Review: Cannondale's All New 2022 Jekyll 1

Jun 22, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  
True to its name, the Cannondale Jekyll has undergone numerous transformations over the course of its multi-decade existence. Depending on the year, it's worn the freeride, over-mountain, and enduro labels, and it's always had a healthy dose of Cannondale-specific innovations, including a proprietary pull shock and a long travel Lefty fork. There was even a model with an electronic fork lockout all the way back in 2002.

There aren't any electronics to be seen on the latest version, but the 2022 Jekyll does cast a unique shadow, thanks to the split downtube and plastic guard that allowed the bike's designers to position the shock as low in the frame as possible. That feature even has its own name - the Gravity Cavity. The jury's still out if names that rhyme are any better than three-letter acronyms...
Cannondale Jekyll 1 Details

• Wheel size: 29"
• Carbon frame
• Travel: 165mm (r) / 170mm fork
• 64-degree head angle
• 442mm chainstays (size L)
• Weight: 34.5 lb / 15.6 kg (size L)
• Sizes: S-XL
• Price $6,100 USD
cannondale.com


The new Jekyll rolls on 29” wheels, with 165mm of rear travel and a 170mm fork. It also uses a high pivot Horst Link suspension layout, complete with an idler pulley and an integrated upper chain guide, a departure from the single pivot designs the Jekyll used in the past.

There are two complete versions available, the $6,100 Jekyll 1 reviewed here, and the Jekyll 2, which is priced at $4,100. Both models are available with a subdued, graphite paint job, or there's a flashier, color changing option that looks even better in person than it does in photos. I'm normally a fan of all-black-everything, but the number of compliments the Jekyll's paint scheme received could convince me to change my tune.



bigquotesThe Jekyll has a well balanced, predictable feel to it, a trait that would make it work well as a race bike, assuming the tracks were rowdy enough, or as a long-travel machine for riders who want want to mix in some pedal powered laps with their bike park and shuttle runs. Mike Kazimer


Cannondale Jekyll

Frame Details

Back in 2019 Cannondale was experimenting with a downhill bike that used two shocks, a bike that also happened to have a split downtube design that's nearly identical to what's used on the Jekyll.

On the Jekyll, an aluminum link rotates on a pivot that sticks out from the downtube, activating the trunnion mounted shock. A plastic guard is in place to protect the shock from flying trail debris and mud, although the openings at each side do mean that it's not totally sealed off from the elements. Along with helping to keep the bike's center of gravity nice and low, the shock's position also leaves plenty of room for a water bottle inside the front triangle.

The idler pulley is the other obvious talking point about this green machine. It's made from steel rather than aluminum, which Cannondale says means it should last as long as the chainring. Steel is a little noisier than an aluminum idler would have been, due to the fact that it won't wear down to mesh perfectly with the chain, but Cannondale's designers felt that the extra durability was worth that tradeoff. A small upper guide is mounted to the frame in order to help ensure that the chain stays where it's supposed to.

Cannondale Jekyll
The shock is tucked away as low in the frame as possible.
Cannondale Jekyll
An integrated guide helps make sure the chain stays in place.


Cannondale Jekyll

Geometry

The Jekyll's geometry falls right in line with current trends, with numbers that I'd classify as more contemporary than crazy. It has a 64-degree head angle, a 77.5-degree seat tube angle, and a reach of 475mm for a size large. The chainstay length varies depending on the frame size, ranging from 430mm on a size small and going all the way up to 450mm on the XL version.

It's nice to see that the seat tube lengths have dropped on all sizes, a move that makes it easier to run a longer travel dropper post. The size large comes with a 170mm version of Cannondale's LowDown dropper, but I was able to run a 200mm Fox Transfer post for part of the test period without any issues.


Cannondale Jekyll

Suspension Design

The Jekyll's high(ish) pivot suspension design gives it a rearward axle path for the first two-thirds ofthe rear wheel's travel, and then it begins to go slightly forward. This is in contrast to a bike like the Forbidden Dreadnought, which uses a higher main pivot location that gives it an entirely rearward axle path. One isn't inherently better than the other, but it's worth a mention since they're both recently introduced enduro bikes with idler pulleys.

The Jekyll's anti-squat hovers around 100% in the easiest gear, a number that drops as it goes through its travel. It has a moderately progressive leverage ratio, and it should work well with either an air or coil shock. The pedal kickback chart illustrates the effectiveness of that idler pulley – the chain forces are almost entirely isolated from the cranks.

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Cannondale Jekyll

Cannondale Jekyll



Specifications
Price $6100
Travel 165mm
Rear Shock Fox Float Factory X2
Fork Fox Float Factory 38, 170mm
Cassette SRAM GX, 10-52
Crankarms SRAM X1 Eagle, 30t
Rear Derailleur SRAM GX Eagle
Chain SRAM NX Eagle
Shifter Pods SRAM GX Eagle 12-speed
Handlebar Cannondale 1 riser, 30mm rise, 780mm wide
Stem FSA Grid 35, 35mm
Grips Fabric Funguy lock-on
Brakes SRAM Code RSC, 220/200mm rotors
Hubs Formula / SRAM MTH 700
Rim WTB KOM Trail i30
Tires Maxxis Assegai 2.5" / DHR II 2.4", EXO+
Seat Fabric Scoop Shallow Elite
Seatpost Cannondale DownLow dropper


Cannondale Jekyll









Test Bike Setup

Getting the Jekyll up and running didn't present too many hurdles, other than the challenge of accessing the high speed rebound dial on the shock. It's a hard one to reach, especially if you're trying spin it all the way closed to start counting clicks. Luckily the plastic shock cover is easy to take off, and once that's removed it's much easier to access the dial.

I ended up running the Float X2 shock with 19mm of sag (29%), which entailed inflating it to 170 psi. Up front, I set the Fox 38 up with 83 psi and ran one volume spacer.

I ran Cannondale's house-brand, 170mm dropper post for part of the test period, and then swapped it out, mainly out of curiosity to see if a 200mm Fox Transfer dropper post would fit. It did, and I preferred having that extra travel available in the steeps.


Me.
Mike Kazimer
Location: Bellingham, WA, USA
Age: 38
Height: 5'11" / 180cm
Inseam: 33" / 84cm
Weight: 160 lbs / 72.6 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @mikekazimer
The final setup note has to do with the chain – my bike showed up with a chain that was too short, so I ended up replacing it with the fancy rainbow colored one pictured here. According to Cannondale, that was an issue with an early production run and has since been corrected.

Testing took place in Bellingham, Washington, and the surrounding area over the course of the last three months, a time period that saw conditions change from wet and wintery to hot, dry, and dusty.



Cannondale Jekyll
Climbing

I ended up being pleasantly surprised by how unfazed the Jekyll's suspension was on the climbs. Even when pedaling out of the saddle the shock didn't dip into its travel any more than necessary, and I never felt the need to reach for the Float X2's blue climb switch. That's a good thing, since that switch is positioned pretty far away, and accessing it on the fly can be challenging.

The Jekyll's level of maneuverability and traction on tricky climbs falls in the middle of the road – it's not the best in its class in either of those categories, but it also never felt like a massive chore to get it up and over chunky rock or root steps. The 34 pound weight isn't out of the ordinary for a bike in this category, but remember that weight is with EXO+ casing tires – installing heavier duty tires will ratchet the number on the scale up even higher.

More and more companies have hopped on the steeper seat tube angle bandwagon, and for good reason – the resulting upright climbing position is much more comfortable on long uphill grinds. It also makes it easier to weight the front wheel, which is especially helpful on bikes with slacker head angles. On the Jekyll, the position I ended up in was comfortable without being cramped, and I could happily head out on long rides without any fit issues.

There is one fly in the ointment when it comes to the Jekyll's overally climbing performance - in the easiest gear on the cassette there's noticeable drag and noise from the idler pulley, due to chain line that the 52-tooth cog creates. The issue diminishes when the chain is shifted further down the cassette, but it's worth noting that if you spend a lot of time in the granny gear that rumbling chain can get annoying. I'd say the noise was more noticeable on the Jekyll than on other high pivot bikes I've been on recently, a list that includes the Kavenz VHP 16, Forbidden Dreadnought, and Norco Shore.


Cannondale Jekyll

Descending

The Jekyll is one smooth operator, with the ability to make it seem like someone fast forwarded geologic time by a few million years so that all the rocks lost their sharp edges. It doesn't completely erase square-edged hits, likely due in part to the shock's medium compression tune, but it does make them much less jarring, which in turn makes it easy to maintain momentum in choppy terrain. It's a bike that feels best at higher speeds, with a solid, ready-for-anything disposition that comes in handy when you're dropping into a brand new trail, unsure about what's around the next corner.

Depending on how it's executed, a high pivot suspension design can make a bike feel more planted than poppy, due to the chainstay length increasing as the bike goes deeper into its travel. On the Jekyll, that trait isn't as noticeable, and I didn't have to make any adjustments to my riding technique when hitting jumps. Granted, it's not a wildly energetic machine, but there's still enough life to it that it it doesn't feel totally glued to the ground, and it more than holds its own on machine-made jump trails.

I did find myself wondering how a coil shock would feel on this bike, or possibly a lighter compression tune. Even with the high- and low-speed compression all the way open on the Float X2 I felt like I wanted a touch more small bump sensitivity; there wasn't quite the level of grip I was looking for, something a coil shock or a different tune would likely take care of. Keep in mind that I'm on the lighter side of the spectrum, and this trait might not be as apparent to bigger riders.

The Jekyll is still manageable when the miles per hour drop, but it isn't isn't quite as easy to snake through tight, techy sections as the Kavenz VHP 16 that I reviewed a few months ago. That bike's shorter chainstays gave it an impressive ability to handle awkward, slow speed maneuvers. Those moves were still possible on the Jekyll, they just didn't feel quite as effortless.

Overall, the Jekyll has a well balanced, predictable feel to it, a trait that would make it work well as a race bike, assuming the tracks were rowdy enough, or as a long-travel machine for riders who want want to mix in some pedal powered laps with their bike park and shuttle runs.

Cannondale Jekyll
Cannondale Jekyll
Nukeproof Giga review
Nukeproof Giga

How does it compare?

The Nukeproof Giga falls into a similar category to the Jekyll, with 170mm of rear travel and a 180mm fork. The geometry numbers of the two bikes aren't that far apart either – both have a 475mm reach for a size large, and the frames have the same head tube angle, although the Giga ends up measuring .5-degree slacker due to the longer fork.

One geometry difference is that the chainstay length on the Giga is 445mm for all sizes, while Cannondale offers size-specific chainstay lengths, which could be beneficial to smaller riders.

Both bikes have steep seat angles and good pedaling positions, but I was more likely to use the climb switch on the Giga than on the Jekyll, since the Giga is a little more likely to cycle into its travel during out of the saddle efforts. I'd call it a draw when it comes to seated climbing performance – both bikes stay nice and calm. The Giga's lack of an idler pulley does give it the edge when it comes to drivetrain noise – it's much quieter than the Jekyll.

It's on the descents where there's a more noticeable difference between these two long travel machines. The Jekyll has a more muted feel, and despite having a little less travel it seems to smooth out the terrain more than the Giga. The Giga does feel more precise, though; it felt easier to switch from one line to another, and there was a snappiness to its handling that the Jekyll doesn't possess.

Comparing prices between the two is difficult due to exchange rates and taxes, but Nukeproof's consumer-direct model does allow them to offer a better value when comparing build kits.



Cannondale Jekyll
KOM Tough instead of Trail rims would have been more appropriate.
Cannondale Jekyll
A look at the underside of the frame with the plastic guard removed.

Technical Report

WTB KOM Trail rims: The Jekyll's wheelset seems undergunned for what the bike is capable of. I'm typically not that hard on wheels - I consider my riding style more smooth than smashy - but within a few rides I'd already put a sizeable dent in the rear rim and needed to true both wheels. There's also the fact that the SRAM hub limits riders to an XD freehub body. That's not the end of the world if you plan on sticking with a SRAM drivetrain, but it would be nice to at least have a hub that's compatible with a Shimano Microspline driver body.

Maxxis EXO+ tires: I didn't have any flats during the test period, but this is another area where I think a more robust option would be a better spec choice due to the Jekyll's intended use – the last thing you want is a flat tire ruining a race run. Even a Double Down casing rear tire paired with that EXO+ front would have been a good compromise.

220 / 200mm rotor combo: This was the first non-motorized bike I've been on with a 220mm front rotor, and I'm a fan. The Code RSC brakes stayed strong on longer, brake burning descents, and the amount of power was easy to control.

Gravity Cavity: On my very first ride on the Jekyll a small rock flew up and into the plastic shock guard, where it rattled around until I stopped and fished it out. That was a one time occurrence, but the openings on each side of that guard do allow debris to get in. If this was my personal bike I'd be inclined to drill a drain hole in the plastic – as it is, water and mud can collect at the bottom of the guard where it's mounted to the carbon frame.






Pros

+ Extremely smooth and composed in rough terrain
+ Well supported pedaling performance
+ Color changing paint job makes it stand out, in a good way


Cons

- Idler drag is noticeable when climbing
- Potential for debris to get into the Gravity Cavity
- Wheelset isn't up to bike's capabilities



Pinkbike's Take

bigquotes
Cannondale have always done things their own way, for better or worse. In the case of the new Jekyll, the new design is decidedly for the better. It's a fast, solid machine with plenty of pedaling support for climbing or sprinting through the flats, and an impressive ability to make short work of technical descents. The idler does create some noise in the easiest gears, but in this case I'd say the pros of the design outweigh the cons, especially when it comes to maintaining speed in rough terrain.
Mike Kazimer









270 Comments

  • 548 1
 Downtube storage comes as a shock
  • 44 9
 Hopefully they’ll rebound back soon. (Sorry that was bad bring on the downvotes)
  • 8 0
 Twin tube in a tube = triple tube?
  • 5 0
 @superkeen: I heard you like tubes...
  • 1 0
 @jaydawg69: Sounds totally tubular!
  • 274 4
 Good effort to Hyde the shock!
  • 6 8
 Best comment yet, this is too good!
  • 10 2
 * chef's kiss *
  • 15 4
 This comment gave me a good jekyll
  • 16 0
 Dad? Is that you?
  • 159 5
 The day has come! I have to say, C-dales have gotten pretty good looking in the last few years.
  • 20 2
 Agree! This thing is a stunner.
  • 25 0
 Big respect for trying something new. Having an idler on a production bike is some real risk taking you rarely see from big companies these days. And that paint man, daaang. Reminds me of the Kleins from the 90s, Cannondale’s aluminum nemesis
  • 30 1
 You know, I read the whole review and didn't once come across something that was Cannondale specific. No special BB size, headtube size, proprietary fork or shock, no weird decision that makes sense to only one engineer. Very acceptable bike! D'oh - missed the proprietary rear wheel offset! So close Cannondale, so close!
  • 8 2
 @nouseforaname: the rear wheel is offset compared to standard boost, and requires wheels to be dished differently.

To be fair, it does lead to better bracing angles, but no one else uses it. At least super boost is kind of a standard, and would lead to the same results (a laterally stiffer wheel)
  • 2 0
 @nouseforaname: my thoughts exactly....
  • 5 0
 @nouseforaname: agreed. It's good to see them innovating without just trying to be different or proprietary. I hope it pays off. Bike looks great and has some real potential performance upsides.
  • 2 3
 It does look good. Great design with the high pivot and idler too. I'm not on board with the open hole for the shock though. Scott did it right concealing it with the Spark.
  • 2 0
 yeah, downtube protection even has speed vents :.)
  • 4 3
 The jekyll has been a pretty amazing looking bike for a while now, and this new one is even better. I've always lusted after the jekyll haha. Maybe one day. This new one looks stunning.
  • 1 1
 2005 Orange Chase was a well polished machine.
  • 1 1
 @tbubier: i think its mostly the paint
  • 1 0
 @sdurant12: Doesn't Guerilla Gravity do the same on their aluminum rear stays?
  • 111 16
 Nice to see a new bike with the same size wheels!!
  • 19 0
 Short back and sides ain't dead.
  • 58 15
 No lack of 29ers out. Its 2x 27.5 that would be good to see for me. Way more fun....
  • 13 25
flag MattP76 (Jun 22, 2021 at 6:18) (Below Threshold)
 @Richt2000: Totally agree with that. However I would rather see 29ers than faddy Mullet Bikes
  • 24 2
 Mullets are just the better option for shorter riders. No point in having a big fast 29" rear wheel if you don't have room to handle the bike. It's neither more fun nor faster.
  • 19 33
flag MattP76 (Jun 22, 2021 at 7:33) (Below Threshold)
 @c-radicallis: Us shorter riders, me included, have never wanted or asked for a Mullet. They took 26ers aways from us with no real reason now they are slowing taking away our 27.5 for no reason again and replacing them with faddy Mullets which people like me dont want or need.
  • 18 19
 @c-radicallis: Mullets are better full stop. I'm 6ft 2 and will probably never go back to full 29.
  • 14 0
 @MattP76: shorter rider here, 5'6", riding in the PNW, mullets are definitely the way forward for short
inseam riders who struggle with a big rear wheel but still want to go fast on big terrain.
  • 12 0
 @MattP76: I do agree with you to a point. I’m a shorter rider as well and ride 27.5. I wouldn’t go back to 26 as you can really notice the extra roll over. My main gripe with modern bikes is that they are focused on outright speed primarily, which is great for getting podiums. I will never be the fastest guy and prefer the ease of 27.5 wheels. My riding buddy has a bike with a steeper head angle but 29” and struggles getting it around tight switchbacks, both up and down. I simply wish companies left us the choice. Thank you Evil, Pivot, Knolly, GG, Revel, Yeti,… Oh, Yeti and Pivot, sort yourselves out and get a threaded BB in there. Seriously, for that money!
  • 5 0
 @bigtim: Business in the front, also business in the back.



Business at the sides as well for good measure.
  • 7 0
 @MattP76: 5'7" been on a mullet for 18 months, can't imagine buying anything else. Have you ridden one? I personally don't find much down side to the big front wheel. Mullet might not be quite as snappy as a full 27 but I actually think they turn better even in tight stuff. I will say that the big front wheel is more of an advantage where I ride compared to some areas in the UK.
  • 15 4
 @Jordmackay: Fun to state your personal opinion as a fact. Glad you're enjoying your mullet, but for many out there a full 29er is the ticket.

We spend all this engineering (high pivot with idlers) to create rearward axle path to avoid the rear wheel getting "hung up" on obstacles, despite the increased complexity and additional drag to the system. Guess what also helps to limit rear wheel hang up? That's right! Larger diameter wheels.

As someone who is also 6'2", who rides primarily steep, rocky and technical terrain, I love the increased contact patch and rollover of a full 29er. I'll happily trade minor minor improvements in agility for the benefits of a 29er. But I also won't tell any internet strangers that they shouldn't enjoy their preferred wheelsize.
  • 3 5
 @KJP1230:
A lot to do with it is bottom bracket height.
If 29ers had the same bb height as 27.5, then that would be a step in the right direction.

I’m not sure why manufs think that 29ers need 350mm heigh BBs when the same travel 27.5 is 335-340mm...

Makes a massive difference on the steeps, and cornering.
  • 4 2
 @Richt2000: My current rig is a 170mm travel full 29er, which I believe has a 345mm bottom bracket. At sag/in compression (cornering), I'd venture a guess that my effective BB height is lower than a 340mm BB, 150mm travel, 27.5" bike - simply by virtue of more BB drop as a result of ~25-30% sag over more suspension travel.

Beyond that, if you're trying to suggest that 5mm of BB height during dynamic riding is more noticeable than 29 vs 27.5 wheel diameter at the rear wheel, I think we're operating from two different planets. Moving the center of mass of a 250 lb (me + bike + gear) system by a couple of millimeters is so unlikely to be noticeable to anyone but the top 0.01% of riders...if that.

Hell, I sometimes do the flip chip to raise the BB 10mm because of all the damn pedal strikes. I can't imagine pedaling over technical terrain with a 335mm BB. Nightmare for rocky areas.
  • 2 0
 @vp27: Don't forget about Ibis with the Mojos! And they do have threaded BBs.
  • 4 0
 @KJP1230: same here man. 6'3" and I love my full 29er personally.
  • 3 0
 I'm just a tad over 5'8" and have no desire for a mullet. Tire doesn't hit my ass anywhere on the 29er
  • 2 5
 @jaydawg69: I suggest you go to a pump track ride a bmx, or just ride a 26" DH bike. Then go back to your 29er and realize you can't handle the bike for shit.
  • 1 0
 @SC3081: Hah yeah! They’re the … Wink
  • 1 0
 @Richt2000: Because there's typically 19mm difference in overall radius between setups for a given tire size
  • 1 5
flag Jordmackay (Jun 23, 2021 at 1:00) (Below Threshold)
 @KJP1230: Have you ridden a mullet? Its nothing to do with the rear getting hung up. If I ever get a high pivot it will also be a mullet. Party in the back is why I ride it. They corner better and that isn't questionable. But I'm glad you are enjoying your full 29er but if you haven't tried a mullet you have no opinion on the matter
  • 3 0
 @KJP1230: thanks for the principled reminder of 29" benefits: rollover and contact patch. Inertia should be there as well. Just because the industry is exploiting these characteristics doesn't mean they're not true. If I were racing I'd go full 29
  • 3 1
 @ceecee: Agreed, and terrific point! You've highlighted one of the reasons I actually run heavy tire and cushcore setup (both front and rear). Firstly, I don't mind the extra workout on the way up. Second, in the words of Creedence Clearwater: "Big wheels keep on turnin'" Smile
  • 3 1
 @Jordmackay: I have demo'd 27.5 and mullet bikes recently. Sticking with my full 29. In fact, I ride with a group of excellent riders, and even my buddy (who is shorter than me AND works at a bike shop) just purchased 2 new full 29ers this year alone.

Glad you like your mullet. But to say "mullets are better full stop" is absurd. See the recent bike checks across EWS and DH - plenty of mullets and plenty of full 29er. And these are folks who have access to any configuration they like. Hell, some of the "full 29er" folks are women and shorter riders!
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: I use the lightest knobbiest insertless 27" tires I can still find. Your setup sounds terrible for trail bonus air lines, but you're still correct!
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: Fair - but as a large and strong rider, I don't mind the extra muscle needed to play with the bike. Additionally, my riding style falls toward the "smashing" end of the spectrum. That said, I've always been a believer that even big bikes are agile, so long as they are going fast enough!
  • 1 0
 @bertbc:
Yea obvs, so why aren’t the frame’s geo to drop the bb back down.

I’ve ridden so many 29 and 27.5 bikes its obvious to me. I loved the 29ers with the low bbs like the evil offering, nukeproof reactor, marin alpine trail, and couldn’t stand ones with a 350+ bb like the pivot firebird. (Actually the firebird 29 was much better with 27.5 wheels dropped down 19mm!)

Stump evo was 325 bb - ripper!
  • 1 0
 @Richt2000: The Stumpjumper EVO BB is 340mm, not 325.

You're entagling very broad "I like this bike" and attribute it to something as specific as BB height. Maybe you didn't like the Pivot Firebird because you didn't like a LOT about that bike (frame geo, suspension system, damper tune, tire choice, etc.)

The fact is, you can only drop the BB so low before it becomes a nightmare to pedal. Most modern "rippers" seem to live in the 335-350mm BB height range, and the effective BB height (the actual height at sag and during real world riding) is going to be highly dependent on suspension travel, rear axle path and sag.

Example: if you ride a 150mm travel bike at 30% sag, with a BB height of 335mm, your effective (on trail) BB height is ~308mm. If I ride 170mm travel bike at 30% sag, with a BB height of 350mm, my effective BB height is ~319mm (assuming similar wheel arcs). This will cause the center of mass of the whole system to be within 5-10mm across both of these bikes. That is SUCH a small difference compared to wheel size, suspension kinematics, suspension tune, tire choice, wheel base, reach, HTA, etc. Hell, you could effectively lower the BB by a couple mm simply by running slightly lower tire pressure or selecting a different tire volume.
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: was talking about the mk1 evo, bb is 328mm to be precise.

Yes I fully understand what your saying and agree to some extent, but I also think you under estimate how many bikes I’ve tested, ridden, owned which when combined is probably coming up to 100 (I used to do a bit of trade). Yes it is definitely personal preference, as it is for everyone - I’m just saying the above from real world experiences and experiments, a lower bb corners better and feels more confident.... unless you live in a very rocky place and are going to ground out all the time / potentially have an off from pedal strikes etc.

[thumbs up]
  • 1 0
 @Richt2000: Serious question: in your experience, does 5mm of BB height make more or less of a difference (related to handling and confidence) than HTA and wheelbase? My hypothesis is that HTA and wheelbase (as just 2 examples) are going to be much more noticeable than BB height, but I have not tested 100 bikes Smile
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230:

In my opinion they all go hand in hand. You don’t say how much difference of HTA and wheelbase to compare so I can’t really answer that, but yea they can make more of a noticeable difference. The other trait of the firebird 29 I didn’t like was it was a relatively steep HTA. When navigating very steep chutes and steering in a catch berm, this combined with a high BB made it feel like the front it was going to fold under itself. If I had been on a XL, with the same BB heigh, the extra reach and wheel base *may* have prevented this feeling. Or had the head angle been 63.5 then again, maybe this would have helped. However same bike with 27.5 wheels, so BB is now 20mm lower, didn’t get any of this feeling of turning under... So in answer to your question - its a combo of all of them.

The evil offering mk1 has very similar geo to the fb29, although a steeper head angle of 65.6 (0.6 steeper) and a lower bb at 338 (10mm lower) and a similar wheelbase. I found this way more confident on the same steep chute.

Currently I’m riding a Nukeproof Giga 275 with 190mm fork, which is longer wheelbase, lower bb and slacker head angle than both, and I’ve never felt so confident :-)
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230:
And yes I can tell the difference of 5-6mm of bb height. I went from a nunkeproof reactor to a 2021 transition scout for my trail bike, and it did feel higher. Obvs I got used to it, but even though the scout is slacker and longer than the reactor, I’m not sure I’m as fast as I was on the reactor!! (Take these bikes to loamy rooty steep off piste, very minimal rocks)
  • 1 0
 @Richt2000: Interestingly, I hypothesize that as your bike gets slacker HTA and longer wheelbase, you may actually desire a higher BB. Take, for example, the most recent 2021 Specialized Enduro. Very long, very slack, very capable, and the majority of reviewers say that the bike is best in the "high BB" position. This raise in BB actually allows for easier direction change, while the bike's supple suspension and long, slack nature takes care of the confidence during cornering compressions and descending.
  • 1 0
 @Richt2000: If you're riding a Giga 275, and you've overforked it to 190mm, your BB height is going to be 353.6mm (I did a quick trig calculation on the vertical rise added from the extra 10mm on your fork, and came up with ~+8.6mm added to the stock 345mm BB height).

This would make your current bike's BB higher than the Pivot Firebird (348mm) in stock configuration, and the current Evil Offering (I know, you are comparing the the mk1) which comes in at 339-347mm.

Again, this leads me to believe that the confidence you are feeling is the result of suspension kinematics/sag, HTA and overall bike geometry...not the BB height.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: no, it measures at 338mm, as the BB height is dropped when the suspension is in the ‘progressive’ mode. Nukeproof neglect to mention that the geo changes between linear and progressive modes.
Don’t worry, I measure everything - I’m a complete geek!
  • 1 0
 @Richt2000: Ha, fair. If you can't tell, so am I! Fun engaging you in this chat.

Personally, and you could probably tell from my comments, I ride a 2021 Spec Enduro and I have found that I prefer it in the "high BB" position. That said, part of my drive there is to avoid pedal strikes. Where I ride is technical and rocky on the climbs, and I ride 175mm cranks - I'm constantly smashing my pedals into rocks.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230:
Supposed to be an amazing bike, I’ve owned a 2017 Enduro 29/6fattie and a 2018 Enduro 27.5. Preferred the 27.5 unsurprisingly!
  • 1 0
 @Richt2000: because that much bb drop would mess with the kinematics of the suspension. Either the 29r has functional suspension and pedalling, or it has similar bb drop to 27.5
  • 61 4
 Definitely not a Session!
  • 14 20
flag FuzzyL (Jun 22, 2021 at 6:21) (Below Threshold)
 No, I really like the look of the new Jekksy… ah… Jeffyl… eh… Jekyll…
  • 10 2
 Different, but look closer the the ol' Glory Hole (sort of)
  • 34 0
 I love the color!
  • 22 2
 the low center of gravity with this low shock and linkage are nice, until you put a full water bottle above it, same as with santa cruz bikes, the enduro etc. but I don't notice the difference with or w/o bottle on my bronson v3, so all this talk about low cog of bike frames is merketing talk imho.
  • 16 0
 I'm also highly skeptical of any CoG talk on a frame that is part of a >100kg system
  • 1 0
 True but I don't remember SC touting lower Cg.
  • 7 0
 If you're "enduroing" isn't your bottle empty by the time you drop in to descend?
  • 4 5
 @Arierep: Yes, it's all BS. Rider body movement is far more important, but at this point, the BS has gone for so long that Goebbels would be proud of it.
  • 1 0
 @briceps: yes because you only do one downhill run a day or you refill after every downhill run. always. oh no it's an enduro run, not a downhill run!
  • 5 0
 @nouseforaname: Godwin's law in action
  • 5 0
 A low COG bike deff makes a difference. Even a moderate rider can feel it in loose gravel. For most riders, they feel it when running heavier tires. There is extra stability because when the weight is low, the bike wants to pivot side to side from the bottom, like a metronome. The tires are less likely to dance laterally. When the weight is high, its more like a swing, where the rotation happens at the top of the bike, so the tires are more likely to be thrown off line by rocks/gravel.

You can really feel this on an ebike, where they are just so heavy that there is little deflection in loose rocky sections.

Where I take issue is that shock placement has a dramatic effect on the CoG. Tubing shape is often more likely to affect the CoG, since air shocks are often lighter than a comparable section of aluminum tubing.
  • 5 0
 @hamncheez:

Plenty to explore in COG, for sure.

But an (200mm long, day) air shock weighs less than 200mm of aluminum bike tubing? Impossible
  • 1 1
 @jonodavis: Well sometimes a lie DOES get told enough that it's accepted as truth. And that WAS one of Goebbels maxims.
  • 3 0
 @AckshunW: no but if the shock is low, the links are low too
  • 1 0
 @AckshunW: Look at that seat tube junction, where it meets the top tube. I bet thats heavier than a non-piggyback air shock. ep1.pinkbike.org/p5pb18698217/p5pb18698217.jpg
  • 2 0
 @Lookinforit: Good point about the linkages.
  • 3 0
 Downhills come at the top of climbs. CG only matters for the downhill. Finish your water at the top and take a piss for a net lowering of your CG.
  • 1 0
 @briceps: haha nice catch
  • 24 4
 Cannondale Add on PB before the official launch.... Genius.
  • 17 0
 Well done Cannondale!! I am on deck! Anyone from the Northeast or any moto heads know the real gravity cavity is at Southwick in Massachusetts! Pin it to win it!
  • 9 0
 Pretty sure Gravity Cavity is at Unadilla in New Berlin, NY. BRAAP!!
  • 1 0
 I was going to mention the gravity cavity on tail of the dragon no better feeling than riding a supermoto through that!
  • 1 1
 I believe the gravity cavity is actually at Unadilla in New York. I could be wrong.
  • 1 0
 @gooded: Indeed, braap.
  • 1 0
 @gooded:
Indeed it is, I spaced out on the late night keyboard.
  • 15 1
 Jeeez. Cannondale finally woke up, huh? High pivot (check), long-travel (check), 29er (sorry mullet lovers...check), hidden shock (check).

Nice looking bike from a brand I often ignore.
  • 5 0
 so a hidden shock is the new thing to have?
  • 1 0
 @generationfourth: Given the layout, I think a recessed shock position that generally protects from the elements is desirable, yes.
  • 16 2
 Cannondale is back.. Big fun on a Idler and I don't care about the drag.
  • 14 1
 WHAT A SIK BIKE!
  • 11 0
 That bike looks awesome! Props to Cannondale for always keeping things a little weird.
  • 11 1
 Good luck getting that shock to survive a British summer, let alone a British winter. The Cannondale open mud bath shock.
  • 10 0
 is this the pinacle of MTB? horst link and highpivot?
  • 4 0
 Sure sounds like a hell of a combo. Definitely want to try one sometime. I've always been a horst link fan over other platforms. Adding in high pivot sounds amazing.
  • 7 0
 What is the performance advantage of putting the shock inside the frame like this? Is this serving any real purpose other than being unique? I'm not buying the "lower center of gravity" bs.
  • 5 0
 why do the axel path graphs for high pivot bikes have differing scales on the axis? That graph is 4 times as wide as the axel path really is - for the 40mm of travel below the sag point, the wheel moves a whopping 4mm rearwards - this is not 'helping the wheel get out of the way' in any meaningful way.
  • 4 0
 Compared to classical Horst Link bikes or single pivot with a way more forward axle path, this could make a significant difference imo.
  • 8 0
 Not calling the gravity cavity Dave's glory hole is a massive missed opportunity
  • 6 2
 The numbers and bike look pretty awesome. The wheelset is very disappointing—the drivetrain much less so, but still someone given the price.

Pants seem to work well on my gravity cavity, so I’m sure that people will come up with solutions if problems arise
  • 9 1
 I’ll happily settle with GX if it gets you the upgrade to Fox Factory at this price point. Unfortunately, $6k is pretty standard for GX builds going into 2022, and most companies aren’t even stocking Grip 2 dampers on those builds, let alone factory.
  • 7 1
 Also, having Code RSC brakes stock is pretty awesome at that price point.
  • 7 1
 Code RSC’s, factory suspension. Tgis is a fantastic spec by today’s standards. All top quality components. Just ride it until the rims fold then replace with something better.
  • 4 0
 @thenotoriousmic: and I think at this point, most people will probably opt for AXS GX over XO1, and since their isn’t a good availability on that for awhile, might as well leave that as a future upgrade for the consumer. But, the new GX is so good anyway, I’d much rather the bike have GX than downgrade brakes or shocks. It’s truly a great build for the dollar.
  • 2 0
 Honestly, at this point getting anything besides frame only is admirable. Have you tried to order anything in bulk for any bike component? You'll get a response, "Yes! Sure! Awesome! Our lead times are 22 months."
  • 6 0
 I like the look, they made some bike moves and changes but the one thing that I don't like is the gap in the frame and the plastic shock cover.
  • 7 1
 Ai Offset wasn't mentioned. It is a disadvantage in my books, as I would have to dish my spare wheels in order to use them on this bike.
  • 2 1
 my guess is they will do away with that once more brands adopt a universal 55mm chain line
  • 2 2
 Funny, the selling point for AI offset was the better chainline. Now you're stuck running wheels with a stupid amount of dish and the chainline still can't keep the bike quiet (not that Cannondale ever produced quiet bikes to begin with)...
  • 3 0
 While I agree that it is extra faff, in reality 1/4 turn loose/tight on the nipples is usually enough to dish the rim quite a lot
  • 4 2
 @Arierep: We're talking more than a 1/4 turn here, these wheels are a full 6mm off center. In most cases that requires swapping out the spokes to shorten them on one side and lengthen them on the other.
  • 3 0
 @m47h13u: I've dished a wheel for a boostinator adapter and it was half turn tight, half turn loose at most
  • 2 1
 @Arierep: Something is definitely wrong with your wheel if you managed 3.5mm latteral movement with a full turn of 2mm thread. Having built AI wheels before I can tell you it's much more labour intensive than half a turn in and out on both sides.
  • 3 0
 @m47h13u: say what you will, but that was the case. Wolftooth actually predict that in their website
  • 1 0
 Question- The reviewer complained about the noise (and possible drag) from the extreme cross chainline in the lowest gear. I've heard others have the same compliant for idler pulley bikes. Could the idler pulley be on a shaft with a few mmm of movement from left to right (with a spring to pressure it into the center or something) so as you move across your cassette range, the idler cog and move a little too? Or maybe put it on spherical bearings so it can pivot a little bit?
  • 7 0
 Man this bike is just all kinds of things!
  • 10 7
 Very interesting looking bike but I see one huge potential issue:

Exposed shock that's recessed in the down tube looks like it's going to get mangled by loose stones.

I have experience with Giant bikes which have that small pocket in the down tube connecting the lower shock eyelet with the frame and these bikes have much bigger pocket with stanchion parallel and getting a stone in there between shock body and inside wall of the down tube could mangle everything.
  • 3 0
 Verrry niiiiice!

Would be amped to see something like this more in the Trail / AM Bike region (think Forbidden Druid).

I love the high pivot bikes, but I'm actually thinking about downgrading from my Propain Tyee to something more suited to my local trails (but with a HPV and the genes to smash it in the alps nonetheless please)

Hope they'll come up with something like this soon!
  • 5 0
 "I never felt the need to reach for the Float X2's blue climb switch" = "I'm not saying it's a good climber, but I'm not not saying that either"
  • 7 0
 This has me excited for what GT has in store!
  • 3 0
 I've always been a fan of the jekyll. This new one looks incredible! Love that paint job. While I'm not a fan of the proprietary technology, I do love how Cannondale does things their own way. Definitely an amazing looking bike.
  • 7 0
 Thing looks fun!
  • 6 0
 Well done @mikekazimer - never let them forget about "over mountain".
  • 2 0
 Why do companies make bikes that are more than 160mm of travel but less than 180? 160 is sorta that magic number for a bike where you can use it for enduro racing, regular trail riding, and bike park laps, and anything above 180 can basically use a dual crown fork and make it a freeride/dh/park bike.... i just don't understand the reasoning for using 165/170 on a bike
  • 1 0
 I also wonder why the industry has settled on 170mm rear travel for big 29ers. Why can't I have that extra 10mm that the 27in and mullet bikes get? I like long chainstays anyway.
  • 6 1
 Mr Hide is the rear shock? Brilliant
  • 1 0
 Is Nukeproof consumer direct? I thought they had some bike shop dealers in the US. I also thought that Chain Reaction was just another dealer who happened to be an online retailer. Can’t seem to order their bikes directly on the Nukeproof website so not consumer direct right?
  • 1 0
 They are not, have to order through a dealer - nukeproof.com/pages/find-a-dealer

IIRC CRC is the parent company for Nukeproof and Vitus...https://www.pinkbike.com/news/dale-mcmullen-ali-beckett-nukeproof-vitus-interview-2016.html touches on that.
  • 5 0
 Another sweet bike to CANNONDALES range
  • 6 0
 Looks cool as hell.
  • 5 0
 I was surprised coz cannondale put BSA bb system....
  • 3 0
 Would it not make sense to have the idler have a tiny bit of float, like a derailleur pulley to make it adapt to the chain line?
  • 3 0
 It would create a mushy pedal feel because the chain on the upper side gets pulled, which in turn would also pull the idler in position of shortest path between chainring, idler and sprocket.
  • 2 0
 @malca: Huh?
we're talking only a little bit of lateral movement, with some sort of bushing. Again, along the lines of what Shimano does with RDs.
Thinking about this more...if the chain over the pulley is under tension from either pedaling or suspension compression...couldn't they design a tooth profile that was more accommodating of the angles involved? It doesn't need to be a full narrow/wide profile for chain retention.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie:
Oh I am sorry you mean a pulley that would adjust to chainline. Yeah that could probably work.
  • 3 1
 Man, would this bike be 40lbs if aluminum or is it able to withstand 10foot drops to flat? Seems really heavy for a carbon bike, and the only reason I might get a carbon bike I have to protect is to drop lbs.
  • 1 0
 You said the small bump was OK. Well at 29% that's not a surprise. Did you go try a slightly lower shock pressure for comparison? On my Transition, 5-10 PSI makes a huge difference in small bump and also the front to rear balance of the bike.
  • 1 0
 "The Giga does feel more precise, though; it felt easier to switch from one line to another, and there was a snappiness to its handling that the Jekyll doesn't possess."

This. Exactly This. When riding my Giga it feels like I can snipe any line. Amazing property of a bike.
  • 2 2
 If you use tire inserts, maybe exo+ is enough? Saves a little weight if you need inserts anyway. I´m about the same weight (72 kg) and I have had problems with dents even I use DD and Super gravity casings at back and 23 psi pressure. @Mike Kazimer
  • 10 2
 Inserts do nothing against cuts and slashes tho
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer Just as an FYI, looks like the geometry chart is messed up, seat angles and standover don't match - might not be your fault, so possibly pass it on to Cannondale :-)
  • 4 0
 Hiding the shock newest industry trend?
  • 1 0
 I'll bet the suspension manufacturers will love it since they can hide a prototype shock out of the way and nobody can see it; media, regular people, or their competition. Hell, I'd encourage it all in the name of some kickass stuff secretly developed in the RockShox or Fox or whoever's Skunk Works...
  • 3 3
 I like the rear shock being much lower on this and some other brand frames for the lower center of gravity. I also hate it because as a guy who does most of my own bike services, that looks like a real problem to keep clean and reduce wear on things like hinge bearings. It's not as bad as the Specialized version. I sometimes think that bike Mfr's are purposely designing in maintenance issues to drive service & parts revenue. This design only adds to this conspiracy theory. Bearing kits are pretty spendy already, plus the labor if I go to a bike shop. If more crud is getting into the cracks & crevices, service becomes necessary more often and thus, more parts revenue to the Mfr and more service revenue to the bike shops, and less riding for me.
  • 2 1
 Unless you’re living in UK conditions, bearings should last many years and it’s easy to pop the seals and service. Full bearing replacement is usually $150 or less. I don’t see this as a big hinderance.
  • 3 0
 @SvenNorske: what? Northern Europe has enough rain to smack bearings out of that frame quickly.
150$ for e bearing replacement? What kind of bearings are that?
  • 2 0
 This is nice and may be my next bike. I’ve seen the cannondale riders use a dual crown fork on this but will it void warranty if I use one?
  • 2 0
 So the Jekyll is muted, even more so than the Giga, but you need more small bump sensitivity, and a softer compression tune or coil? I don’t know, set up issues maybe?
  • 1 0
 Good lookin' bike, but the Spark wore it better when it comes to the Crying Game tucked in shocks. I can see bike techs cursing both models when it comes to extracting the shocks for service.
  • 6 0
 You need a new mechanic if removing a plastic cover makes him curse...
  • 3 3
 What an amazingly stupid combination of external and internal routing. The dropper housing is out at least as much as it's in, and still needs _three_ zip ties! Brake hose needs an external ziptie but would still need a bleed to reinstall... Hooray for worst of both worlds!
  • 1 0
 I won't be surprised if we see this architecture trickle into more bikes in their line. Lots of R&D has gone into this layout...use it on everything ! call it SNAKE-TONGUE
  • 1 0
 "...someone fast forwarded geologic time by a -450- million years so that all the rocks lost their sharp edges."
That's what they did to the entire East Coast (Appalachians)

best Jekyll yet?
  • 1 0
 Soon going to be time for Pinkbike to do a High-Pivot shootout, with the number of enduro/long travel bikes going that way. Would be super interesting to know who has the best approach to the supposed best layout.
  • 12 10
 Looks great, but putting the shock in a bath that will fill with mud and debris make it hard no for me.
  • 8 3
 thats not how it works.
  • 13 0
 My gravity cavity is ALWAYS spotless after a bath!
  • 4 3
 @NorthEasternDownhiller: The shock sits in a box that's open at the top and closed on 4 sides and underneath, and it sits in the path of the rear wheel - you think it won't fill with mud?
  • 9 2
 People said the same thing about shock tabs on rocker bikes and yeah a drop of mud showed up there every now and then, but it never filled up. I think you're worrying about this too much.
  • 3 0
 @honourablegeorge: It's not obvious in the pictures because the bike's green and the photos are shot against a green background, but the plastic guard isn't flush to the underside of the downtube at the sides, only at the top and bottom.
  • 5 0
 @NorthEasternDownhiller: I think we probably ride in very different conditions.
  • 1 3
 @Woody25: saw 4 of the bikes yesterday on my hometrails. They definitely suck debries up. If you don't get that you are really slow or you just have dry conditions all around the year.
  • 1 0
 @Serpentras: Good info, thanks for the heads up
  • 3 0
 i dont like how exposed forks are, im not riding any bike with front suspension anymore!
  • 1 0
 @Woody25: it also look cheap as duck.
As they arrived at the top right next to me I thought what horrible botch is that on the downtube.
  • 1 0
 I bathing with your shock sounds pretty kinky, what else do you do with it?
  • 3 0
 whats that empty room between downtube and downtube protector for?
  • 4 0
 shonk clearance at bottom out i would guess
  • 6 2
 @NorthEasternDownhiller: to suck muds and debris?
  • 1 0
 @Jaemin97: probably airflow my dude. how much do you ride in the mud? sounds like you ride in it a lot.
  • 1 0
 @NorthEasternDownhiller: Bikes dont need downforce to stick on the ground.
They could design the downtube covers that empty space with spare carbons or sth
  • 1 0
 They put it there so you can feed a tire tube through it and store it there. That’s so Enduro!



Or you could just get a little piece of motocross foam and put it there to keep the debris out.
  • 1 0
 You can see from the photos that it's there to allow dirt to exit the frame, otherwise it would build up on the bottom half of the shock cavity.
  • 4 1
 Mamamia that frame is a mud catcher !
  • 1 0
 I live in the south west, so it’s not an issue. Even if I lived in the north west, or England, why would I want to ride in the mud? I never understood that. Haha
  • 1 0
 @FaastEddie:

No one wants to. You don't have a lot of choice. Ride in mud / don't ride at all are the options in the UK for 90 percent of the year.
  • 1 0
 @FaastEddie: In the UK, a lot of the time you have to ride in the mud if you want to ride. You can still have a damn good time too
  • 1 0
 @T4THH: I know. Just messin with ya. ;-)
  • 4 0
 SOOOO AWESOME!
  • 3 0
 If the price is correct that bike is a incredible deal
  • 4 0
 Pure sex!
  • 2 0
 why not cover the downtube completely to prevent mud and dirt from entering??....
  • 2 1
 Overheat the shock
  • 1 0
 @DHhack: scott & bold managed
  • 1 0
 I believe in the review he says that one of the adjustment knobs Is accessed by removing the plastic cover. Wanting to put the shock that low they had to make a compromise, I guess
  • 1 0
 @rafallied: You comparing suspension temperature characteristics of a xc bike with a 165 travel enduro bike that will do park laps all day long? Makes sense on pb I guess…
  • 3 1
 Guess this means the new GT is gonna have an idler too. I pity the groms at the sporting goods stores.
  • 3 0
 "shock cover is east to take off"

What would happen if it was west?
  • 4 0
 *shock ejects itself from bike James Bond-style*
  • 1 0
 If you're going to go with a high single pivot with idler pulley design, why not mount the pivot higher up to maintain a completely rearward axle path?
  • 2 0
 Looks like mud from the rear wheel is going to absolutely fill up the area with the shock like a bowl.
  • 1 0
 May I ask what the tune in the bike was Mike? Looking at getting one myself and would want to try getting the tune sorted out first
  • 1 0
 I'm just saying that this bike in aluminum with rockshox zeb, e1900, nx, super deluxe select and base e*thirteen or race face components would be a beast
  • 1 0
 Truly innovative and pushing the envelope. It's incredible they are such an unpopular company, but the smart guys in my school were always a bit weird.
  • 3 0
 In stock?
  • 3 1
 C'mon @cannondale... Bring back the Super V in a modern guise!
  • 2 0
 I'd prefer the raven. That was nuts
  • 1 0
 i’m a bit curious about the anti squat number, is that calculated in a different way to a non idler bike?
  • 2 0
 Whereas on a non idler bike the chain is pulled from the top of the chainring, making anti-squat values depend on chainring size, in here the chain line comes from the top of the idler cog, so chainring size is irrelevant.
  • 1 0
 In other words. This bike seems to have pretty low anti-squat (less than ideal in my opinion), but if you ran it without idler there would be a lot of anti-squat (definitely too much).
  • 1 0
 So in my opinion the idler should have been put a little lower, for extra anti-squat. But the reviewer does say it sprints well, so maybe it's not so bad.
  • 6 0
 @DavidGuerra: they really should have consulted you first.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: From what I can see it would inded be possible to place the idle lower with no problems. So it's a matter of preference. Now, I can't actually comment on this bike's anti-squat because no anti-squat table has been supplied here. Nevertheless, many brands do go with lower (in my opinion) anti-squat than would be desirable. The former Jekyll is a clear example of that. An argument for low anti-squat is less chain growth and a supposed better suspension performance because of it. It might be that this creates a better impression of their bikes across the wider user group. Personally, I much prefer a >100% anti-squat, with a reduced or inexistent suspension bob when sprinting, that robs the power of every pedal stroke, over the supposed disadvantages of chain growth. I have also expressed this through my consumer preferences, since my current bike is an Orbea Rallon, that has relatively high anti-squat and allows me to run a larger (34t) chainring without going below 100% anti-squat.
  • 2 0
 They put a shock in the SWAT compartment!!?!
  • 1 1
 A c#*k in the twat dept.
  • 5 4
 If your gonna stick a fox factory X2 on a bike I want to see it. Almost takes away from the bike if you cant see it.
  • 1 0
 The geometry table needs to display standover instead of seat tube angles. Bike looks fantastic though
  • 2 1
 Standover is useless, you have the seat tube length
  • 1 0
 @DatCurryGuy: it's a typo on the table
  • 1 0
 What local trails where you riding. I Live in Gig Harbor Washington and always looking for new trails.
  • 2 0
 Gravity cavity sounds like a romantic skydiving getaway.
  • 1 0
 Wondering how it will compare with the 2022 Norco with new linkage that looks just like VPP...
  • 2 0
 Oops I thought it released already
  • 1 0
 All I can say it's high pivot enduro bike and comes with coil in the rear stock
  • 1 0
 Can't wait to see how this compares to the Traffic Cone when it's released tomorrow!
  • 1 0
 Norco Range release will be today I guess. Enduro-mtb.com had the release on their homepage for a few minutes
  • 2 0
 look rad cool, speck wise not so, especially for base model
  • 2 0
 First Cannondale I’ve liked the look of since The Prophet
  • 2 0
 a it more travel would be nice....... but anyway, a great bike concept!
  • 2 1
 Gravity cavity? Should be called a bum hole because you'll be wiping shit out of there on a regular basis.
  • 1 0
 What was the tested size of the bike? 180cm seems like it's between medium and large.
  • 2 0
 Size large. I wouldn't have wanted to go smaller - the 475mm reach on the large worked well for my height.
  • 1 0
 That seat stay looks like it could be flexy since it isn't mounted to the seat tube
  • 1 0
 perfect for those of us that want the look of an e-bike and none of the benefits...
  • 1 0
 So what’s the actual seat tube number? Only publishing this ‘effective’ rubbish is scammy
  • 1 0
 Colours choices Shoulda been C'dale Blue, Red or Black with Yellow Cannondale on the side
  • 1 0
 My guess is that at some point the engineers said: f*ck it, we might as well split the downtube ourselves. Cracking design!
  • 1 0
 Me likey. Can't wait to grow up some day to where I can drop 6k on my rig. I'm 72.
  • 4 4
 So it's a high pivot that only has a rearward axle path for around 60% of its travel? I'll pass
  • 4 0
 Have to concur there. Why bother with an idler if you don't take full advantage of the benefits?

Otherwise, this is a HUGE improvement imo.
  • 4 0
 @IamZOSO: Exactly! As an actual owner of a high pivot bike, I can say why go through all the trouble of having an idler for a marginal rearward path. It seems like they're trying to address a problem that doesn't exist.
  • 3 5
 You assume Dorel made some design decisions here based on logic.
  • 1 0
 Maybe the idea was to keep it a little less velcro'd to the ground and have a bit more 'pop' like it says in the review? Some people still like a bit of fun!
  • 1 0
 This is not high pivot bike. This is a 29er with a "not too low pivot".
You could see these path on a 26" bike with no idler. But it's really standing out from average 29er.
  • 2 0
 @jlauteam1: Possibly. Seems the best solution would be to go vertical after 60% rather than forward. The new supreme protos seem like a good way of dialing in how much path it has and also when it occurs.

IMHO, If I were looking for "pop" I'd rather have a conventional suspension platform and not deal with the idler.
  • 1 0
 @ATXZJ: I agree, but I think it's also good there are choices in between so this is another shade of grey for people to choose from. I think if it was purely a high pivot that acted exactly like others, buyers would just be more likely to purchase based on some other spec like paint colour or components.

I am mostly interested to see if Cannondale will make any headway with their new designs. I was somewhat interested in the Habit but the Ai offset and 29" wheels were just not something I wanted to be a part of lol. I like that they seem to be supporting a few riders that are less/not race focused.
  • 1 0
 I believe the intent of the high pivot is to remove pedal kickback and/or remove chain tension on the suspension so it works as intended. That’s what they been talking about for 20 years since before rearward axle paths were a “thing”. Rear axle path is a secondary benefit, not the main objective.

Quoting Pinkbike here.

“A high pivot can create a rearward path at the axle, which, in theory, allows the rear wheel to more easily move away from, and then over, an obstacle. The high pivot position, however, leads to a lot of chain growth as the axle moves away from the chainring, which will cause a lot of pedal kickback.

But there is a solution - the simple addition of an idler pulley close to the pivot point that routes the chain up and over it. High pivot bikes equipped with idlers have characteristics that are unique: the lack of chain growth, along with the rearward axle path, allows the wheel to float over bumps in a very different way than other designs.”

I don’t think you will notice that 40% of the forward path. ;-)

www.pinkbike.com/news/the-resurgence-of-high-pivot-suspension-design.html
  • 2 0
 @FaastEddie: I understand how idlers/high pivots work. I own one. IMHO, a paltry 11mm max rearward path for 60% of the travel is NOT worth the headaches of having an idler. Bike looks fine but seems everyone in marketing is jumping on the high pivot bandwagon in appearance but lacking performance.

Mind you I haven't ridden this Cannondale, but looking to buy another high pivot, just not this one
  • 1 0
 If the new scott spark had an enduro bike relative
  • 1 0
 It has the looks and weight of what I hope a future e-bike will have.
  • 1 0
 It's wildly more expensive in the UK, £6500 and £4500.
  • 2 0
 Me like
  • 1 0
 I like the mud tub for the shock.
  • 1 0
 Excuse me, I think there's something loose on your bike.
  • 1 0
 KOM trail is the OEM name for KOM Tough
  • 1 0
 Frankly those WTB wheels don't belong on any bike
  • 1 0
 Yay, another overdamped bike, wooo ...
  • 1 0
 this means the new habit will be a 150/130 bike.
  • 1 0
 Where's the Lefty fork, c'mon C'dale!
  • 1 0
 I hope the do a lefty rear end like Ducati! That would be funkaaayyy. Hahaha And maybe some dual front disk brakes while they are at it!
  • 1 0
 75 Degrees Centimeters Stand-over aye?
  • 1 0
 cleaning that shock and frame looks terrible
  • 4 6
 It looks like at a certain point in the travel the shock body will be proud of the downtube, i.e. only the plastic guard between it and rocks. Not ideal.
  • 5 2
 looks like there's room to me.
  • 3 0
 @NorthEasternDownhiller: Looking at the arc the linkage will travel thru I'm not sure. Why else would they make the plastic guard protrude that far? But maybe just for extra clearance if a rock gets between the shock and guard. Kaz should have filmed it going thru travel.
  • 2 0
 @kcy4130: hopefully we get a slow mo! can't wait to see that. We can take a look then. But I think you're right: they added a bit of extra room just in case.
  • 1 0
 Smaak dit.
  • 1 0
 hmmm
  • 1 1
 Move color but unsure about that shock placement.
  • 1 1
 Where the shock left?
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