch is firm and consistent. I was a die hard Shimano Saint/Zee rider and I gave these a go as they were speced on my bikes, I won't look back.
  • + 1
 Which pads do you use?
I have the Slate t4 G-Spec on my hardtail. The brakes are ok, but I don't like the power.
  • + 1
 I’m glad to hear you had good luck with them. I couldn’t get enough power out of mine, even with 203mm rotors.
  • + 1
 @eoisaacs: pop some metallic saint pads in there and then do a leverbleed but force a bit more fluid in there. Their pads suck. Saint pads rock. TRP uses a cam system in their lever similar to Shimano servo wave except the power delivery is a bit higher in the stroke to create better modulation. If you force a bit more fluid in there you get to use that leverage when the pads actually contact the rotor. This trick will slate brakes from goood entry level to some of the best on the market!
  • + 1
 @OneTrustMan: So far only TRP original pads, my bikes are pretty new. I liked the feeling on my Force but yes it is lacking power. Then I got my Fury with the same brakes and they had the same feeling but we more powerfull and have a better bite. When looking closer I found that my Force has the Red pads (semi-Metalic) while my Fury has the "copper" colored pads which happen to be Metalic pads. Difference is already quite important between these two so check which ones you have, Red is garbage, copper is good enough. To my surprise the Metalic pads have more bite than the Semi while it should be the opposite showing how bad these are. Now I'd say throw some good pads like Saints or Trickstuff and you'll be sorted. I also had good success with Nukeproof (semi, and metal) or Superstar kevlar pads (organic) and their fins but all this was on Saint/Codes, maybe the TRPs are a bit more sensitive to pad quality.
  • + 1
 @HurricaneCycles: I have a hard time understanding how overfilling your lever will help. Sure when the pads are new they will be closer to the disc and that may make a difference but unless you top it up every few rides to compensate for the lost pad thickness, at some point you will be back to normal specs. Let alone that this trick will make it impossible to push your pistons fully back in place for pad change.

Btw the TRP Slate doesn't have any fancy stuff like servo going on in their lever, that's actually one of they selling point saying that simplicity and direct drive of the piston allows for their excellent modulation. If you even have these brakes just look at the lever, the shaft goes directly from the lever blade to the piston.
  • + 1
 @Balgaroth:
Thanks
Well I will try the Saint metalic pads and also I will mobilize the pistons.
Mobilizing pistons alone can make such a huge difference in power.
I will keep the simple TRP brakes. I just hope they will working longer without any issues than Shimano's.
The only flawless experience I made so far with high-end MTB brakes are Sram brakes who just keep working no matter what and have super nice feeling.
But damn, TRP brakes looking so freaking rad. ( Moto design....love it )
They just have to work. I really want to keep them and be as good as possible.
  • + 1
 @OneTrustMan: Well so far the ones on my Force have 450km, that's not massive but they haven't show any signs of change or issue. I still have some old Saint 810 caliper running with Deore 1 finger lever, never rebuilt once, many years of DH, now on the commuter/winter hardtail. Neglected AF but still going strong lol If anything neglecting them allowed for less issues of modulating lever distance ahah.
  • + 1
 @OneTrustMan: hey man today I tried a mew setup on my slate T4 that is absolutely savage. I had some deore levers at home so I swaped them and boom super good power even on original shit pads. On the other hand now my saint caliper using the trp lever are rather underwelming lol. Basically save your money on pads, get some shimano lever and be happy with plenty of power and less arm pump. Modulation is much less good but still better than what you get with a normal shimano brake and you have a nice short lever. Gonna order some XT levers for the other pair of Slate t4 i have on the DH bike. Rather stoked Smile
  • + 1
 @Balgaroth: to answer your question, the leverage rate changes thru the stroke even if it’s not an actual cam in place. By putting just a little more oil in there than called for you are effectively using a stronger leverage ratio by making the pad co tact a little earlier in the stroke. At last that’s how it feels. It’s worked great for me.
  • + 1
 @HurricaneCycles: like I said I had a mix Deore/M810 that was working really good on my hardtail, very much a Zee. Now that I have the TRP lever on the M810 caliper, same pads, the power is now very hard to get, still slightly supperior than with the TRP Slate caliper but not by much. Goes to show that essentially there is nothing wrong with the TRP Slate caliper. Considering the TRP/M810 combo is on my hardtail/pump/commuter I don't mind much to not have saint level of power so this will remain that way.
  • + 4
 These seem like a hard sell in Europe, where one can get a set of Deore's for 95 EUR or SLX's for 140...
  • + 3
 I cringed a bit and my heart skipped a beat when I scrolled down and saw that last photo... looks way to similar to the avid elixirs that still haunt my dreams.
  • + 0
 What's wrong with those now? I have one as my back brake. I think it makes a good back brake because of the good modulation. Might fab up some Brembos soon here, getting pretty sick of this bicycle component f*ggotry.
  • + 3
 "...easy to run the brakes moto-style or the proper way..." ZIIIING!
  • + 2
 Lol I'm waiting for all the Euro etc people to make a ruckus about this
  • + 2
 @mtbikeaddict: Thunder rolls in the distance......
  • + 1
 People that say things like "kudos for trying"....infuriate me. They might as well say " Looks like someone's got a case of the Monday's".
  • + 9
 Looks like someone woke up on the wrong side of the bed.
  • + 2
 Article says "gimmick free" then immediately talks about the gimmicky cheesegrater heatsink.
  • + 2
 I would try them on my hardtail - the cheaper version looks better to me than the more expensive one.
  • + 1
 Yeah good price new brake)
  • + 1
 What’s going on with the 2 hose moped version?
  • + 1
 I'm still waiting for SRAM to move to mineral oil instead of Dot.
  • + 0
 What's your deal with dot fluid?
  • + 1
 @foggeloggliod: the one time I tried bleeding my Hayes brakes that used dot fluid I got it on my wall and the paint quickly bubbled.....


Mineral oil fo life!
  • + 1
 @foggeloggliod: It is toxic. I don't want to wear gloves and protective eyewear. Also, I would rather my skin on my hands be glowing and moisturized after a brake bleed.
  • + 1
 @tacklingdummy: it's not toxic, unless it's exposed to oxygen, then it becomes EXTREMELY toxic.
  • + 1
 Look forward to a review...
  • + 1
 the lever style makes me think of the Brembo levers on a KTM, I like it!
  • + 1
 You can buy a cheap set of shimano for $65 Canadian per brake.
  • + 1
 You can also get them for $60 Canadian per set. Big Grin
  • + 1
 Forever attack!
  • + 1
 Fonduro

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