Reverse Components' 2020 Bike Hacks Collection - Pond Beaver 2020

Apr 9, 2020
by Dan Roberts  
For 2020 Reverse Components have put together a smattering of products for all over your bike, whether fix a specific problem, help out with setup or adjustment or just simplify your ride.

Here's a look at their bike hacks collection.





Reverse Components Bike Hacks Collection


Travel and Sag Indicator

The travel and sag sag indicator does exactly what it says on the tin. Designed for use with coil shocks, where measuring sag sometimes needs two pairs of hands, there's an external shaft with an O-ring you can measure. It can also be used to see how much travel you're using during a ride, a handy feature for use during the initial setup of a bike. The sag indicator is made from aluminium for the plates, a steel tubing and 3D printed plastic for the rest. It mounts in minutes using zip ties, and will also work for air shocks. It costs €24.90.








Steerer Clamp
Their steerer clamp is a headset spacer with the ability to clamp the fork steerer. If you've got a persistently loosening headset then this could help remedy it but it could be really helpful for when you're removing your stem and bars for travelling or working on your bike. It costs €9.90.




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Angle Spacer
A simple spacer that changes your head angle by effectively increasing the axle to crown of your fork. The 10mm spacer should change your head angle by 0.5 degrees and there's additional versions for 2020 for single crown and dual crown 1 1/8" steerers, as well as the already existing version for tapered steerers. Admittedly 10mm more travel in your fork could be more beneficial, but if you're after changing your head angle or raising your BB on the cheap then this could be an option.

DH Angle Spacer costs €19.90. The tapered version and the 1 1/8" single crown version cost €12.90.





XD Driver Single Speed Kit
Got an XD driver on your hub and want to go single speed? Here's a lovely little CNC'd setup. Can also be used with the chain tensioner above and there's a really solid single speed setup for your XD driver equipped DH bike. It comes in at €89.90.





Reverse Components Bike Hacks Collection
Reverse Components Bike Hacks Collection


Single Speed Kit and Chain Tensioner
A full single speed setup for any kind of bike that can run on a standard Shimano freehub. More and more people frequenting bike parks in the summer, especially over this way on the Swiss/French border, are riding with a single speed setup for the entire season. This could be a good option if that's what you do, or if you really hate gears?

The rear cog uses a wider flange to not mangle your freehub and it's compatible with 9, 10 and 11 speed chains. There are 13 and 17 tooth gears available.

The single speed kit on its own costs €25.90 and the chain tensioner costs €69.90.








Black One D-2 Stem
The D-2 (2 diameters) is a 35mm diameter clamp stem that uses a shim to size down if you want to fit 31.8 bars. It's available in 50mm and 35mm lengths and could be a good option if you've got a bunch of different bars and setups lying around and like to tinker and change your cockpit.

It comes in at €59.90.





Reverse Components Bike Hacks Collection


Flip Guide
Last in the smattering of components from Reverse is their Flip Guide chain guide.

Available for ISCG 05 mounts or even for the Bosch Gen 4 and Shimano ebike systems uses, as the name suggests, a guide that flips out of the way to allow you to take your cranks off without having to remove the chain guide. The guide locks in position and can be simply moved by hand to either of its positions.

The guide mounts to the backplate via a spring loaded system that allows you to fine tune the position of the guide in relation to your chain, meaning you can get it running spot on with no need for fiddly spacers that will inevitably roll off under the largest and heaviest piece of equipment in your workshop or kitchen.

The Flip Guide costs €29.90.






Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020








100 Comments

  • 79 0
 I've been running a steerer clamp for awhile now - although mine has an extra feature that also clamps my handlebar
  • 3 0
 What a genius must have had the idea for that
  • 10 0
 Not when you take the stem off for flying etc. It also gives you extra clamping force to stop the headset coming loose.. With hardly any weight added compared with a spacer...
  • 23 0
 When I saw the chain guide I had to reverse up and check it wasn't made by one up
  • 3 0
 i hope nobody flips out over this
  • 2 1
 Coke or sugar syrup water.
  • 10 0
 The steerer clamp makes a lot of sense, and the price is right. Will be ordering one
  • 4 0
 Let me know if it creaks
  • 5 1
 @gtill9000: unlikely to creak more than shity Specialized integrated headsets, and it's not like the clamp is holding the steerer by it's own
  • 6 0
 I have the luck of being able to travel internationally with my bike occasionally (well until they shut everything down recently) so the steerer clamp would be just the ticket for holding things in place. I've been using an old stem I had kicking around but this is a much nicer solution.
  • 2 0
 @Blackers: exactly!
  • 5 5
 isn't it easier solution to just remove handlebars?..
  • 3 0
 @Blackers: yeh same with the extra stem. It always grates me that I'm giving up some extra grams for that convenience. So this makes way more sense. Packing bikes is always on the weight limit!
  • 2 0
 @ka81: Not really, getting them set up in the right spot again is a PITA so removing the bars with the stem is easier and faster.
  • 4 0
 I bet that clamp would work well as a steerer tube cutting guide for a travel toolbox
  • 1 0
 @Blackers: ???
Installing handlebars is PITA ??! .. Make one mark and you're ready to go!!
  • 2 0
 @ka81: agree that re-installing handlebars is not a big deal once you use a sharpie. But there are situations where removing the stem is necessary, like certain bike bags and messing around with stack height. And maybe I'm traumatized by the finicky headset on my Stumpy Evo, but I prefer to avoid unloading and having to reset the headset as much as possible
  • 3 2
 @ka81: 2 bolts to remove the stem, slide it off and you're done. 4 bolts to remove the faceplate, remove the bars, put the faceplate back on, reverse for the install along with lining things up, making sure the plate is one evenly versus slide the stem back on, tighten 2 bolts. I know what's easier for me but if you're so inclined to faff about with the other method then each to their own.
  • 3 1
 @Blackers: @Arierep:
Do you realise that if I will describe both processes briefly, in fair way, then we'll find out that "removing headset may be even longer (and harder)? Should I spend time for that or you can imagine all the step by yourself?! )

P.s. Sorry for bad english, not my native.
  • 8 0
 The single speed kit for the dh sled is awesome!

Most of the options out are ghetto rig or spend lotso $$$.
  • 1 0
 @Charliewinz: but you cant use 13T or 14T cog
  • 4 0
 Love the sag indicator! I made one similar a few years ago for my bike and put a mark where I wanted the sag to be so that I could just look down while on the bike and see if the preload/spring was correct. It was much easier to check without having to set the o-ring while on the bike and worry if you got off incorrectly.
  • 6 0
 Having a mark on your travel indicator for where sag is supposed to be is by far the most user friendly option. The only reason most suspension companies go with the o-ring and measure method is that Rock Shox has a patent on printing/etching travel markings on the stanchion.
  • 13 0
 @reindeln: I'm always impressed by the foresight of rockshox to patent that
  • 4 0
 Can someone really tell a difference by 0.5 degree head angle change? Seriously curious...

I put a 2 degree works headset on my bike and it made a significant difference, but I m definitely not in tune with my bike enough to notice 0.5....
  • 17 0
 It´s changing more than HA though...Can you feel extra 10mm stem spacer? Most people do.
  • 5 0
 @Mondbiker: true, I once lowered my handlebar 5mm and I couldn't believe how much of a difference that made, at least in the first few meters of the trail
  • 3 0
 its more noticeable on longer travel bikes. 0.5° wont make a difference if your radius is 1mm from the center. But imagine if it were a 200mm radius. the HTA angle changes but so does the arc length. This means your wheel base is longer. And then if its 0.5° slacker, chances are that steerer tube is closer to your body; so you changed the effective reach (you handle bar contact point).

But most people aren't super picky.
  • 1 0
 If it was isolated to just head angle, I probably couldn't. But when changing the flip chip in my bikes it is a noticeable difference since the bb is changed, leverage curve us changed etc. It is subtle but noticable.
  • 2 3
 Yes and no. It's part rider, part bike. I think it all comes down to the length of the head tube and the lengt of the fork.

Might sound strange but what I mean is, that this head angle "changing device" produces an off-set. This off-set is called "0.5 degrees" but it is not. It only produces a change of 0.5 degrees to your steerer tube angle on average length head tubes. If your frame has an head tube of 100mm and you're using this "off-set device" than you're more likely to notice it, beause the change to the steerer tube angle will probably be more than 0.5 degree. When you use it on a head tube of let's say 130mm, than you will be less likely to notice it, because it will be significantly less than 0.5 degree of a change to your head angle.

Let's assume your steerer tube angle has been changed by 0.5 degrees with this device, then the length of the fork will determine the distance by which the front axle will move forward. This distance will be bigger with a 180mm travle fork than with a 100mm one, simple because the axle -to-crown length is bigger.

Just my 2 cents
  • 4 1
 @vhdh666: I don’t think so. This spacer is just a taller crown race. So all it does is increase axle to crown by 10mm. Headtube length will have zero effect.
  • 1 0
 @vhdh666: @cord1 is right. This spacer does not take into account the length of the head tube. It does not work by tilting the steerer tube inside the the head tube, but raising the front of the bike by means of lengthening the axle to crown. It's the same as using a 10mm longer travel fork on your bike as stated in the press release
  • 7 0
 I heard that if you put it on the Donut the forks point upwards.
  • 1 0
 @downhiller900sl: I think, technically, it adds to the total stack height of your headset and head tube. The a-c length of your fork will be unchanged, although the effect is the same.
  • 2 0
 I've got a SC HTLT with a 160mm fork, so my effective HTA is around 66*. If I want to play with getting it closer to 65.5 or 65, do these angle spacers seem like a good idea or would that totally mess up the ride with the higher BB? I don't even know if these spacers would work with an integrated headset.
  • 3 0
 Replaces the crown race on the fork
  • 9 0
 It will slightly raise your bb and slacken your seat angle. You have a couple other options:
- Increase fork travel to 170 - similar effect to the angle spacer, but with added benefit of more travel
- Angle headset - slackens head angle, steepens seat angle, lowers bb
- Offset bushings - slackens head and seat angle, lowers bb
  • 3 0
 I don't think It'll mess up anything, 5mm at the HT will be like 3 at the BB, you won't even notice. And the change is small enough that you can achieve the same position you had by moving the seat a bit forward and removing spacers from under the stem.
  • 1 0
 @ismasan: It´s typically 1/3 of change at fork AC so 5mm change would equal to roughly 1.7mm at BB, 10mm would be closer to 3.5mm at BB.
  • 2 8
flag littleskull99 (Apr 9, 2020 at 15:54) (Below Threshold)
 @DMal: -Angle headset - slackens head angle, steepens seat angle, lowers bb

Impossible!
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: sorry, wrote 5mm by mistake, the spacer is 10mm
  • 6 0
 @littleskull99: It´s magic. Or geometry, one of the two.
  • 1 1
 @Mondbiker: think that one is called metalwork
  • 4 0
 get a works components headset
  • 2 0
 @littleskull99: Slackening head angle (whilst maintaining fork length) also has the effect of lowering the BB and steepening of seattube. Change may be minuscule, but it’s a mathematical fact.
  • 2 0
 I wonder if that angle spaces would work for reducing travel whilst preserving geo. Say you want your 150 fork to be 140 to take advantage (I guess) of the responsiveness of less travel. Reduce the fork travel and add the angle spacer.
  • 2 0
 Reducing the available travel while maintianing a2c isnt going to make the bike any more responsive. Itll just have less travel. Putting a atiffer spring in it will make the bike more responsive. The travel available is basically irellevant
  • 4 0
 So to be super clear, the DH angle spacer is also a crown race reducer from 1.5 to 1.125? If so, that's a product that I have wanted but didn't dream existed.
  • 1 0
 Ya, have they just made something that salvages a load of 1 1/8th headtube frames?
  • 1 0
 Still waiting for Problem Solvers or these guys to figure out a forward-offset set clamp that can be retrofitted to one of the more reliable droppers, so those of us with nice older bikes can reap the benefits of steeper seat-tube angles...
First choice, 9point8’s brilliant (& Canadian) execution of the mechanical brake in place of hydraulic cartridge – temperature proof, never needs bleeding!! ...silky smooth.
... Pretty Please!??
  • 3 0
 Reverse components living up to their brand name!! ONIT!!
  • 2 0
 Would all be much more appealing with less branding. Does every square inch really need to be covered in white ink?
  • 3 0
 I'm sure brand-of-old Roox love the Reverse logo...
  • 2 0
 Still have a yellow Roox Stem and Bar in the Bin.
  • 1 0
 @bbmbc: Roox was the widest bar i could find round 2001 and still in service with the dannys stem now on the "family" bike (kidseats) all the paint has flaked off stem though.
  • 2 1
 Combining angle offset spacers and anglesets and playing with fork travel open up a lot of bike feel and fit tuning. Very cool
  • 2 0
 Tensioner looks good, bloody good price too! Makes me a bit gutted at the £ I paid for an SB One Frown
  • 1 0
 The Tensioner is made in CoLab with SB one, its just the older one without a Clutch thats why it cheaper
  • 1 0
 @Loris123: Yeah that's the version I have, paid nearly £120 including post
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla: Is the simple SB One tensioner working well for you? I'm considering buying the Colab but don't know anyone with it.
  • 1 0
 @coregrind: to be honest I've only had one ride on it, i set it up then winter hit an now the lock down Frown but, yeah it worked well even on a non NW ring. Even without a clutch The spring is SUPER strong! It is a very nice well made bit of kit
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla: Thanks for the info. Without a clutch I was hoping the spring tension would be greater than some of the other options available. I just placed an order. My Colab and single speed bits should arrive early next week. I'll be set to ride in 2021!?
  • 2 0
 @nojzilla: The product you have is the SB ONE Boner and not the Colab/CT
  • 1 0
 @Loris123: its not a older version, its a new one with less features
  • 2 0
 show us the new range of mullet bikes already; come on transition, the sentinel screams for it!
  • 3 0
 Good looking stuff!
  • 2 0
 Any link to Roox components? The logo looks quite similar.
  • 2 0
 @Mondbiker: I have a yellow one.
  • 2 0
 @bbmbc: They were making some cool stuff, I wonder what happened to them.
  • 2 0
 Does the angle spacer work with Specialized integrated headsets?
  • 2 0
 since it replaces your existing crown it should. I'm not sure if the internal bevel on headset bearings varies between headsets/manufacturers though, but that would be your only hangup.
  • 1 0
 @lognar: That was my thought, but I will email them to double check. That would be awesome if it worked. This and an offset bushing gives you a lot of options with Spesh stuff now
  • 2 0
 @Jcmonty: You're in luck. Integrated headset bearings all use standard bearings, so the spacer crown race angle will match the bearing on your bike.
  • 3 1
 Who makes the xd driver single speed kit?
  • 1 0
 Steerer clamp. "Problem Solvers" sent a fax from 1998, and wants to know why it is so thick.
  • 1 2
 What about a seatpost clamp, so when you remove the post you know where it was? Reverse, please make it e-bike freindly as your other products.
  • 1 0
 Such good ideas and stuff!
  • 1 4
 Im reasonably confident that fork manufacturers are not going to like you noving the lower bearing seat up the steerer like that. Sounds like an instant warranty void to me...
  • 2 1
 No different to a longer head tube.. No extra stress.. Like the difference between an internal cup and external cup headset.
  • 1 2
 @BigYeti1977: Nope. Completely different to headtube length. This thing changes the point at which the steerer is supported by the bearing. It moves it from as close as possible to the crown/steerer interface to somewhere up the steerer.
  • 2 1
 @gabriel-mission9:

Pretty sure the load will still be in the same place... The bearing is just higher up.. The interface is still sat on the top of the yoke part ?
  • 1 0
 @BigYeti1977: nope. The bearing is what interfaces with the frame. This spacer moves the point at which the steerer interfaces with the bearing.
  • 1 0
 @gabriel-mission9:

It sits on a 45 degree bevel so the load goes back to the same place plus about 10mm of indirect leverage.. So next to nothing.. Think about different offset wheels on a car etc..
  • 1 0
 @BigYeti1977: indeed. Now think about how much flex occurs in this area during pinkbikes infamous huck to flat tests, compared to how much flex there is at a cars wheel/hub interface. These are very different situations.
  • 1 0
 @gabriel-mission9: Pretty sure that is the frames flexing.. don't think 10mm is going to make much difference... Not enough for a warranty issue anyhow.. The hucks they do are not exactly massive though.. So If you are going big enough to snap a steerer the frame will always go first... I have busted loads on the downtube but never bent a steerer...
  • 1 0
 @BigYeti1977: Right... I think we're gonna have to agree to disagree here. Having worked in the warranty side of this industry for some years, I'm gonna stick to my original comment. I wouldnt go anywhere near a product like this.
  • 1 0
 @gabriel-mission9: Just saying frames are much much weaker than steerers..

DMR trailstar broke in 3 weeks of riding
Also broke Ohlins RXF36 forks in a week... so they were rocking back and forth in the bushes... Steerer was mint... Personal choice as you say Smile
  • 1 1
 Does anybody know who makes that xd driver ss kit?
  • 2 0
 Reverse, right?
  • 1 0
 Its build by SB ONE Bikeparts
  • 1 0
 @sbobikeparts: where can I get replacement jockey wheels for the G3C? The ones with gold like here www.bike-components.de/en/SB-ONE/G3C-Chain-Tensioner-p72417
  • 1 0
 Just bored as f^%#
  • 1 0
 Dam this shit is park
  • 6 7
 Pound Beaver Wink
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