Group Test: 14 of the Latest & Greatest Flat Pedals Reviewed

May 15, 2023
by Matt Beer  
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If you’re a diehard flat pedal enthusiast, you know that not all of the touchpoints where your feet stand on a bicycle are made equally. Crappy pedals can be the difference between having total confidence or literally hanging on for dear life, so we rounded up fourteen of the latest and greatest shin tenderizers to scrutinize.

Grip and stability come from a combination of pedal features and hardly ever does a single one dominate. The usable platform area, pedal thickness, and type of traction pin can drastically affect the ride. Depending on the rider’s preference, size (I'm a 42) and shoe, that combination of grip might fall short if the pedal is the wrong shape, or be over the top if the pins are too long.

We focused on pedals that weren’t featured in this round up and included a couple of favorites for comparison's sake. Like our Field Tests, there’s always another bike (or in this case, a pedal) that you were hoping to see, but we can’t test everything under the sun in one review.

Which shoes did we test with?

In order to give a broader perspective on the pedal grip and feel, we used more than one type of shoe. For the majority of the test, I stuck with two of my favorite flat pedal trail riding shoes; the Specialized Roost 2FO and Ride Concepts Tallac Flat. The Roost is slightly stickier but has a softer sole. On occasion, I dabbled with the stiffer option from Specialized, the 2FO DH to deal with some foot fatigue on pedals with deep concavity. I also tried Leatt's Flat 2.0 with a very soft sole to gain a broader perspective of what riders would experience.

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Measurements

One of the most talked about dimensions of flat pedals is how flat they really are. But that doesn’t always make them a sure sell. Thickness isn’t necessarily as important as the concavity, or curve of the pedal.

In this case, we measured from the horizontal across the front and rear pins down to the middle of the pedal body to give a concavity depth. We also recognize that the thickness around the inner and outer edges can be taller than the middle of the pedal body.

The overall length of the pedal can easily outweigh the thickness, in terms of torque forces. Meaning, if they’re thicker, then they probably need to be longer to offset any concerns about keeping your feet from flying off too easily. Like frame geometry, it’s important to look at more than one dimension before making a judgment call.

What about longevity?

Testing the durability of fourteen pedals would take more than a few months, but we did pass these pedals around between friends to expedite wear. Although most were not even close to reaching a rebuild, a couple showed signs of needing love.




Contents





Hope F22


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• Weight: 362
• Pins per side: 11
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 105 x 111
• Internals: 3x cartridge bearing + IGUS bushing
• Colors: black, silver, blue, orange, red, purple
• MSRP: $184 USD
Hopetech.com

Hope Tech churns out CNC’d components in its Barnoldswick, UK, factory for nearly every corner of a bike including their latest F22 flat pedal. The design uses the same internal features of the previous F20 platform, like an IGUS bushing towards the crank arm, and three sealed cartridge bearings but increases the asymmetrical shape. There’s a load of chamfered angles to reduce hanging up on obstacles, pointy pins, and excellent concavity.

Hope ships the pedals without the pins installed, which allows for customization but requires extra patience. Only the pins at the front and rear ends are replaceable from the reverse side.

Although they’re one of the grippiest while descending (and that’s with the pin height reducers installed) I did tend to lose my footing while climbing more often on these pedals compared to the rest of the lot.

My theory is that Hope intended riders to stand further forward on their toes rather than the mid-foot position I naturally gravitate towards. The front-to-rear ratio is one of the largest in the test, and for my foot position that puts too much torque on the front half of the pedal at times, causing my foot to rotate itself off while climbing.

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Pros
+ Extremely grippy
+ Lots of chamfered edges
+ Pins are easy to tune/change

Cons
- Short rear half of pedal is noticeable while climbing




DMR Vault


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Features:
• Weight: 432
• Pins per side: 11
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 105 x 105
• Internals: 1x cartridge bearing + IGUS bushing
• Colors: black, silver, blue, orange, red, pink, and more
• MSRP: £120.00
dmrbikes.com

The Vault has been the go-to choice for flat pedal diehards, like Brendan Fairclough, for years. They balance grip, shape, and weigh in at a reasonable weight and are fairly inexpensive. Their shape is wide, concave, and has plenty of chamfered angles.

In terms of performance under all shoe types, these are the winners for keeping my feet in place. They’re not too concave, which alleviates any foot cramping. For riders with smaller feet, this could change though, as their area is on the large side.

The Vault pedals use two pin types. At the front and rear edges, you’ll find the coveted threaded pins which are conveniently removable from the reverse side.

One downside is that they needed to be re-greased quicker than some others. Changing the DU and bearings is just as straightforward as the competitors though.

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Pros
+ Favorite balance of grip and shape
+ Hassle free, threaded pin replacement

Cons
- Seals are not as impervious or durable as others




North Shore Billet Daemon


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• Weight: 362 grams per pedal
• Pins per side: 11
• Usable platform dimensions (L x W): 112 x 103mm
• Internals: 2x cartridge bearing + IGUS bushing
• Colors: black, silver, pewter, gold, blue, red
• MSRP: $220 USD
northshorebilletcom

NSB is a Whistler-based manufacturer that specializes in CNC work and makes nearly all of the pieces of the Daemon pedal, even the ten pins on each side. These platforms are longer than most and have a massive amount of material cut out in the middle. The pins are placed away from the axle area to give a serious amount of concavity.

The axle uses a double-sealed steel axle with “VG-style” shaft seal and X-ring. These have multiple sealing surfaces and are less prone to rolling, compared to O-rings. An IGUS bushing is used inboard and then paired with two stainless steel, sealed Enduro cartridge bearings on the outer end.

I love these pedals because of the long dimension and cradle that the concavity forms for your shoe. They are dead easy to relocate your foot on. I did expect slightly more grip out of the pins though, given their puncturing appearance. Adding a threaded style pin, with an option to install reducers, might increase the grip even further and please shoes of all types.

On extended descents with soft-soled shoes, I did find my feet becoming mildly more fatigued. That could be due to my 42-size feet reaching the limit of the lengthy 122mm platform and ultra-deep concavity. Switching to the stiffer Specialized 2FO DH flat pedal shoes helped to relieve that.

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Pros
+ Huge platform is easy to relocate foot position
+ Deep concavity

Cons
- Small allen head bolt on back of pin jams with dirt
- Pricey




Wolf Tooth Waveform LG


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• Weight: 394 g
• Pins per side: 11
• Usable platform dimensions (L x W): 112 x 106mm
• Internals: 3x cartridge bearing + IGUS bushing
• Colors: espresso, olive, red, silver, black, blue, orange, and purple
• MSRP: $200 USD
wolftoothcomponents.com

Wolf Tooth makes a ton of machined parts, everything from chainrings to snazzy handlebar adaptors, but the Waveform is their first take on a pedal. The curvy platforms come in two sizes and a host of colors that match the rest of their parts palette.

We tested the larger 112x106mm Waveforms, whereas the smaller size runs at 105x99mm and knocks off 11g. All of the pins are machined to a sharp, smooth finish and are removable from the opposite side with a 3mm allen key. Six extra pins are included in the box and there is only one height.

The material in the middle of the platform has been reduced in the middle to give a mild dual-concavity, plus there’s ample support close to the crank arm. Even the size large platforms don’t seem over the top in terms of sizing.

Again, a pointier or threaded pin would raise the level of grip, but the shape and feel is spot on. I removed the center pins and found an increased level of grip without any foot fatigue. Overall, the Waveform pedals have a sensible amount of support and grip that provide a “goldilocks” ride.

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Pros
+ Grippy and supportive without going overboard on sizing
+ Platform runs tight to cranks

Cons
- A threaded pin option would raise the level of grip




PNW Loam


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• Weight: 442 g
• Pins per side: 11
• Usable platform dimensions (L x W): 115 x 102mm
• Internals: 2x roller bearings (one large inboard), 1x bushing
• Colors: black, silver, purple, orange, green
• MSRP: $99 USD
pnwcomponents.com

One of the most easily identifiable pedals in the test is the smooth finish, round edges, and angular platform on the Loam pedal from PNW. There’s also an oversize bearing on the inside of the axle and narrower diameter traction pins, like the Race Face Atlas, Canfield Crampon, and OneUp’s alloy option.

I’ll admit, I had some preconceived notions about the Loam pedals in that the angled leading edge would feel strange underfoot and the lack of concavity would cause a few foot slips. Even with a soft-soled shoe, it’s tricky to actually say if I could feel that unorthodox polygon shape.

The inner bearing bulge never caused any major concerns either as I tend to ride duck-footed. Riders who throw tricks where their feet leave the pedals, or position their feet close to the cranks, typically won’t favor this design.

That bearing also started to spin the platform around a bit too quickly for my taste after just a handful of rides. I opened up the internals and found all the bits were in order and clean. Adding thicker grease helped calm this down for another couple of rides.

In terms of grip, I’m of two minds about the Loam pedals. The pins are actually quite impressive, but there’s a lack of concavity to the profile. The front and rear sections of the platform are lower than the center. I thought removing the middle pin would help with this, but that actually pronounced the area over the axle and decreased grip.

Removing the pins should be straightforward since they are accessible from the reverse side, however, the tiny allen key head became clogged with debris soon after the first ride.

It’s worth pointing out that the PNW Loam pedal is the least expensive alloy option in the test. I can’t comment on their long-term durability just yet, but if you’re looking for a pedal that isn’t overly expensive with moderate grip, these could work well.

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Pros
+ Grippier than expected
+ Inexpensive alloy option

Cons
- Lacks concavity
- Started to spin rapidly after a few rides





[PSECTION id=5dev]
5DEV Trail/Enduro


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• Weight: 340 g
• Pins per side: 12
• Usable platform dimensions (L x W): 110 x 90mm
• Internals: 4x roller bearings, 1x IGUS bushing
• Colors: black, silver, purple, gold, kash
• MSRP: $249 USD
ride5dev.com

By far the smallest pedals in appearance, but the ones with the sharpest edges, are 5DEV’s Trail/Enduro option. These use the same shape as their All Around pedal but feature two more pins near the center of the platform which are said to increase the traction.

Like the PNW Loam pedals, there isn’t a great deal of concavity because the 5DEVs are very thin overall. They use a 17-4 stainless steel axle which 5DEV claims is 30% stronger than chromoly steel. Two portions of the platform are raised to make way for the four roller bearings and IGUS bushing on the inner end of the axle.

The bushing and axle tolerance also seemed tighter than normal which made the pedal reluctant to stay attached to your shoes, particularly while climbing. Even after a couple of rides, they never broke in so I backed off the axle nut slightly to relieve that friction.

5DEV didn’t design their pedals to have a totally locked-in feel. The sharp, threaded pins grab your shoe quickly without letting them sink too deep into the rubber which gives an interesting hold. Those bumps on the platform do take away from the effective width of the pedal and the concavity though.

Looking at the measurements, the Trail/Enduro pedal is not only small in area and height, but also Q-factor. At 108mm, it’s nearly the narrowest in the test. Personally, I’d trade the clearance for a wider footprint with more support that’s quicker to reposition your foot on. The Trail/Enduro pedals could be a solid option to reduce wide Q-factors on some eMTBs though.

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Pros
+ Unique balance of light grip without totally locking in
+ Narrow Q-factor might appeal to eMTB riders

Cons
- Bushing tolerance is on the tighter side
- Expensive




Pedalling Innovations Catalyst


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• Weight: 526 g
• Pins per side: 18
• Usable platform dimensions (L x W): 130 x 95
• Internals: 2x roller bearings, 1x bushing
• Colors: black, silver, purple, red, blue
• MSRP: $149 USD
pedalinginnovations.com

If there’s one pair of pedals that grabs people’s attention, it would be the oversize 130mm long platform of the Catalyst pedals that mountain bike strength coach, James Wilson, founded. The theory behind the massive pedalling platform is to stand with the ball of your foot much further forward, which is shown in studies to deliver more power through your pedal stroke. To back their claims of improved power, stability, and comfort, Pedalling Innovations offers a 30-day money back guarantee on the $149 USD pair of pedals.

While I can say that these monstrous platforms gave me the most confidence in making a connection with my foot placement, I’ll hold off on claiming they improved the specific power delivery. Real-life versus controlled lab results can vary anyhow.

What’s certain though is that there is ample real estate to push down on the pedals. Pedalling Innovations does preface by explaining that your foot needs to be positioned further forward on the Catalyst pedal than traditional types. Finding that spot takes a few rides to adjust to but quickly becomes natural.

For a pedal with such a large platform, the ground clearance is very acceptable because you end up riding with your feet closer to the level of the wheel axles, as opposed to an exaggerated “dropped heels” stance.

The Q-factor is also on the narrow side at 105mm. That didn’t pose as much of an issue as it did on the 5DEV because of the increased length on the Catalyst - there’s an insane amount of purchase to rest on. Pedalling Innovations even makes an XL Catalyst that’s 17mm longer and 10mm wider for size 13 ft and up.

With all eighteen pins per side and the massive surface area, you might think that they’d be the grippiest but I had to install the taller supplied pins for more traction. More concavity from the taller pins helped provide the grip I was looking for.

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Pros
+ Insanely stable footing
+ Doesn’t require rider to “drop their heels” as drastically compared to traditionally sized pedals

Cons
- Needs taller outer pins (supplied but difficult and tedious to change)
- Bushings became dry and noisy after a dozen rides




Crankbrother Stamp 7 LG


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• Weight: 340 g
• Pins per side: 10
• Usable platform dimensions (L x W): 114 x 111
• Internals: 2x roller bearings, 1x IGUS bushing
• Colors: black, silver, purple, red, blue, purple
• MSRP: $189 USD
crankbrothers.com

Simple and effective; that’s the gist of the Crankbrother Stamp 7. These are the larger of the two platform sizes (114x111 vs 100x100mm). There’s also no rider weight limit on either size Stamp 7 which uses a well-chamfered aluminum platform and chromoly axle.

The internals are covered by two different bearing sizes and used in conjunction with an IGUS bushing. At the end of the axle lies a clever grease port capped by a Phillip’s head screw.

To rebuild the pedal entirely, you’ll have to remove it from the crank arm. That’s a minor inconvenience but you won’t even need a socket set to access the internals.

Traditional grub screw pins get my vote for the most traction and that’s all that Stamps use. Those do give up the ease of replacement because these pins aren’t removable from the opposite side of the pedal.

In terms of performance, the Stamp 7 Large pedals are one of my favorites because they balance out all of the qualities I seek in a flat pedal. They’re light, grippy, and have a sufficiently thin frame that doesn’t compromise on concavity, plus the grease port makes them a cinch to regrease.

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Pros
+ Thin and concave
+ Grease port

Cons
- Set screw pins are difficult to replace




Race Face Atlas


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• Weight: 378 g
• Pins per side: 10
• Usable platform dimensions (L x W): 112 x 106
• Internals: 1x large roller bearings, 1x bushing
• Colors: black, silver, purple, red, blue, purple
• MSRP: $179 USD
raceface.com

Another great all-arounder from Race Face is the second generation Atlas pedal with a thin profile, sharp pins, and angular edges. All of the pins load from the reverse side and are of the smooth, needle type. They only use one oversize bearing close to the crank arm and one bushing on the outer end of the axle. By moving the bearing to this location, the platform height is reduced which adds to the stability of the pedal.

The design does mean there is a sizable bump on the inside of the platform for the oversize bearing. Although the platform doesn’t incorporate a noticeable raised bump from the axle itself, some riders will avoid this style of construction due to the bearing bulge that your foot can land on.

Neither the marginally raised center over the axle nor the bearing bump bothered me and I thought that the slim profile and sharp pins of the Atlas edged out the similar construction of the Loam pedals.

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Pros
+ Thin without raised axle bump
+ Easy pin replacement


Cons
- Bearing bulge doesn’t work for all riders
- Some riders complain about the needle-style pins snapping easily




Pembree DA2


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• Weight: 452 g
• Pins per side: 10
• Usable platform dimensions (L x W): 115 x 105
• Internals: 2x cartridge bearings, 1x IGUS bushing
• Colors: black, silver, purple, red, blue, purple, pink, orange, bronze
• MSRP: £129.00 GBP
pembree.com

Pembree’s DA2 pedals are made in Brighton, U.K. and put through the EFBE TRI-TEST for gravity bikes. For a locally made pedal with a highly conscious effort to stay green, the £129.00 DA2 pedals have great value and come in a rainbow of colors.

They’re a tough-wearing pedal with 10 traction pins per side that don’t require special attention to be removed if damaged. The design is straightforward with two cartridge bearings and an Igus bushing.

In terms of support, the DA2s stout platform put them closest to the Tenet Omen V2, although Pembree’s wider-diameter pins don’t bite into the shoe as vigorously. Those pins aren’t quite as tall either, granted, there’s still a decent amount of concavity to match with a long and wide platform area to reclaim solid contact.


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Pros
+ Simple design: large, concave, burly platform
+ Easy pin replacement

Cons
- Not the grippiest pins
- Thinner options exist




Tectonic Altar V2


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• Weight: 410 g
• Pins per side: 10
• Usable platform dimensions (L x W): 115 x 105
• Internals: 2x cartridge bearings, 1x IGUS bushing
• Colors: black, silver, purple
• MSRP: $190 USD
tectonic.bike.com

New kid on the block, Tectonic, first caught our attention for their carbon composite platform pedal. They’ve since revised the savage-looking Altar pedal to be CNC’d from aluminum in Durango, USA. Their double-ended pins are made from hardened steel that is turned down to a threaded finish held in place by a bolt at the side of the platform.

The internals also differ from the norm by using O-rings and four cartridge bearings, one of which is oversized near the crank arm, instead of a commonly found bushing. Even with the large inboard bearing bulge, there’s still plenty of concavity from the tallest pin down to the middle of the platform. Like the NSB Daemon’s though, that amount of curving from a soft-soled shoe might be too unsupported for some people’s taste.

So far, they’ve seen ample amounts of water and haven’t given up in terms of durability. Between the tall, threaded pins, which are easily replaceable, deep concavity, and mud-shedding capabilities, the Tectonic Altar V2s make it into my top choices.

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Pros
+ Mega grippy threaded pins
+ Huge platform
+ Unique method for replaceming threaded pins

Cons
- No option to add middle pins or spacers
- Pins needed to be tightened after first couple of rides




Chromag Pressure


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• Weight: 418 g
• Pins per side: 9
• Usable platform dimensions (L x W): 115 x 105
• Internals: 1x cartridge bearings, 1x DU bushing
• Colors: black, silver, purple, gold, red, blue
• MSRP: $127 USD
chromagbikes.com

The Pressure pedal is an update on the popular Contact pedal and carries over favored features amongst freeriders with a platform that wraps in towards the crank arm. That helps the rider to find a solid platform after one-footed maneuvers. The Pressure also has a narrower Q-factor than the Dagga and Scarab pedals.

Chromag’s burly parts have always stood the test of time for me and the axle grease still looks like it came out of the factory. The internal design uses their G3 axle with one bearing and one DU bushing per side.

I removed the front and rear pins on the platform to provide more concavity, which ultimately provided more grip. The spacer system is a clever way to achieve a tuneable feel. I suggest having a drill handy to carefully thread those pins in and out to remove the spacers, otherwise, you’ll spend a solid twenty minutes changing them out.

Removing bent pins might require cutting the damaged portion off first. That’s the trade-off between stronger pins versus those thinner style needles on the Tenet, Race Face, and PNW pedal that tend to sheer off without notice.

Overall, the Pressure pedals are a solid all-arounder. They’re not the grippiest pedals with the round, smooth pins, but that could work for some riders who aren’t looking for fly-trap style pedals. Offering a traction pin with threads to the top of the screw could be a game changer for this otherwise excellent pedal.

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Pros
+ Solid performer for the price
+ Body wraps in towards crank arms for solid foot placement

Cons
- Threaded-style traction pins would enhance grip




Tenet Omen V2


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• Weight: 440 g
• Pins per side: 10
• Usable platform dimensions (L x W): 115 x 105
• Internals: 3x cartridge bearings, 1x IGUS bushing
• Colors: black, silver, purple, umber
• MSRP: $127 USD
ridetenet.com

Based in Bellingham, Washington, Tenet Components has evolved their Omen pedal to a second generation with redesigned bearings, seals, and axle for increased workmanship. The Omen V2 is their premium pedal that is made in-house and certified for gravity riding through the EFBE Tri-Test.

Tenet also offers a special service with their Pedal Refresh Program. Customers with pedals that are less than a year old and in need of a rebuild can receive new intervals for just the cost of shipping. After one year, the cost is still minimal at just $30.

On the trail, the massive platform measures in at 115x105mm isn’t the thinnest, but has 2mm of dual concavity which forms a bowl-like shape under the middle of your foot. They’re also the only pedal to offer either smooth or threaded pins, plus washers to adjust the height. I primarily used the smooth, needle-type pins which provided a generous amount of grip. Swapping the pins around the front and rear edges to the threaded pins bumped up the traction even further, making them one of the grippiest pedals in test.

As much as I loved the Omen V2, I did feel like they had less clearance or I bumped them more frequently than the other pedals here. The huge square profile and larger 120mm Q-factor might weigh into that.

For those who are counting grams, their mass shows on the scale too. At 460g, they’re a touch heavier than the huge NSB Daemons, but still roughly 120g lighter than the monstrous Catalysts.

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Pros
+ Huge area and pins provide solid footing
+ EFBE Tri-Tested

Cons
- Some riders complain about smooth pins snapping easily
- Not as slim as others in test




OneUp Composite


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• Weight: 440 g
• Pins per side: 10
• Usable platform dimensions (L x W): 115 x 105
• Internals: 1x cartridge bearings, 1x DU bushing
• Colors: black, orange, green, blue, red, purple, turquoise
• MSRP: $59.5 USD
oneupcomponents.com

Composite pedals spark a hot debate for riders; is it worth investing in an expensive option when options like these OneUp pedals exist? You can still replace the pins and service the internals like any other alloy option - they’re less than half the price. The Composite pedals use a large 115x105 platform and are also available in a smaller size (97.5x92mm) now.

Why are they up against premium alloy competitors? We included their alloy options last time around in a flat pedal group test and thought we’d compare the two.

The Comps offer up to 2mm of concavity from the outer pins to the axle body, whereas their Alloy pedal is virtually zero with a focus on a low-profile platform. The Comps provide a decent amount of grip from threaded, versus the smooth pin-type, and don’t feature the oversize bearing on the inner end of the platform like the Alloys.

I toyed with removing the central pins to increase the concavity but ended up reverting to the stock setup. Without the pins, I could notice that raised section above the axle and thought it reduced the grip marginally.

If you’re a clipless rider who’d like to give flat pedals a shot or think alloy pedals are overpriced, then the OneUp Composites will do the job without breaking the bank. I’m not sold on the idea that composite pedals catch less on rocks or roots, since it’s the pins that usually cause hangups, but to each their own.

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Pros
+ Inexpensive
+ Reverse loading, replaceable, threaded pins

Cons
- More concavity would increase grip




Wrap Up

That’s a lot of words about metal platforms that propel bikes forwards, so which ones were favorites and why? The most important factor for me has to be concavity. Without this, you need either mega-tall, sharp pins, as I discovered on the PNW Loam pedals - they didn’t have enough concavity in the frame of the pedal and needed the middle pins to reclaim traction.

Secondly, the pin type does make a difference. Hands down, threaded pins are superior. They offer the most grip with their tiny edges that bite into rubber shoe soles, or shins by mistake. Thin, needle-style pins found on the PNW and Race Face pedals work but possibly break with less force and have a touch less hold on the shoe. A solid example of this was seen on the Tenet Omen V2 when we swapped between these two pin types and saw an increase in grip, keeping the pedal body the same.

Other features I’d look for in a quality pedal would be near equal front to rear length on the platform which should better your chance of keeping your feet connected to the pedals while climbing.

Durability is a tricky one to measure. A few pedals with standard DU bushings dried up faster than any with an IGUS bushing. Otherwise, rebuilding any of them isn’t overly complicated or expensive - bonus points for Tenet and their refresh program.

None of the axles bent or pedal bodies were severely damaged. We lost a few pins and some caused more fiddling than others to replace, but otherwise didn’t encounter any other major dilemmas.

Top Picks

Ranking these in a particular order is a tough call when thinking about all of the factors such as grip, durability, overall feel, and value. If I had to pick my top favorites that each stood out in one of those four categories, it would be the Tectonic Altar V2 for all out traction, Tenet Omen V2 for workmanship, Crankbrothers Stamp Large for platform feel, and the DMR Vault for value, not forgetting that they each need to stand up in the other three categories too.


Most Grip
Winner: Tectonic Altar
Runner Up: Tenet Omen V2 (threaded pins installed)

Best Value
Winner: OneUp Composites
Runner Up: Chromag Pressure

Best Overall Feel
Winner: Crankbrothers Stamp Large
Runner Up: DMR Vault


Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
363 articles

412 Comments
  • 174 0
 Deity T-mac crew 4 life !
  • 46 4
 Deftraps-cheaper and rear loaded pins.
  • 15 0
 I just replaced my Oozy pedals with T macs and the difference in grip is crazy. AND the T macs are by far and away much easier on the soles of my shoes.
  • 33 0
 @wyorider: yep. Blows my mind how good the deftraps are for the price. I wanna buy fancy aluminum ones but the deftraps are too good.
  • 8 0
 @Longroadtonowhere: I reeeeeally want a pair of silver Waveforms but my plain black Deftraps work too well to justify blinging out that hard. I’ve broken one pin’s mounting hole beyond repair but the grip is still there and they’re really easy to service
  • 2 18
flag gearbo-x (May 15, 2023 at 9:36) (Below Threshold)
 Specialized 2FO Flat, worst shoes I have ever used. everything is too stiff.
  • 18 14
 Daggas > T-Macs
  • 12 0
 I have both, and feel like the TMacs are ever so slightly more grippy, but the Deftraps are unbeatable for the money!
  • 6 0
 Love the grip and comfort of my T-macs, but wish they had a chamfered leading edge to make pedal strikes less jarring. I guess you can't have it all!
  • 4 0
 @wyorider: Deftraps are lighter (391 grams) and on sale for $50 Canadian right now....they are my favourite pedal!
  • 10 1
 The Tenets are really good, but I just tried TMacs after getting tired of how frequently I was servicing the Omens. Holy crap, the grip on the TMacs is unreal. Promptly bought a second set for my other bike. With Stealth S1 rubber, I can literally lift a pedal upward and not have my sole come off. I've noticed that I never have to reposition my feet after long rough downhills either.
  • 12 0
 Deity T-Macs and Deftraps are the best I've used. Great grip and extremely durable.
  • 17 0
 Here for the Deity T-Mac comments. I've had about 3 months on mine so far and am well impressed.
  • 11 3
 Where are the Canfield Crampons?
  • 6 0
 @wyorider: I've been rockin Deftraps on my hardtail for about a year now and they kick ass. Even on a hardtail I rarely ever slip a pedal.
  • 5 2
 Crankbrothers are awesome
Large Stamp 3's on XC/Trail bike
Large Stamp 7's on AllMnt/Enduro bike
  • 1 1
 Pressures are actually the best.
  • 9 0
 Deftraps FTW on a budget
  • 6 7
 deftraps blow the grip out t-macs out of the water... and cost 65$
  • 2 0
 For life!
  • 14 0
 Deity Deftrap, best nylon platform ever! I'm surprised PB only had one nylon pedal in the mix, and not even a good one. I guess advertising ...
  • 4 0
 Right. As if they’re not on the list
  • 1 0
 @sanchofula: They are really thick tho at 18mm right? Is that an issue at all?
  • 8 0
 @Svinyard: yeah, they are thick, but I dont know anyone who has an issue with it. They have to be a little thick to not have an axle hump. They are by far my favorite and the most grippy flats I've used.
  • 4 0
 @Svinyard: I never notice the thickness (and I run fancy shoes and SPD SLs on pavement for minimum stack). Also don’t hit more stuff than any other flat. I just step and grip.
  • 1 1
 @in2falling: I’ve yet to have a CB pedal that doesn’t develop play within weeks
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: not a problem, a few millimeters is nothing, it’s not like a thicker bike shoe sold (5.10) would keep folks from buying a certain shoe.
  • 1 0
 Love my T-macs, except for the bent left spindle in the 3rd week, and I can’t find any replacements at the moment
  • 4 0
 Straight to comments to say the same. I've used half of the above pedals. The Deity T-Mac are not only the best to use but every other pedal I've used has needed a rebuild in under one year. My T-macs are 18 months now and still running smooth.
  • 1 1
 @sanchofula: kona wah wah's for the win
  • 1 1
 @in2falling:
I concur, and have had the same setup, but was disappointed with pin performance and the need for constant servicing. The pins were destroyed and became unreplaceable after less than 2 seasons. Now I am super happy with the OneUp alu. Better grip, less maintenance and I can always replace pins, after I shave them off on rocks.
  • 2 0
 @wyorider: yeah but the tmacs are still better by a slim margin. Deftraps aren’t as concave but the thin pins definitely grip really good. Tmacs with those thinner pins would be the shit.
  • 4 0
 Once you go T-Mac, you never go back!
  • 1 0
 100% agree…and they didn’t even test any… but they had the PNW garbage. T-Mac with ALLLL the grip.
  • 1 0
 @blurryvision: yeeeeeees! T-MAC alllll day long
  • 2 0
 Seriously…how could they not include TMac’s in this line up. Severe oversight
  • 1 0
 Agreed!
  • 111 2
 I can’t believe my favourite pedal, the [insert pedal name here] isn’t on the list!!!
  • 82 2
 Nukeproof Sam Hill
  • 5 4
 Reverse Components Black ONE
& Nukeproof Neutron
& NC-17 Sudpin Pro (although pins come loose quickly)
&....

There are so many other pairs of great pedals.
  • 5 0
 @wburnes: Yep, fantastic pedal and half the price of some of these.
  • 5 0
 I love so much my 22€ composite pedals from BikeComponents.de
  • 17 0
 @spendtimebehindbars: Nah they are awful. I have them for about 5 years now and they would not die, would like to buy new ones but can't.
  • 12 1
 And if I had to pick one, it’s Chromag Dagga’s.
  • 7 0
 Nukeproof Horizon downhill flats, Deity Deftraps
  • 4 2
 DMR V12!
  • 6 1
 @wburnes: standard Nukeproof Horizons are definitely the go to. I'll take a pass on the "Sam Hill" label jthat forces me to pay more for bling just to slam into rocks.
  • 15 1
 Burgtec Penthouse MK5.
  • 8 1
 Race Face Chester (cheap and good)
  • 2 0
 @fartymarty: just got a set to try- was hoping they were on the list
  • 3 1
 True haha but you have to agree “Spank” spoons should be on here
  • 1 1
 @superstar components nano pedals are the absolute bomb.
  • 1 1
 Blackspire Sub4's.... 430g's and only $90 WTF are these on in this list??? I'm on year 8 with mine!
  • 2 0
 #1Chromag Dagga, #2 TMac. I’m thoroughly confused as to why the Dagga’s and the TMac’s didn’t make this list. Sam Hill’s as well…. Plus the yoshimura chilao pedals are really good and no mention? This list certainly leaves much to be desired
  • 1 1
 @bojackbikeman: Isn't BlackSpire just a knockoff brand like Superstar. No original designs.
Just order 'em from a catalog company & pick a color & pattern combo?

From what I can tell, all of the ones in this test seem to have their own unique, brand specific designs.
  • 1 0
 @OakleyVT: They were all on the last pedal roundup that PB did a while back. They (sort of) mentioned it in the intro.

www.pinkbike.com/news/12-of-the-best-mtb-flat-pedals-ridden-and-rated-2020.html
  • 2 1
 Superstar EVO X still going strong after so many years, decided to change bearings recently but as far as I could see they were good as new.Used to get some attention but felt a long way in pecking orders after Brexit.
  • 1 0
 @OakleyVT: Dagga all day..
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: It is the opposite. They design and manufacture in house.
  • 37 5
 I'm pretty picky about pedals, and I must say the OneUp composites are by far the best pedals I've tried for the money. They're light, have plenty of grip, deflect off of rocks nicely, and replacing pins is super quick (they're also standard SHCS's, so you can buy 100 for less than $10). I've heard complaints of the pedal bodies breaking when taking an impact in cold weather, but so far mine have fared better than most of the $150+ pedals I've ridden.

My favorite top dollar pedals are the Hope F20, mainly because they're ridiculously durable. They don't have nearly as much grip, though. I'm excited to try the F22 pedals at some point.
  • 2 0
 Interesting! I agree and use both of the main pedals you mention.
  • 14 0
 One problem: they lack concavity
  • 8 1
 @cuban-b: Agree. I really dislike the feel of these pedals and a bit baffled why they're so popular given the prevalence of other options at the same price point.
  • 4 2
 @jeremy3220: Goes to show how personal all this stuff is. I've tried all kinds of flats over the years and I keep returning to the OneUp Composite as the one I "notice the least" while riding. Being in Bellingham I wanted to love the Tenet pedals (runner-up for best grip), but I cannot get my feet to stay put on them.
  • 6 0
 @cykelk: You're definitely correct in that it's largely personal preference. Some people like smaller platforms, while others like bigger platforms. Some like all the traction, while some like to be able to easily adjust foot position. On top of that, some pedals just interface better with certain shoes, some are better in the mud, and some are better at brushing off impacts. That's part of the reason why there are so many options out there; most pedals are mediocre at best for the majority of riders, but might be the goldilocks pedal for the remaining 10%. With that said, at least half of the pedal options out there shouldn't exist. There are far too many $150+ pedals out there that don't meet a reasonable standard for workmanship, durability, reparability, etc.
  • 2 0
 The only problem with one ups is that they are kinda fragile. Both axles and body, So atleast for me they last a year at best. Or like my last pair 4 rides Big Grin Any other recomendations for good plastic pedals?
  • 5 1
 I love my one-up plastics. Smashed them into all sorts of stuff, ride in gritty UK winter, never service them, just throw in new pins from time to time. I reckon there's more grip on the body than aluminium pedals, especially when wet. Far better than the permanently needing service and not especially grippy DMR Vaults I had before
  • 1 1
 I like the one-up composits, but I find I destroy them after a season or two at most. I've cracked 2 pairs, and worn out the plastic holding the axel on a few others. I recently changed to the Anvl metal pedals and I really enjoy the solid feeling.
  • 8 0
 OneUp: Axle bulge in the middle...not ideal
  • 3 1
 Do you like filling the axle on the balls of your feet?
  • 2 1
 @Svinyard: this is by far the worst thing about one of petals. They seem to work and be pretty grumpy, but that axle bolt in the middle is the dumbest thing anybody’s ever done to a peddle. Same thing with the aluminum ones that massive bulge in the axle just like on the raceface ones absolute garbage.
  • 1 0
 Same here. Lack of grip (based on this review) has never even crossed my mind. They’ve handily outperformed my Tenet Occult pedals that were twice as much (on sale).
  • 2 0
 I just lower the three middle pins a turn or two - concave and no axle bulge feeling for me.
  • 2 0
 I agree. Been using these pedals for 2 years and no problems whatsoever. One of those parts that you forget about while riding. BUT, it depends on the shoe: 510 Freerider pro, the pedal feels flat, grippy enough. With my old impact vxi I feel the axle in the middle of my foot and grip levels are way down, even with the softest rubber. So, Oneup composites but only with Freerider pro.
  • 5 1
 Try Deftraps. Better shape.
  • 2 0
 @cuban-b: One way to solve that problem is installing 12mm screws front and back, and leaving the standard 10mm on the middle. This creates a nice concavity and almighty Grip. You will also need to rebuild your shins from time to time! But hey, grip > shins..
  • 1 0
 @jeremy3220: any suggested concave pedals at the same price point? I have one-ups and like them better than race face chesters that came on my bike, but could use a better shaped pedal.
  • 2 1
 @dsciulli19: dmr v11
  • 1 0
 @s4rK: or buy concave pedals
  • 8 0
 @dsciulli19: Deity Deftrap
  • 3 0
 @Svinyard: I completely agree with you, that axle bulge drives me nuts and I dont see why such a good company would have engineered them that way?
  • 2 1
 @OakleyVT: I literally have never notice an "axle bulge" and I run three pairs of OneUps on three different bikes. As a larger rider I've never broken one and ride them in the bike park at Trestle all season long.
  • 1 0
 No grip on the oneups, also snapped the axle. Lasted almost 3 seasons though. Now anval tilt pedals and they are sooooo grippy after oneup.
  • 1 1
 @Sambolo: Sounds like a shoe problem.. OneUps are grippy as hell.
  • 1 0
 @gilpinmtbq: sure they’re grippy, but there’s grippier ones too.
  • 1 0
 @gilpinmtbq: spikes are super low. I use impact pros.
  • 36 2
 Plastic Wah Wah 2. They have a large platform, grippy pins and can be bought for less than $35 USD.
  • 1 0
 Yeah those are good
  • 1 0
 Agreed These are three most obvious omission from the list !
  • 5 0
 Good pedal, but I snapped my composites in half pretty quick, Kona was awesome and warrantied them with the aluminum and those didn't last long either....if they get a better axle I may come back, but I am on Diety Deftraps now and they are amazing!
  • 2 0
 @pedalhound: Also snapped a spindle. Fortunately the alloy and plastic use the same spindle so I was able to use one from a cracked plastic body one.
  • 2 0
 I've really enjoyed these pedals. I've got a size 12shoe and really like the size. If it was super rocky terrain with speed, i'm guessing the thin spots on the body might be an issue but they've been great for the last couple years. They are better than the OneUp composites The only con is the bearing budge. I don't like that usually but you get used to it I guess...and it does give you a bit of feedback as to if your foot is in the wrong spot.
  • 1 1
 Composite Wah Wah 2 are $65, I have a pair and they are great. Very grippy and with a large platform. Almost too grippy as repositioing my foot while descending is kinda hard to do. However the bearings starting to feel dry/crusty after 1.5 years of use, I got a pair of PNW composites to replace the Konas. Only 1 ride in on the PNW, they feel perhaps a hair less grippy than the Konas but still getting used to them.
  • 29 0
 No TMac or Deftrap feels like a miss.. Good review though!
  • 8 1
 They were in the last flat pedal shootout. There's a link in the OneUp review above.
  • 24 1
 My shins prove that the Chromag Daggas have the best grip.
  • 33 0
 Does that mean they are unblemished as your feet always stuck to them?
  • 7 0
 @ZanielGa: They only slipped _once_ in the whole time I had them. Ended up with 20 stitches and a good view of my shin bone (from both sides). I'm back on clipless Big Grin
  • 5 0
 @enki: I've been using Daggas for a couple of years now. My "ooft" moment was only 7 stitches, but it's never great when the medic says "the good news is your tendons are fine. The bad news is that I can see them"

I now run (no joke) front and back cheap football (soccer) shinpads under my trousers. I don't want to give up the grip, but I'm in no rush to suffer them on my legs again!
  • 26 7
 Burgtec Penthouse wasn’t tested, gives other brands a chance to win something.
  • 6 1
 This is just the best of the rest Wink
  • 5 2
 Best pedals I've used by far.
  • 7 4
 I actually have the mk5 and they're not that nice, they're pretty slim/small, bearings are not so durable and the grip is not that nice. I would dare to say a bit overhyped as far as pedals go (I do know that the rest of their stuff is quality)
  • 3 1
 I do like my MK5s.
  • 2 0
 @tgr9: get some 12mm x M4 stainless steel grub screws and they're super grippy.
  • 3 1
 @tgr9: You're the first person to ever say that about their bearings. The bearing seals on their pedals are untouchable.
  • 2 0
 @BrambleLee: I'll be the second to say it. I was surprised by how quickly mine let water and dirt in, leading to surface rust on the axles around the bushing area, especially as they are a UK company that should take our crap weather into account in their designs.

I had to replace the bushings after less than 6 months. They've needed more frequent services than the Superstar Nano Evos they replaced, but I folded one of those in half on a rock strike so I'd stick with the Burgtecs out of the two!
  • 2 1
 @tgr9: Yep they’re utter crap. The platform is too close to the pedal so you’re always catching your shoes on your crank arms and the axel’s are made from cheese.
  • 2 0
 Yep. I’m still running a set of Mk4s which have been beat on for about 5 years now. Snapped an axle last year and within a week they were turned around and serviced/axles replaced, all free of charge (including postage both ways). And they knew they were 4 years old. Not only are they great pedals, but Burgtec stand behind their products, too.
  • 1 0
 The burgtec uses an industrial oil seal, the same type that pembree and others use so I would expect them to deal with dirt / water very well.

They are way to close to the arm though and don't seem to have the longevity of the older models - maybe they changed from UK manufacture to overseas?

You cant say a bad word about burgtec gear though, because ratboy, syndicate, jibs, the lads....
  • 1 0
 Agreed I do like my Burgy v5 flats
  • 21 2
 Gripping review!
  • 9 1
 it should be pinned to the top
  • 6 1
 bearing resemblance to some of the greatest posts
  • 4 0
 @slovenian6474: so nice for pinkbike to provide a platform for this content
  • 11 1
 I might be in the minority, but I think concavity often doesn’t help flat pedals. When you’re weighted it often flex’s your foot awkwardly, sometimes causing damage on huge impacts (I destroyed my arch tendons on a big case once on T-Macs). Concavity supports your foot better and when you slightly unweight, you don’t lose contact with the middle of the pedal completely. To each their own, but for what it’s worth, I’d rather have my flat pedal be slightly concave and thin.
  • 5 1
 I like the convex shape of the OneUps as it allows your foot to move when under light load. Then when you need the grip underload it's there.
  • 9 1
 100% spot on. I like one-up convex shape. If you're true mid-food (arch over spindle), then concave is uncomfortable for long days and convex is a natural fit for the arch of foot. Most riders I see tend to put ball of foot on axle so I can see why concave works for them since it matches shape of that part of your foot.
  • 4 0
 @ryan77777: Canfield Crampon as well for convex
  • 6 0
 @ryan77777: Totally agree, concave is better for ball of foot on axle, convex for medial arch on axle. Tough to really grade pedals if you don't qualify this first...
  • 1 0
 @ajaxwalker: I agree the convex shape is great but with size 14 feet I still find them a bit small, just had first ride on pnw range (composite version of loam reviewed above) and fewer extra mm made a big difference and the reviewers negative about the lack of concavity is my positive!
  • 1 1
 @ryan77777: when the Pedaling Innovations Catalyst came out, some of my riding buddies became (strangely) evangelical about them. I suppose some internet personality convinced them of the latent superiority of the design. Anyway I've always been suspicious for exactly the reason you gave. I have the ball of my foot on the pedal, and arguably that's not a bad place to be. 1) under heavy impacts you can flex the tendons on your heel, which is one of the many ways our bodies naturally deal with impact absorption 2) you can drop your heel to help lower your center of gravity in turns. The further forward your heel is, the less drop you get from that maneuver. The review seems to think that you "don't have to drop your heel as much", but it's more that you physically can't drop your heel as much.
  • 2 1
 Interesting comments here particularly in regards to how different people's physiology can be. I switched from Chromag Contacts to the OneUp composites and it took about a week of riding them before my plantar fascia was so aggravated that I was limping around like a cripple, no crashes or anything like that but on long descents I could feel my feet cramping up and hating it. Seems so many years on heavily concave pedals have made my feet very sensitive to reduced concavity in a pedal and the OneUp pedals genuinely felt convex to me. Once my feet were healed I switched back to my Chromag pedals and the problem has never returned.
  • 2 0
 @WaterBear: I've been trying them, and I've found that I can still drop my heels enough to feel comfortable. It's not as big of a change as you might think.

IMO the bigger change that you see is that you're moving your foot about half an inch (possibly more) forward, which has an effect of increasing the rear center of the bike and shortening the front center of the bike.

The biggest benefit for me is I find I have less anterior ankle pain, as the pedals have less leverage on my feet during big impacts. Overall I would say I like them more than most other pedals, but they aren't the end all be all.
  • 2 0
 @farkinoath: With my Nukeproofe Horizon I got often numb feet or even cramps in my feet (concavity of pedal) and on long rides also frequently cramps in my calves (foot position).
Then I read about this mid-foot positon and tried it out. No numb feet, no cramps (feet and calves). With my new bike I wanted the Catalyst pedals but due to the pandemic they were not available. So I got the one-up aluminium. I’m sold to mid-foot pedaling.
I would like to try some longer pedals like the Tectonic Altar (not so bulky as the catalyst) but the concavity holds me back. (And the price)
  • 3 0
 @b3n: I’ve been riding them for years and find that standing on the catalyst pedals is a rest instead of perching on the balls of your feet. I have more recovery on downhills and more power because of that recovery time. I also get to wear minimalist shoes as I don’t need a stiff sole. I run tall pins in the center and short pins on the edges. Better grip for me and Less shin rake.
  • 11 1
 Notably absent: Shimano, who announced the PD-M8141 and PD-M829 pedals in summer of 2021 and yet still have not managed to ship a single pair out to reviewers, let alone production shipments to retailers. After nearly 2 years, WTF is the problem?
  • 2 0
 I have the older M8040 and they are my favorite among all the flats I've tried. I broke an axle last year and for $30 I got a new axle assembly and was back up and running. While they were down I bought an set of the composite Bontrager Line pedals and now those live on one of my other bikes. The pins are just small m2 screws inserted from the backside and are super grippy. They've been durable enough and the price was right.
  • 3 1
 Those imaginary saints looked very promising. Would love to get a pair if they ever become available
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: those M8040 were clearly a poor axle design. I had the axle tip break off after less than 100 hours of bikepacking. Lots of similar reports online. Disappointing in comparison to the never-die reliability of virtually every SPD pedal they've ever made.
  • 1 0
 @Inertiaman: yeah I had the same failure. Mine lasted several thousand miles but still failed. I bought axles for both since I expect the other to eventually fail.
  • 1 0
 I've been riding the MX80 Saint pedals for about 7 years now and they are great, easy to service and really cheap compared to most metal pedals out there.
  • 1 0
 @BARAVNZLA: Exactly! That's why the M8040 generation were such a huge disappointment. Prior pedals from Shimano had been indestructible. I rode MX80 pedals for a while; good pedals, but I prefer a larger platform. So my fingers are crossed the M8141 and M829 will have the larger & thinner platform but with the reliability of the MX80. If they eventually materialize . . .
  • 1 0
 I have one 8040 and one 8141. Notice that I have ONE of each.

Two years ago a snapped the internal spindle off the 8040 (I'm 170 lbs) and replaced it with the 8141, which snapped in the same place after a year. I brought it to a LBS last Sept/Oct and I'm STILL waiting for any word on warranty.

I love almost all of my Shimano products, but this is garbage.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: I think you've got an M8040 and an M8140. The M8141 has yet to ship. The numbering sequence is a little odd, since the difference in look/design is very minimal between the 8040 and 8140, but the 8141 is dramatically different from prior models despite its small +1 increment in model #.
Hopefully your LBS will eventually get you a set of M8141 and they will last.
  • 1 0
 @Inertiaman: Correct. I meant 8140. I'm not holding my breath for my LBS. Their bike mechanics are fantastic, but their warranty returns are brutal.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: axle kits are like $30 the hard part is getting the old bearing race out. If it’s been more than a year chances are your shop hosed you and you’re not getting warranty. Shimano can be pretty stingy. The last time I checked they had axle assemblies in stock, likely the best shimano will do is provide new ones at no cost. If they won’t I’d try to get your shop to sell them to you at cost since they’ve sat on the pedals for so long.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: My LBS told me it was not a replacement, but a credit. Either is fine, but it took them almost six months to send it to Shimano and then no follow up to get word back from Shimano. I'm not sure what part of this they think is good service.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: yeah that sucks. I have warrantied a lot of stuff though Shimano at my shop and they are pretty responsive but don’t buy into the “just riding along” line and are more selective. That being said, they ship fast when they have stuff in stock and don’t fight too much, especially if it’s an item with a history of failure (Ultegra cranks, I’m looking at you) sounds like your shop is sitting on your parts and aren’t properly motivated.
  • 14 1
 Chromag Daggas are the way
  • 4 2
 exactly. saw Skills with Phil using those on YouTube and found myself a set of used ones They are outstanding
  • 7 0
 @t-rick got influence’d
  • 10 1
 Glad to see the almost complete lack of axle bumps. More brands embracing the in-board big bearing, or just going with a normal _flat_ design. Although 5DEV seems to have taken the worst of both sides: big inboard bump that some people dislike, _and_ bearing bumps in the platform itself.

"They use a 17-4 stainless steel axle which 5DEV claims is 30% stronger than chromoly steel."

That's also a pretty silly comparison, because "chromoly steel" encompasses a whole range of alloys/grades. Some do have quite lower tensile and yield strengths, but that also generally are more elastic and not as hard, which can be quite good depending on application. However, some chromoly grades, like 4140, are pretty damn close to 17-4.

Compared to 4130 (very common in bike world), the 17-4 axle might be able handle more force before taking damage, but if it does break it's more likely to just snap instead of bending first.
  • 9 0
 It seems the reviewer was highly biased towards concavity, where on some pedals that’s not the intent behind the design, like the pnw loam/range and oneup comps and alloys are both a convex profile. I’ve equated cancavity to better heels-down aggressive descending and a convex profile to a better pedaling pedal- which in my mind would make it a better all-rounder. After riding some anvl tilts and then jumping on tmacs and most recently the oneup composites and pnw loam pedals i quite like how convex these pedals are for climbing feel. I also find the more concave a pedal is, the more fatigued my feel get. In the review, I would’ve liked mentioning intended uses for each of these pedals- be it bikepacking, xc, dh, even techy climbs. Saying there’s one pedal to rule them all is equivelant to saying theres one bike that fits every type of riding and riding style.
  • 2 0
 I'll give you that, you def feel the concavity w/ TMACs. Climbing for 1hr or more I do notice my feet getting a bit sore, but surprisingly for long park days I've never felt my feet hurting. Probably because I'm shifting positions, getting on and off the bike for uplift, etc.
  • 8 0
 Am I the only one that finds front loading pins easier to deal with? You just grab the bent/mangled pin with vice grip pliers and spin it out...

When rear loading pins get wrecked, you have to hacksaw or tin-snip the remaining nub of pin off or else you run the risk of destroying the threading in the pedal...

Front load pins are superior.
  • 2 0
 My Stamps have so many sheared off pins that have nothing to grab, only way I can think to get them out will likely damage the pedal. I think we're boned with either type.
  • 1 0
 I agree. Don't really see an argument for rear loading pins, but some people love them.
  • 3 0
 @FaahkEet: front loaded pins with hex key access on the back is the best of both worlds
  • 1 0
 When I have to pull a rear loading pin, it’s been ground down on granite. Top loader would take heroics to pull.
  • 7 0
 I wear US13-14 shoes and like the Catalyst XL's. I'm not necessarily a fanboy and would happily try a comparable pedal if there were one but nothing else comes close for platform size. To me it's one of the things like a taller stack/bar height that makes a substantial difference as a bigger human. You don't ride a medium frame, why ride medium pedals.
  • 9 0
 I’m a composite fan through and through. Deity Deftraps will forever live on my bikes.
  • 2 0
 Really like the feel of those but I've bent 3 axles on them from pedal impacts. Luckily they sell a kit to repair them but I wonder if the metal is soft or what.
  • 1 0
 @milesofpain: You don't think what happened to them would have bent any other pedal?
  • 9 0
 Deity Deftraps have been flawless so far. 3 seasons spin like new and have taken a beating.
  • 9 4
 The new Race Face Atlas pedals are about as bad as it gets when it comes to durability. The pins thread through close to no material, so the holes ovalize quickly. After less than a season, my pair could only hold about half of their pins. The other issue is that the pins bend rather than breaking clean off. That means replacing them is more tedious; I had to cut them off and file them flush with the pedal before turning them out so they wouldn't destroy the ~2x threads in the pedal body.

Aside from that, they were probably my favorite pedals as far as grip and feel under foot, though.

Disclaimer: Race Face sent me a free pair of pedals to try. Not sure that really worked in their favor, though.
  • 4 1
 Checks out for modern RaceFace products. Used to be a fan, but everything of theirs I've tried lately has been a disappointment.
  • 2 0
 @ratedgg13: That's so true, they were super good. Now, I'm not hard on equipment but i managed to break a raceface carbon bar with a really mellow crash, ripped it right out the stem which is Rf. And a friend just bought the new era cranks and they lasted 2 days on the andes. Swiss Cheese.
  • 1 0
 On my RF Aeffect pedals, the bushings developed slop after a few rides. Sure, they did replace the bushings for free, but I was out of Pedals for several weeks (package go lost in shipping...)
  • 8 0
 I have Deity Deftraps and Chromag Daggas and both are outstanding. I want to try the T-macs next.
  • 6 0
 HT PA03A are great pedals. Thin, big platform grippy a s & amazing value.
Ive had Vaults , Deity, One Up , Race Face, Burgtec and these are good.
Factor in cost and prob one of best out there
  • 7 0
 The phillips screw on the crank bros pedal looks like somebody lost the original screw and couldn't find an exact replacement at the hardware store.
  • 7 1
 I have no plan to own a metal pedal on any of my MTBs. All composite, all the way. There's no way you can get me to believe your $250 metal pedals are _that_ much better than my RaceFace Chesters which cost 1/5 the price.
  • 5 1
 Multiple test winner Nukeproof horizon pro dh pedald for 54 euros (including taxes, vat and postage costs to EU countries).
Can't beat that offer.
www.wiggle.com/eu/p/nukeproof-horizon-pro-downhill-flat-pedals?color=grey&sizeStandard=One+Size
  • 1 0
 Took 2 sets of Enduro version of the pedal. Value for money is unbeatable.
  • 4 0
 Kind of happy to see the comment about 'bearing bulge' for the RaceFace Atlas. I was running Raceface Chesters happily for a few years, then switched to OneUp alu pedals when I got a new bike - those OneUp pedals have a similar bearing bulge to the Raceface atlas, and it kinda bugs me. Until reading this article I was assuming I was the only one having the problem and I just needed to work on my technique! Ended up switching back to the Chesters recently but am now noticing how much less grippy they are and how the platform is smaller. Pedals are too expensive to keep trying out different ones, but I guess I haven't found my perfect match yet!
  • 3 0
 This is how I feel about the Tectonic pedals. I want to try them, but at that price I don't want to risk disliking the bearing bulge and losing 50% on resale. It's not that the price is necessarily unwarranted, it's just outside my comfort zone for experimentation when I've intuitively avoided axle bumps and bulges until now.
  • 3 0
 @AndrewHornor: maybe they should provide demo units
  • 8 0
 Hilarious. Leaving DEITY out of this “comparison”.
  • 7 0
 Now deftraps will be sold out everywhere after this comment section.
  • 8 0
 Deftraps
  • 5 1
 Been on the same set of Spank Spikes for 10 years now. Got the Ti axle upgrade in them. Bulletproof pedals. Easily rebuildable. Certainly not the latest, but price and all things considered they are among the greatest.
  • 1 0
 Used them for a long time and loved eveything about them except the squeeking from the 5.10s rubbing the end nut. Still happened, although less, with the Spank redesigned nut.
  • 1 0
 Spank Spikes are the the shortest-lived bearings of any pedal I've ever used. One Whistler day in the wet and the axles would seize to those stupid outboard bearings.
  • 8 1
 You’ll pry my Chromag Daggas out of my cold, dead hands
  • 14 0
 or shins
  • 3 0
 or both
  • 1 0
 Correct
  • 8 0
 No TMAC no care.
  • 6 0
 Was about to post the same thing. Any flat pedal test without a T-Mac in there is a worthless test. I know it's impossible to get EVERY pedal in there... but the T-Mac is pretty widely regarded as one of the best.
  • 3 0
 @onemanarmy: The concavity might not be for everyone, but for rough Park days (mine are Bolton Valley/Sugarbush), I love the extra grip and they're perfectly comfortable.
  • 7 0
 Tmac’s all day. The oneup pedals are like bars of soap.
  • 4 1
 I love DMR Vault and have run them for years but all my latest sets have had the issue shown clearly in the photo above where the DU bush migrates out, popping the seal out. In severe cases it makes the pedal actually bind. Emailed DMR about the issue and they say they hadn't heard of it occurring yet you can see it clearly in the review photo haha.
  • 2 1
 mine does the same thing, even after I glued them in
  • 1 1
 Get the igus bush upgrade kit from eBay: www.ebay.co.uk/itm/283568407489
  • 10 7
 Can't beat OneUp composite pedals for price/durability/grip. Running the same set for the past three seasons on my Slayer and, despite being 6'4, 250lb (300 at my worst), I can't see them falling apart anytime soon.
  • 3 1
 Had a set I ran for three years. Replaced screws occasionally with cheap alternatives (it's like $35 for replacement pins from OneUp after shipping). Still ran great but replaced them with new ones because the bodies got hammered. For $60 you can't beat it.
  • 2 1
 They are half the price of the next cheapest ones, the value is amazing, and the grip is great.
  • 2 0
 @nbram: just an fyi u can get replacements pins for much cheaper at just about any hardware store
  • 5 0
 I was unimpressed with them as a whole. They're pretty good when you've got full weight on them, but if you get slightly unloaded then it's extremely easy to lose footing compared to other pedals. This made me lose confidence in them. I'd much sooner recommend Deftraps or Wah Wah 2s.
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko: they lasted 2 rides on my bike, immediately replaced with deftraps.
  • 3 0
 Ooof! Fourteen different pedals?! You should have known I have something due this morning at work. Now I have to go through all of these before I can even start the other thing…
  • 1 0
 Not sure when they came out, but I'm surely over 10 years on my OG pair and on the second replacement sets of bearings. Excellent grip with the new thinner steel pins and only pedal (to my knowledge) which fully runs on cartridge bearings
  • 5 0
 I've seen two Tenet pedals snap the shaft. Not fun ending a ride because you didn't bring your backup pedals.
  • 10 1
 @slovenian6474, though our V1 pedals were ISO passing products there were a few cases of broken spindles due to fatigue in isolated scenarios. This prompted us to take a real hard look at how pedals are tested and it became glaringly obvious that ISO simply is not enough for mountain use. When we designed the Occult and Omen V2 we worked with EFBE (a third party cycling specific test lab) closely to ensure that we would design the most durable pedal we could possibly make. The Occult V2 and Omen V2 are EFBE Tri-Test GR certified which is a huge feat to accomplish that many other brands opt out of.

If you want to ensure that your pedals are up to the task, you should ask the brand you are interested in "How do you test your pedals?". Actually, you should ask that question for every mountain bike product on the market.
  • 2 0
 @ridetenet: maybe you be able to shed some clarity as to the three different weight claims of the omen? The website says 406, the first chart on this page says 460 and small blurb under the actual review says 440?
  • 3 1
 @ridetenet: Just wanted to drop in to say how damned good Tenent's pedals are. Ridiculously smooth bearing action and just generally super pleasant to use. I had been sold on Oneup composites' value, but after trying out a pair of Tenents I've now bought a set for each of my bikes. They really do make a different to how the bike feels.
  • 3 0
 @ridetenet: So what happens to all the supporters who bought your V1 pedals that are tested with the "simply is not enough for mountain use" ISO test?
  • 2 1
 @nickkozak: Weight is 460g. Typo, just updated the site. Sorry for the confusion.
  • 4 1
 @slovenian6474: Just to clarify, ISO is how every single pedal in this review has been tested at the base line. It is a requirement to pass ISO to sell a product in many countries. There are instances of spindle failures with every pedal that is sold on the market. This is an unfortunate reality with mountain bike products and we simply recognize that the industry has to do better, us included. This is why we have made an internal standard of passing EFBE Tri-Test GR for all products we produce moving forward because we ride products hard and so do our customers. That being said, we will stand by our products no questions asked. If someone had issues with our pedals we will warranty them with our latest version. If you are looking to upgrade to the newer pedal for peace of mind, we are happy to offer a trade up at a steep discount. Please feel free to contact me at tyler@ridetenet.com.
  • 2 0
 @coachzed: Thank you for the support and kind words!
  • 3 1
 @ridetenet: Tyler like I have mentioned to you via message. In my group of riders there are over 12 brands of pedals on our bikes. The tenets on three bikes two sets have broke and not from being over weight or overall aggressive rider. People now riding on your pedals are just wondering WHEN is this going to break not IF. Not fun riding with something like this in the back of your mind. Again a trade up for a product that is known to fail and have witnessed breaking, No thanks. Did I love your pedals before these issues in my my group YES. I had always recommend your pedals in any thread about what pedals to get but the lack of taking care of fellow riders not ok with.
  • 5 0
 I have ridden flats for 10 years, Tenets are the only pedals that almost killed me mid ride and broke.
  • 3 0
 @cogsci: My brother in-law messaged Tyler from Tenet two weeks ago about his second set of broken pedals and has not heard a word from him.
  • 1 1
 @elf1974: they are a two man operation that is likely over their head right now. I imagine they are praying that no one gets seriously injured but can not afford to do a mass recall.
  • 2 0
 @ridetenet: I am the one responsible for one of the incidents in OP's post, as well as the one @elf1974 is referring to. Overall I love the feel of the Occult pedals- when they're there. But I've now missed out on a ride due to a broken pedal from bunny hopping in a parking lot, and had to coast out from the top of Unemployment Line due to another broken pedal. In both incidents the spindle sheared at the crank. Both incidents were also on V1 pedals.

I can't really speak the V2's beyond that they've lasted one ride. Still waiting to hear about replacing my second V1 pair. Again, I love the feel of them, but I already wreck enough on my own. I don't need to add "are my pedals going to break on this feature?" to my anxiety.
  • 3 0
 @cogsci: That was my thought as well. That is why I emailed tyler separately about making it right. I got the basic we will give you X amount off of the V2. I loved the pedals but after this moved on to TMacs.
  • 2 1
 @ridetenet: somethings are just designed and engineered better to start with!
'There are instances of spindle failures with every pedal that is sold on the market. '

At consumer level or testing phase Proof of this please?
  • 2 1
 @YukonMog: Anecdotal personal experience, I don't know anyone who has had a pedal catastrophically fail other these v1 tenets. I have a mangled DMR Vault in my garage from a medium speed pedal catching a rock and dead stopped the bike. It didn't break though and I rode out on it. I'd be curious to see failure rate compared to V2 and other pedals instead of "a few cases" which we all know is more than a few.
  • 1 0
 @slovenian6474: I may be wrong but the Tenet MK1's look to use a 10mm bush vs the 12mm the later and almost every other pedal on the market uses.

You can see the difference between the V1 and V2 axle here - ridetenet.com/collections/hardgoods
  • 2 0
 Does no one run crank boots any more?

Certain pedals in the test, with a large flat area where the pedal interfaces with the crank, can't be used if you're running carbon cranks with crank boots. Namely the PNW and RaceFace pedals. Seems that might've warranted a mention.

Was also kinda curious about a comment on the Stamp 7s. Personally it never even occurred to me to leave the pedal axle attached to the crank while servicing them. Lot easier to take the whole thing off and service it on your bench, and part of my pedal service routine is to clean/regrease pedal axle threads anyway.

Then it occurred to me, I've never seen another rider or mechanic service a set of pedals, and now I'm kinda wondering, am *I* the weird one? Is it common practice to just remove the pedal body from the bike, while servicing pedals?
  • 1 0
 I've had no issues running crank boots with outboard bearing pedals. You just have to use thick pedal washers (or a stack of 2). It's really not an issue as long as you still have plenty of thread engagement and you're torqueing them correctly. I might reconsider that statement for someone near the max capacity of the pedals/cranks, though.
  • 1 0
 How do you affix the spindle to a bench/vice if there's no flat.
  • 3 0
 Crank bros has earned their iffy reputation for quality and often needless "innovations" but sometimes they just really nail a product. The Stamp 7 is such a case, they are simply incredibly good.
  • 2 0
 When I bend a pin on my PNW composite pedals it's a pain to replace because the hexagonal slot that holds the nut isn't rigid enough to stop the nut from spinning. Guessing that's true for all composites. You need pliers and some patience. Maybe replacing damaged pins on alloy pedals it's it's own challenge, idk.
  • 6 1
 based on how awful 5dev are, their QC and Service, Id think using their pedals would be a death sentence
  • 6 0
 What . . . no Canfield's ? ? ?
  • 3 0
 I ran One UP aluminum pedals for years I would either break them or the bearing went bad in less then 6 months. I switched the Deity Bladerunner pedals and they are by far then best pedal I have used in a long time.
  • 3 1
 DMR Vaults require a LOT of regular service. Minimal sealing, and the super cheapo soft crank-side bushings get play in them within a month or two, even in the dry. Pretty soft axles, too, I've bent a whole pile of them. If you run these, buy rebuild kits by the dozen and a few extra axles while you're at it.

I understand that testers can't run bikes or parts for a full year+ to really test how they last, but long term durability should be a higher criteria on the list.
  • 2 0
 Can anyone recommend a narrow width flat pedal?

Not all flat pedal riders are on smooth bike park trails and with low BBs these days pedal strike on embedded rocks, roots and deep ruts is an issue I regularly encounter and want to avoid
  • 5 1
 Really disappointed you didn’t compare based on medals won on each pedal Wink
  • 3 0
 When Ive broken pedals it's usually the axle, not the body. So I'll stick to composites that you can find for about $40 on sale all day
  • 5 3
 At the risk of being that guy, I'm genuinely surprised Squidworx didn't get any love here, or in the last flat pedal review, especially since they're a Pemberton company. And they offer a 5 year warranty.
  • 10 0
 We've sent them a few sets for testing, so disappointed we're not included again.
  • 2 0
 @squidworx: My 2 year review; they're indestructible.
I ride all winter and I'm not that careful about avoiding stuff. Zero maintenance done and they're still spinning smooth.
Also of note, they shrug off impacts quite impressively, so very little damage shows.
  • 2 0
 I hadn't heard of these prior to reading this comment. Just looked them up, and they seem extremely gimmicky. Hard to see that a pedal where we can mix and match the colors of the platform is something the market was really demanding.
  • 2 0
 @BrambleLee: Not gimmicky at all! I've ridden @squidworx pedals for several years and they are awesome. I'm a heavy rider who rides a lot. I've smashed them into lots of rocks and they still perform. Contrast that to other pedals I've owned, the pins bend and can't be removed so I loose traction on them, whereas the Squidworx pedals have pin insets (or whatever the term is) and bent pins can easily be removed and replaced with the bonus pins they give you when you buy a pair of pedals.

What I don't understand is why they arent feature in the above review and why they haven't blown up more because they are as good as any pedal on the market that I've tried PLUS you can colour-coordinate. Of course performance trumps aesthics, but with these pedals, I got both Smile
  • 1 0
 Agreed. I run them on both my bikes and have thousands of kms run through them. And based in pembi too. I guess Outside doesn't care about hwy99 since they closed their squamish offices.
  • 2 1
 I'm pretty sure all of these pedals work awesome, but I switched from crankbrothers stamp 1 over to the raceface atlas and wow it's like I'm clipped on the bike. The grip is just insane. Plus they look steller in the kash money color
  • 1 1
 Atlas is a great pedal
  • 1 0
 @kobold: I've been pretty happy with my Atlas pedals.

I do wish they'd offer a concave version as I do pop out of these more often than I do out of my T-Mac's.
  • 5 1
 Nobody thinks it's weird that someone can find enough to say about flat pedals to write entire reviews?
  • 3 0
 Not me. Even among good ones, they vary quite a bit in design and I find it's a big confidence boost to have ones I like.
  • 1 1
 Yes and also that a $40 product is identical functionally to a $250 product. It's a flat pedal, it grips and spins or it doesn't. The most proven tech in the sport. Hard for a serious manufacturer to f it up.
  • 2 0
 More variety than Clipless.
  • 1 0
 Distinct lack of leading edge chamfers on a good number of these. What's up with that?

Do the square edges grab on rocks more? I would think maybe yes...

Does the forward offset provided by a big chamfer have any advantage? I would think maybe with ball-of-foot-over-axle foot position, but maybe less with a position closer to arch-over-axle. Interestingly, the Catalyst, arguably the design most intended for arch-over-axle, also seems to have the most aggressive chamfer and forward offset.
  • 5 1
 Twenty6 FTW. Still the best pedals I've ridden. Tyler was way ahead of the game.
  • 2 0
 I remember… I regret not taking the good ones of my bike when I sold it years ago.
  • 1 0
 Heck yes! My one pair of twenty6 predators are on their last legs. Love how my feet instantly find a good position on these pedals without fidgeting about to get stability. Think enough. Plenty of grip but not too much.

Anyone found a comparable pedal these days? If I had a time machine.
  • 3 1
 Wonder why Tectonic switched to aluminum for the V2. Been loving the original. By far my favorite pedal after switching from Deity T-mac. T-macs were great but couldn't always replace the broken pins.
  • 5 0
 Deftraps. Plastic TMacs with rear load pins. Best flats I’ve tried.
  • 3 0
 From their website:
"We experienced quality control issues from our mold tooling during follow-up production rounds, resulting in unusable parts. We made the tough decision to pivot our design to an aluminum pedal body, using nearly all of the same parts. We machine and assemble these here in Durango, making the transition as seamless as possible. We still believe in the performance benefits of our original material, and plan to reintroduce that product line when our budget allows, but are very proud of the aluminum pedals, and were able to incorporate minor improvements and bug fixes with this revised version."
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: I'll def be recommending these to my friends who are just getting into bikes
  • 3 2
 I’ve been using the same pair of DMR vaults since 2016. Replaced bearings once and a few pins here and there. They’re still going strong. I wanna try something lighter like Yoshimura’s or 5dev but I’m afraid of disappointment.
  • 1 0
 impossible to do everything i know, and this is a great reference for people w/out opionions. well done. I personally love the dagga's to death. I've tried a lot of the stuff tested above, and Dagga's have had the best life and pedal feel for me.
  • 1 0
 I’m obviously out of touch as I was looking at the prices and thinking, How much!

I only ride flats occasionally and think I’ll stick to my old DMR v8,s and some other thinner pair, whose name escapes me at the moment as I haven’t used them in a while.
  • 1 0
 Honestly any pedals made in last 10 years will be a lot better than your V8s. Worth a shot. Trust me Ive been riding V8s since mid-90s when I could only afford the Wellgo ripoff ones!! Sticking with DMR, Try some composite - even the V11 plastic version of the Vault is decent. If you don't want to fork out for the Vault but it's significantly better than the V8s.
  • 4 1
 Canfield Crampons.
Super thin leading edge.
Convex. (Concave doesn't mean best grip by default)
I installed longer pins, and grip is even more excellent.
  • 3 1
 Why not SunTour XC II? Still sell for $150, OG, @ 40+ years old are proven and will last longer than your knees/bike ever will. All in good jest since nothing ages worse than mnt bike stuff.
  • 1 0
 Retired my trusty DMR Vaults about 4 years ago and replaced them with oneup composite pedals. on all my bikes Never gone back. While they are probably not as 'immersive' as the Vaults, I actually find that the composites slide over rocks better in case of a strike, and although they offer less overall feel, work out much better for me.
  • 1 0
 I was on Stamp 7 for years and recently got the new RaceFace Atlas. Love the grip, but a ton of peddle strike. Anyone else get that? I even put in the washers to make it shorter. Anyway, still love them, but kindof missing the 7s.
  • 1 0
 OneUp Composites. Ride 3 bikes offroad. Same pedals on all bikes helps keep the touch points as similar as possible. They work, work well, and have held up famously. And..., with 5 bikes that get ridden often - it does 't break the bank to keep those touch points same ol' same ol'.
  • 1 0
 missing the lightest, best and most expensive of them all:
www.syntace.com/en_GB/products/pedals/mountain-bike

Ain't got no idea about the other pedals, but that's my second pair ( first stolen with the bike ) and i'm damn happy Smile
also think having different sizes for different shoe sizes is a good idea.
  • 4 1
 I wanted to try Tenet or 5Dev this year but the price and weigh of the OneUp composites are just too good.
  • 6 0
 Go tenet (or one up) vs overpriced shite from a company who employs / is run by dick heads.
  • 1 0
 The smoothness and bearing quality between the two is not even comparable. I sent my 5Devs back to the store.
  • 2 1
 my favourite flat pedals ever where the Specialized Boomslang, but couldn't use them with the carbon crank boots that came on my new bike, currently using Nukeproof Horizon DH (Sam Hill), but yet to give them a proper test
  • 3 0
 Thank you for taking the side profile photos that many manufacturers refuse to provide!
  • 1 0
 Even though rated as not having the grippiest pins, there is something to say about the style of pin that the pembee pedal uses, thick and short = less likely to snap off when catching a rock strike.
  • 1 0
 Wondering why Tectonic abandoned the composite material and went with alu on the Altar V2. Kinda liked having a high end composite option, usually pretty light and glides over rocks better.
  • 1 0
 My "Mzyrh" pedals from Amazon are my favorites for the money, some of the stickiest Ive ever encountered, super durable and under $30 per pair. Only change is they are a bit on the small side (platform wise)
  • 3 1
 Seems silly to spend more than $60 for a pedal you're going to be smashing into rocks until you finally hit one hard enough to bend an axle.
  • 3 1
 All of them have shortcomings and the Grim Donut deserves better. How hard can it be do design and make a pair or Grip Donuts?
  • 3 0
 I've had the Race Face Atlas for over a year and no issues...like them quite a bit.
  • 1 0
 I ride the big one ups with 5 10 shoes and have a perfect grip and I'm also totally satisfied with the durability. A pedal doesn't have to be able to do more than that and it shouldn't cost more anyway.
  • 1 1
 Since many pedals use the same thread size for the pins, I've found that adding DMR Moto pins has transformed a couple of my pedals to a better high-grip status. I think they are grippier and more durable than threaded pins.
  • 1 1
 Raceface Atlas have nice foot feel and grip but they fail in a painful way. When the bearing fails, the body slides off the axle. Have fun riding down the rest of the trail without a slippery tapered axle for a pedal after you just smashed your shin or crashed from losing the pedal. Happened to me 3 times before I switched to Chromag Daggas. Two seasons on the Daggas and I have not had a single issue.
  • 1 1
 This is an honest question. What's the point of running flat pedals? I rode flats for 5-6 years. As I got faster and rode gnarlier terrain I wanted my feet to stay on better. Shifter to SPDs and have ridden those for 5-6 years. Several of my friends have gone to flats so I'm also trying out flats again and every time I ride, I wonder what the point is. Unless you're doing tricks in the air where you want to take your feet off, then why? I keep trying to figure it out.
  • 7 1
 Flip it round- why are you clipping in? There's really very little point in clipping in unless you are a racer.
Are you clipping in for making up a lack of technique (rear wheel lifts, dropoffs, bunnyhops?) Or for a perceived benefit of power? (Google Flat Pedal Manifesto).
  • 1 0
 @YukonMog: that’s a fair point. Still why are racers clipped in? There has to be a reason most are. Fun for me is going as fast as I can. I’m clipped in because my feet occasionally got moved or even bounced off the pedals in rough sections on DH. Back on flats I have to spend mental energy on keeping my feet on when descending.
  • 3 0
 @chagel: It's the opposite for me. I have to spend mental energy when I'm clipped in. I think so much about being fixed to my bike that it's no fun at all to ride technical trails. And compared to my riding buddies I don't seem to be in any disadvantage when it comes to pedaling for hours.
Seems different people have different likes.
  • 1 1
 How is it even possible to do a flat pedal group test without even mentioning the diameter of the pins on each pedal?
That's one of the biggest factors in grip and shoe wear.
The main reason for me running Vaults now is the bigger diameter pins that doesn't devour shoes at nearly the same rate as pedals with thinner pins.
I used to thrash a pair of freerider contacts in a few months when I used pedals with thinner pins before switching to Vaults.
  • 3 1
 Great to see PB can do a proper review of the DMR Vault and note it's major fault. Unlike Singletrackworld who clearly take backhanders.
  • 1 1
 Threaded pins may have great grip initially, but they tear your shoes up so fast that soon the grip is crap. "Flat pedal" shoe manufacturers also don't seem to know they are designing for flat pedals, big sipes in the soles swallow pins and reduce the grip and represent missing material so wear soon reduces grip in these areas particularly
  • 1 1
 This really shows pedal grip ratings are subjective as hell as other sites claimed DMR vaults are the grippiest pedals in tests vs some of the same pedals. They also claimed hope to not be as grippy. I'd argue DMR are grippy to the point of being too grippy but I also run 5.10s
  • 1 1
 Downvote for any pedal with grub screws. Once they take a good hit you can't get them out unless you've got a drill press and extractor kit. I have not seen rear-access grubs either. Shame spending so much on fancy pedals and being left with sheared pins.
  • 1 1
 great write up. really enjoy these tech comparisons. A couple things not mentioned; the important factor of shoe size to platform dimension. bigger feet on smaller pedals gets good on traction but bad on foot fatigue from your sole bending around a small pedal. so, I would of made a note that smaller pedals are better for smaller feet and vice versa. or maybe thats just too obvious? Other thing - why not test OneUps alloy pedal? why only have one plastic pedal in the test? I thought these were a comparison of "premium" pedals. I feel the composites deserve their own shootout. thanks for the content.
  • 1 1
 Amazed at bushing issues with Catalysts. I had some for 4 years, spun like new the day I sent them off with a used bike.

There is a design issue where the pedals can't be disassembled if you beat the crap out of the outer edge, but I never needed to rebuild. I was a fan, but really haven't noticed a negative difference switching to Canfield Crampons (for matching colors perfectly...)
  • 1 1
 Can we please stop talking about the “concativity” of pedals?

There are (almost) no concave pedals out there.

No use describing them as concave, if what is really meant is that they have longer pins in the front and back.
  • 1 0
 I just bought RaceFace Atlas. They have less grip that you would expect seeing those long and thin pins. They have very comfortable platform but i am disappointed with the grip. I use Five Ten Freerider Pro shoes
  • 6 3
 Flat pedals win medals baby
  • 4 0
 They do. Not nearly as many as clipgin pedals though.
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: would be funny if the few flat racers would win 50% of the races. Then we would not have this discussion...
  • 1 0
 Personally the shoe rubber matters a lot with pedals. I've had great luck with old 510's now i'm on the RC boa flats. Can we get a flat shoe test up ASAP?
  • 3 0
 Wait we are supposed to service our pedals?
  • 1 0
 The price shown for the Tenet Omen v2 is off, they come in at 189 USD: ridetenet.com/collections/hardgoods/products/omen-v2-pedal
  • 2 1
 To add insult to injury, the Occult is a better pedal than the Omen while being quite a bit cheaper as well.
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer adding Chromag Dagga pins to the pressure/contact solves all your complaints adding threaded grip and a better bent pin removal. Best of both worlds!
  • 1 0
 I run dagga pins with one washer under em in my Chromag Scarabs and my DMR Vaults, with moto pins in the middle. Significantly ups the level of grip!
  • 1 0
 +1 for adding the Dagga pins, but I dug around my random parts and found a Blackspire rebuilt kit with even sharper pins which I installed in all the rear spots and now my Pressures are legit.
  • 3 1
 No Burgtec mentions?? I’ve rocked mine for years. Best platform, best bearings imo
  • 3 1
 DMR Vaults FTW! Mine are spinning smooth after multiple years. Yoshimura Chilao are sweet too!
  • 3 1
 And the winner is - Sam Hill Nukeproof DH .. try these and you won't look at anything else
  • 2 1
 As long as you stock up on spare pins. And bring them along for your rides too.
  • 4 1
 I'm surprised that no Deity or Burgtec pedals were included.
  • 1 1
 "lacks concavity" should read "opposite of concavity" or, lol, "reverse concavity".

Personally, I was surprised at the awesome grip that the reverse concavity actually gives
  • 1 2
 Defiantly the Tectonic Altar V2 for me. Sickest pedal out there, made by a rider for riders. A little pricey yeah, but at least your money is going to someone who gives a sh*t about there product and brand.

Anyhow. as someone whos been riding the V1 for multiple years now i would highly recommend.
  • 3 1
 T-Macs Nukeproof Dagga Test is irrelevant without these as they set the bar.
  • 1 2
 I haven’t got the time or inclination to read all the hate mail here as to where everyone else’s fav pedals are so sorry not sorry if this has already been said, but where the feck are the Burgtec pedals??? Seriously!!!! I only came here to see how far ahead of the competition they are. X
  • 1 0
 Love to see all the love for the Deftraps !!

I’ve tried a fair number of flats and they take the win!

Oneup alu. On the other hand. Absolutely garbage
  • 1 0
 I love the T Mac pedals andI just happen to have a 2019 Santa Cruz 5010 size large attached to them. The bike comes with the pedals. I will be listing it this weekend.
  • 1 0
 The fact that the tester wasn't wearing Freerider Pros *AND* the T-mac wasn't incuded pretty much invalidates any conclusion the article came to.
  • 3 2
 $12 CULBERTA MTB Bike Pedals at Amazon - They are light and I like Nylon much better than metal when hitting a rock.
  • 1 0
 I remember paying like $50 (JensonUsa) for RaceFace Atlas pedals not that long ago...dang son.
  • 3 2
 Missed the aluminium Kona Wah Wah 2. Seems to be THE most overlooked pedal that's also the most awesome ever.
  • 3 1
 Burgtec mk5 pedals all the way!
  • 1 2
 I have 2 sets of Atlas pedals and I haven’t had issues with pins. Some have been getting shorter due to hitting them on rocks but no different over the other pedals I’ve had. Good little test. I liked it.
  • 2 2
 Crank bros stamp 7 are by faaaaar and away the best pedal here. They're the Maxxis of pedals,to use any other pedal is a failed experiment
  • 3 1
 Today I learned that $136 for a pair of pedals is "inexpensive".
Nice one.
  • 3 1
 Of all the needlessly expensive things to buy for a bike aluminium pedals are at the top of the list. Composite pedals do the same job for a quarter of the price.
  • 3 1
 Diety Black Katz!! Full stop.
  • 3 1
 Loved the shape and feel of Black Katz but not grippy enough without getting hold of some longer pins. Think the DMR Terrorpins fit if I remember.
  • 1 0
 @YukonMog: Sorry to hear that. I wonder if the rubber on your shoes is a bit too hard. What shoes are you wearing?
  • 1 3
 "Other features I’d look for in a quality pedal would be near equal front to rear length on the platform which should better your chance of keeping your feet connected to the pedals while climbing."

Say what now?
@mattbeer you're saying you think you can feel that with your foot hanging over the front and back edges of the pedal? I'm seriously doubtful of that. Like your center of force is exactly onto the axle, yet you're saying your feet want to rotate off?

This is what drives me crazy about mountain bike journalism, opinions stated as fact, and sometimes obviously incorrect assumptions made.
Don't get me wrong, I like your writing Matt, but that's utter nonsense. You most certainly cannot feel that off center in the pedal. You're body is way too dynamic for that. Or foot you also notice your shoes not being symmetrical behind and in front of your ankle?
  • 2 1
 How do you know what someone else "most certainly" can or cannot feel?
  • 1 1
 @AndrewHornor: because center of effort would have to be so far off the pedal rotational axis that it would quite literally only protrude one way, AND you would have to not center your foot.
  • 1 1
 @AndrewHornor: also because half of the reviewed pedals are slightly offset top to bottom. But only one feels funny? Not bloody likely.
  • 2 0
 @BarryWalstead The Hope pedals have a significantly shorter rear half and I lost my foot placement while climbing much more frequently than the other pedals.
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer: I'm not arguing that you didn't like them or they didn't provide the grip while climbing that some others did, but the reasoning isn't sound.
If you have a shorter rear section behind the axle, it actually means you have less leverage to rotate it backwards because of the INCREASED leverage provided by the longer front.

Again, you obviously didn't like them, and I have no horse in this race, but for whatever reason you didn't like them it cannot be as you have stated. The basic mechanics dispute your reasoning, not your experience.

And I like your writing Matt, you're maybe better than average for mtb writers, but I had to point out the logical fallacy of the discussion.
Happy pedaling on something other than those offset Hope pedals!
  • 4 2
 For me bestflat pedals are not in this test: BURGTEC MK5 !
  • 1 0
 On the chart it says the oneup pedals are 340 and then in the review they are 440g
  • 1 0
 The best flat pedal is not on this list. SYNTACE NUMBERNINE2 TITAN 285 grams
  • 2 1
 Anybody running the Bontrager Elites? $37 usd and seem pretty decent.
  • 1 0
 there might be a mistake, weight of One up composites is almost 100g. off,
  • 1 0
 Yep you are right - they are around 370g, not 440g.
  • 1 0
 Chromag Scarab

Matt, what's your shoe size?
  • 2 0
 He wrote 42.
  • 1 0
 @watchtower: thank you!
  • 4 2
 Yoshimura FTW!!!
  • 2 1
 Surprised not to see them on here. My 2nd favorite pedal, I just wish they were a tad more grippy Smile
  • 2 1
 @v57z3F0q: Recently got a set and am super happy with them coming from Oneup's. Surprised not to see them on the list.
  • 1 0
 @D-Rick: they’re sweet for sure! Love how my feet can sit close to the crank too.
  • 2 1
 Chromag Dagga of course! In purple.
  • 1 1
 Silvers sick as well - best pedals eva - sam hill nukeproof oil slicks are a close 2nd.
  • 2 1
 Sensus Crue great pedal and the best box
  • 3 2
 Sensus Crue pedals are heat...where they at?
  • 3 2
 What about yoshimura and Burgtec ?
  • 1 2
 Chromag Dagga's are the best hands down...So much grip, great feel and the most durable flat pedal I've ever used. Would have been nice to see them in the test.
  • 1 2
 BEST FLAT PEDAL:
www.straitlinecomponents.com/products/amp-pedals?variant=5947830915

If you can find them with titanium axles you get these beauties at 272gr/pair
  • 1 0
 Better snap up that one remaining pair if you like them. Straitline is not making bike parts anymore Frown
  • 1 0
 Left off the Burgtec MK5, they would have won for sure.
  • 1 2
 Another good value pedal is the Nukeproof Neutron. Amazing grip, durable and cheap.
  • 1 1
 Oneup alloys for the win!
  • 1 0
 Never mind
  • 1 0
 YAWWWWWNNNNNN.
  • 1 1
 And here I am still running Kona Wah Wahs. It the 2s the original ones
  • 4 3
 Get a grip Get Burgtec
  • 2 2
 BMW shinburgers are dope!
  • 2 2
 Specialized Bennies are hard to beat at $80. (On sale right now for $60)
  • 1 2
 Vault crew! I like to take my bike out for photographic adventures and they work awesome with my hiking boots also.
  • 3 2
 CANFIELD CRANPON.
  • 1 1
 @mattbeer you're getting your Q-factor mixed up with pedal stance width
  • 1 0
 Q-factor is a crank width measurement yes, but they run hand in hand. Call it pedal Q-factor or stance, the further from the cranks the pedals run, the more rocks you're likely to hit ha!
  • 1 1
 Cost more than 60$ should be a con
  • 1 1
 were are the YOSHIMURA CHILAO?????
  • 1 2
 DMR V12 Mag, is still the best pedal of all time, going on like 15 years, 7 bikes, bearing are STILL MINT
  • 1 1
 DMR do a "midi" vault if you have smaller feet
  • 1 1
 This is all great, but who won in the appearance category?
  • 1 1
 Best flat pedal is clipless pedal !
  • 2 3
 Solution to all those pedals. Spd
  • 1 3
 Run flat pedals on my bike ride the clipless pedals I already have installed with tennis shoes.
  • 1 1
 Well this is an outstanding solution. I’ll give it a try on all my steeds!
  • 3 3
 Yoshimura All The Way !
  • 1 2
 Wheres my FUNN BIGFOOT bruh?
  • 1 2
 Wish someone would test Canfield Crampon pedals. Very happy with mine.
  • 1 2
 No Pembrey pedal ......... shame on you
  • 1 2
 No Yosh?
  • 1 1
 They were in the 2020 version...
www.pinkbike.com/news/12-of-the-best-mtb-flat-pedals-ridden-and-rated-2020.html

Best pedals and customer service!
  • 1 2
 Boomslang?!
  • 1 2
 Odyssey Black Widow
  • 5 7
 Fookers for the win baby
  • 6 0
 Get da fook outta here hahahaha
  • 2 2
 i ride fookers on my trail bike and dirt jumper. i've ridden much fancier, bigger pedals and i didn't like them. feet kept getting stuck in weird positions, ruining everything. never happens on my cheap ass fookers. someone once said they weren't the same thing as the twice as expensive chesters, but that's a bunch of crap.
  • 1 0
 @Gilesa: I'm on some cheap ass Rock Bros on my DJer. People here might not believe it, but I like them better than the DMR Vaults that were on previously.
  • 1 3
 No Fookers?
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