Review: 2022 Santa Cruz Bronson - Mixed Wheels For Mixed Intentions

Aug 2, 2021
by Matt Beer  

The Santa Cruz Bronson first debuted in 2013 as a dual 27.5 bike, and in the years since has become a staple in the lineup, a team favorite for jib sessions and even some enduro racing. For 2022, the bike underwent the mixed wheel treatment, emerging with a 29" front wheel and a 27.5" rear wheel, and updated geometry.

Despite having a larger front wheel now, the travel remains the same - 150mm of rear wheel travel paired with a 160mm fork. The shorter travel, dual 27.5" 5010 model is still there if you are looking for the ultimate jib toy.

There are six build kits available and frame-only options, with no aluminum frame choice. The complete bikes start at $5,059 USD for the R kit and C-level frame. The creme de la creme XX1 AXS kit with a CC-level frame and Santa Cruz’s Reserve carbon wheels will drain $11,389 from your bank account.

Santa Cruz Bronson Details

• Wheel size: 29" front, 27.5" rear only
• Travel: 160mm front, 150mm rear
• C or CC carbon frame
• 64.5º head angle (low)
• 76.5º effective seat angle
• Size specific chain stays (439mm size L)
• Weight: 14.1 kg / 31 lbs (size L)
• Sizes: XS - XL
• MSRP: $5,059 - $11,389 USD
santacruzbicycles.com


We tested the XO1 kit with a CC frame. This gives you a wireless SRAM AXS XO1 drivetrain with carbon cranks, Code RSC brakes, Reserve carbon rims, a Fox 36 Factory fork, and a RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate rear shock and Reverb Stealth dropper post.


bigquotesThe Bronson V4 has become more capable while maintaining its playful and versatile characteristics. This is truly a bike that could tackle enduro races, jump sessions, and multi-day epic rides. Matt Beer




2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX

Frame Details

The Bronson V4 frame doesn't change that much in appearance compared to the prior version, save the big front wheel. The downtube is slightly steeper because the forward shock mount is lower than before. This does create a kinked downtube, which stands out more due to its enormous volume. I wonder, is Santa Cruz trying to bridge the gap between the look of their eMTBs?

There are no aluminum frame build options, a concept introduced on the previous generation. The choice of the regular C or higher grade CC carbon carries on and reflects in price as you climb the MSRP ladder. The high modulus CC carbon is 200-300g lighter (depending on frame size), even though it's said to offer the same strength and stiffness.

A big change for Bronson lovers is the acceptance of all rear shocks. The shock tunnel has been carved so you can now swap out to a coil shock or an air shock with a larger volume can if you wish.

The internal cable routing caters to those who run their front brake on the right; two ports on the left hand side of the headtube and one on the right. The downtube has a bolt on rubber bottom bracket and shuttle guard, while the chainstay gets the ribbed bumper treatment. The seatstay has a thinner rubber strip and the dropout can use a SRAM Universal Derailleur Hanger.

There are no chainstay adjustments or accessory mounts, but you will find ISCG tabs, a threaded BB, and the lower shock mount continues to use bearings that are guarded by a short fender. The lower link rotates a lot around the shock, so those bearings keep things super supple for a longer period of time than regular DU bushings.

2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX
The Bronson can now accept any air or coil shock options.
2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX
The protection on the stays offers good protection, but the chainslap noise from the AXS derailleur was louder than expected.

Santa Cruz Bronson

Geometry

Geometry is one thing that is expected to change when you build an MX wheeled bike. The stack is 14mm taller on this new frame, but the head tube shrinks from 120mm to 110 in length, obviously to account for the wagon wheel at the helm. Predictably, the reach grows from 459mm to 475, in the high BB setting, which is much for fitting for a size large.

There are five sizes to choose from with the reach ranging from 405mm on the XS to, and 500 on the XL with fixed chainstay lengths altered to match the fit. Santa Cruz achieves this by relocating the pivot placement on the front triangle, so all rear triangles use the same mold.

Chainstays are another measurement to ponder over, as I mentioned they are tuned for each size of frame, ranging from 432mm on the XS to 443 on the XL. Those numbers might seem on the shorter side for you folks hopping on the long chainstay trend, but if you're looking for that high speed stability, maybe the Megatower is the bike you're after.

There is only one adjustment, located on the lower link, to alter the head tube and seat tube angles from 64.7º to 64.5º and 76.9º to 76.5º, respectively.

2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX
This adjustment primarily stayed in the "LO" setting for the types of trails that I ride, with the focus on descending performance.
2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX
The size specific 439mm chainstays felt bang on for the size large frame and suited the snappy nature of the Bronson.

2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX

Suspension Design

Santa Cruz has been fine tuning the VPP suspension for 20 years. They believe this is the best system for the job and have the race pedigree to prove that their bikes can go fast in multiple disciplines of racing.

The travel remains unchanged from the V3 at 150mm of rear wheel travel, but the kinematics are revised to work with a 230mm x 60mm shock, differing from the shorter 210mm x 55mm previously spec’d. Now, the shock tunnel is wide enough to accommodate all air and coil options, with a leverage ratio that works for either.

There is a suspension setup guide on the Santa Cruz website to help you find the comfort and support you are looking for in the Bronson. It's a straightforward chart outlining the sag and shock pressure based on rider weight, and it includes clicks of rebound and compression, as well as the same details for fork setup.

2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX
2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX

Specifications

Specifications
Price $9849
Travel 150mm
Rear Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate
Fork Fox 36 Float Factory, 160mm
Headset Cane Creek 40 IS Integrated
Cassette SRAM XG1295 Eagle, 12 spd, 10-50T
Crankarms SRAM X1 Eagle Carbon DUB 32t
Bottom Bracket SRAM DUB 68/73mm Threaded BB
Rear Derailleur SRAM XO1 Eagle AXS, 12 spd
Chain SRAM XO1 Eagle, 12 spd
Shifter Pods SRAM GX AXS
Handlebar Santa Cruz 35 Carbon Bar, 800mm, 35mm rise
Stem Burgtec Enduro MK3, 42.5mm
Grips Santa Cruz House Grips
Brakes SRAM Code RSC
Hubs Industry Nine 1/1, 148x12, XD, 6 bolt, 28H
Spokes Sapim D-Light
Rim Santa Cruz Reserve 30 V2 Carbon
Tires Maxxis Minion DHF 29", 3C EXO TR, Maxx Grip/ Minion DHR II 27.5", 3C EXO TR, Maxx Terra
Seat WTB Silverado Medium Stainless Fusion
Seatpost RockShox Reverb Stealth, 31.6mm



2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX


2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX






Test Bike Setup

A usual day out on the Bronson consisted of roughly 500m of technical, single track climbing and descending and some machine-built jump trails, all found on Vancouver's North Shore. The conditions have been dry, loose, and faster rolling than normal. I found myself straying a little from my usual downhill sections because the Bronson was so much fun on lower angle trails, but there was still no shortage of rocks to test the bike with.

Although the reach measurement fit me well at 472mm for a size large (in the low setting), it may be on the shorter side compared to what other brands are depicting as a size large frame. This does fall in line with the sizing on the rest of the Santa Cruz bikes, so at least the numbers stay consistent.

The 42.5mm stem suited the Bronson well, but I preferred my usual 35mm length stem and 765mm wide bars for a faster response to steer the large 29" front wheel.

Matt Beer
Location: North Vancouver, BC, Canada
Age: 34
Height: 5'10" / 177cm
Inseam: 31" / 79cm
Weight: 160 lbs / 72.6 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @mattb33r

After some experimentation, I ended up running the SuperDeluxe shock at 150 psi, which equated to 30% sag, with the stock two volume spacers still in place.

It was refreshing to see a Fox 36 again since this fork is plenty stiff and suits the Bronson well. A 38mm stanchion fork wouldn't be a wild choice, but the 36 never held me back. With 88 psi and 2 volume spacers, it matched the spirit of the bike; lively, but with enough muscle to save me from poor line choices.



2022 Santa Cruz Bronson


Climbing

All the shocks used in the Bronson build kits have climb switches, even the base model. The lock out is just that; the shock becomes very firm, so it's best saved for smooth surface climbs. The traction is far superior with the switch open to let the shock do its thing and keep the wheel on the ground. I preferred to ascend with shock open, since the trail conditions have been exceptionally dry and loose throughout B.C. this summer.

There's also the fact that the climb switch is difficult to locate without taking your eyes off the trail. That's not the end of the world if you're going to set it at the bottom and unlock it at the top, but if you're the type of rider that likes to adjust things depending on the position and traction you're looking for it could pose a challenge.

I found the climbing position to be comfortable for my 178cm height, although I did end up sliding the seat all the way forward on the rails to get my hips more vertically in line with my feet. The good news is that the actual seat tube angle measures 72.2°, which is much steeper than the previous Bronson, and when the post was fully extended my center of mass didn't end up too far over the rear wheel. The VPP suspension is active without altering the dynamic geometry wildly, and it keeps the BB high near the sag point. This makes lunges and lurches up and over stepped terrain easier to time because you know where the bottom bracket is going to be, and I didn't have any issues with pedal strikes with the 170mm cranks.

The overall relatively light weight (claimed 13.97kg / 30.8lbs for a size medium) made the Bronson zip uphill. I did notice that I was a little more likely to spin the 27.5" wheel on my typical climbing route compared to the bikes with 29" rear wheels I've been riding lately - it was a little easier to overpower the DHRII's grip and get it to break free on the loose, dusty trails.

2022 Santa Cruz Bronson
2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX
The Bronson rocketed up my usual climb route and the smaller rear wheel didn't hold me back from cleaning all the cruxes. "Cheat mode" - the climb switch is a nice addition to the budget friendly build kits, but it's a little tricky to reach on the fly with a water bottle installed.

2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX


Descending

There’s no guarantee that this bike will make you link rutted turns like some of the 50/01 crew, but the small rear wheel is undoubtedly easier to change direction. It might not have the same "bump eraser" feel of a full 29er, but this bike wants to party. I found myself looking for different ways to ride the same old trails, basically searching for any bank or bump to carve up or pop off.

The girthy downtube has a sturdy feel without rattling your teeth loose. The ride is definitely on the stiffer side of the spectrum, but that has its merits. Large G-outs are handled well. It tracks true and unwanted frame flex, keeping your body from wiggling left and right. Even with the carbon rims, I didn’t find myself getting bounced off line in rough, off-camber sections or feeling fatigued more than normal on extended descents.

The small bump traction is decent, and the bike remains composed in the mid-stroke, letting you push into turns and compressions in anticipation of the next trail feature. The bike can be ridden by any level of rider comfortably and confidently. As mentioned in the climbing section, the dynamic geometry doesn't change radically. The Bronson goes a good job of not dive too deep into its travel, but those smaller square edge hits do have a tendency to slow you down more than I anticipated.

It wasn't so much the smaller rear wheel getting hung up, but more the suspension taking a little bit of time to get into the mid-stroke. I did experiment with the air pressures and clickers to try and find a solution. I started out with the shock at 157 psi, for 27% sag, but quickly changed this to 150 psi. The firmer setup was a little too harsh over repetitive square edge hits. The bike never settled into the sweet spot, despite increasing the fork pressure to keep the balance front to back. Once the rear shock was sitting at 30% sag, the suspension performance improved overall. The dynamic geometry came to life and I could stay light over stutter bumps, but still get the support I needed to push the bike into a corner or pre-load a jump. I only found the very end of the travel on large hucks, even with two volume spacers, the stock configuration.

It did seem like the ideal window for shock pressure is relatively small; a few psi here or there can make a big difference in how this bike rides If I was spending more time on the Bronson, I would try jumping on the "trail bike with coil shock" bandwagon for their better break away compliance - I have a hunch that would have created the shock feel I was searching for.

Like the positive suspension traits, the 64.5º head tube angle has a role to play in this ability to move the bike around quickly. It's slack, but not that slack, which will help the bike's geometry suit a wide variety of rider types and riding locations. It's worth mentioning that Santa Cruz chooses to mold integrated headset cups into all their frames, which optimizes construction. That's hard to fault, but it does take away the ability to install an angle adjusting headset for those riders who want to do some geometry modification.


2022 Santa Cruz Bronson
Santa Cruz Bronson
2021 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO review
Specialized Stumpjumper Evo

How does it compare?

This bike goes toe-to-toe against the Specialized Stumpjumper Evo with its similar travel and angles. The geometry is almost identical when comparing the S4 size to a size large Bronson. Although I rode the Stumpy in a full 29” setup, it can be converted to an MX wheel setup. This paints a picture of who these types of bikes are for; the rider who loves all day missions, covering a wide variety of terrain, but also blasting off side hits on the trail.

The Bronson feels a little more solid, both in frame flex and suspension support, lending to a more lively feel with almost a BMX snap response to it. I wouldn't say that the Stumpy is a flexy bike by any means. It's a very comfortable ride. The more linear suspension did have less support in G-outs through berms and pumping terrain, plus bottom outs were mildly harsher. That FSR suspension took care of the square edge bumps like butter, but it may need some tinkering for those riders who are sending it deep.

One thing the Stumpjumper has is that safe sense of riding “in the bike” ride, likely due to the greater BB drop and being below both axle planes. The ability to ride short or long chainstays, tweak the head angle, and have a choice of either wheel size out back are strong selling points for the Stumpjumper. Some may argue that more adjustments add complication, but Specialized has a well formulated geometry calculator and terrain guide on their website to help you find the perfect balance.


2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX
No missed rides. These rims took a licking.
2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX
The stronger, the better. Codes were the right call for the Bronson.

Technical Report

Santa Cruz Reserve 30 rims: The rims had their fair share of impacts and haven't missed a beat. I even had to stop and inspect the bike after an unsuspecting rock made a horrible noise. To my surprise, the rim and tire was intact like it never felt a thing. The spokes are still evenly tensioned and even with the lightweight, foldable tires, they never burped. The wide 30mm internal width produces a square profile to the Maxxis Minion DHF, which I prefer, to sense the shoulder knobs engaging sooner. They have left me impressed for a 490g weight of the 29" rim.

SRAM XO1 AXS drivetrain: This was my first long term test of SRAM's high end wireless shifting. I wanted to dislike the system because I am still a fan of a good old mechanical system, but its reliability and robustness is hard to argue with. Even after a few knocks, the shifting still performed perfectly and adjusting the trim is easy. It's hard to argue with the clean look of one less cable and the battery life is incredible.

SRAM Code RSC brakes: I was stoked to see SRAM's Code RSC brakes on the Bronson, since they have a great power to weight ratio. I do like a brake with a bit more power to progress through the stroke, but they were predictable and reliable. An easy upgrade would be a 200mm rear rotor. The weight difference is only 46g more than the stock 180mm. The front brake does the majority of the work to slow you down, while the rear controls the direction at times. So, you end up dragging the rear brake more and ultimately it heats up just as much or more than the front.

Maxxis EXO tires: Tires are subjective to riding style and terrain. I was impressed that the lightweight EXO casing tires survived the whole time I was testing the Bronson. They endured some nasty shralps and sharp rocks without a burp or a hiccup, although they did bounce and roll a lot when you get them up to speed on hardpacked trails. A more supportive casing like the EXO+ would calm that feeling down and be more suited for the Bronson.

2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX




Pros

+ Didn’t lose its character with 29 front wheel
+ Tailored chainstay lengths per size
+ Supportive suspension
+ Stiff, but not rigid frame

Cons

- Square edge compliance could be better
- Limited geometry adjustments
- More chain slap noise than expected


Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesSanta Cruz has evolved the Bronson to keep up with what riders demand from a do-it-all bike - it can be mild-mannered, but it's there to back you up if you get in over your head. I had a blast finding new lines on my usual laps and enjoyed the nimbleness of the MX wheel setup. Take the time to dial in the rear suspension and you'll be rewarded with a 150mm bike that can go bigger and faster than you'd expect. Matt Beer







235 Comments

  • 231 7
 Who in their right mind would pay nearly $7000 CAN for a bike with Sram NX on it when you can get any number of well made aluminum frames and much better components for less money?
  • 91 12
 People are obsessed with carbon. I can say after owning, riding and racing an alloy demo 29 for a year I don't miss carbon at all.

100% agreed.
  • 64 77
flag ream720 (Aug 2, 2021 at 8:38) (Below Threshold)
 @z-man: it's almost like lightweight matters more for pedaling up hills lmao

"my full alloy 50lb downhill bike was sick, screw carbon trail bikes"
  • 166 1
 @ream720: NX cassette weight offsets carbon frame weight savings pretty quickly.
  • 9 70
flag IF-OBA-WILLS-IT (Aug 2, 2021 at 8:52) (Below Threshold)
 @k2enemy: "pretty quickly"? Does it or doesn't it? genuinely curious.
  • 72 5
 Aluminum seems to be becoming more and more preferable over carbon lately. Not only for the fact it's cheaper, but bc most people can't tell a significant difference. People are starting to realize geometry, specs and suspension design are more important than frame material. Plus you don't have to constantly worry about every single rock that dings off your alu frame. Spending an additional $1k to save a pound is just not worth it especially with the major inflation going on in the bike industry rn. Not to mention the bottom tier specs coming with a $5k carbon bike...
  • 21 1
 @ream720: Comparing DH bike to trail bike?? If you actually compare apples to apples, there is generally a 2lb difference in weight between alloy and carbon trail bikes. After just switching from carbon to alloy based on geometry (Banshee doesn't produce carbon frames) I can tell you that 2lbs isn't that much if you do your homework on the bike you're purchasing -- fit and geo matter more.
  • 12 0
 it's a rather simple equation that heavier rotational parts = significantly heavier feeling and acting bike. unless youre asking whether there are weight differences between drivetrain tiers; another thing you can find very easily on the internet
  • 6 0
 @stumphumper92: Yea, before long, aluminum bikes are going to start costing just as much as carbon bikes from 2 years ago.
  • 25 0
 Santa Cruz builds cost more than a frame + aftermarket parts.This is crazy, but on the other hand those are just bikes for people who can afford them. And there is no denying that they are very popular, which means that they are priced right for their intended target. Fortunately we live in great times and we, the poor, can buy cheaper but equally good bikes.
  • 3 4
 Someone brainwashed by marketing
  • 18 1
 You can get any number of well made CARBON bikes and much better components for less money
  • 18 3
 So over at Vital (the non-Outdoors bike website) they just reviewed the new Trek Session, and said "Trek states the change in material was driven by their World Cup riders' feedback and need for more frame compliance."

So as far as I understand, the greatest factor in frame stiffness isn't the material (carbon, aluminum, titanium, steel, etc), but the tubing geometry. Steel frames are more compliant not because steel is a more flexible material than aluminum- the truth is the opposite. Its because steel allows for more compact tubing geometry.

So carbon can be made into pretty much any shape/local geometry you want, and you can even lay up the fibers to tune the flex of members independent of local geometry (the only way to do this in metal is with oval tubes). So why aren't more bike companies doing what Scott does and make compliant carbon frames? Seriously, just use smaller tubes with thicker sidewalls. Or does the impact susceptibility of unidirectional fibers require so much protection that you end up with too large tubes and too stiff bikes?
  • 18 2
 People who want a new trail bike right now and these are readily available on the sea to sky that's who. Any of the bikes you mentioned are nowhere to be got or there is months and months of waiting.

2018/19 second hand Nomads etc are being sold for the near same money it was a no brainer for me. It is expensive absolutely and I'm bankrupt but I'm f*cking stoked I got a new bike its a hoot to ride. Components are not the greatest but that doesn't bother me as Im going to trash them the same way I would if there was higher end it Im not going loose sleep over a broken NX mech.
  • 3 0
 I would imagine it’s because they are heavily invested in their carbon research and it’s a high end material for a high end brand?

They have a lot more freedom of design with carbon.
The Downtube on these new run of bikes is massive. It looks aggressive , plus that gold is fantastic in person
  • 2 3
 The demo is such a harsh ride and weighs a metric shit ton. @z-man:
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: SC used to use exactly what your talking about, thicker smaller tubes for impact resistance. It was specifically mentioned on the first v10 carbon they made the downtube extra thick and smaller dia for impacts, it actually ended up way thicker than necessary and they later thinned it with same dia on the next variation. They’ve since gotten larger and thinner and that especially true on the new 5010, Nomad and Bronson and coming from an N2 to N4 and now N5 taking the N5 to Downieville and hearing rocks hit under and sounding so loud and hollow it is a little nerve racking. one rock flew up and I was sure it cracked the tube but it was ok. So far so good but it is now noticeable how much thinner the tubing is and doesn’t have the muted ride the N2 and even N4 had. Still rides great though.
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: so true! My carbon propain tyee cost 4400 € with code rsc, lyric ultimate and rear rockshox ultimate damper.
  • 3 0
 @lkubica: "we the poor can can buy cheaper but equally good bikes". I disagree I think you can buy cheaper and much better if you buy smart. It's a win win
  • 19 0
 When analyzing weight sprung vs unsprung mass must be taken into account. It's not just a game of making sprung mass less, but rather a game of ratios. A high sprung mass compared in conjunction with a low unsprung mass is ideal. That is why moto bikes typically have better working suspension. This means a heavy frame is not a detriment compared to a heavy drivetrain. A bike with a lighter cassette and derailleur, but heavier frame will track better than a lighter frame with a heavier drive train. That is why a carbon frame with a shitty NX drive doesn't make sense.
  • 3 2
 @ZSchnei: what's hilarious is that I was pointing out the irony of someone else saying "my demo 8 is all alloy and I'll never look back at carbon" in the comments of a trail bike article. I guess more than one person missed that.
  • 2 0
 @z-man: i dont get the obsession either bitd it was a case of oooh how light or ooooh how cool now theyre built like panzer tanks and every chuff has one
  • 4 1
 Vitus will sell you a carbon framed enduro bike with Shimano XT, Fox Factory and DT Swiss 1700 for less than CAD7000. So it's not the carbon that makes these things expensive...
  • 2 0
 @ream720: I did notice that comment and admit that your comment went over my head.
  • 2 0
 @Jesse221: I was looking to buy a used Nomad and a disturbingly high number of ads said something like, "brand new front triangle [from rock strike]."
  • 11 11
 I’ve been preaching how overpriced this brand of bicycles has been for years.

I take a lot of heat on here for saying their frame design is dated, bikes are under spec’d, overpriced and then throw in repurposed, repainted frames from year to year.

Santa Cruz is a total joke.
  • 5 4
 My 2021 Commencal Meta AM 29 has a better frame design, better part spec and was $4800 CAD.
  • 14 0
 Better parts spec not frame design @lastminutetech:
  • 1 0
 For example, the Raaw Madonna 2 frame set was once more expensive than the Santa Cruz Megatower CC frame set. It was a post-season discount, but I wonder why I should opt for expensive aluminum when I can have the same expensive carbon. I feel that the manufacturers are sure that they will withdraw money from us in any way they can.
  • 2 1
 @digger01: You cannot compare prices of butique brands to SC. They make much much less bikes so the cost per unit is simply higher. SC on the other hand makes a lot of bikes but price them as they would be a boutique brand (so in the end SC earns much more than say Raaw on a single unit). When I want to drop a considerable amount of money for a fancy bike, I would rather give those money to a smaller company.
  • 3 1
 if you can pay 7k changing cassette to correct spec no issue
  • 1 0
 @z-man: Mannnn, how good is that Demo. I switched from a carbon YT and it's so much nicer to ride. Was blown away. Metal is the absolute business.
  • 2 0
 @ZSchnei: all good bro
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: did you mean non-Outside?
  • 1 0
 @k2enemy: no kidding. I wish the Nx cassettes weren’t permanently welded to the bikes.
  • 2 0
 @freeridejerk888: i find theyre too short and too steep. But hey if you need to buy a SC for whatever reason go for it. Its like buying a BMW 328. Sure, nice car but you can get a much better ride for less….and without the dirty brand that goes with SC & BMW
  • 1 0
 @Starsky686: because of the free hub, you have to change your rear wheel or rebuild it with a different hub ( and spokes, and nipples...)
  • 5 4
 @lkubica: Santa Cruz is as much a boutique bike brand as ford is a luxury car manufacturer.... They are a mega company offering over priced, over marketed bikes... As one person mentioned to me, buying a SC is like buying a beer with more foam then liquid!
  • 2 0
 @k2enemy: Plus the cassette is rotational weight. Don't forget the shit wheels on many cheap bikes that add tons of rotational weight.
Really the big joke is that the reviewer calls this bike relatively light. Since when did 30+ lbs become light lol? Santa Cruz bikes are way heavier than they should be and way more expensive. Orbea is lighter and offers better value. My 2019 Scott Genius is only 26 lbs with good tires too--now that's light for a 150mm trail bike! Plus the remote lockout is great.
  • 2 0
 @Mr-Monterey: relative to rim, tire, and insert, cassette is not contributing significantly to rotational weight since it is so close to axis of rotation. It is, however, unsparing weight, which is worth considering.
  • 1 0
 @skidusty: ok, edgelord.
  • 1 0
 @lastminutetech: i dunno mate isnt rob roskopp is worth 12 million or something ? if i could sell my bag of sand to the arabs and be worth bank then i wouldnt see it as a joke commercially, granted however the product might be to you an a whole other informed people
  • 106 1
 Anyone else miss the days when a new Bronson meant a new Ratboy video. they were good times.
  • 122 12
 I sadly miss even more the times when ratboy sounded like a fun dude instead of posting brain dead conspiracy bull***. (Also applies to some others in the 50to01 crew)
  • 7 1
 @Greghoin: what conspiracy bull? Genuinely curious
  • 4 1
 @Greghoin: Whats going on?
  • 15 0
 Remember that Blur TR video? That was class.
  • 40 5
 @Nasum: @pipomax: he posted a photo with 'wave patterns' for brain activity during different situations. the last one being a flat line and the description 'believing in the virus mutations' or something like that. Blow was a text box saying 'you have to be braindead to believe in this' or something like that.

might've fallen on his head or something lol
  • 28 0
 @waldo-jpg: He’s done some drugs. He also doesn’t have any formal education in the matter. Personally, I wouldn’t turn to someone like that for medical advice.
A lot of my mountain biking heroes are really just that…
  • 1 0
 @Greghoin:
the he's my boy !!!!
  • 4 1
 @Greghoin: he's awesome to watch on a bike but if his views on other stuff offend you more than his riding impresses you then I guess you'll sadly miss him.
  • 1 0
 @erikkellison: agreed. same situation, maybe even more drastic in bmx
  • 2 0
 @waldo-jpg: Maybe he meant to say it doesn't take much brain activity to understand that organisms mutate? Or a no-brainer as they say? I thought only Christian fundamentalists reject the concept of evolution theory. If the consequences weren't so severe, the current situation would make for an interesting school study. Vaccinate the majority of a population with a vaccine that works against most mutations and watch the mutation which the vaccine is least effective against become dominant. That's how Darwinism works. Have only a few different "threats" to a species (in this case, a few different vaccines as a "threat" to the virus) and the mutations that are least affected will survive and become dominant. I doubt Josh would disagree with the concept of genetic mutations. I don't follow social media but I have watched videos of Josh riding bikes and he seems like a wise man.
  • 1 0
 @waldo-jpg: it was a joke, he even said so in the next side. He said it was about learning to love each other despite our differences and different beliefs. Please don't misrepresent his position.
  • 4 1
 @hamncheez: oh the irony. i was merely the messenger conveying the information of what i had read in his storypost. Dont misrepresent my position.
  • 3 0
 @waldo-jpg: What's the use of a messenger who presents the message out of context?
  • 39 6
 Love the bike (and color). Wish it was still full 27.5" wheels though
  • 21 0
 Just do what I did and buy a Nomad. Climbs great and is just bananas on the downs.
  • 7 0
 @ascotsmanrides: Exactly. My buddy has a nomad and he loves it. I still would like the shorter travel range though. I personally would get the nomad but I know people who would rather ride a 27.5" bronson.
  • 18 0
 Just bump the fork travel and put a 27.5 wheel on there.
  • 1 1
 @Joecx: True, good idea. By like 5-10mm of travel? But that would be a 170-150mm trail bike. The handling would be all jacked up right?
  • 4 0
 @noakeabean: Not really, I've been on a part time MX set up for my last three bikes, For the tight local trails I run a 27.5 with the fork set at160mm and for the faster, steeper trials 29 with150mm. Both work great for the conditions I use them on.
  • 2 0
 @noakeabean: Get a higher stack crown race - www.ebay.com/itm/262344350511
  • 1 0
 @djjohnr: was gonna say the same thing except I don’t know if I’d trust that one (looks a little funky) but I believe king has taller crown races for their headsets.
  • 2 0
 @noakeabean: I have a v3 with a 170mm fork. It's awesome.
  • 1 0
 @CaptainVonAwesome: So sick!! Any pics?
  • 2 0
 @Jesse221: I have a couple of them, work fine. They're pretty simple components.
  • 1 0
 Just cascade link and over fork a 5010… then it’s literally the travel numbers and modern geo Bronson
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: Great Idea
  • 1 0
 @noakeabean: not at all. Consider enduro guys are racing 150mm rear with 170-190mm on the front.
  • 37 7
 Looks like a fifty-tall-mega-high-nomad-bron-boy. Did I get it all?

Khmm.. That was a shit joke even for the first time, can we now just appreciate how good this thing looks?
  • 13 0
 Looks like a S.........anta Cruz
  • 28 4
 "Square edge compliance could be better"

Pretty sure all twin-links/mini-links and their variants have this weakness. Kind of comes with the territory.
  • 9 1
 Yeah, gonna have to compromise on one of the metrics, either climbing prowess or plushness.
  • 9 7
 Sounds more like the shock tune is a tad off to me with the new lower leverage ratio.

Needs/wants and EXT.
  • 7 1
 @tacklingdummy: yep. I have two different 150/170 enduro bikes. one is a VPP(not SC) one is a modified horst. the small to medium bump compliance on square edge hits is night and day between the bikes, but the bigger stuff it's all kind of the same. the VPP based bike is an excellent climber, the horst climbs like it weighs 15lbs more than it does. lol
  • 9 1
 @Krispy-at-Go-Ride: Don't we all (want an EXT).
  • 2 0
 My old Switchblade rolled up square edges like they weren’t even there.
  • 3 11
flag mtb-scotland (Aug 2, 2021 at 9:26) (Below Threshold)
 @chakaping: nope
  • 4 0
 @chakaping: @Krispy-at-Go-Ride I've been riding an EXT (front and back) the last month, and ya the hype is real. On a very linear frame (only 4% rise) with a normal, non-progressive coil and I have the same support as an air shock with all the spacers in there, but the endless grip that a coil provides.
  • 11 0
 A lot of that can be fixed with a better shock. That shock isn't good. The old Fox DPX2 wasn't good either. The new one is much better but personally... I'd run a Float X2 or a coil. Coil on that bike will help with that small hard edge a LOT.
  • 5 0
 It's the shock, I had the same feeling and switched the rockshox to a float X2. Night and day difference!!
  • 5 1
 @onemanarmy: yep, my first upgrade to my Megatower was to remove the Super Deluxe and install an X2. Completely different feel to the rear end.
  • 1 1
 @mtb-scotland: I know you just want a Mezzer lol
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: I have a Storia V2 myself, on a single pivot Orange - it's not night-and-day better than an X2, but it's definitely got an edge in some situations (wet roots, off cambers, going very fast). The most notable thing is that it doesn't have a classic coil feel, it doesn't insulate you from the trail at all.
  • 1 1
 @chakaping: Doesn't offer anything more than what I have already other than the HBO.

Mezzer wouldn't fit on the back plus I have one already Razz
  • 1 0
 @mtb-scotland: tell us about the time you tasted one then
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: tasted what?
  • 2 0
 @mtb-scotland: my EXT is delicious. Tell us what you thought when you rode one though.
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: I have not used one. My current shock does what I want so no, I don't want or need an EXT (or any other shock for that matter).
  • 1 0
 @mtb-scotland: You said it doesn't offer anything more than your existing shock, not that you don't want anything more from it.
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: yes it doesn't offer me anything. I am extremely happy with my current shocks performance. Another shock is not going to help with anything.

why are you being so defensive about a shock lol
  • 1 0
 I wouldn't ever pay full price for EXT, but hands down it is the best suspension on the market. It is noticeably better than anything else I've ridden.
  • 17 3
 You need to spend 7 grand to get something that isn’t severely compromised someplace in the spec. And even then they cheap out and give you a lower level shock. 6 grand gets you garbage 370 hubs and performance level suspension.

Santa Cruz is still over building their carbon, especially the C level frame. I guess you could see it as a good thing, but they are still too heavy.

It’s a fun bike, but I have a hard time putting down close to ten grand on one. Is this the future? Or an evolutionary dead end on the way to something else? Santa Cruz has to many dentist types they don’t want to piss of and won’t take any kind of great leap forward.

Good luck getting one anyways. By the time you actually get it something better will be out.
  • 16 2
 As a SC owner, they make very high-quality, well thought out frames. Yes, they are overbuilt and a bit heavier, but I would much rather that + a great warranty/customer service, than having a flimsy frame. Go to the Evo forums and see how many people have already cracked their frames, which are paper thin at the downtube. It's a bike that writes cheques it's carbon layup can't cash.

With that said, the value proposition has gotten out of control. You can often buy a frame + MSRP on the parts on the full build for cheaper… lol wut? They know people walk into the store and want a “SC bike” so they will bear the markup on the components as well. The other infuriating thing is they nickel and dime you on every component. A 200mm is $6 more than a 180… DT 370, but no ratchet LN…

Anyway, I would go SC again, but I would build up a frame and would need a discount on it as well. No way I’m paying $5k cad for a frame.
  • 4 0
 @splitlit: Agreed.

I've owned 4 SC bikes, but I bought them all as "frame only." I know exactly what I want, and many times I'll be moving some existing parts over.
  • 5 1
 True the 5010 frame is built like a brick shithouse to protect it from all the cased jumps the 50:10 wannabe crowd manage to do!!
  • 7 0
 @splitlit: This is true of all manufacturers. Do you really see $10k in the sum of parts for any bike... S-Works, Yeti, SC, TR?

Frames in the the $3500 range can be built up with high end parts for $6-7k... the same components the manufacturers are including in $9-10k offerings.
  • 1 0
 @krka73:

This exactly.
  • 1 0
 @splitlit: there was a test on mtb news with the new megatower, where the cracked the downtube without noticeing.
www.google.com/amp/s/www.mtb-news.de/news/santa-cruz-megatower-enduro-vergleich-test/%3famp=1
I also own a 5010 cc and am very happy with the bike. I just bought the frame and got a huge Rabatt on the price, but still the frame was so expensive. Frame my point of viel the bikes are war too overprieced. Well made indeed but too expensive.
  • 1 0
 @splitlit: I go with SC because of the quality; its definitely there. The quality is appreciated when you work on bikes yourself. I bought the base aluminim model bronson in 2020 and consider it a great value at $3.5k. Its a mega shred stick.
  • 1 0
 @splitlit: @splitlit: Hey, man -help me out. I'm cruising some Evo forums and Ctrl + F-ing the words "crack" and "break" and there's been no mention of any such events on the places I've looked. Where did you see this?
  • 1 0
 @rbruhns: There was a picture of the downtube thickness on the mtbr thread and a lot of comments/discussions on the overall durability of the bike, but all of those posts were deleted, including my posts. That's all you need to know really...

Shame, because I was super excited about the bike.
  • 3 0
 @splitlit: bro, she goes to a different school, that's all you need to know. /s
  • 14 1
 "the trail conditions have been exceptionally dry and loose throughout B.C. this summer."

I wish I could say the same about the UK... We can send you some rain if you like.
  • 15 0
 @fartymarty yes please! We’ll take some rain.
  • 4 3
 quite a general statement about the UK having rain this summer. Been great when I am.
  • 3 0
 @mtb-scotland: yup, another nice toasty ride today
  • 3 1
 @mtb-scotland: it hasn't down in the south. Sorry thought you guys were have as shit a summer as we are.
  • 5 0
 We'd gladly take some here in California. Our trails have been completely blown out for months.
  • 6 0
 @onemanarmy: years, really
  • 1 0
 @babathehutt: we had a couple months of decent dirt over winter. Ha.
  • 2 2
 @fartymarty: nope - been great for a change. Dry and dusty trails are a bit of a novelty.
  • 1 1
 Where have you been living? It’s been raining this weekend other than that it’s been 25+ Degrees for the last there months. Even now the trails are still loose stone and dust.
  • 3 0
 @onemanarmy: The largely overlooked east coast has had a very solid balance of temperature / precipitation. Also, we have water and such. Plenty of flow to be found, but it’s a tech-rider’s paradise in its least processed form. Rocks and water > anything lacking water lol
  • 11 0
 I think a comparison of the Bronson versus the new Patrol would have been better. Both are mullet, similar travel, similar geometry and similar rider intentions.

However, when you look at the cost, you can either get a
-Carbon NX Bronson for $5050 USD, OR
-Aluminum XT, Factory Patrol for $5600 USD

It kinda becomes a no brainer.
  • 4 0
 I was in the market for a new trail bike and wanted a mullet. Was looking at Patrol, Bronson, Stumpy Evo and Forbidden Dreadnought with Ziggy link.

Patrol XT build was a no brainer on value. Fox Factory, full XT build, XT 4-piston brakes. They don't screw around on spec, DT Swiss 350 w/ 36t ratchet, OneUp dropper and bash/guide, 165mm cranks, real Schwalbe tires etc.

Definitely heavier than the Bronson especially with aluminum frame but way better spec value.
  • 13 0
 Good review, but wish there would have been some commentary about the ride vs. the old Bronson.
  • 5 0
 I was hoping to read more of that as well.
  • 7 0
 same. Convince me to replace my 2019
  • 8 0
 "but the small rear wheel is undoubtedly easier to change direction"

This wasn't entirely the experience of the testers when they tested this a couple years ago. No one mentioned the increase in nimbleness or ease of change of direction when talking about the handling.
www.pinkbike.com/news/video-are-29275-mullet-bikes-faster-than-29ers.html

@Matt how was the MX setup when jumping? Anything you liked/didn't like about mix wheels there? I think a lot has been made about the "speed" etc but I'm more interested in the fun factor of a MX setup (if its true) vs straight 29er
  • 1 0
 upvote, same here. Thinking of changing my Nomad V4 to Spindrift Mullet - I am pretty sure it will be faster but will it be the same fun factor? How will it behave on technical jumps where you need to change direction etc
  • 1 0
 Mullets jump much easier than full 29ers. In my experience it's easier to stomp the jump face. The timing feels more consistent. The lighter rear wheel with reduced gyroscopic force allows you to whip, table and move the bike much easier too.
  • 1 0
 @Purpledragonslayer: but how do they compare to 650b? Everyone compares MX vs 29 but not 27.5. Is it worth a switch from 27.5?
  • 1 0
 Just came off a test ride with the new Bronson. And have tested a few other mullet setups too (SJEVO, GG). I own 27.5 bike, and also tested several 29er. I think in general mullet jumps better than full 29 or full 27.5. It's better than 29 due to shorter stays and height/leverage with the rear axle. I find it better than my full 27.5, because of the higher stack, requiring less vertical pull on the front.
  • 10 0
 VPP will forever hold a place in my heart... good job SC...
  • 8 1
 Sick bike. If you are gonna have just "one" bike, that rig is one of the best tools for it. Best setup for majority of riding. Can get you to the top of the mountain and can just bash going down.
  • 2 0
 Yup. Considering this or the Stumpy EVO
  • 4 0
 @MikeyMT: i bought an EVO over the weekend, really dig it so far. The same shop had the Bronson on the floor as well. If i were buying a bike on looks alone, totally would have been the Bronson. The gold looks MUCH better in person than i would have thought. So hawt.
  • 2 0
 @MikeyMT: I had one of these on pre-order but while I was waiting, found a Stumpy Evo and I couldn't be happier with my decision. The build kit you get on the Evo blows the Bronson out of the water, even more so on the 2021 before Specialized raised the Evo's price by $1k. The adjustability is great to have and I like the option of being able to run full 29 or a mullet if I want.
  • 1 0
 I think the Nomad is more versitale. It can still climb, probably not much worse than Bronson and you can take it to DH tracks too Wink
  • 6 0
 “ The internal cable routing caters to those who run their front brake on the right; two ports on the left hand side of the headtube and one on the right.”

huh? right hand back brake and shifter enter on left side, left hand dropper enters on right side.
  • 1 2
 Brits....
  • 3 0
 @onemanarmy: right but the bike doesn’t cater to them any more than another bike. it’s a standard setup.
  • 5 2
 @onemanarmy: or anyone smart enough to realise you should operate your most important brake with your dominant hand?
  • 3 0
 A devious underhanded play to force brit/aussie/kiwi owners to go wireless no doubt.
  • 1 1
 I have this bike and can confirm there is defiantly some bad cable rattle from the front tringle!
  • 1 0
 @ConnorM21: agreed, I've been on mine in the alps for the last two weeks and it's driving me crazy!!! Will investigate further when I'm home this weekend as I think I may have a fix
  • 7 0
 I’m confused here’s talking about a “budget friendly option” with climb switch for over 5k?? When did 5k not get you a climb switch?? That’s always been an option in 2k bikes.
  • 1 0
 @f00bar: ha to be fair I don’t think many bikes need it. I have never used one unless it’s a super long fire road climb. And VPP is far from being a good climbing bike. Any DW or Switch bike kills VPP in climbing efficiency.
  • 2 1
 @andrew8404: DW sucks downhill, it's all about priorities
  • 8 1
 When you buy a drivetrain that costs 1200$ and the quality differs from one unit to other, is this even acceptable in other industries?
  • 6 2
 that's nothing.....go to Specialized and drop $6000 in a whole bike and have that be true! lol
  • 2 0
 @conoat: Can't deny... New enduro is a disaster
  • 2 0
 @Noeserd: what’s the deal with the spec enduro?
  • 1 0
 @Afterschoolsports: It cracks like crazy
  • 1 0
 @Noeserd: ouch. That’s no good. I would hate to have finally found a bike in this current desert of a buying market, spend big S dollars, and have it crack on me.
  • 2 0
 @Noeserd: this! also, it's the first bike I beleive that was made in Spesh's own new plant. they got some growing pains I think.
  • 2 0
 @conoat: Feels more like a design problem to me tbh, cracks are always in the same spots
  • 2 0
 @Noeserd: I have seen a couple places that crack a lot. right in front of the BB and the chainstays, most commonly drive side.
  • 2 0
 @conoat: Tons of headset cracks, check the enduro owner club on facebook
  • 1 0
 Yeah if they’re consistent in location, that’s a design issue. Someone messed up the fea/simulation. Composites simulation is a really tricky business. It’s quite easy to mess up and end up with completely wrong information. I know at work some of our simulations didn’t translate into real world part behaviour. The whole aerospace industry is full of similar stories. Boeing is going through huge issues right now with the 777x development where the fuselage and wing failed the ultimate load testing.
  • 5 0
 Why bother including a flip chip that changes the head angle by 0.2 degrees, and the seat tube angle by 0.4 degrees?

That change in head tube angle is so minuscule as to be completely negligible. I seriously doubt that anyone could, would or should notice the difference. Doesn't seem worth introducing a flip chip that offers almost no adjustability.
  • 1 0
 Suspension kinematics and pedal strikes
  • 3 0
 @jeremy3220: I'd be curious to learn more about the alteration to suspension kinematics, but the changes to the geo are so teeny tiny I don't think they amount to much of anything.

-3mm in BB height, -3mm in reach, +2mm in stack. Just grab a ruler and look at how insignificant 2-3mm is.

You're telling me that there are riders out there who care about a 0.2 degree HTA change and 3mm of BB height? Who are these people? I want answers. Smile
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: If your pedal strikes a rock by 3mm or less you might care, or more accurately if three mm of clearance allowed you to smack your pedal slightly less hard which allowed you to not crash you might care?
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: I have a Tallboy and have experienced first hand that it makes a difference. The pedal strikes are definitely noticeable. It's not just the static geo change but the leverage curve is more progressive in the low position so the initial stroke is softer. It's for fine tuning the feel of the bike. I much prefer that over the attempt at "two bikes in one" approach which had big compromises each way. You're changing the front triangle orientation so there's no free lunch, it makes way more sense in the real world to use it as a fine tuning tool.
  • 1 0
 @jeremy3220: Which position do you ride in most? Hi or Lo?
  • 5 1
 Is anyone really surprised it looks like an e-bike? Companies have slowly aligning aesthetics for years. I think they don’t want their riders to suffer the stigma of “that’s obviously an e-bike.” Why? Perhaps to unify all riders under a brand/consistent aesthetic, a la Evil? Perhaps to evade enforcement of e-bike bans at most trails.
Personally not a fan of all bikes looking like they have motors.
  • 8 1
 If matt beer doesn’t need 38mm stanchions then neither do you!
  • 3 0
 ...unless you're 20kg+ heavier than him?
  • 2 0
 I'm on previous version Bronson and really wanna try the MX out. I've never wanted to go full 29" just cause I have shorter legs and like the playfulness the smaller rear wheel affords. Worried I'd butt-buzz a lot on steep slabby stuff too.

Also wow 150 psi in the superdeluxe - I run 190 in mine and weigh the same as Matt. I do like a bit stiffer suspension (and it doesn't feel great at low speed) - but the support it gives when pumping at high speed is nice. SC suggests 175 psi for 160 lbs / 195 psi for 180 lbs.

Also how are those i9 budget hubs? Weird that they only spec hydra on the highest built.
  • 4 0
 I run the 1/1 hubs on my enduro bike and Hydra on my DH. Iv'e never had a problem with either and they are actually really similar with both great quality
  • 6 0
 I run Hydras and 1/1 hubs. My next wheel set will probably have 1/1s because they're cheaper and the engagement is still excellent.
  • 6 0
 New shock is 230 x 60mm. Bigger can, lower pressure--longer shaft, more chainslap? 150psi for 160lbs. Cascade link is a worthy upgrade for Bronson.3, but expect to add at least 10psi to current pressure. Considering a B.4 Medium is longer than a B.3 Large and that Beer is using a short stem and narrow bar, and is at limit of saddle rails, I'm not sure frame size is optimal
  • 2 0
 @ceecee: Ah good point. Thanks!

New Bronson suggestions from SC:
160lbs (72.6kg) 150 psi 16.5-19 mm
180lbs (81.8kg) 175 psi 16.5-19 mm
  • 2 0
 Matt Beer with a name like that.....a PB brew guide would be a great series. Highlighting excellent pubs that are a very short distance from trailheads. I can think of a couple in Albuquerque along Tramway near the foothills trails. We certainly don't need more bike reviews.
  • 4 0
 Saw one at the shop this week. Pretty stoked to finally see bikes coming out with downtube's wide enough to smuggle bricks in. I mean, not for me, but for my friends.
  • 2 0
 Picked mine up a month ago. The gold is awesome in the flesh. Lots of compliments on the trail. The super deluxe was pretty decent but swapped to a DHX2. Love the feel of the bike. So far ridden Pano, Revie and Whistler bike parks. It rides great. The MX wheel set up allows it to track really well in the corners. It climbs well, but suffers ever slow slightly on stepper technical sections compared to a 29er. Loving this bike so far.
  • 2 0
 Dunno if this is your first bike review on PB @mattbeer, but if so it's a very solid start.
You convey a good understanding of the ride feel and the bike's foibles and character. Something your much-more experienced colleagues occasionally overlook.
  • 1 0
 He knows a female nut, how suspension goes through the motions, and that 35mm long stems resolve steering problems
  • 2 0
 @chakaping Yes, this is my first review, but I feel like I have been critiquing bikes since day one. You are right. The difficult part is translating what you feel into words.

Thanks for the kudos! I think all of our tech editors are great and have their own groove.
  • 15 14
 Santas are so boring these days even Matt Beer can’t make the review interesting.

They all look the same, the colors are all variants of vomit and just differ in what you ate before, the geo gets a tiny bit longer and slacker every iteration but still relatively conservative, and they’re overpriced as hell. The perfect dad bod vehicle.
  • 5 1
 As a dad who likes SC bikes, I'm offended! I think they look great, but you have me questioning whether it's because I'm old. Thanks man.
  • 1 1
 @zamanfu: I really don't like SC bikes, bad colors, crazily overpriced, however they do ride great which is annoying and probably part of why they can get away with these prices (kind of), decently long slack bikes that still have fast handling that communicates quickly, I'd still never buy one but they are good bikes.
  • 4 3
 "The good news is that the actual seat tube angle measures 72.2°" that's better but not good news.... Hard pass on SC/ most brands till they get that STA steeper. I wonder when the day will come when everyone stops slamming their saddle forward so you're not sitting on top of the cassette. Some day we will get to use saddle rails properly....

Good looking bike but must suck to climb anything steep
  • 2 0
 I switched from a slash 29 to a Marin with a 78STA, its a revelation in climbing, I'd never buy a bike that doesn't have this, Zero fat bikes with this as well a real shame.
  • 1 0
 Us with long torsos and shorter legs proportionately to their height can slide their saddles back.
  • 3 0
 For what it's worth despite my bike being carbon (less the wheels) it is still damned heavy being an XL. Makes me wonder just how much heavier an Aluminum version would be.
  • 2 1
 27.5 wheel in front is going to obsolete soon. Once companies have mullet specific geometry like this bike, it is over. The only thing holding back the mullet was the hacked geometry of a converted 29er or 27.5. 29 in the front is just better.
  • 1 0
 All the aluminum vs carbon talk is fine. And I would ride aluminum without problem. But until the average person has no preference for carbon it makes resale of aluminum bikes difficult.
I tend to flip bikes every one or two years. Carbon always makes resale easier. ( even if it shouldn’t)
  • 2 0
 I put a MegNeg on my Bronson V3 and it was 1000% a game changer. Seems like that could help with the small bump compliance and rigid feel that the reviewer mentioned on the V4.
  • 1 0
 Same! The tune of the Super Deluxe Ultimate? was never right. Putting a MegNeg can on the shock completely changed the bike.
  • 1 0
 I’ve been riding mine for a month now. Put an X2 on it after 2 rides. Mixed suspension drives me CRAZY.

This bike would have been SICK with adjustable wheelbase like the megatower.

This bike rips. I love it. DHX incoming. They’re right about the rear getting hung up on repeated square edge. Solution: do push ups.
  • 2 0
 The previous Bronson also got hung up on square edges. I attributed this to VPP. I assumed all VPP bikes get hung up like this? It’s like the bike sagged into the edge and never popes up and over it, it just stayed sagged in and got hung up. Wasn’t fun riding that day (It was a demo bike I was trying out).
  • 2 0
 Pink bike: " bikes shouldn't have geometry adjustments, just make the slack low setting the only setting ". Pinkbike's latest review: docs the bike for lack of geometry adjustments.
  • 3 0
 @mattbeer A 9point8 Slacker Kit can be used to adjust Head Angle on frames like this.
  • 2 0
 If I'm reading between the lines correctly: you weren't that stoked on this bike.

Also, I wish more bikes had bb height flip chips like stumpy evo!
  • 3 0
 Stoked to have Matt Beer reviewing bikes on here. Is he the fastest reviewer to date on the site?
  • 3 0
 Excited to see Matt Beer write this up. These are words we can trust. Great job Matt!
  • 4 0
 24 up front 29 in the back. The real party mullet
  • 1 0
 Sounds good.. farthing mullet FTW!!
  • 1 0
 Actually make that a reverse farthing mullet… I misread your comment
  • 3 0
 I am always amazed at how popular SC bikes are given that I have never read a review of one that is particularly glowing.
  • 3 0
 Say what? The Nomad V5 and Bronson V3 reviews were both really good.
  • 2 0
 The tallboy 4 also got a good review here.
  • 1 0
 un error...... what a long long long stem???
"The 42.5mm stem suited the Bronson well, but I preferred my usual 35mm length stem and 765mm wide bars for a faster response to steer the large 29" front wheel.""
  • 3 0
 I love my 2014 Bronson and I'm sad I'll never be able to afford another.
  • 1 0
 Santa Cruz Boss: Hey guys, what's a cool new bike color?
.
.
.
Santa Cruz Minions: That villain form the movie Sin City has a nice skin color.
.
.
  • 1 0
 is it just me or are people far less excited about SC these days when compared with some of the brands getting around (even non-boutique ones like commencal)??
  • 9 7
 Got to be one of the best looking bikes there is!!
  • 2 0
 More Yellow Bikes, please!
  • 2 0
 thats a nice yellow. only a few can get it right like that.
  • 3 1
 Shameless plug - someone should buy my 2020 Bronson! So plush, so fun!
  • 2 0
 Test rode the new Bronson recently...Good Job Santa Cruz. Stupid Fun
  • 2 0
 Beer is such a badass last name
  • 2 0
 Would love a Alum version
  • 1 3
 Showroom honda Crf450 cost LESS than bronson cc reserve by 1500 bucks. Mucking around with some gold colored pedal toy OR roosting softball size rocks **uphill**and travel that will swallow trail features whole at 60 mph then float triples on a supercross track. Gimme a break. I hate to be the guy that says the emperor has no clothes...
  • 2 0
 Well written. I like beer.
  • 2 0
 I would say take my money but I don't have enough
  • 2 0
 Moto brakes FTW!
  • 1 1
 How progressive is the frame? It sounds like it might be too progressive for your weight.
  • 3 0
 There probably isn't a production bike in the world that's too progressive for Matt Beer's riding prowess.
  • 2 0
 Nice, Intense review...
  • 2 0
 Looks like a…Nomad?
  • 2 0
 Like my nomad anyway (Zeb 29er up front - 170) except with 170 rear travel.
  • 1 0
 thats a killer greedy deal
  • 1 0
 Girthy...
  • 1 0
 Looks like a…Bronson!
  • 1 0
 I miss Kaz reviews
  • 1 3
 Santa Cruz are truely status bikes offering poor performance for high cost... Like others have mentioned there are way better options out there!
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.029529
Mobile Version of Website