Review: 2022 Scott Spark 900 Tuned AXS - A Hidden Shock & All the Integration

Aug 25, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  
Scott acquired a majority share in Bold Cycles back in 2019, and at the time they stated that the two companies weren't going to crossover on research and development. Two years later the launch of the new Scott Spark clearly shows that wasn't entirely true, since the Spark now shares the same hidden-shock suspension design that gives Bold's bikes such a distinctive look.

Along with hiding the shock in the downtube, a feature that's found on both the carbon and aluminum models, Scott also gave the Spark a dose of the longer and slacker treatment. There are two versions – the race-oriented RC model, and the trail-oriented 900 model that's reviewed here. The RC and the 900 share the same frame with 120mm of rear travel, but the 900 gets a 130mm fork and a slacker head angle thanks to the orientation of the angle-adjusting headset cups.
Scott Spark 900 Tuned AXS Details

• Wheel size: 29"
• HMX carbon frame
• Travel: 120mm (r) / 130mm fork
• 65.8-degree head angle
• 437.5mm chainstays
• Weight: 25.3 lb / 11.5 kg (size L)
• Sizes: S-XL
• Price $9,999.99 USD
scott-sports.com


Scott offers an enormous range of models, with prices starting at $2,800 USD for the aluminum Spark 970, and going all the way up to $14,000 for the very high-end Spark 900 Ultimate, which uses an HMX SL carbon frame, a SRAM XX1 AXS drivetrain, Syncro's Silverton carbon wheels, and Trickstuff Piccola brakes.

The 900 Tuned AXS I've been riding sits one rung down, with a still-tall $10,000 price tag and an HMX carbon frame. The build kit includes a SRAM X01 AXS drivetrain, Fox Factory suspension, and Shimano XTR 4-piston brakes.



bigquotesThe new Spark is a tech climber's dream machine, with a blend of quickness and stability that makes it easy to pick apart those rocky and rooty puzzles. Mike Kazimer


Scott Spark 2022 review

Frame Details

No matter what your thoughts are on hiding a shock inside the downtube, there's no denying the fact that the Spark has a very sleek, very modern look. There's also plenty of room for holding two water bottles inside the front triangle, a plus for anyone planning on leaving the pack at home and heading out for a long ride.

Scott took the integrated cockpit concept a step further on the new Spark by running the brake, dropper post, and suspension remote housing through the headset, rather than through ports in the side of the frame. That probably helps knock a few extra grams off the frame weight, but the downside to this design is that it's not easy to swap out stem spacers, or the stem itself for that matter, which means it takes much more work to opt-out of the stock cockpit setup than it would on a more traditional setup.

Scott Spark 2022 review
Scott Spark 2022 review
The shock is hidden behind a plastic door on the bottom of the downtube.

Scott Spark 2022 review
The port on the seat tube is used to access the upper shock bolt, or to see how far the o-ring moved on your last huck to flat.


Geometry


The Spark's geometry falls right in line with what's starting to become the norm for this genre of bike, with a 65.8-degree head tube angle, 437.5mm chainstays on all sizes, and a 470mm reach for a size large.

The Spark's seat tube angle measures 76.4-degrees on the size large. The seat tube itself is fairly long at 490mm, and the max post insertion is 225mm, which means that riders hoping to run a dropper longer than the 150mm version that's spec'd could potentially be out of luck.


Scott Spark 2022 review

Suspension Design

The secret shock compartment is the main talking point about the new Spark, although the suspension layout itself is a fairly typical link-driven single pivot with flex stays. The shock can be accessed via a plastic hatch at the bottom of the downtube, and there's also a port on the side of the frame that's used to access the upper shock bolt.

I've seen it mentioned that this port can be used to check sag, but that's incorrect. The shock is oriented upside down, so the only thing you can really tell by removing the rubber plug is whether or not you've used all the travel – the portion of the shock where'd you'd be able to measure sag isn't actually visible. Instead, indicators on the frame and upper link are used to determine sag.

As you may have noticed, the Spark has the latest version of Scott's TwinLoc system. A lever underneath the bar makes it possible to toggle the shock between full travel, 80mm of travel, and fully locked out while simultaneously firming up the fork. The lowest lever is for the dropper post. It sticks out a little further than the lockout levers in order to prevent mistaking one lever for the other, but I'll admit my thumb accuracy wasn't always on point - I occasionally firmed up the shock when trying to lower the dropper post.... More on that in a bit.



Specifications
Price $9999.99
Travel 120mm
Rear Shock FOX NUDE 5T Factory EVOL Trunnion
Fork FOX 34 Float Factory Air / Kashima FIT4
Headset Syncros - Acros Angle adjust & Cable Routing HS System
Cassette SRAM X01 XG1295 / 10-52 T
Crankarms SRAM X01 DUB Eagle Carbon crankarm 55mm CL / 32T
Bottom Bracket SRAM DUB PF 92
Rear Derailleur SRAM X01 Eagle AXS
Chain SRAM CN X01 Eagle
Shifter Pods SRAM GX Eagle AXS Rocker Controller
Handlebar Syncros Fraser iC SL DC Carbon 0° rise / back sweep 8° , 760mm
Stem 60mm, integrated into handlebar
Grips Syncros Pro lock-on grips
Brakes Shimano XTR Trail 4 Piston
Wheelset Syncros Silverton 1.0-30 CL
Hubs DT Swiss Ratchet
Tires Schwalbe Wicked Will 29x2.4" EVO Super Race
Seat Syncros Tofino 1.5 Regular Titanium rails
Seatpost FOX Transfer Factory, 150mm



Scott Spark 2022 review








Test Bike Setup

The Spark's integrated handlebar and stem means there's no way to adjust the bar roll, so that's one setup step that I didn't need to deal with. I typically run a 40mm stem and 780mm bars, but in this case I left the cockpit setup alone due to the hassles that swapping things out would create. I also wanted to give the bike a fair shake in its stock configuration – as it turned out, the 760mm bars and 60mm effective stem length ended up working pretty well for me.

I ran 87 psi in the Fox 34 fork, with two volume spacers.

Getting the shock set up is a little trickier due to the fact that it's hidden inside the frame. There's a sag indicator on the seat stay that lines up with a mark on the seat tube to help make things easier, which works, but I ended up extending the indicator mark with a Sharpie so I could eyeball it while seated.

Me.
Mike Kazimer
Location: Bellingham, WA, USA
Age: 38
Height: 5'11" / 180cm
Inseam: 33" / 84cm
Weight: 160 lbs / 72.6 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @mikekazimer

25% sag equated to 170 psi in the Fox shock, a number I later decreased to 160 psi to achieve 27% sag.

Testing took place in Bellingham, Washington, during an especially dry summer. There were a few damp days in the mix, but overall conditions were a mix of moondust and hardpack.

Scott Spark 2022 review

Climbing

The new Spark is a tech climber's dream machine, with a blend of quickness and stability that makes it easy to pick apart those rocky and rooty puzzles. I rarely activated the fully locked-out position that the TwinLoc remote offers, but the middle 'Traction Control' setting saw a lot of use. In that position one of the air chambers in the shock is closed off, effectively reducing the rear travel down to 80mm. It gives the bike an even more efficient feel, while still providing enough traction to keep the rear wheel gripping the ground. Even with the suspension fully open the Spark has plenty of get-up-and-go, thanks in part to its overall light weight.

I mentioned before that the cockpit setup differs from my typical numbers, but I ended up getting along just fine with the fit of the bike. While the Spark's reach has grown 10mm from the previous version, the seat tube angle has also steepened. That gives it a shorter top tube length, which makes the seated pedaling position feel less stretched out, even with a 60mm stem.

The seated climbing position isn't as upright as the positions you'll find on many newer enduro bikes, but it's also not a stretched out and hunched over XC race setup, which helps the Spark remain comfortable on flatter and rolling sections of trail, or when grinding up a steep logging road for a couple thousand vertical feet.



Scott Spark 2022 review

Descending

That quick handling that the Spark exhibited while climbing is also present on the descents, which makes navigating tight switchbacks a breeze. Technical trails with a moderate gradient are where the Spark really shines, the types of trails where maintaining momentum is more about picking the best line rather than simply letting off the brakes.

The Spark feels fast, but there's also a level of calmness to its handling that's a departure from what you'd find on a full-blown XC bike, which provides more time to correct a poor line choice. Diehard XC racers may turn their noses up at the idea of a sub-66 degree head angle on a bike like this, but I'm convinced it's the way to go. I never found myself thinking “If only the head angle was steeper,” no matter which way the trail was pointing. Plus, even with that fairly slack geometry there is a limit to what the Spark will let you get away with - this isn't the bike to pick if you're planning on trying to rocket down the roughest descents as fast a possible. It is fun to try and find that limit, though, riding on the line between control and chaos, that point where the tires are just barely hanging on, and everything becomes a blur.

That sub-26 pound weight makes it extremely easy to get the Spark airborne, but it isn't what I'd call a 'poppy' bike. It feels best with both wheels on the ground, pumping the terrain to gain speed rather than trying to catch air off of every little bump. I opened up the rebound a little quicker than usual in an attempt to add a little zip into the Spark's manners, but that didn't really do much to wake it up.

I started off with the suspension set to 25% sag, which gave the bike a firmer, more efficient feel at the cost of some small bump sensitivity. I eventually settled on 27% sag, which gave the Spark better traction in chunkier terrain. I'm sure I used all the travel on more than one occasion, but there wasn't any clanging or jarring impacts when that occurred.



Scott Spark
Cross-country Field Test 2020
Transition Spur

How Does It Compare?

I currently have a Transition Spur as my personal bike, which made it easy to do back-to-back laps between it and the Spark.

When it comes to geometry, both bikes sit in a similar realm. The Spur with a 120mm fork has a 66-degree head angle and a 480mm reach, while the Spark with its 130mm fork has a 65.8-degree head angle and a 470mm reach. The Spark has a slightly steeper seat tube angle of 76.2 versus the Spur's 75.9-degree angle, a difference that's easy to compensate for by the sliding the seat forward or back on its rails.

The Spark's claimed frame weight is nearly a pound lighter than the Spur's, at 1999 grams vs. 2450 grams. Both bikes will feel nice and light if you're coming from a burlier trail or enduro bike, but it's worth a mention for all the gram counters out there.

Even though the geometry numbers are pretty close on paper, there are distinct handling differences out on the trail. The Spark's TwinLoc system makes it possible to give a firmer suspension platform, and that combined with the lighter weight gives it the edge over the Spur on the climbs. I was more likely to stand up and sprint in an attempt to beat my personal best climbing times on the Spark, while the Spur has a slightly more relaxed, neutral approach to climbs.

Even with a 60mm stem the Spark has a more compact, nimble feel, which makes it easier to get through tight, awkward ascents. If you place a high priority on technical climbing performance, the Spark takes the point in that department.

It's when the trail tips downhill that the Spur really comes to life, with a blend of playfullness and stability that the Spark can't match. Don't get me wrong, the Spark is very capable, but the Spur takes things up a notch. I was much more comfortable in the air on the Spur, while the Spark's manners encourage more of a wheels-on-the-ground approach. Some of that could likely be adjusted with a shorter stem and higher rise bars, but all that integration makes that a tricky procedure.

Overall, I'd say the Spark is 60% focused on the climbs and 40% focused on the descents, while the Spur has those numbers reversed, with more of the focus on the descents, despite having only 120mm of travel.

The $3,300 Scott Spark 960 Black

Value

No matter how you look at it, $10,000 is a ton of money for a mountain bike, and this isn't even the top of the line model. The good news is that Scott's lineup runs deep, and includes a huge range of build options.

Which one offers the best value? Aluminum is going to be the way to go if you're on a budget, and in that category the $3,300 Spark 960 Black gets my pick. It has a Shimano Deore 12-speed drivetrain (other than the XT derailleur – I really wish product managers would up-spec the shifters rather than derailleurs), Shimano M510 brakes, a RockShox Judy fork, and an X-Fusion shock. It's a solid, workhorse build, and one that could be upgraded with nicer components further down the road. I would have preferred to see a Fox Rhythm fork over the Judy Silver, but that fork doesn't enter the lineup until the carbon Spark 930, which retails for $4,500 USD. The 960 Black does weigh nearly 7 pounds more than the super-fancy model reviewed here, but you'll also have $6,700 left in your bank account.


Schwalbe's Wicked Will is a fast rolling rear tire, but it can get a bit drifty as a front when conditions are dry and dusty.
Quarq's Tyre Wiz remote pressure gauges have a blinking light that provides a visual cue to let you know if your tires are at the right pressure.

Technical Report

Schwalbe Wicked Will tires: The Wicked Will tires are an appropriate choice for the Spark given its speedy intentions, although the Wicked Will isn't my favorite front tire when conditions are loose over hardpack - that's when it has a tendency to abruptly lose traction while cornering. The tires are fast rolling and can handle a relatively wide range of conditions, but I did end up sticking something a little meatier up front in an attempt to find some extra grip in the very dry and dusty conditions. In this case, it was a Specialized Butcher Grid Trail tire, which worked very well, but riders who don't want to mix hot patches could accomplish something similar by going with a Nobby Nic or even a Magic Mary to boost the Spark's capabilities in looser terrain.

Quarq TyreWiz: Might as well keep the gadget train rolling, right? I'm not opposed to Quarq's TyreWiz pressure monitoring system, but since I already use a floor pump with a digital gauge I don't think they're all that necessary. Maybe it was just the thing to make sure the Spark hit that $9,999.99 pricepoint? In any case, they do work, and you can check your tire pressure trailside on your phone, or verify that they're inflated to your ideal pressure by looking at the color of the blinking light. Green = good, fast blinking red means they're overinflated, and slow blinking red means they're underinflated.

Chain noise: The Spark isn't the quietest bike, especially in rougher terrain where there was more chainslap racket than I expected. I've found that some AXS derailleurs seem to clutch less than their non-motorized counterparts, and the Spark's big downtube also amplifies noises.

Scott Spark 2022 review

TwinLoc Tangent: Scott keep tweaking and adjusting their TwinLoc system, and yet all of the incremental changes still aren't enough to sell me on the concept. Honestly, it's not the idea, it's the overly-complicated execution that frustrates me. I can't really envision a day when they'll release a bike without any remote suspension adjustments at all, so barring that, here's my ideal scenario:

The dropper post lever should be in its typical position, located underneath the left side of the handlebar. That way it's easy to reach, with no other levers to confuse things. Next, for the suspension control I'd like to see something along the lines of a Zirbel twister with two positions – open and traction control. There's no need for a full lockout – save that for the XC race version of this bike. In this configuration it'd be almost impossible to mistake one lever for another, and you'd still get the extra efficiency benefits of being able to firm up the shock.

What about the fork? I don't think it needs to be connected to a remote at all. It's not as if the 120mm Fox 34 bobs up and down wildly on the climbs without one, and ditching the remote means that the superior Grip 2 damper could be used instead of the FIT 4.

While I'm griping, I'd also like to see at least one version of the Scott pushed further into the aggressive trail realm. Something along the lines of what Rocky Mountain has done in the past with their BC Edition bikes, or Specialized with their EVO models. Give the Super Spark some slightly beefier tires, wider bars, and a shorter stem and it would still be a relatively light weight trail bike, but even more capable in the techy stuff.

Ok, rant over.




Scott Spark 2022 review





Pros

+ Excellent technical climber
+ Good geometry for all-around speed
+ Futuristic looks and room for two water bottles


Cons

- Integrated bar / stem and headset cable routing makes it more difficult to customize setup
- TwinLoc system creates a cluttered cockpit
- Chainslap noise is loud in rougher terrain




Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesScott have cooked up something really interesting with the new Spark. Sure, I have some gripes about the TwinLoc system and some of the other frame features, but I can also appreciate that Scott decided to do things their own way and created a bike with its own unique flavor. At the end of the day, the actual ride performance is what matters, and in this case the Spark is extremely enjoyable, especially when it comes to covering a lot of varied terrain as fast as possible. Mike Kazimer








240 Comments

  • 187 4
 Next they'll hide the forks, then the wheels, until it becomes the invisible boat mobile
  • 77 0
 Sounds like a fun project for Dangerholm.
  • 3 0
 yea probably it just has to look cool and they will
  • 52 0
 I’ll sell you a fully integrated invisible bike for $10000 my account details will follow shortly and I will send it to you ASAP
  • 2 1
 ok milkmaid man
  • 5 3
 muhmuhmuhmuuuuuh-muhmuhmuuuuuuh-muhmuh muhmuhmuhmuuuuuh-muhmuhmuuuuuuh-muhmuh muhmuhmuhmuuuuuh-muhmuhmuuuuuuh-muhmuh MAAAAAAAAN RAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYY
  • 14 0
 @enduroNZ:
Money transferred. How will I know it's arrived?
I'm so excited, finally a real product that doesnt make me feel ripped off. Man I love the internet!
  • 6 0
 Holy crap Levy must be so pissed he didn't get to review this @mikekazimer.
  • 6 0
 @WasatchEnduro: didn't he wind up in hospital with anaphylaxis last time he touched a twinloc lever?
  • 10 0
 If I had this spec bike, I would want the frame to have a window so ppl could still see my blingy Kashima shock.
  • 2 0
 @baldybrucetires: You're the kinda guy who buys a bike rack just because it has a Kashima coat lol
  • 1 0
 @cgreaseman: pshhh your bike rack doesn’t even have kashima bro?
  • 124 2
 If someone would’ve told me when I was young how expensive and awesome mountain bikes would be now, I definitely would’ve been a dentist
  • 18 1
 Luckily the rest of us can still access that performance in a lot of cheaper brands. My Giant Reign 29 is still probably my favourite bike, and I’ve been lucky enough to ride a bunch of high end super bikes.
  • 16 0
 @notthatfast: Exactly this, bought a used Reign from a PB listing for 2k that does everything and more I ask of it, up and down the mountain. Sure, an $8k bike would be nifty but not at all necessary.
  • 11 3
 It's never too late to learn how to invest your money.
  • 10 1
 Just take out a second mortgage on your house. That's what I did!
  • 13 0
 Dentist $$$ only matters if you can get a bike. My Scott dealer told me to take a hike when I asked about getting one of these in 2022. I wish someone would have told me bikes would be unattainable so I could have been a Kazimer
  • 4 0
 I’m still on my trusty old 27” Giant Trance with an over stroked coil shock and saint brakes, I’ve ridden so many new bikes from Ibis, Norco, Specialized, Marin, Merida, Polygon, Scott, Commencal etc etc and although there some good takeaways from a few of them, I’ve definitely not felt anything worth $8k+ that it would cost to upgrade to a new bike with similar spec… looks like I’m stuck with my bike for another 5 years unless I want a downgrade in spec
  • 5 2
 It’s the tech bros that seem to dominate the high end bike market. $10k is nothing for a bike when you strap it to your $170k Sprinter van conversion. So much expendable cash when your stock options mature.
  • 1 0
 @notthatfast: totally. No need to pay for nino Schurter salary
  • 55 3
 You have to re-cable the entire bike to adjust the stem height? Are you kidding me?
  • 11 3
 buyers for this are looking for an xc ripper not downcountry, slammed stem would be the norm.
  • 53 0
 That seems like a relatively minor inconvenience when you consider that you have to buy a new stem and handlebars to adjust the bar roll
  • 17 1
 They thought of that. You can simply flip the spacers open.
  • 34 4
 This is what happens when road cyclists design a mountain bike…
  • 4 0
 @futureearth, but then where do you put them? They can't go on top of the stem.
  • 9 0
 That is the case for most modern road bikes. Have to recable the bike to replace a Headset bearing !!! Welcome to my life a mechanic
  • 7 0
 And what are you supposed to do to put it in a bike bag for a plane journey? Can you take the barstem off and dangle it by the gazillion cables somewhere in your bag?
  • 64 0
 A moment of silence for mechanics at Scott dealers...
  • 47 1
 @vegankidd Like @futureearth says you don't have to re-cable anything. I get the point in the review of it being a bit more complicated than on a traditional setup, but it's still quickly done.
To clarify: The only time you need to re-cable is if you need to replace your upper headset bearing. And the only "problem" adjusting stem height is that you need to find the right height for you and cut the steerer tube to be able to run the plastic covers. The stock spacers are designed to split open so you can remove them.
So for example if you want to try a lower position, you just remove the handlebar, split one or more spacers open to remove, put the handlebar combo back, put some random spacer on top of the stem and go ride. Is it a good fit? Great, cut the steerer and assemble the stem again with the stock plastic covers.
There are also several traditional stem options available, which comes stock on the lower end models without the one-piece combos. Rotating the cup to change head angle is also done in no time, even trail side.
  • 6 0
 @notthatfast: But one of the Mike's told me 'bikes are bikes'
  • 8 8
 Could not agree more. 490mm seat tube on a size L that is not even a particularly large size L? And then compare it to a Spur? Uh ok.
Surprised that was not listed as a con given how drastically that will affect versatility by way of limiting downhill capability. Yeah yeah its xc oriented and everyone and their grandma can high post down vertical slabs but still, that's nuts.

Gimmicky bike for people with too much money that stick to relatively flat terrain.
  • 3 1
 This was supposed to be in response to @notthatfast 's comment about it being a mountain bike designed by roadies.
  • 4 2
 A slightly heavier $4000 MTB that fits you properly is way faster than a featherweight $10k bike that doesn't. All this integrated stem stupidity does is make dialling in bike fit more difficult or even impossible. Fail.
  • 3 2
 @dangerholm: Great explanation, I'm surprised @mikekazimer didn't look further to find this out and simply bashed the concept.
  • 1 0
 @SATN-XC: No, it really wouldn't. It's a trail bike not an XC race bike.
  • 2 0
 @chakaping: that's true...I think XC racing as soon as I see the Spark but your right on this one, trail oriented
  • 5 1
 @qblambda, it's still a silly concept. The fact that you need different spacers than the ones supplied to even experiment with bar height illustrates that.
  • 2 0
 @Linc: The proportion of riders who actually finely dial in their bar roll for bio-mechanical reasons etc is probably very small. I’d imagine that most just slap the bars on in a somewhat comfortable position, likely around the neutral roll setting.
  • 1 1
 @MaplePanda: Cool - nice that Scott's flagship 10k bike is designed for punters that don't set their bike up properly...

Anyway, bar roll is important, so is experimenting with different stem lengths (or even stem rise), so is experimenting with bar height vs adding spacers (not the same thing). Any experienced rider with tell you these little tweaks are crucial to having a bike perform how they want it.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: Scott bikes are supplied through shops, which are sanctuaries for round spacers.
Also, any amateur mechanic has at least a few of them.

A silly concept to me would mean the need to route the cables and bleed the brakes every time you adjust the stem height... Which is clearly not the case here.
  • 1 0
 @Linc: I suspect it's a lot like suspension settings - a lot (majority?) of riders will fiddle with them and make them worse than factory defaults. I suspect plenty of riders mess about with bar roll, change stems etc because of what their old bike had, what Nino is running or what their friends have, rather than what they should use on their shiny new bike. Lots of roadie shops do proper bike fit setup, but I've never seen that for MTB
  • 33 0
 As the past owner of a BC Edition Rocky Montain, the idea of a "super" spark has me intrigued. Get rid of the lockout entirely (I'm no racer) and spec a few beefier components and this would be a great bike for a huge diversity of Canadian riding.
  • 9 0
 Why not the YT Izzo at that point?
  • 5 0
 @Lejalapeno: The Izzo has lockout!
  • 5 0
 My 2019 Instinct BC Edition is my favorite bike ever. Its so perfect for a guy like me that only wants one mountain bike, but wants it to be capable for all the types of BC riding.
  • 2 0
 @Lejalapeno: Because it would have to actually be in stock.
  • 19 0
 You mean like a trail bike? Wink
  • 3 0
 The Twinloc is awesome, especially the traction mode. The effective change in BB height coupled with the increase efficiency makes it a beast to climb with but the full lockout is silly. I know some folks that have super sparks and they love em.
  • 1 0
 @olly76: Didnt they ditch the lockout this year?
  • 2 1
 @Lejalapeno: I like supporting my LBS and have heard a lot of horror stories about YT quality control and warranty.
  • 2 0
 @Lejalapeno: coz then you’d have to ride a YT
  • 5 0
 The travel adjustable rear suspension absolutely has its place in BC. My genius is running a grip 2 but I absolutely wouldn't want to loose the nude functionality.
  • 1 0
 @loamfiend: Dunno actually, you may well be right - just remembered from the reviews I read a while ago.
  • 30 0
 "other than the XT derailleur – I really wish product managers would up-spec the shifters rather than derailleurs"

Needs to be made a headline, no better yet, have it as an advert banner in huge neon yellow letters over a dark background.
  • 3 0
 As to up-speccing the shifter and not the derailleur, 100,000x, yes please. Neon advert scrolling FTW
  • 34 1
 I couldn't own a $10k bike that says TURD on the downtube.
  • 31 9
 That is one fine looking mountain bicycle!
  • 3 1
 It really does look cool. The down side is it might be mistaken for a motor bike. After the first week I rarely adjust my shock so that's not an issue, and it would help keep it clean. I assume it will not overheat.
  • 13 2
 Mild disagree. It looks like an anaconda that's digesting a shock
  • 3 0
 Ebikes have way fatter downtubes. Personally, I don't see this getting confused with a bike housing a motor. Yes the downtube is tapered towards the bottom bracket, but it doesn't appear to me to be overly huge or grotesque. I think it's a very slick looking design. It certainly doesn't look like a hardtail, but I think the common hiker/non-biker would easily mistake it for one since the rear shock is hidden.
  • 8 0
 @preston67: it would not be mistaken for an ebike when people pass me on the way up. No problem there.
  • 9 1
 I thought the same thing -- that Scott looks mint! Then they showed it next to a photo of the Spur. Not even fair to the Scott...
  • 7 0
 I thought the same then saw the Spur in the photo below it and realised how amazing that little Transitions angles look
  • 9 0
 @Stoaks: The Spur is definitely a gorgeous bike... perhaps the best looking bike out right now. Not to mention it's elite level performance!
  • 4 0
 @Baller7756: if I had money and they had bikes for sale… Spur 100%
  • 1 0
 @mattg95: "Anaconda that's digesting a shock": You, Sir, win the Interwebs today.

[Please close comments, turn off the lights, and everyone go home now.] ; )
  • 17 1
 Goddamn it is aggravating when people start squawking about shit they know NOTHING about. Perhaps it has been noted before but TwinLoc is TUNABLE. There are barrel adjusters on both levers that control the level of suspension control you want on both the fork and the shock - independently of each other. That is to say you can have the fork set up so it does lock out, or partly open, or fully open whatever you want - independently to how you want the rear shock to behave. It is dead easy to achieve whatever amount of suspension control from the levers once you have set it up. As far as cockpit clutter - i guess to each their own, but I do my riding looking at the trail not the cabling on my bicycle.
  • 2 0
 Also I don't think the handlebars are cluttered. Maybe the cables...but not the bar itself. The bars are actually quite tidy when the seatpost and lockout are on one part.
  • 22 5
 I still want to know if it will fit a coil...
  • 5 0
 Coil on XC? I wonder how that'll work...
  • 5 8
 @zuckleberry: Why wouldn't it? The trend for the past couple of years has been to make air shocks more linear (with volume spacers to play with ramp up) and larger negative air chambers to help it through the first part of the travel. In turn, frame suspension designers have made their layout more rising rate to still give you a progressive suspension overall. Back in the days it was the other way around with air shocks being inherently progressive and in turn the frame rear suspension was designed for falling rate to compensate. Single pivots are easiest to understand so look at the Cannondale Rush, the Santa Cruz Superlight/Juliana etc. So either way, if air shocks are more designed to behave like coil shocks and the frame linkages in turn become designed to work with air shocks that work more or less like coil shocks, they should work just fine with coil shocks too. Provided the shock fits the confined space there of course.
  • 4 0
 @vinay: yes yes, we now have progressive leverage curves so we can compensate with a heavier coil instead of making the lr flat and using a light air shock.
  • 2 0
 @zuckleberry: Apparently Revel is offering coil on their Ranger frame (XC-ish) to good reviews. I opted for the Luxe Ultimate though.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I personally feel that XC riders would aim for a more stiff feel on tough ascents. While coil shocks are great for downhill since they’re really sensitive, I know from personal experience that it’s easier to climb with stiff suspension. There’s a reason shocks have “piggyback switches” and coil has never been put on to an XC bike.
  • 1 0
 @MDW83: I didn’t actually know this! I wonder what made Revel take that route
  • 1 0
 @Notmeatall: I explained that in my response to @vinay
  • 18 1
 in the market for a short travel bike....I think Mike sold me on the Spur
  • 9 0
 spark looks like a great bike but damn, i cant stop looking on my spur
  • 5 0
 Just get a Spur, assuming you can find one.
  • 2 0
 @mironfs: at the moment I ride a Santa Cruz Tallboy but I’m really thinking about going for a Spur..
Maybe I try to get a used Spur frame and swap over all my parts to give it a shot!
  • 1 0
 @Pukeproof: sent you pm with one instock in eu Wink
  • 2 1
 Best bike I’ve ever owned hands down.
  • 1 0
 @mironfs: if it's a Large, let me know!
  • 1 0
 Another bike to look at is the Spot Ryve 115. Fun, poppy trail bike that is light enough for XC (my 6-star weighs about the same as the Scott).
  • 9 0
 What's the alloy Spark's frame weight? It'd be interesting to know how much of that 7lb difference is the frame or the components.

Personally, this bike looks like a wicked trail bike/bikepacking option. That big open front triangle with no shock to interfere with frame bags is a real dreamer. My only concern would be the leverage ratio. Too high and it'll require a lot of air pressure to suit a loaded frame.
  • 13 0
 Claimed weight for the full alloy frame is 3290 grams, so there's a pretty sizable weight difference of 2.8 pounds between it and the HMX carbon version.
  • 40 4
 @mikekazimer: I loved your "3290 grams" answer, then you totally ruined it saying "2.8 pounds".
  • 6 0
 lol 32lb XC bike? I'm sure they could lop off some frame weight if they didn't have to make it look like the carbon one.
  • 6 1
 @cebolla: Yes, we needed it in stone
  • 5 0
 7.25lbs for 120mm frame isn't horrible. Lighter than a Tallboy or Phantom.
  • 2 0
 @cebolla: Fist bump
  • 15 6
 This bike looks so good. Great design. Don’t understand why every one complains about the twin lock. Once you use it and see how functional it is you forget about all the cables. Can’t wait to get my hands on one. Really nice to see that Scott took such a radical approach and make it work.
  • 4 0
 the entire bike is smooth and sleek with integration everywhere giving it a very minimal look (I think it looks fantastic); that said, I think the point about the TwinLoc is that the cluster looks jarring compared to the reset of the bike. I'm sure it functions great.
  • 5 10
flag notthatfast (Aug 25, 2021 at 9:42) (Below Threshold)
 Once you try riding a bike with a well designed suspension system that doesn’t require a lockout to be efficient you’ll forget you ever even wanted one.
  • 8 0
 @notthatfast: anti-squat on Scott bikes is typically above 100%, the twinloc isn't there to compensate for anything.
  • 5 0
 @notthatfast: Yeah I've ridden those bikes and they still go wompwompwomp with weight bob when you're out of the saddle. I bought a 150mm Genius as it does pedal super efficient wide open (anti-squat ranges from 103% to 129%) and was part of what motivated me to get it.

Power delivery is great wide open but middle mode firms it up to more that of an XC bike which is handy for adding a touch sportiness on smoother trails, for out of saddle re-acceleration, G-Out resistance, and for propping up the rear a little more on steep climbs (which I found really useful).

Lockout mode on mine (X-Fusion shock) ain't full lockout either, just really high compression. What this did was to allow me to really stomp up a fast climbs without compressing the bike but still soak up the trail chatter.

In the case of the Genius it's already efficient without twinloc, it was just a pretty sweet treat on top and felt it was pretty brilliant as I had everything in one bike. I don't think I need it on fork though.
  • 2 0
 I had twinlock and it had two problems. First is I never wanted to lockout the fork, ever. Second was the open mode was too soft and the trail mode was too firm. What I really wanted was a full range adjustment so I could set it at the correct level and leave it there instead of switching between two wrong options.
  • 3 0
 Fork lockout is for sprinting to the line in an xc race or riding out of the saddle up a hill on the road. I can't imagine using it anywhere else.
  • 1 9
flag Baileym76 (Aug 25, 2021 at 11:34) (Below Threshold)
 @boozed: It's there because XC racers think you have to lock out a bike to sprint, even if it does nothing. Complete Placebo effect for most.
  • 5 1
 @Baileym76: Your suspension contains dampers. Dampers concert motion to heat. Your suspension moves when you pedal. End comment.
  • 3 0
 @dthomp325: you can simply disconnect the fork lockout cable. So that's not a real problem. I am sure you can setup at least on position of the shock to work according to your needs.
  • 1 0
 @IluvRIDING: you can disconnect the fork, but you still don't have any way to adjust low-speed compression, it's stuck on full-open permanently unless you buy a new damper. I'd imagine most people's ideal setting is somewhere in-between full-open and full-closed, which is the problem I had with the twin-lock. It's either all open or all closed, you can't adjust "3/8 clicks" like on a normal fork/shock. I replaced the fork entirely and that was a huge improvement, but I could never get the shock setup in the way I wanted. I eventually used a bit of cable housing and a dropper post cable stop to lock the shock adjuster into a specific position that was close to what I wanted. I don't think I'd buy another one, which is a shame because their frames are super light.

Plus, as the review notes you're limited to the FiT damper, which is far inferior to both the grip and charger dampers. I've personally tested all three current mid-travel forks and FiT is very noticeably behind the others, it can't keep up in rocky or rooty terrain with high frequency, high speed hits.
  • 1 0
 @dthomp325: On mine there was the micro adjustment on the lever barrels, and then where you clamped the cable (pull the compression in more and clamp) for more of a macro setting...but I'd rather have a non remote damper on the fork with adjustments.

I will say on my old Spark I went from a DT Swiss shock/twinlock to a non-remote CTD for additional trail adjustment... in the end though I always wanted a remote shock back.
  • 14 3
 Some of us have 7-8 km of tarmac to the trails and we need full lockout, and that's wwhy twinloc is great!
  • 6 1
 Drop the remote lockout on the fork? @mikekazimer they spec a remote lockout on the 170mm fork for their Ransom!

Someday, mark my words, I'm going to create a small electronic lockout that just listens to your power meter over ANT+, and at user-set thresholds it locks or unlocks your suspension based purely on whether you're pedaling or not. That simple. Maybe have a gradient sensor so you can have it detect descents and not engage.

I also love the idea of shrinking the air volume instead of a hydraulic lockout.
  • 11 2
 I call this the home mechanic's nightmare.
  • 6 0
 Why cant they offer higher end specs on the Aluminum frame? I had a Nukeproof Mega years ago, Aluminum and specked with Fox Kashima. It was 3600 was the perfect bike.
  • 3 0
 cuz this is a bike for xc racers and weight weenies who turn their noses up at alloy. If you're looking for nicely specced alloy bikes I'd look at Transition or Commencal, keep in mind bike prices have gone up ~20% in the last couple years
  • 2 0
 @lyzyrdskydr: Transition has transitioned to mostly carbon. PBJ being an exception.
  • 2 0
 @PJSANAB: Patrol and Spire both have multiple alloy builds with top level suspension and brakes
  • 5 1
 That's why I put a pike on my old spark and a 3 way thumb lever for shock. And Dumped that ridiculous 3 way lever for shock and fork combo. If I'ma stand out of saddle and mash which isn't often I can just click my fork manually. The tiny 3 way thumb lever for the shock only is where it's at. And the one up super low stack seat dropper allowed me to run 170 drop.
  • 1 0
 I’m currently rocking a Spark and would love to do this. Which thumb lever did you use?
  • 1 0
 Hey, I'm also looking at doing this with a CTD remote, would be keen to hear what remote you have used. Also, any chance you can let me know what size your Spark is? I've got a large, and just trying to figure out how long a stroke dropper I will be able to squeeze in.
  • 1 0
 @harrybeaumont: the 2013? ctd fox lever I tried wouldn't allow me hit lockout and get between the limits on TC mode. Or I had to pre tension the cable so much that I wasn't sure I was getting fully open mode. Some leverage ratio tweaking may resolve this though.
  • 2 0
 @juanny: I've got a 2019 Spark (last gen), and hoping to use one of these - www.ridefox.com/fox17/help.php?m=bike&id=524.
  • 1 0
 @harrybeaumont: that's the style I tried..
Lever model year differences might yeild changes in leverage rate though according to my local fox tech.
  • 2 0
 @harrybeaumont: that's the one im using
  • 2 0
 @Yody: do you get full lock out with that as well as being within the markers dial rotation limits for traction mode
  • 1 0
 @juanny: ya I get all the modes.
  • 1 0
 @juanny: the shock just has a check valve when when it's in open so Im open mode you will feel a little click but open mode is def using all the travel and sags more. I did have to use a bunch of cable tension. You lock it I'm right.past when you get to full lock (which isn't a 100 percent lock but it's definitely the lock out third position
  • 1 0
 @Yody: Cheers, hopefully mine will work when it turns up. Was wondering what size frame you're on? Looking at a Oneup dropper, and trying to figure out what the longest one I'll get in is.
  • 1 0
 @harrybeaumont: XL. 34" inseam. 180 one up dropped to 170 and the 611 sqlab seat. All come together to just work out
  • 1 0
 @Yody: Cheers, I'm a L unfortunately so might have to look more like a 160
  • 6 1
 Looks great but the bar stem combo would be a big no for me. Not been able to roll my bars forward in a position I feel comfortable in would be a big problem. Wonder if the lower end aluminum bikes have the same bar/stem?
  • 1 0
 No, they use a stem+bar
  • 1 0
 The lower and mid level bikes have a 2 piece bar/ stem. The cable routing is the same, but you’re free to use the bar of you’re choice.
  • 4 0
 Don't know why the insist on putting the twin loc levers in the same place as the dropper. I moved mine to the upper right side and it works well there. Even upper left side would be better than the mess they keep coming up with. And I've yet to hear a single reviewer or owner that agrees with locking out the fork.

I couldn't quite figure out the cable routing - do they actually pass through the integrated stem/handlebar piece ? If so how would it even be possible to replace this part ? There would be no way to route the cables at all except by drilling a hole in an aftermarket stem or leaving off the top cap and star nut ?
  • 1 0
 My last bike was a ‘15 Spark. It had the TwinLoc on the top of the bars on the left. I wonder why they don’t do that anymore.
  • 2 0
 @icthus13: it's more prone to break would be my guess. My 2018 reign sx had the lockout for the rear shock on top of the bars on the left side. Over 2 years of riding (before cracking the frame) I had 2 moderately hard crashes and the lockout switch was beat to shit
  • 5 0
 Would've liked to hear more about suspension performance. Is there any performance advantage to the integrated shock other than keeping the shock clean? If not it just seems like needless complexity just for aesthetics
  • 2 0
 There's also less cooling for the shock. I've seen a DPS on an xc bike get so hot that the seal melted and coated the shaft in black goo.
  • 4 0
 "the $3,300 Spark 960 Black gets my pick"

A down-country bike that weighs 33 pounds without pedals? I can't imagine that being any fun. Maybe @mikekazimer should test that one instead of the $10,000 version. I bet it won't get his pick after all.
  • 3 0
 And weight isn't the only problem. The major complaint I have with the way Scott does things these days is that you can no longer get anything but a poverty pack spec with the alloy frame, and even that's now ridiculously expensive.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: "poverty pack spec" LOL! That's an extremely funny term because it really gets to the truth of it.
  • 7 0
 UK riders want to know: does the shock cover incorporate a drain hole?
  • 5 0
 Crazy that trail-oriented XC bikes have 65.8 degree HTA..

*Insert comment about a few year old trail/enduro bike having a steeper HTA.*
  • 5 1
 that TwinLoc with the dropper switch is a cluttered mess (but I guess you could get used to it).....if there ever was a time for livewire, this would be it...especially on a $10k bike.
  • 3 0
 I like the idea of keeping the dropper lever solo under left bar. When I had a spark I swapped the twin-lock for an over the bar style from back in the days of front derraileurs. Very clean cockpit though! Bike shops will get to tack on decent labor charges to swap out bar/stems for these customers. Great review, Kaz
  • 1 0
 Hey, I'm looking at doing this with my Spark, did you use one of the CTD remotes? Cheers
  • 1 0
 @harrybeaumont:

He probably used an over-the-bar twinloc remote from the 2016 and before Spark. I wish I’d kept the one from my ‘15 Spark to put on my newer one
  • 7 0
 I'd rather have 10 cables than this ugly stem tower.. uurgh
  • 4 0
 My base '21 Epic Evo with some upgrades (SID ultimate and MT Trail SL brakes) weighs about the same at literally half the cost. Not that everything is about weight, but interesting comparison nonetheless.
  • 3 0
 I love the look the spark, but the twin lock and goofy stem/bar combo and routing is a turn off. I am sure could learn to live with twin lock or ditch it, but routing is a deal breaker. This thing would be the perfect FS adventure rig. It is screaming for a frame bag.
  • 3 0
 Fortunately for you, models below the tuned bike reviewed don't have the bar/stem combo. Yes integrated routing, but once you go in behind the headtube like most current bikes then there's realistically no real world difference in build/maint.
  • 3 0
 Despite the Bold's (sorry, Scott's) hidden shock frame, the Transition Spur looks much cleaner. The reason is the lines, esp. the straight line the top tube and seat stays form. Makes it look like a hardtail, and ht's always look clean. Bike industry designers take notice!
  • 3 0
 Would be cool if I’m a review one day was “we tested the mid-price range” or “we tested what “brand” thinks will be the biggest selling of their range”…
A $10,000 pedaller looks sick don’t get me wrong but… well it’s a lot of cash
  • 24 18
 Integration sucks and the Spur is a better bike.
  • 1 11
flag b1k35c13nt15t (Aug 25, 2021 at 8:26) (Below Threshold)
 The Spur is essentially the old Spark with new Spark geo.
  • 3 6
 …If you’re an old dude who goes slow uphill.
  • 10 1
 @LeDuke: Old dudes are all about going fast uphill, because that's all that mattered in the 90's. Going fast downhill is for the young'uns.
  • 4 1
 The Spur is not a real bike though. It’s not for sale and never has been available.
  • 1 0
 @nzandyb: Get both.
  • 3 0
 "AXS derailleurs seem to clutch less than their non-motorized counterparts" - is this true? I was disappointed with the weak clutch on my previous non-motorized sram offering.
  • 4 0
 I recently put GX AXS on my bike. The chain slap has gotten audibly worse then the XO eagle I had on previously. Which leads me to believe that this is true. It also keeps loosing up. I have to tighten the mounting bolt every other ride. Kind of annoying, but it definitely shifts phenomenally. At least when the derailleur is mounted correctly.
  • 4 0
 From my experience Sram der clutches can vary in clutch tension from the factory, and tend to weaken a bit over time. I like that Shimano's clutches are adjustable and serviceable, but they seem to require constant maintenance (not to mention all the other issues with Shimano 12s).

I consider ders as a wear part, so I'd take X01 cable over AXS any day. Would consider AXS for a road bike tho
  • 4 0
 @harryhood: same experience. GX Eagle AXS clutch is definitely less effective than the XO1 mechanical Eagle it replaced. Not so bad that it annoys me or causes problems, but it is noticeable. Other than that, no complaints.
  • 7 0
 Another vote on AXS clutch weakness. I have an XX1 and a GX setup, and both get slap happy in the chunk.
  • 4 0
 My GX AXS has me contemplating putting the STFU chain holder thing on my bike. Noticeably more chain slap than my non AXS Gx.
  • 7 1
 If your seat tube is longer than your reach, you're doing it wrong.
  • 1 0
 Mmm. Must be an XC thing.
  • 5 0
 I'll be interested to watch a nice video of a non-pro mechanic changing volume spacers in this shock...
  • 1 0
 I’m am a pro mechanic but it honestly only adds about a minute to remove the shock versus the older Spark, or Genius or Ransom, so dies it adds time but it’s pretty inconsequential.
  • 2 0
 It's a really cool bike and was shown and considered days before I located my own Spur frame so I especially appreciated the comparison.

The integration is tough because just some small changes to stem height & length + bar roll can pretty dramatically effect my personal comfort on my bike.

Regarding the lockouts for a 120/ 130 bike, I'm just not a fan of the integration but really even just the idea at it's core. This is a DC bike made for constant undulating terrain and those switches just add more weight and complexity that isn't needed as it already pedals so darn well.

Now if Fox built the shock with an electronic lockout activated by if the shock was currently climbing or not, I'd be totally in to it. With a phone App to control your preferences for when it locked out.

Thanks for the review MK!
  • 3 0
 not the kinda bike Dan Roberts gets for a test. But I would have loved to read his reverse engineering / maintenance bit on this frame. Well, if he‘d be even willing to do that. considering his former employment with Scott
  • 2 0
 TYREWHIZ came on my 3zero moto’s, it was great for a year, then the poorly designed and flimsy battery closing stopped holding the battery tight enough to make a circuit. this happened to the front and the back. Just a poor design and apparently not covered on warranty.

Not worth the weight, now well designed if my experience is common.
  • 3 1
 I know people prefer different styles in bikes but I cannot appreciate the looks of this at all. It just looks a bit to much like an ebike to me.
It looks overly complicated to work on and it boggles my mind how many people dislike internal brake routing yet this is ok?
  • 2 0
 It’s really only slightly more complicate to work on than an average dual suspension bike. To remove the rear shock literally takes about a minute longer than the older version or the Spark or a Ransom, Genius etc. so not a huge concern considering most people only have their shock removed for service once a year or so. Cable routing is actually improved from the previous version of the Spark and easier to route because of the large cover on the downtube that’s used to access the shock.
  • 6 0
 super spark is a genius
  • 1 0
 For me, one of the beauties in bicycles is that you can see the machinery, the modern, miniature wizardry between your feet, whirling away, propelling you forward, faster. And it being so readily accessible trailside means less issue either finding problems or fixing them.

The new Spark seems to be an exercise in modern minimalization, or at least hiding only what some modern design studios would suggest to be "so last decade."

I digress. I'm sure the bike rides just fine, but the aesthetics are definitely... polarizing.
  • 5 0
 Please make a bike that is harder to adjust and work on.....said NO ONE!
  • 2 1
 I have a last gen top fuel so this bike really interests me as a trail bike. I love the twin loc, I actually have one on my TF. I love the 2 bottle mounts. Its competitors with 2 cages dont have cable locks other than the new TF but its only running a single bottle cage. Tough call but i really like this new spark.
  • 1 0
 The new Lux Trail has a twin lockout and 2 cages, worth a look
  • 3 0
 What a stunning bike! I think it looks a lot better than even the Spur! Then again, I've always been a a fan of the swingarm, rather than rear triangle, look.
  • 2 0
 I think the spur looks much better. More like a mountain bike and less like a Kickstarter concept. but it would be boring if we all liked the same things.
  • 1 0
 im all for this new bike, but when will scott design their own bikes again? the only real design they did recently was change the Gambler back to 4 bar the genius design was better before they changed it couple years back, they used the mindset of "how can we make a bad MTB"
  • 4 1
 So many reasons I would never buy this and price is 4th on the list. Scott can keep its hidden shock and stupid cable/stem design and I'll keep my $10k.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer As always, thanks for a great in-depth review. Do you guys get any say in which spec model bike companies send you? When the price range is $2.8-14k, I imagine MOST people are interested in the bikes from $6k and less.
  • 2 0
 Meh Scott can suck it. I know inventory is tight, but only selling bikes to their big dealers, cutting out their smaller LBS's who've been supporting them for years. Not into it.
  • 2 0
 Bought the 910 version of this bike to complement my Pyga Hyrax. It is fast as heck! Up, down and on the flats. Already popped on a 780mm bar and will source a Grip2 damper in due course.
  • 8 5
 Amazing review. This new bike definitely "sparks" some long conversations. Bravo to Mike for bringing such good work!
  • 1 0
 Beautiful, just wish Scott would get rid of all the twin loc and lockouts and all that jazz, too cluttered, but just my .02, to each their own. Should fit nicely amongst the spur, EE, ranger crowd.
  • 3 0
 Looks fantastic......But.......Looks like it could be a pain to service- maybe Scott can do video about servicing??
  • 1 0
 It’s honestly pretty similar time/ effort service the suspension when compared to most other dual suspension bikes.
  • 2 0
 TwinLoc, hidden shock, hidden cables in the bars. Probably a pain in the ass to work on and it also looks like a turd next to that Spur….
  • 1 0
 With the big hole near the bottom bracket at least the dropper routing will be a breeze.
  • 1 0
 @magnusc: Dropper post routing is super easy. It’s on par with an external post. The hole in the downtube also make routing the other cables super easy.
  • 3 2
 A nudge toward the future where you won't be able to change jack squat on bikes because they'll all be proprietary and bike model/size specific. How do you change linkage bearing? Easy, you don't and just get a new bike!
  • 2 1
 A linkage service is pretty similar to most other dual suspension bikes. It’s not any more complex and takes a similar amount of time.
  • 2 0
 May not be my type of bike (I can see the merit in it though), it may be a pain in the A$$ to work on BUT holy crap does it look amazing!
  • 4 1
 seriously, we all just wanna see the new Ransom
  • 2 0
 Check out Bold Cycles new enduro bike, it looks exactly like the spark.
  • 1 0
 I wish I could upvote this x100!
  • 3 1
 one of the most beautiful Bikes I have ever seen. In green should be a grande slam
  • 3 0
 So you're saying buy the Spur, Epic EVO or Blur TR.
  • 2 0
 They want 3300 for a base model with a Rock Shox Judy on it. Good Lord that is seriously overpriced.
  • 4 1
 Needs a 36 lowered to 130mm
  • 1 0
 Nice, good to see an alloy version too. Definitely something I'd like to spend time on but I guess that goes for any mountain bike really.
  • 3 0
 First longer PB-Review I read every word of! Thanks Kaz! You rock!
  • 1 0
 Why are dentists the reference point for bling bike ownerhship? All the guys I know that have nice bikes are nurses ("murses"). How did this urban legend start?
  • 3 1
 It's not a review article without a squish video
  • 2 0
 Scott really made a Bold design choice with this one
  • 1 0
 That scott looked really sexy, Until you put it beside the spur. Mmm Transition
  • 1 0
 Evvvvvvery thing integrated but still no space in the downtube to store my flipflops.
  • 1 0
 @cgreaseman Dangerholm be like: "OK, now show me the money."

Like Apple copying all the jailbreak Apps.
  • 1 0
 Opened review, scrolled down while looking at photos, read pros and cons, then comments. Done.
  • 1 0
 Anyone else have comments critical of O U T S I D E get deleted? I'm pretty sure they pulled one of mine.
  • 3 2
 Fox Rock Shox? Finally, the collab I’ve been waiting for.
  • 8 0
 Santa Cruz? Have you been living under a bike rack?
  • 1 0
 Liar liar pants on fire. (First line only)
  • 1 0
 save some cash and get a bold unplugged/linkin fro 2018
  • 1 0
 These hidden shocks better not awaken something in me
  • 1 0
 This video should be in "Huck to Flat" format. And braille.
  • 1 0
 Levy quit because of the Outside buyout didn’t he? Hero.
  • 1 0
 Is this true? If so damm straight.
  • 1 0
 ...not to be mistaken for an e bike
  • 1 0
 Are they trying to out orca giants ebike with that paint job?
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer How does it compare to the Norco Optic?
  • 1 0
 Cool looking bike but most models are for dentists or brain surgeons.
  • 1 0
 What's the actual seat angle? Looks slacker than the Transition
  • 1 0
 For 10K that thing better give me a hand-job after the ride, too!
  • 1 1
 @mikekazimer Rate graph etc?
  • 2 1
 Shocking
  • 2 2
 Still ugly as hell. Thankfully l don't have to buy one.
  • 1 1
 Kazimer is tacky as hell for leaving the barcode on the bike. SMH.
  • 1 0
 Right, i mean no one wants to have their serial number on their bike do they :/
  • 1 2
 this bike looks wicked.
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