Review: 5 Indoor Cycling Trainers Ridden & Rated

Feb 5, 2021
by Nikki Rohan  


Indoor Trainers & Accessories For Winter Quarantine

It’s the heart of winter in the Northern Hemisphere, meaning riding opportunities are pretty limited for many mountain bikers. Sure, the days are finally starting to get longer, but in many places it’s going to be months before the trails melt out. While I used to spend my winters spinning on a trainer bike and lifting weights with my buddies in our local gym, I am now doing those same things from the security of my garage thanks to Covid-19 having all but closed the majority of gyms here in the United States. Even with some gyms opened (briefly) before locking down again, some of us can't risk going back to the gym until we have wide spread vaccinations in place (as controversial as "science" is these days in some parts of the world, the bottom line is I really don't want to kill my husband, who has ALS, or my 84 year old father, who lives with us). So, other than the really nice stationary bikes at the gym and some coached programs there, until Covid-19 forced me into my garage, I had zero experience with any type of home trainer or any of the online training apps/programs like Zwift, Rouvy or Sufferfest. So here it is, Covid gifted me the opportunity to learn the ropes, test what works for me (and what doesn't), and give you a beginners perspective on indoor training options.

Casey Gatz is my partner for this review and comes in as our tech expert/trainer geek. He was one of my cycling coaches in the winter training programs I’ve used for the past few years and is way more tech savvy about the mechanics of these trainers and how to apply an online program than I, bringing a valuable perspective and some great technical observations to this review.

Below you will find an overview of the five trainers Casey and I tested, what we each liked or didn't like about a specific trainer, and all the fun I had learning how to spin a bike on rollers. It's important to note that these are short-term reviews and for a more in-depth review, you really have to check out the industry staple, DC Rainmaker. And while these are short-term reviews, we both spent a minimum of 10 hours on each trainer (except the rollers—see the review below for the why on that). The focus of our testing was on ease of set-up, stability, changing bikes/bike compatibility, feel, power consistency, noise, required accessories, app integration and cost.

Warning: there is a fair bit of tech that needs to be dealt with in this article, so this is a text heavy piece vs. a shred and destroy video. A couple terms worth understanding before you dive into this review: FTP for starters—FTP stands for Functional Threshold Power and it's a measure of the best average power output you can sustain for 1 hour in a time-trial scenario. Second is ERG mode, which is a smart trainer setting where the trainer adjusts its resistance automatically to help the rider hit specific target power levels without needing to shift gears on the bike or resistance on the trainer. Since there are no resistance dials on any of these "Smart" trainers, the ERG mode is used to essentially put you where it thinks you need to be based on your FTP. Taking an FTP test is a good starting place for anyone new to the indoor trainer world as a way to structure your rides in order to get the most benefit from a trainer. All the trainers we tested, with the exception of the rollers, had an ERG mode option.

Table of Contents
Elite Quick-Motion Rollers
Saris M2 Smart Trainer
Stages SB20 Smart Bike
Wahoo Kickr
Tacx Neo 2T
Top Picks





Tester: Casey Gatz
Height: 5'10"
Weight: 150 lb
Notes: Started racing motorcycles at 5 and has been on two wheels ever since. A consistent rider who sneaks in what he can usually before the family wakes up and the workday starts.
Tester: Nikki Rohan
Height: 5'5"
Weight: 135 lb
Background: MTB'ing for over 20 years, including a short stint competing in enduro races in the PNW, Trans BC, Trans-Provence, Downieville Classic, Grinduro, and the occasional CX race.





Elite Quick-Motion Rollers

• MSRP $569.99 USD
• Power Supply not required
• Easily adjustable and compatible with road & mountain bikes
• Maximum weight (bike & athlete): 115 kg (250lbs)
elite-it.com/


Nikki
When I contacted Elite to take part in this review, I let them guide me to what they wanted me to review. The focus for the article was going to be a variety of products at a variety of prices, and while we had touched on "smart" trainers, when the box arrived I really didn't know what I was getting. While I was hoping for the Nero, which is a unique set of "smart" rollers that ELITE makes, it was the Quick-Motion basic roller that showed up. The Nero is much more like an interactive trainer that includes ANT+/Bluetooth connectivity and offers basic speed, cadence and power measurements. The Quick Motion rollers did not have that same function, although if you purchase the Misuro B+ accessory from Elite, it should allow you to connect to the ELITES E-training platform. Product issues aside, I had never ridden rollers so this was an opportunity to see what they were all about.

Set-up was fairly easy. The rollers came with some basic directions and within 30 minutes, they were unboxed and adjusted for my road bike.

Rollers are intimidating to a newbie like me, to say the least. By the time you have a bike on the rollers you’re pretty high up there and there’s none of the stability one has when locked into a trainer—even with the parabolic shaped rollers that are designed to keep one centered. Consequently, I opted to set up a table directly adjacent to the bike to hold onto until I started pedaling, and to help get on/off the bike. The resistance dial is a nice feature on these rollers, but I wanted as little resistance as possible at the start so I made sure to keep the dial set at the minimum. After the initial few minutes of "cling to the table for dear life" mixed with hesitantly placing my hand on the bars, I got the feel for the rollers, allowing me to practice "spinning" with no shifting. This lasted about 10 minutes and then I got fairly bored and decided to increase resistance and see how close I could get to an out-of-the-saddle attempt. Ha—I never got there. Even though my balance got better, I found the only thing I could really focus on was cadence and spinning at a fairly low resistance. I’m sure with more time, I’d get there; but I simply wasn’t motivated enough to up my game past the "I'm riding on ice" sensation of rollers.

Because we did not have the Misuro B+ to connect the rollers to any type of E-training program, the only feedback I was able to get from my time on the Quick Motion rollers was... time. That being said, I do have an external power meter, speed sensor, and cadence sensor on my gravel bike, and a heart rate monitor. But my plans to use the rollers like I would any other trainer fell to the wayside when I realized how much focus was required for me to simply adjust the tension and keep my wheels moving. This isn’t a dis on the rollers as a training tool, it’s just that after a hard day’s work, the mental focus required to ride rollers as a newbie wasn’t my jam.

Fancy features aside, there are some really nice things about these rollers. First, they fold down to a nice compact size and store easily in a small space. Second, they require no power. Third, while the rollers don't transmit ANT+/Bluetooth power data, you can buy the Misuro B+ accessory ($90 USD) to enable transmission of that data. If rollers appeal to you, then you may want to check these out.


Casey on the Elite Quick-Motion Rollers.


Casey
When looking at the trainers we reviewed, these were definitely the odd-duck out. They didn't have any of the smart features, and being rollers they demand a different level of commitment. I have a pair of rollers I purchased probably 15 years ago that haven't been ridden in 10. After about a minute of holding onto a chair for dear life, I was back at it.

Getting these rollers into position took a little coordination, since there are two bands that connect the rear drive wheels with the front. Though since they are primarily a plastic construction, they don't weigh much and wrestling them into place was more a practice in finesse than brute force. With the rollers on the ground and a desk to start on, I was out of the gate and spinning. Like other rollers, these felt to be more geared toward training pedaling efficiency and smoothing out form vs. throwing down the watts. The rollers have a slight rise near the ends that supposedly helps keep you from riding off them; maybe I was unknowingly running into those, but I never felt like I was hitting the edges or close to riding off the sides. However, I've never actually ridden off a set of rollers even when they didn't have a parabolic “safety” shape like these.

Being that we couldn't connect the rollers to any smart apps or trainers, these really only served to help me focus on form and to engage my entire body while riding a bike. While I can't get the "riding a bike on ice" sensation on a smart trainer, I am still able to do all the other skills. After several rides that all were significantly shorter than I had planned, I was happy to jump off the rollers and back onto a more traditional trainer. You're either a roller person or you're not. I am not.


Details of the Elite Rollers.


Pros

+ Easily fold up
+ Best for spinning the legs
Cons

- No power/speed/cadence
- Balance and practice is key





Saris M2 Smart Trainer

• MSRP $499.99 USD
• MP1 Nfinity Trainer Platform: $1,119 USD
• Saris TD1 Trainer Desk: $329.99
• ANT+/Bluetooth/ANT+FE-C
• Speed, distance, power and cadence sensors
• 20 lbs // 9 kg
saris.com/



Casey
Setting up the Saris M2 was more complicated than many of the others. First there was the actual building of the trainer, which was more involved than the others (the included instructions were helpful here). Then there was getting the bike on the trainer, which was as simple as installing the correct components and then tightening the rear knob till it clicks. However, this appeared to be waaaay too much pressure. I was running 700x28’s at 90psi which was far more pressure than I would ever run on the road. Tightening until the “click,” in fact, put so much pressure against the tire that the sidewalls were in contact with the trainer. But…following their directions, I started the calibration process with the phone app, and started reading accurate power. After about two minutes though, I could smell burning rubber and see lots of little pieces of my tire on the ground under my bike. After this first failed attempt, I just tightened the rear wheel until it wouldn’t slip and re-ran the calibration. This time it worked. Sort of—keep reading.

Once you get the trainer all set up and the bike on the trainer, and calibrated, this trainer works well—this need to calibrate is going to be pretty similar with all “smart” wheel-on trainers. But because of changes in pressure within the tire and how tight the rear knob is, you really should calibrate before every ride for as accurate a reading as you can get. The “tighten to click” was intended to fix that need for lots of calibration, but in reality it doesn’t always work well—at least not on this particular trainer. To test the power, I’d use my own power meter recording to my head unit and compare that to the Saris unit during and after the ride. I saw power numbers all over the place with this trainer without calibration—as much as 50% under or 15% over vs. my control power meter. But calibrate before every ride and you'll be fine.


Saris Tightened to Click
Saris M2 Tightened to click. Garmin Vector 3-Red / Saris-Purple
Saris M2 Tighten to Correct
Saris M2 Tightened to correct.Garmin Vector 3-Red / Saris-Purple
Saris M2 Calibrated
Saris M2 calibrated.Garmin Vector 3-Red / Saris-Purple

The actual feel on this trainer was better than my older fluid trainers of years past, but not nearly as good as compared to the direct drive trainers like the Wahoo Kickr or the Tacx NEO 2T reviewed below. When tightened to “click” the feel was absolutely horrible; but when tightened until the wheel didn’t slip it improved significantly. In ERG mode, the trainer was able to maintain power and adapt to changes in cadence fairly well as compared to some of the other trainers (where I’d fall into the ‘cadence spiral of death’ that I saw with the Tacx and Stages trainers).

The noise on this was quite a bit louder than the direct-drive trainers (90db next to the freewheel using a free phone app vs. around 60db for the direct drive trainers, and even less for the Stages bike) and if you had this inside your house or an apartment, you’d be annoying everyone else in the adjacent rooms. Purchasing a specialty “trainer tire” will significantly decrease this noise, and will prevent burning up expensive rubber, but keep in mind that such tires are for trainer use only, not on the road.

In general, this trainer is better than the non-smart trainers from years past. The advantage over using just a similar fluid trainer and a power meter are the ability to do ERG workouts and, when using Zwift, it provides some grade increases, etc—although this trainer seemed to over-exaggerate the grades compared to the other trainers: in its default setting, hitting 8% grades made it tough to turn the pedals over. That can be fixed in Zwift by setting the trainer difficulty slider, but I'm not sure why this trainer felt that much harder than the others when I encountered "grades".


Casey on the Saris M2 Smart Trainer with M1 Nfinity Trainer Platform and TD1 Trainer Desk.

Nikki
The M2 was the first trainer that showed up at my doorstep all boxed up and in pieces. I unpacked it and as uncoordinated as I am with tools, I was able to put the thing together without too much fuss in under an hour.

Next up, I had to change the tire on my gravel bike to a road style slick tire to keep the noise down and so I didn't ruin my Maxxis Rambler rear tire, and then change the mounting system to the thru axle (it came stock with a quick release system). As I've ridden plenty of wheel on trainers, after I got my bike onto the M2 I skipped reading the directions (I can sometimes be a bit impatient) and tightened down my rear wheel to where it wouldn’t slip, and moved right on to calibrating the trainer using the Saris app on my phone. This turned to be a good thing, as had I read the directions I would have tightened to click, and would have then proceeded to shred my tire like Casey did.

As this was the first "smart" trainer I had ever used and my first time using Zwift, it took some navigating to finally get into a ride and see how ERG mode worked. The first 10% hill I hit in Zwift pretty much had me stopped in my tracks. The trainer had turned up the resistance so hard I could barely get a revolution in. A quick chat with Casey (being the tech savvy one between us), and we decided that it probably had something to do with my lack of patience and failure to properly calibrate. So—back to the drawing board. Eventually I started to figure things out and found my pace. Being on a trainer that could feed me power data blew my mind. Yeah, I own a power meter and had been on fancy bikes in the gym, but to be able to have a trainer for under $500 that recorded my ride data and could sync up with Zwift or Trainer Road, it was like a light bulb went off as I suddenly realized what I had been missing out on in the comfort of my own garage.

Going back to the M2 after testing the Kickr and Taxc was a little more complicated. While I liked that I didn't have to take my rear wheel and cassette off to set up my bike, the M2 is fairly loud and does a good number on your tire. If I were just using the M2 exclusively (or any other type of wheel on trainer), I’d opt to purchase a proper trainer tire as the heat generated by the friction of the tire on the trainer will destroy a regular tire fairly quickly, and they are a bit quieter than a regular tire. But if you've ever tried to get one of those suckers on or off your rim, you will really want a cheap spare wheel with a trainer tire mounted to it exclusively for trainer usage. If you are looking for a super affordable "smart" option to up your winter training and can handle a bit more noise vs. a direct drive trainer, this is definitely a great option for winter training.



Details of Saris M2 Smart Trainer on the MP1 Nfinity Trainer Platform.

Pros

+ Budget friendly
+ ERG mode stability
Cons

- Loud
- Uses up tires - need trainer tire
- Need to calibrate each ride





Stages SB20 Smart Bike

• MSRP $2,899.99 USD
• ANT+/Bluetooth
• Max Rider weight: 300lbs
• Weight: 138 lbs // 63 kg
stagescycling.com/


Nikki
The Stages SB20 Bike was delivered to my doorstep basically as a complete package (their PNW HQ is only an hour away), making set up fairly easy for Casey and I. When you buy the bike new, you don't have that luxury of unboxed and pre-built delivery, so you will want to check out the in-depth review of the SB20 Smart bike by DC Rainmaker for beta on complete set-up. After I rolled the 138 lb smart bike into my office and swapped the stock road style drop bars for a set of low rise flat bars, I was ready to jump aboard and get my sweat on.

But not so fast! First came the pedals, which was waaay easier said than done. None of my pedals use a pedal wrench for installation—all of them use an allen key threaded through from the bike side of the spindle. And since the cranks are fairly close to the flywheel, there is minimal space for mounting these types of pedals. It can be done; however, be prepared to utilize about a three inches of rotation over and over and over to get the dang things on. Pedals that require a 15mm pedal wrench to install will help your sanity a LOT!

With my pedals finally in place, I was quickly able to adjust the bike for my height and reach while I downloaded the Stages app "Link" to configure the bike. Since I had the SB20 set up with an MTB specific bar, the app let me configure the gearing as if it were a MTB as well; for those looking to train in the gearing they race in, this is a great feature. The last step in set-up was getting the SB20 to sync to the training programs I was using. After some searching around the Stages site for support, I finally figured out that I simply had to turn the Bluetooth on my laptop off and then back on, and then whabaam!—I was finally ready to go. I would recommend that one take the time to watch the well executed and detailed Stages YouTube videos like I did to simplify setting up and configuring the SB20.

I started my testing using Zwift and Sufferfest; and excepting first world problems, like choosing a route or training plan, it was mostly smooth sailing. I quickly started to get a feel for the shifting (which is only available in non-ERG mode modules), and the Smart part of the training, i.e. using ERG mode. While you can just jump on the SB20 and pedal in their app, knowing your FTP or taking an FTP test is a good starting place for anyone new to the indoor trainer world in order to utilize ERG and get the most out of a trainer. I have an FTP from pre-covid gym classes, so I spent most my time on the SB20 in ERG mode in Zwift. As you will read below, Casey struggled with the 3-4 second-ish gap the bike had between power zones or in his case shifting. I wasn't doing any racing, so it wasn't something that really bothered me, but I did notice the delay. By comparison, the Kickr and the Neo 2T have almost no delay.

When it’s all said and done, this was one of my favorite of the Smart Trainers for a number of reasons: First, I was up and running on the SB20 within 40 minutes of seeing it for the first time. Secondly, while it’s a 138 lb. beast, I liked that it was heavy and stable because I could stand up and sprint without feeling like I was going to break something. I also like that it comes stock with a removable tablet holder, phone holder, and dual, easy to reach water bottle holders; on the other trainers I needed a platform for my phone or iPad. From a pure convenience perspective, I liked that I didn't have to use my own bike so I could jump on the trainer without removing a wheel, worrying about shredding an expensive tire, or taking a cassette off. If you are someone who is more likely to ride a trainer because it's ready to go all the time, that is definitely something to take into consideration. While we didn't review the Peloton bike in this piece, their popularity has exploded, and the Stages SB20 is similarly priced to the higher end Peloton, but it offers compatibility with a wider range of Apps and training programs.




Casey
Setup on this bike was relatively simple. There were a bunch of hex wrenches that came in the box for easy swaps from the mountain bike bars to the road bars and back. Probably one of the best aspects of the SB20 was how customizable this bike is: we were able to get pretty good fits for my 8yo daughter, my 5’10" wife, and for myself. And while my wife and I have similar saddle heights, everything else between our preferred bike fits is different. If more than one person is using this bike, sticky notes or discrete sharpie marks make “bike” swaps fast and easy. Pedal swaps was another story though. Like Nikki, most of my pedals use an allen key on the inside of the spindle to thread on/off the cranks. With the Stages SB20, there’s just not much room between the crank-arm and the bike frame to insert your hex, so changing between pedals took way too long, and it was hard to get decent torque with the maybe 30 degrees I was able to turn my hex keys. If your pedals allow the use of a 15mm pedal wrench, then no worries.

As a stand-alone bike, this thing is rock solid. Even trying my best, I wasn’t able to rock it off balance. After hard workouts where your legs are shredded, having no top-tube made dismounting easy without tempting a hamstring cramp. At the same time, by not having that top-tube, it was hard to keep the crank area free from sweat. I found that this bike got more sweaty than trainers where I was able to put one towel on my top-tube and another across my handlebars.

Using the app was pretty simple for this bike. One of the best things is the ability to set the electronic shifters to essentially any possible drivetrain you’d like. You have the option of up to 10 rings up front, and 50 in the back. I’m not sure how well a 500 gear bike would actually serve, but if you want to that kind of range, it appears to be possible. That novelty wore off quickly, though, and I settled on a 12 speed 52/36 front x 10/33 rear, which provided a pretty solid range of gears for riding in Zwift.

In ERG mode, this bike really struggled to maintain consistent power. During workouts on both Trainer Road and Zwift I was constantly over or under the prescribed power level. Then, after a bit of low power, it would seem to try to overcompensate and set the tension higher to have the “average power” be correct. After a few workouts trying to figure out the bike’s trick, I turned off ERG mode in frustration, since I was able to maintain my own power much better than this bike's software could.

While ERG mode seemed to struggle with workouts more than any other trainer, the SB20 would read consistent power between my power meter and the bike. The sprints were picked up, and when I’d stop applying power it would read zero. This bike has essentially two crank-based power meters, and because of that you’re able to track things like power balance, pedal smoothness, etc. After a few years of having these metrics available on my own power meter, while I appreciate their availability, I honestly haven't looked at them since my first week of power meter use. However, I don’t have any injuries or power imbalances that I’d be tracking; but if you've got big imbalances in your legs or really rough pedaling, maybe you'd find more value with these tools.

A nit-pick: while this bike plugs in, the power meters that the bike uses are their own separate unit that require separate batteries. In the middle of one of my wife’s races, I started hearing a string of obscenities coming from the garage. Rushing out there, I found that the bike had started reporting a consistent 126 watts and she was quickly dropped from the group she was racing against. There was no prior warning to this, and even having connected the app earlier in the day, I didn’t know that this was coming. Fortunately we had some CR2032 batteries in the drawer and she was able to get back to racing the next morning. Lesson learned; keep batteries in stock or you might end up sleeping on the couch.


Stages SB20 Stationary Bike
Stages SB20 Power consistency. Garmin Vector 3-Red / Stages-Blue


The other frustrating aspect of this bike was the delay between applying power to the pedals and that power being displayed on apps like Zwift, etc. When trying my hand (and getting smoked regularly) during races, this bike was always a few seconds behind the curve. When you’re trying to hang-on to the virtual group, being several seconds behind the curve makes it really hard. I’d find that I was either off the front (apparently attempting to break-away), or struggling at the back. Consequently, it was really difficult to stay with the group when there were fast changes in power. For consistent efforts like time-trials, this was a non-issue. But in a pack, as soon as you see someone else is putting the pressure on, you’re caught on your heels.

For me, this was a deal-breaker. I never did a Zwift race before doing these trainer reviews, but after getting into them during all this trainer testing, that lag made a fun activity frustrating. At the same time, my wife also got into virtual riding and the Stages bike was her go-to tool. Like Nikki, she liked jumping on this as well as the more up-right position that you can set on this trainer vs. deconstructing her bike for a direct drive trainer or the Saris wheel on trainer.



Details of the Stages SB20 Smart Bike.


Pros

+ Offers a solid feeling and confidence for standing/sprinting
+ Unlimited gearing options
+ Very very quiet
+ No bike needed/easy to adjust to different riders
Cons

- Slight delay in Power
- Display needed (phone/iPad/laptop)
- Expensive





Wahoo Kickr

• MSRP $1,199.99 USD
• ANT+/Bluetooth/ANT+FE-C
• Speed, distance, power and cadence sensors
• 47 lb // 22 kg
wahoofitness.com/



Casey
Setup on the Wahoo Kickr was similar to other direct drive trainers. If you can change a rear wheel, you can get your bike mounted to the trainer. Like the Tacx 2T, this comes with the Shimano HG freehub, so you’re somewhat limited in what cassettes you can run out of the box. For mountain bikes with 12 speed drivetrains, the supplied Sunrace 10-50 12-speed cassette worked great—you just lose the use of the 10-tooth cog, as the HG spline won’t allow anything smaller than 11 teeth. Switching between the different axle standards was easy with the included parts. This trainer also allows for a user to adjust between wheel sizes (from 24” to 29”) so you don’t need to use a front-wheel holder to stay level.

Stability on the Wahoo is similar to other direct-drive trainers: they have very little sway and I never worried about tipping over. The feet have some slight movement built into them, which allow for subtle movement of the trainer. At first this felt odd, like my gym floor was slightly shifting under me, but after a ride or two I no longer noticed it. In or out of the saddle, the trainer worked well.


Wahoo Kickr
Wahoo Kickr Power consistency. Garmin Vector 3-Red / Wahoo-Yellow


Using the Wahoo for training rides was overall pretty damn awesome. The Kickr provided some of the most consistent efforts in ERG mode and I didn’t experience the cadence issues I had with the Tacx or the drastic swings in power I saw with the Stages bike. These consistent power numbers meant I had no frustration utilizing workouts in Trainer Road or on Zwift. This trainer had a very fast response to all of the grade changes in Zwift; with many of the other trainers there would be slight lags in both power and grade, but the Kickr was always quick to respond. Additionally, when racing in Zwift or doing non-ERG workouts, this trainer was great at responding to changes in pace and efforts; I’d apply power to the pedals and see instant changes relayed to the program I was using. This trainer didn’t give the same feedback when riding on Zwift that the Tacx did—where you felt the cobbles, etc.—but that’s a nit-pick.

Overall, this ended up being my favorite of the trainers to use. It’s quiet, it packs down very slim when not in use, changing between bikes was easy, and it did a good job of relaying power in both structured trainings and online racing. If a whisper-quiet trainer that does both ERG training and online racing is your thing, the Wahoo Kickr nailed it.




Nikki
Casey tested the Kickr before me, so set-up was a breeze. I pulled it out of the box, mounted the cassette, changed the adapters for a thru axle, and attached my bike. Wahoo has an app, but I was able to pretty much sync easily with Zwift and TrainerRoad without any configuring.

The Kickr has adaptors for a variety of wheel mounting options, from an old school QR (135mm) to a non-Boost rear axle (142mm) to a Boost rear axle (148 ). It also has a built-in adjuster that allows you to adapt it for different wheel sizes and keeps the bike level, which eliminates the need for a front wheel block to even things out. The trainer folds up small, is fairly lightweight, and pretty much ticks all the boxes for what I was looking for in a Smart Trainer. One important thing to note is my primary mountain bike has a super boost rear axle (157mm spacing), and neither the Tacx nor the Kickr will allow for that wide of a rear axle, but I was easily able to mount my gravel bike with a 142mm rear axle and mountain bike with a boost thru axle to the Kickr by swapping out adaptors.

I spent a good 10+ hours using the Kickr and it was fairly comparable with the Neo 2T. There was no gap in ERG mode like there was with the SB20, and the power output was super steady. In Zwift, the Tacx power output in ERG mode would be up and down plus or minus 5 watts in each target zone, vs. the Kickr which seemed to micro adjust to keep you pretty on target at all times.

For the price and ease of use, this was by far the best bang for your buck choice for a wheel-off Smart Trainer that we tested. While the Tacx has some really cool features and functions, I lean towards the simpler design and "less moving parts" concept of the Kickr.



Details of Wahoo Kickr Smart Trainer.


Pros

+ Accurate/steady power in ERG mode
+ Fast communication with apps
Cons

- Not compatible with super boost rear axle
- Pricey investment (the Kickr Core is worth a peek)





Tacx NEO 2T

• MSRP $1,399.00
• ANT+/Bluetooth/ANT+FE-C
• Speed, distance, power and cadence sensors
• 47.3 lbs // 21.5 kg
tacx.com/



Casey
Setting up the Tacx NEO 2T was pretty easy. Just like the Kickr, if you can change a cassette, you can get this up and running as setting your bike up on the Tacx is essentially the same process as changing out the rear wheel. This trainer didn’t come with a cassette, though, so either run down to your LBS and pick one up or pull the one off your bike. The NEO 2T comes with the Shimano HG freehub though, so you’re somewhat limited in what cassettes you can run with a mountain bike—although the cog spacing on a 12 speed cassette is the same whether you’re running SRAM or Shimano, so the Sunrace 12-speed from the Kickr or a SRAM NX 11-50 HG cassette will work if you’re using a 12 speed drive train; you’ll just lose the 10-tooth high gear/Shimano’s 51-tooth rock crawling gear.

Once I got the bike onto the trainer and the wheel block placed under my front wheel, I was surprised how stable the bike was. In the saddle, I never had the feeling like I was going to tip over or that the bike felt wobbly; and I didn’t have any rocking going in and out of the saddle doing all-out sprints. I've seen professional riders screw these types of trainers onto a platform on the floor for stability, but it never moved for me. I weigh in at 150 pounds and while I’m fit, I’m generally unable to output massive power numbers. But if you're heavier or putting out 1,000+ watt efforts regularly, maybe you'll need some more support.

This was the first of the smart trainers I tested and was surprised how more realistic riding this was compared to my fluid trainer from 10+ years ago. Not only did this spin up and maintain speed more realistically, but this one also provided feedback when on Zwift. At first, I thought there was something wrong with the trainer, but then I realized I was riding on ‘cobbles’ and that the bouncing was the trainer…it took riding on Zwift to the next level. Additionally, when riding on Zwift, grades felt realistic, and in general, the NEO 2T provided a better realistic feel vs. all the other trainers.

Power on this was very consistent when compared to my power meter, however generally it was reading a few watts lower. However the numbers were always consistent and the response to pedal inputs was super fast: I’d put power to the pedals and the trainer would relay those numbers to Zwift or Trainer Road—the two applications I use regularly—in near real-time.


Tacx Neo 2T
Tacx NEO 2T Power consistency. Garmin Vector 3-Red / Tacx Neo-Green

When doing workouts in ERG mode, the Tacx was very responsive to changes in cadence. Almost too responsive. There were many times where the workout would increase the power, my cadence would drop as a result, the trainer would increase the tension to make up for my reduced cadence, and I’d find myself at 30 RPM struggling to turn my legs over. Consequently, during my first workout that had big shifts in power in ERG mode, I quit about halfway through due to sheer frustration. But after a few sessions, I figured out the groove of this trainer in ERG mode: focus on consistent cadence and don't worry about the power numbers.

These direct drive trainers were not something I had considered before doing this trainer review. The cost seemed to be a bonus that I didn't really need. However, after spending almost three months riding every day on trainers, and factoring in how long winter and the darkness of the PNW are, I can easily see now that investing that money into a trainer like this that I'd use regularly is a no brainer: you come out the other side in the spring ready to shred instead of suffering through that painful six week period where you’re trying to make your legs remember what real bike rides are.


Casey on the Tacx NEO 2T.


Nikki
Set up was a breeze. Just like the Kickr Smart Trainer, Casey tested the NEO 2T first and I pretty much just pulled it out of the box, mounted the correct cassette, changed the adapters that came with it for my thru axle bike, and I was ready to start pedaling. I didn't have to download any apps or calibrate the trainer, it just synced right up with the training apps I was using.

Like the Kickr, it was nice to be training on my own bike where things like reach, saddle height, saddle position, and cockpit are all already dialed in. I have a lot of friends who race and want to spend the winter training on the bike they plan to race, making these smart trainers pretty desirable. Right off the bat, the most noticeable thing about the Tacx as compared to the Saris was how smooth and quiet it was. The only noise I could hear was coming from my squeaky peddle which I have procrastinated overhauling, but that was easily drowned out once I started playing music.

In Zwift, as Casey pointed out, when using ERG mode the Tacx was super sensitive to minor changes in cadence and power, but did a fantastic job of keeping me on my toes. Once I figured out the flow of how each trainer worked, it got easier to use the different training platforms. On the Kickr, the power line was super steady, which maybe isn't as realistic for someone like me who has a hard time keeping a consistent high cadence, so with this trainer I was pushed to work hard on keeping steady.

While the Tacx Neo 2T is $200 more than the Wahoo Kickr, I would say the two are fairly comparable in features, with the exception of the realistic feel mode that the Tacx offers (à la Casey on the cobbles), which is a pretty sweet feature.



Details of the Tacx NEO 2T Smart Trainer.


Pros

+ Easily folds up for slim storage
+ Super quiet
+ Realistic feel mode makes it so you feel the cobbles with vibrations in Zwift and Taxc Films
Cons

- Expensive
- Front wheel block needed
- ERG Cadence struggles






Top Picks

Casey
After spending the better part of 4 months riding every day on several different indoor trainers, there was one that I kept going back to. The Wahoo was easy to connect to all the different devices I tried, held consistent power without constant recalibration, was quiet, and worked well in both ERG and when virtually racing. Through all this testing I started to really enjoy racing on Zwift and the Wahoo gave quick feedback between the trainer and the app. Additionally, when doing structured workouts, this trainer did a great job of holding consistent power and not throwing me into a cadence black-hole.

Before testing and reviewing all these trainers, I don’t think I would have considered investing in a smart trainer. I typically would ride outside a bit during the winter and was able to do structured workouts with my old dumb-trainer and power-meter. Like Nikki, my wife liked the ability to quickly jump on the Stages bike. After finally giving the Wahoo a test though, she didn’t go back for the same reasons. And with two riders in the house, it looks like I’m needing to have two of these in the garage. Whenever they’re back in stock.

Nikki
First and foremost, this was an eye opening experience for me: I am officially one hundred percent sold on the idea of owning a smart trainer. All of the options we tested blew my mind (except the rollers, although they did provide some needed entertainment for my kids as they watched me nerving up to let go of my "security" desk). My main reason? I am the type of human that will procrastinate until there are no hours left in the day to do my workout, so I need all the help I can get. With that in mind, the Stages SB20 is my top pick for this review because it's super convenient and ridiculously quiet. I can place it anywhere in my garage or home I want without worrying about cleaning it, or taking a wheel off, or adjusting it after one of my kids decides to mess with it—it's just there and ready to hit 'GO' as soon as the alarm buzzes in the morning. It's user friendly, easily sync'ed with Zwift/Trainer Road/etc., and was easily adjustable to dial in the perfect fit. For structured workouts it provides accurate power, speed, and cadence data. And it had not one, but two water bottle holders. I'm not virtually racing, so the lag between power to the pedals and responsiveness when "racing" in Zwift, etc was a non-issue for me.

While most my friends have jumped on the Peloton bandwagon (side note: listen to the How I Built This podcast on Peloton) I am still nerdy enough I want to be able to dial my training in to a more cycling specific program that focuses on both power and endurance, so the SB20 is more my style. At $2,899.99 USD it is quite an investment, but the price is comparable to other smart stationary bikes on the market. Considering how much I spent in gym fees and cycling programs over the years, the price of the Stages SB20 is a fairly small investment for the years of winter training I will be able to get out of this bike.


241 Comments

  • 238 0
 Yea but how do they descend?
  • 162 0
 Hold on, let me just drag mine to the top of the stairs.....
  • 36 0
 @bigtim: Send it!
  • 14 0
 I want to know if the seat angle is steep enough for those long, grinding climbs. Not even mentioned here... What kind of review is this?!!
  • 6 0
 The geo is way off and suspension needs some serious work.
  • 49 1
 ebike compatible?
  • 6 0
 I hear that next year's models will be longer and lower.
  • 6 3
 @PocoBoho: but ebikes give you a good cardio workout right? hahahahahhaah
  • 10 0
 @Cerealmike. So to answer your question, OK, but not great. In a completely unrelated topic, does anyone know first aid or remember the phone number for an ambulance? Asking for a friend.
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: I don't think 9-1-1 works across the pond. You can give it a shot though
  • 1 0
 No bottle cages?
  • 3 5
 @noplacelikeloam: That's the number one misconception of ebikes. They just amplify your effort.
I hit my max heart rate every time I ride.
  • 5 0
 @Yaan: Sure, I have an ebike too. But hitting your max heart rate a few times will do very little as a training effect. I have tracked TSS on both and they just don't compare. Structured training is entirely different.
  • 4 0
 @noplacelikeloam: I'm a beer drinking DH rider. I thought that was structured training.
  • 1 0
 @Yaan: Ha! Different kind. ;-)
  • 1 0
 @Yaan: I wouldn't bother trying to explain.

No one wants to belive it...
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: ....so, not an agile climber but you'll get to the top eventually?
  • 2 0
 @Arepiscopo: Fun fact: 911 does work here, it just transfers you to the 999 UK call handling system if you call from a mobile in the UK. I think it might be like that because kids watch so many US films and TV shows that it might be the only number some of them think of in an emergency.
  • 3 0
 @bigtim: 0118 999 881 999 119 725... 3
  • 1 0
 @Linkpin: well sh** that’s good to know. Thanks dude!
  • 2 0
 @PocoBoho: i have genuinely had a lady phone my shop and ask if we have any turbo trainers that are suitable for an e-bike. the mind boggles.
  • 1 0
 @b45her: Us too. However, in my very limited experience riding a Stumpy Levo around the shop, can you not turn off the power and ride it "normally"? I don't want to presume that someone that can afford a Levo and a trainer can't afford a basic trainer bike as well and just doesn't want to start accumulating a fleet.
  • 1 0
 @Allen82 That sounds right...
  • 67 10
 Please do not comment "just ride outside" or similar. These are tools for different needs. I have original Neo, bought it several years ago to use it for recovery after injury. Turned out, it is much better to ride inside when there is ice on the roads, or when you take care of the kids, or just want to be close to your family (if you put it in the living room). Good ventilation is essential, do not use trainer without it.
  • 132 26
 Just ride outside...
  • 34 3
 just ride inside
  • 18 10
 just ride outdoors
  • 15 7
 Buy a jacket, then ride outside.
  • 19 0
 It's true, trainers are preferable when you're recovering from an injury, when you're doing structured workouts but live somewhere hilly/urban/etc, or when you don't want to spend an hour gathering and donning all your cold gear just to squeeze in a short ride in the dark and then have to spend another hour hosing all your shit off and thawing your toes.
The best part is that if you're on a trainer and you forgot/run out of water and snacks you just mosey over to the kitchen.
  • 3 0
 @fullfacemike: and you can binge watch your netflix show on tempo days . . . ;-)
  • 10 2
 Just build trails. In my area winter time is the best time to fix up trails or build new ones.
  • 3 14
flag jaame (Feb 5, 2021 at 11:38) (Below Threshold)
 I don't see the point of trainers for mountain bikes. I don't really see the point of them at all, but that's just me. The reason I enjoy mountain biking more than road is that I like the body movements, the thrill of dirt descents, jumps and shit. Why anyone would choose to sit and pedal on one is beyond me. I'd take a road bike and a used trainer or rollers over an expensive direct drive trainer for my mountain bike every time. It makes no sense at all. For training your pedalling, road bikes are just better.
  • 9 0
 @jaame: Road riding in the rain sucks too for all the same reasons. Structured indoor training has the best bang for your buck if you're trying to gain or maintain fitness. Not only are the workouts themselves ridiculously effective and time-efficient, especially if you stick to a plan, but you cut out all the other time spend gearing up, cleaning and maintaining your bike, figuring out which route will suit your workout the best, etc. I ride a lot of road and mountain in the rain here but when it's time to get my shit together for racing it's trainer time all the time.
  • 6 0
 @jaame: Also, while $1200 for the nicest direct drive seems like a lot, they are nearly zero-maintenance and they last for years. I've had mine for fourish years which means my cost of ownership is less than a dollar a day now whether I'm using it or not. Factor in reduced maintenance costs on my bikes plus the benefits of being fit year-round with frankly minimal effort and the deal is even sweeter.
  • 10 0
 I was recently in a serious car accident. I am trying to recover right now, riding the trainer is all I can do. I normally ride 20 hours a week outdoors, and the trainer sat unused for over a year, until now.

Set up the trainer next to my GF, we are binging Battlestar Galactica lol
  • 5 0
 @fullfacemike: Even better, you can replace your water bottle with a beer!
  • 5 0
 @fullfacemike: Agree on all points. There’s no better way to be a faster trail rider than to be fitter, and there’s no faster way to get fitter than structured training. I’ve ridden outside for years exclusively and just started structured training this past year. I’ve gotten enormously more fit and faster, plus I’m able to ride all year when riding outside either isn’t feasible, safe, or pleasant.
  • 3 0
 similar
  • 2 0
 @MDRipper: build, drink more, maybe wait for sun. You got it bud
  • 1 0
 @hsertic it all depends on the individual - if you don't have family commitments and generally have nice weather and little traffic, then of course ride outside. For the rest of us in the real world, where bike riding has to fit around work and childcare, plus dark winter evenings or mornings, rush hour traffic and the good old British (or PNW, whatever) weather, then an indoor trainer is the difference between being fit or not over winter. And being able to get more laps in on the mountain bike when spring comes. My trainer was free, and articles like this do suggest you need to spend LOTS of money, when the cheapest dumb trainer and a blue tyre will keep you just as fit if you put the effort in.
  • 2 3
 @mountainsofsussex: I can see they have their place. My best bud is all about the trainer in winter. He's always posting up on Strava so I know he's at it every day.
I can see the potential benefits, but putting a mountain bike one one is something I don't understand at all.
I prefer other forms of exercise in the winter but that's just me. I can't think of anything worse than being stuck out there in the garage for hours on end in the dim light, damp and cold. There are plenty of other sports that also help with fitness and also involve doing something other than sitting and spinning.
I'm cool with it if that's someone's bag but it's not mine.
Also, a used road bike with a proper pedalling position and a used trainer is definitely a better proposition than putting an enduro MTB on a trainer.
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: agree completely, for me the trainer is addition, not replacement for riding. And after too many injuries, there are (weather) situations when it is better to ride inside than outside. Any trainer is good if you have the will to ride it, these smart trainers with Zwift just make it a bit easier and realistic.
  • 2 0
 @jaame: It does not have to be in cold damp garage for hours. I have put mine in living space, so I am confortable and close to my family when I ride. It also does not matter if it a mountain or a road bike, any bike that fits you is good.
  • 2 0
 @hsertic: in my case it would have to be in the garage because I live in a tiny house!
  • 1 0
 @jaame: I see your point that hooking an enduro bike up to a trainer probably isn't great since mountain bikes are often fit for handling performance rather than all-day stationary pedaling comfort. Plus it would be bouncy as hell and you'd wreck your suspension sweating all over it. Repurposing an old bike as a dedicated trainer bike is definitely where it's at.
  • 2 0
 @fullfacemike: for people seeking to train on the bike they are racing on, this set up is mint.
  • 2 0
 @Marcencinitas: Do they make jackets with ant+ support?
  • 3 0
 @hsertic: if you're putting in the effort, the colder and damper the better! I ride with the garage door open, and the Garmin says it's 2°C and I've got the shirt off, sweat dripping all over the bike!
  • 43 7
 In my 40+ years of riding bikes, the last thing I'd want to do is pedal anything indoors. 15 minutes on a stationary trainer was an agonizing death in a pool of sweat. After a bad crash this fall requiring surgery and months of recovery, I got a Kickr and mounted up my old road bike and started Zwifting. While it can't begin to compare to riding outdoors, it sure beats missing a day due to weather or work schedule. Virtual racing is a lot more fun than I expected, once I got past the ego hit of getting dropped. The only downside? I no longer have an excuse to not get an age group podium if XC racing ever returns...
  • 6 2
 Trainers are useful at times, but really hard to get motivated to ride and put any worthwhile time on. An hour on a bike outdoors feels like nothing compared to an hour on a trainer.
  • 1 0
 have you tried the tacx software......i was zwifting but after seeing actual footage of tracks on and off road i was hooked. made zwift look a bit boring. I prefer trying to get as close to the real world thing as i can plus i can see different parts all over my own and other countries which is great. It works with most smart trainers and is the same price as zwift. That said if you lkike the social side of zwifting thats probably easier on there but for me i couldn't go back to zwifts computer graphics now....would get bored in like 20 mins.
  • 2 1
 Completely agree. They suck compared to riding outdoors... but for the normal person, they are awesome tools for establishing consistency. I get to mtb one day a week, so when I get on the trainer, I just tell myself "this will make Sunday even better"
  • 3 0
 @rabidmonkfish: The Tacx came with a free trial of the software, and it looked really great and the feel on the trainer was spot-on. And totally agree, if you're 'out riding' those video software options like Rouvy are much better. For me, Zwift has the leg-up on the sheer number of other participants and events like races, group rides, and group workouts. Without those Zwift would lose it's interest in the first few rides. However once I'm racing other people, or trying to finish a workout that 50+ other people are also doing, the motivation to sit in my garage and spin a bike grew tenfold.
  • 5 0
 I signed up for Trainerroad. You set up a plan with a minimum of 3 days a week, and it isn't hard to just stick with it. 3.5 hours a week.
  • 2 0
 @cwgatz: Agree that the racing and riding with others part adds a lot. Knowing that those are real people sweating it away somewhere is fun. My kids watch sometimes too. "Dad, catch that guy from Canada..." or "That Polish guy passed you like you are riding backwards!" Kurwa!
  • 2 0
 @gomeeker: agreed. I had beta'd zwift back in like 2013 and after about 5 rides was bored and didn't go back till this year and loved it. The difference? All the other people I'm competing against. There's always someone faster, and there's always someone that could catch me if I let off. It's been great motivation
  • 3 0
 If you’re still reduced to a puddle of sweat everything you ride the trainer then look into getting better or more fans. You never realize how much air is moving around you outside until you’re stuck on a trainer and it feels like an oven.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: on those days without motivation one needs a minimum of discipline.
  • 1 0
 @HeManHunter: True, but I can't get disciplined or motivated to ride on the trainer. Haha. I am very motivated and disciplined to ride outside though.
  • 17 0
 The rollers may say they are compatible with road and mountain bikes, but the idea of riding knobby tire on the rollers sounds awful. That being said, they are a fantastic tool for improving your balance and smoothness on the bike. I enjoy the fact you are engaged the whole time and cannot zone out like you can on a normal turbo. As a bonus, way easier on your under carriage since the bike can move with you.
  • 20 0
 The cool part about riding on rollers with a MTB is you get two free slick tires for your fluid trainer after only a few rides Smile
  • 7 0
 I have a simple mag trainer. We put my wife's bike on it since she rides the smallest bike in the house and then anyone can use it but I am the only one who does. The most important thing was to get a slick road tire for it. With the stock hard compound almost knobless XC tired that Fuji speced it was like there was a tornado in the room. $15 slick 27.5 off Amazon and it is bearable. Just put on some youtube trail preview videos (BKXC, Nate Hills, etc.) on the TV/XBox and start pedaling. The funniest thing is when they slow down, I do too and if they brake hard or crash, I can't stop myself from pulling my brakes too.
  • 3 0
 If using a smart trainer and using something like zwift, I find I don't zone out so much. I don't generally do training plans and just stick to the races. It's more engaging when you're trying to keep pace with a group or catch the group ahead. I found I couldn't do more than 30 mins on a dumb trainer, but with zwift I was easily riding for an hour or more.
  • 2 0
 The first and only time I tried rollers was 20 years ago on a BMX bike, and I went careening off the sides. Riding on ice is such an apt description of what I felt. Since then, I've seen people hop up on rollers and just go -- so easy it makes me think I must have been doing something wrong. (Most likely). Still it's nice to see them reaffirming what I felt.
  • 1 0
 @steflund: Isn't this where slick tires come from?
  • 1 0
 I like the idea of the Elite, but the maximum weight seems kinda low. Great for stick thin roadies with 0.2kg bikes but for anyone tall and heavier built it might be a limiting factor.
  • 17 0
 the Stage is nice, but you cant fit a water bottle inside the frame. For that reason, I'm out.
  • 2 1
 Even if there had been a mount on the top-tube, the bottles would get soaked in sweat after 15 minutes. The top-tube on that bike was disgusting at the end of every ride, so I can understand why they moved it out front.
  • 1 0
 @cwgatz: it is their own fault for not using one fan. I don't understand why you would not want to do that and why the f*ck do you need your kit on a trainer? Can do it almost naked. ..
  • 16 0
 Rollers are amazing until you lose concentration and have to explain to your wife how you smashed the tv with your face.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, definitely not a “zone out and pedal for a bit” piece of equipment. I had rollers once.... Once. LOL
  • 3 0
 Riding on ice is such a perfect description here.
  • 5 0
 Trying my hardest to hit 60mph I came off my rollers at 58mph. It just burned a 6" long strip of carpet. Nothing too dramatic.
  • 2 0
 @kungfupanda: I can personally vouch that dramatic results are possible, although not necessarily guaranteed.
  • 6 0
 I got a flat tire on the front while riding rollers once. I ended up going OTB right in my living room, of course I was using clipless pedals too so the bike came with me. My wife has never let me live that down.
  • 13 0
 So irresponsible. Not a single helmet in the entire article.
  • 5 0
 For real I think I'd need a full-face for the rollers.
  • 9 1
 Joking asides the tacx neo spins the freewheel like real world momentum downhill or coasting on flats etc after a spirited section so you can coast like on a real bike unlike the kicker and others which don't so once you stop pedalling you very quickly have to expect to build up that momentum again when you start so less like real world biking on them other trainers.
  • 8 0
 Purchased the Wahoo KICKR stationary bike in late fall for the family to use. So much better than the mag-roller we no longer used due to the need to switch bikes.

If it were just me, no way I'd drop the coin ($3k I think), but sharing it across 4 family members and the ability for all of us to re-size and ready it in 30 seconds or so gives it the win.

I'm in the process of building a mount so I can get my laptop up there and work while I ride which should help me burn off some of this extra Covidsulation.
  • 8 0
 The issue with the Stages Bike SB20 having a lag in the power response in Zwift is likely due to have the power source being selected as the stages bike rather than having the left crank power meter selected. You then select the stages bike as the smart bike. Once that is done, the power is extremely responsive. I have the bike and I think it works great on Zwift but the one time I selected the bike as the power source I had the same problem with lag and it was annoying. I bet that switch would likely fix the the erg mode issue too.
  • 2 0
 Thanks for the feedback. I will test this out next time I plan a Zwift ride on the SB20.
  • 2 0
 @nkrohan: My friend is a software engineer on the bike and told me that the left power meter adds both the right and left and transmits the combined numbers to Zwift and other apps. Have fun! Hope it works!
  • 2 0
 That's good to know. The delay in power and the ERG struggles made this bike really, really frustrating. It's disappointing that they've complicated this in such a way that you need to go through these extra steps for such an expensive tool. Seems like that could be an easy fix to reduce confusion.
  • 1 0
 @cwgatz: Agreed!
  • 1 0
 My SB20 is a lot more responsive with the crank length set at 172.5mm. A few in the SB20 group on FB have noticed the same thing. In addition, go into the link app and in the bike settings select “pair with Bluetooth”. The firmware is a bit premature on this bike. It will catch up.
  • 8 0
 All due respect to the authors, if you are really interested in full reviews of virtually ever option available, check out these two YT channels:

www.youtube.com/channel/UC6y_DbpezOinlzHv8O092zw

www.youtube.com/user/gplama

Tacx Neo 2 owner here. Two years in and loving it + Zwift.
  • 14 1
 I could have easily written full articles on each of these (and did in my drafts) but wanted to keep it relatively concise. This wasn't intended to be a full comprehensive review. Check out dcrainmaker for those.
  • 2 1
 yeh i feel like theres so many worthwhile features on the tacx neo's that should have been made more apparent to potential buyers if only to make it clearer to would be purchasers . If i just went of this review i would potentially purchased something else and for this money if i learnt about some of these features of the neo's after the purchase i would have been dissapointed. I did this same exercise a couple months back and am now a tacx neo 2 owner.
  • 1 1
 I agree and for the right person would recommend purchasing the Tacx. All of the direct-drive trainers that are out today are pretty awesome. The feedback on the Tacx is better than the Wahoo without a doubt. For how I use a trainer I went with the Wahoo as my favorite of these, but I'd be 100% happy if I had the Tacx.
  • 6 0
 Kickr has XD drivers available so that you can run Eagle cassettes. Personally I made the move from Kickr to Peloton so my wife and daughter could use it. Surprisingly I enjoy the Peloton much more than Zwift. At the end of the day, trainers are much more personal that it appears so choose wisely.
  • 9 0
 Blasphemy! This cannot be! My eyes!
  • 4 0
 Throw some power pedals on your peloton and you have a happy family and a sync with zwift, trainerroad etc . . .
  • 1 0
 @noplacelikeloam: I got really excited about this possibility until I looked at the price. Damn near 30% of the price of the whole bike!
  • 1 0
 @sjma: Get them from germany . . much cheaper, or used.
  • 2 0
 Peloton here. Bought used before the covid for $1300. Hardly used. Peloton subscription includes SO much more than spinning. The core apps, stacking, yoga. And the whole family has their own profile. My kiddo is spinning and doing body weight classes on his tablet.
  • 2 0
 @owlie: 100% agree, but just be aware the power measurements are all over the place. DC Rainmaker did some analysis on this also.
  • 1 0
 @noplacelikeloam: Ive seen my max go to 530 when I havent even been in it hard. I understand that. But my cadence vs resistance is what I look for. The point of diminishing returns
  • 9 1
 Seems like a lot of effort. Wouldn't it be easier to just sit on the sofa and watch some bike videos?
  • 4 0
 On a Kickr for the wife and I. I can swap bikes without touching another in about 80 seconds. I've enjoyed video games in the past but Zwift was hard to get into. I did a trial and passed on it. Wife and I also trialed Sufferfest, which is pretty freaking awesome for the offseason. Its getting new content all the time and just really engaging. Nice to have that with some nice interval workouts that have a little variety. We both love it.
  • 7 0
 I don't understand how you can ride indoors without a fan? I'm done in 10 minutes unless I have something blowing on me.
  • 4 0
 That's what he said?.......But I'm with you. I have a Peloton in the basement and have 2 fans going normally if its a longer ride.
  • 3 0
 If you’re going to do it, go all-out and get the Wahoo Headwind, which is a fan that adjusts up and down based on heart rate or speed...
  • 2 0
 @DrPete: Have you used it? I'm interested to know how effective it is and if it's worth the $.

I'm running a Kickr Core without a fan currently (in a cool garage - can't imagine using a trainer at 68F/20C indoor temperatures), and I do get pretty drenched by the end of a workout, even with lots of toweling off.
  • 3 0
 @MtbSince84: yup. I have one, and while it’s a total extravagance it makes me happy every time I ride. I leave it linked to heart rate and it really is nice to get it blasting at me when I’m riding hard. The price tag only stings once. Haha.
  • 1 0
 @DrPete: Thanks! I'm not using a HRM, but with Headwind it seems like it would be crucial.
  • 1 0
 @MtbSince84: no problem. You can use the headwind in manual mode or speed sensitive mode, but I never really saw the point. I find it way more useful/helpful for the fan to crank while I’m working on a long climb than to blow hard while I’m coasting downhill for the sake of realism.
  • 4 0
 I've got a Tacx Flux indoors with my road bike setup on it. UK winters are grim, it's just wet and miserable so I find Zwift a good way to keep the legs spinning until the sunshine returns. I'm old and grumpy, being cold and wet makes me even more grumpy. I've noticed more and mote MTBs in Zwift. I'll see if I can get my Enduro bike setup, Mayne the suspension bounce will make it more comfortable on my balls
  • 5 0
 Putting your bike on a trainer really highlights any bike fit issues doesn’t it. I’ll be on my third saddle shortly.
  • 8 0
 Be nice to have a Pinkbike kit option on Zwift!
  • 4 0
 By far the kickr has been the best bang for buck cycling purchase I've made, the whole family uses it through the dark winter months, I have 15k kms on it, prob 25k including everyone, only tensioned the belt once. Made a rocker plate for it though, helps with the lower back
  • 4 0
 Strava says I’ve done 456 miles on the peloton bike this year and none of them were with a fan. I never thought of that - I’ve just opened my window a little bit and enjoyed the cold breeze. Their 60 and 90 minute power zone classes have made a big difference in my cardio health and now I’m even doing their yoga classes. My girlfriend was very smart to get this bike 6 months ago - now I need to get her on a mountain bike.

If I had to shop for a trainer now, the Wahoo Kickr looks like what I’d want to get. I think pairing that with one of their computers would be a good way to keep things integrated, and I’ve always wanted to try out Zwift.
  • 1 0
 Cool breeze in the north east is slightly different than in SoCal. I think it's over 70 here right now lol

I do have a high heat tolerance though, so I can get by with a small fan. No fan at all if it's just a recovery ride.
  • 3 0
 So as someone using the M2 in their garage, with a trainer tire on an older 26" mtb, I enjoyed reading this review. I have never been one to be huge into the trainer, but winter, life, etc made me want to do something. Its an impressive feeling when it starts to change the resistance, and you feel like you are going somewhere.
I would agree that the setup is a little bit of a pain, and that it does need to be calibrated each time, but that's a pretty minor thing to deal with. I run it with just my Garmin GPS, have yet to enter the whole online training bit, but love what it is, does and will do for me. If you are on the fence, I'd say get it. And do be sure to get a trainer tire. It does so much better, and so much quieter with one.
  • 3 0
 I didn’t realise how expensive they were. I presume you then have a zwift or whatever monthly subscription on top. I was being in to get curious about these but at that price I think I will stick to going for a run to keep fit when I’m not riding
  • 2 0
 I bought my trainer LONG before Covid when my friend owned a bike shop. Still pricey. And I rarely used it, opting to run or ride. If you don't need it or want it, it's not worth it. On the other hand, after a serious car accident, it has been helping me with rehab.
  • 5 0
 Would love to see a review on Zwift, Sufferfest, Trainer Road and all that jazz as well, specifically related to mtb training.
  • 3 0
 Invested in a smart TT when the lockdown kicked in. Did a stack of research on DC Rainmaker beforehand. Racking up 500 miles a month training and racing on Zwift now. Don't knock it till, you've tried it. I'm on it 5 times a week. It's great for recovery rides, group rides etc etc. If you want to get fit in the off-season this is the way to go. Unlike IRL, where you freewheel regularly, there is no let up on a smart TT. As a result, riding up hills becomes far easier when you head outside MTB'ing. Your legs can sustain more, your HR is far lower and you're accustomed to suffering. Easy to squeeze in lunchtime sessions when WFH etc. There is a great community and many local leagues. RIDE ON !
  • 4 0
 Highly highly recommend the kicker core (spend the savings on a Wiggle lifeline rocker) combined with Zwift it's seriously addictive and fun training.
  • 2 0
 I have a basic cheap turbo attached to my cheap carbon road bike (it was £100).
The latest GCN training video kills me every Monday, Wednesday and Friday after work.

I would love the spare cash to spend on a complete ZWIFT setup but I think I would live on it, it looks ace.

Until then, my cheap setup that cost me £150 in total will do. It hurts all the same.

I do have a free 37" LCD TV connected to my phone and a nice garden building to ride in too (made from recycled.. really cheap.. windows)
  • 2 0
 "Sunrace 10-50 12-speed cassette worked great -- you just lose the use of the 10-tooth cog, as the HG spline won’t allow anything smaller than 11 teeth."

"Lose the use of"? If it doesn't fit, then how is a 10-50 HG cassette possible? Do you mean you leave the 10T off? Do they supply a spacer?
  • 2 0
 The sunrace cassette is 11-50, not 10-50. Mistype on my part
  • 2 0
 My wife bought a Peloton recently and I didn't think I would like it (either spin classes in general, or using it indoors) but I actually really like it and use it all the time. Definitely has helped my fitness for mountain biking in a noticeable way. They are expensive but if you actually use it often then it's worth the money IMO.
  • 2 0
 Zwift needs to have an MTB gearing option. Just get it done already!

For those who don´t know, speed in the Zwift game is adjusted so gearing on the trainer is relevant. Just as in real life you will get dropped by roadies because you run out of gears. A watt should still be the same watt for everyone but to virtually adjusting would be great for MTB and make flat and downhills relevant i the game.
  • 1 0
 From everything I've run on Zwift, including several different trainers on several different bikes (including my hardtail running GX), watts are watts and Zwift doesn't look at my bikes wheel speed. On my mountain bike and gravel bike there's definitely a disadvantage because I don't have the same range of gearing that I have on my road bike. Watts are still watts, but my bike doesn't have the gear range and so I'll spin-out on flats or downhills much more easily than I would on my road bike. However, if you were to play around with your "trainer difficulty" setting it may help balance those out.
  • 2 0
 @cwgatz I own a SB20 and have been anxious to see them release a MTB handlebar setup (ships only with curly bar here in USA). Your review seems to be a reveal of the new MTB bar accessory!
Also, after owning MANY wheel on/wheel off trainers over the past 20 years... once you go to a purpose built iindoor trainer - nothing else compares. My nice outdoor bike is no longer getting trashed. And the SB20 is actually made to be sweat on ;->.
  • 1 0
 The Stages bike was definitely my wife's favorite of all the trainers tested, and the ability to jump on and just ride is really nice. I wasn't aware of the flat bar availability, as Stages shipped it with both to here in the states. From my wife's coaching she was donated an indoor trainer from the company her gym used, that we've had for a few years now. I'll still ride it from time to time just to hop and go if my bikes are dirty, etc. They're great tools and if the stages bike can fix that erg mode bounce and the power delay they'd be set.
  • 1 0
 If you're going to test rollers, you are missing the best thing since sliced bread, Insideride Smart Rollers. There is no better smart trainer for a mountain biker. I'm on my third year with them and it still blows my mind that there aren't more people using them.
  • 5 0
 They forgot the to list the trainer for doing manuals.
  • 1 0
 I tried that on my Aldi special. It was a bad idea. I don't think you want to wear out a $$ trainer when you could just buy $30 worth of lumber. Or learn in the real world.
  • 1 0
 @vapidoscar: Your last suggestion is the best way.
  • 1 0
 There is a fully interactive version of the ELITE Quick Motions on the market. It is called ELITE Nero an it works with ZWIFT, Kinomap... I can recommend this very much as it feels like real riding and you train your balance. Just as hint for the interested.
  • 5 0
 I want to see the slow mo huck to flat video.
  • 1 0
 I'll just tie a rope from one end of the handlebar to a support strut in the middle of my basement, then riding circles. You can drag a sandbag behind you, for more resistance. Alternate direction so you have even wear on the tires.
  • 1 0
 I got donated a dumb Tacx trainer plus pub bike with trainer tyre by my very generous brother when he upgraded to full on singing and dancing smart trainer. I've no idea how many Watts I'm putting out, but I do the hardest GCN training videos I can find and it's certainly kept my fitness up in the dark wet months with lockdown. I don't think I'd be any fitter with one of these video game trainers, and I don't think I'd enjoy it more. Certainly not £500 + subscription more!
  • 3 0
 The biggest difference is the perceived effort. Without power, my perceived effort on workouts like that was matching the videos. Once I added power I realized that I was letting myself off easy as I got deeper into my workouts and intervals. That's where power (and the smart trainers) really have their place. It's amazing how much more honest my power numbers keep me over my rate of perceived exertion. Though keeping track of your RPE (heart rate etc etc) is also important and used in conjunction with power.
  • 1 0
 @cwgatz: I'm sure I do drop off power over a "ride", but if I'm still breathing through my eyeballs by the end, and my heart rate is bouncing off my max, then I probably couldn't have put any more in. Yes, I'd really like a power meter trainer. But I'd rather have a damper upgrade or a pair of wheels for the bike I enjoy riding, rather than the torture device in the garage. For those that can afford both, yes I'm sure it's a bit better
  • 1 0
 Back before fat bikes and groomed winter trails were a thing I used a fluid trainer and a road or mountain bike with a slick. I also followed along on the ‘Spinervals’ video’s, I thought those were really good workouts and the hard ones I could never keep up on, I wish they would have done a comparison to these.
  • 1 0
 If you are looking for a training shelf that holds multiple screens, a fan, your laptop, towel and 2 drinks, check out the "Pain Station" from Sender Ramps USA sender-rampsusa.com/collections/training/products/pain-station-birch-color
  • 1 0
 Thanks so much PinkBike for publishing this. I'm definitely in the market for a smart trainer, and this in-depth review is more info than I've found on the Wahoo vs the Tacx, which are the current top contenders. Much appreciated, and tell your advertisers that they're definitely hitting the target market with this one.
  • 1 0
 They're both great and you can't go wrong with either
  • 2 0
 @cwgatz: That's the problem... I have to pick one of two great products. I think I'm leaning toward the Wahoo because I like the form factor better, and they have a bunch of extra add-ons like the fan and tilt control that I could add later if I get silly into it. My wife rides (more than I do), and I have teenage kids that would benefit from some access to exercise - involving a touch-screen might actually make them use it - so I don't mind getting something a bit over-the-top nice.
  • 2 0
 @pixelguru: sounds like you need to let her choose then
  • 1 0
 This was awesome. And so very helpful....but I'm not ready yet.

Just as an aside, I remember a mate a decade or more ago doing some winter training on rollers in his garage. 26" MTB on slicks...liked MTB but more a typical roadie. For some bizarre brain faded reason and perhaps chock full of stoke, he decided to dismount with a bunny hop. He was quite fortunate that the wall he ran into was mostly drywall... mostly.
  • 1 0
 I'm surprised Elite gave you a roller for testing... maybe it's all they had left Big Grin I bought their Suito direct trainer back in November because I got a good deal. Still quite an investment, yes, but I've been using it a lot, never got so many km in over the winter. Kudos to everyone still riding outside at this time, but if I have to choose between riding in the dark on icy roads, putting on 5 layers and still freezing my toes off after 90min, or just hopping on the trainer whenever I want and getting some training done, I choose the latter. It doesn't replace riding outside, but it's a great help to keep the legs spinning over the winter.
  • 1 0
 @nkrohan It's super pricey but why not try either the Peloton Bike+ or or if you want to get really crazy why not the Activetainment B/01 bike. You could also enhance your Wahoo Kicker experience by adding some sort of tilting turning base like the InsideRise E-flex system.
  • 1 0
 How about I just go down the Dicks Sporting goods and get a trainer for $150, that also comes with a lifetime warranty, also they're indoor cycles are just as good and cheaper at $500-600 lol. Almost $3 grand for an indoor bike/trainer is ridiculous lol.
  • 1 0
 I have a Wahoo Kickr and one feature of the Tacx I'm jealous of is the freehub body options. The Tacx appears to have a better Campagnolo option than the ones sold by Wahoo for the Kickr. Had I known that before buying the Wahoo I may have gone with the Tacx, but too late now.
  • 4 0
 Will Sven and Boris be shooting the indoor trainer WC?
  • 4 0
 Boy that 5.5 is a pretty bike :-)
  • 2 0
 Even better with two wheels!
  • 3 0
 It's too late- we've all been training all winter. Enjoy being the caboose Wink
  • 2 0
 I have a 1 year old, and I’m kicking myself for not getting one of there when they were born.

It is the nap time saviour of my life.
  • 1 1
 Really random collection of devices to pair against one another that does a disservice to each of them and renders this article pretty useless as any sort of reference... should stick to comparing wheel on to wheel on, direct drive to direct drive, and smart bike to smart bike... and just leave rollers out entirely. And if you're gonna use a platform for one trainer, use it for all of them.
  • 1 0
 I heard that trainers where the back end of your bike locked into a vertical plane is bad for your bike because it causes unusual stresses and flex. Any truth in this? Anyone snapped a bike in a trainer?
  • 14 15
 Here comes likely to be an unpopular comment for avid zwifters... I have a Tacx NEO 2T -> bought it for my wife as a training tool to whilst recovering from foot surgery. But I too have tried it out..

I hate it. She hates it. My assessment is simply -> like a stationary gym bike, but without the comfy seat or fan but has gears. I'd rather ride my MTB on gravel or the road for that matter. Don't get me started on the zwift aspect of it.. total let down.. if I want to fire up a video game - lets get the fun stuff in there like super mario cart type of action.

That all being said, I am fortunate to be able to ride all year round, but even if I couldn't.. I'd rather get my spinning in on a normal gym bike.
  • 7 1
 Watch out, you're gonna get downvoted for giving a completely reasonable explanation as to why you and your wife both have a personal preference.
  • 11 0
 Counterpoint - Just started Zwifting this year. Ride road, gravel and mounain. Have lost 17lbs and gotten to almost a 300 FTP. Smart trainer and Zwift have single handedly been the best money/time investment I've made in a considerable amount of time. Had a mag trainer and got bored after 20 minutes. 60 minutes on Zwift flies by and it's a considerably better workout for the time spent. And its motivating and fun. I can ride year round here too in BC and I'm sorry 5 degrees and raining sucks, I'll ride indoors anytime it's like that outside. Just an opinion from the other side.
  • 3 2
 @fasian: Valid counterpoint - but when its 5 degree's and raining at sea level, that means its about -2 and snowing on the MTN.. and I'll get my workout carving the white stuff instead!
  • 3 0
 Fair enough. But if you indeed had 4-7 months where riding outside was rare, what would your assessments be then?
  • 3 0
 @CDT77: lol that time is coming. i've got two little kids preventing that ATM. My skis are collecting dust!
  • 5 0
 @Chuckolicious: especially during this pandemic. some have had no choice...........
  • 4 0
 Nothing beats riding outside. I've typically got one hour to saddle up get in a ride, and be ready for either work or getting the kid off to school. Winter riding requires so much additional work I'd only spend 15 minutes actually in the saddle. So for time crunched folks like myself, it's a great way to maintain and build fitness during the cold dark months of winter so when spring comes I don't feel like crap. Riding indoors is not for everyone, and if you can ride outside year-round, do it. But for those who can't because of darkness, weather and trail conditions, it's a great option.
  • 2 0
 @Chuckolicious: "I'd rather get my spinning in on a normal gym bike." -> comfy seat, included fan.. etc etc. But if zwift introduced 'real steering' with guns and lazer shooting options.. I'd re-assess.. lol
  • 2 0
 @CDT77: Friendly loadout incoming! Get to the circle! If I could jump on a bike in Warzone I'd be f*cking Greg Lamond now! :-D
  • 2 0
 Love Zwift! Turned my bike fitness around significantly.
  • 3 0
 I had a serious car accident which prevents me from being able to ride my bike. Gym's closed. So I dusted my old trainer off.
  • 4 1
 Yup, they placed "Balance and practice is key" as a Con.....
  • 2 0
 I think they really don't get it.
  • 3 0
 That garage could use some work....
  • 3 0
 HR folks definitely take their cycling seriously. Great write up!
  • 2 0
 @cwgatz Are there plans to try more trainers in the future? I'd be curious on your take of the Saris H3. Thanks
  • 3 0
 I'm always happy to try new trainers, but this is what was sent to us. In general, the direct drive trainers were all very close, and I would expect the Saris to be right there. I've got several friends who use it and love it. So if you've got a deal on a Saris H3, go for it. I didn't think I'd like the trainers and Zwift as much as I did. And my wife (who likes riding, but isn't into training/racing/etc) also has really liked the direct drive trainers, though she couldn't really tell the difference between them. But compared to the wheel-on trainers, she thought it was night and day.
  • 2 0
 @cwgatz: Thank you, sir!
  • 1 0
 Taken from respective manufacturers website...
Tacx neo 2t accuracy less than 1%
Kick'r accuracy +/- 1%
So tacx is more accurate by there own claimed specs of both...
  • 1 2
 Things i never needed and never wanted.. conditions cant be that bad to go out and to exercise. walk, hike,skate, bike, run, swim, surf.. If you are on a stage where you need your stem and pedals.. Sorry.. Than you must be Enduurooo Ha Ha Ha
  • 1 0
 Donno why you guys were using chairs with rollers. Easiest way to start on rollers is in a door way with door jambs on each side (door open). For others ....
  • 2 1
 Now do this again , but this time keep the budget under $400. I'm not spending 2900 big ones on a stationary bike. No way.
  • 3 0
 Look for a used spin bike. I’ve had three different spin bikes, never paid more than $250 for a good one.

Like many home gym products, people buy spin bikes then don’t use them, they sell em for cheap on Craig’s list.

Gyms also sell used spin bikes.
  • 4 0
 A fluid trainer is a good option. Lifeline fluid trainer, speed and cadence sensors, trainer tire, $10 in 2x4's that I used to build a laptop stand, pre-existing fan and it's a perfectly good workout. Total cost was about $300cad. If you don't want to use with an app, you can have a good workout without the sensors and just judge your exertion levels or use a heart rate monitor.
  • 2 0
 @nurseben: Exactly, just add some power pedals and you basically have a stages bike for half the price.
  • 3 0
 @noplacelikeloam: I've got a fluid trainer and power pedals. In theory it's the same, but in practice having a trainer that responds or can do ERG is vastly different. If that's what you've got? Definitely ride what you've got and no need to apologize for what you're riding. However if you're starting fresh and have the means, I was amazed at the difference these new trainers provide for training and 'zwifting'.
  • 1 0
 @cwgatz: 100% agree. Just a cheap alternative . . . Also, you can apparently put the spindles from some power pedals into an XTR pedal on your MTB . . . if you ever get bored with indoors trainer.
  • 1 3
 I’ve ridden many trainers over the past thirty years, Mag, Centrifugal, rollers, spin bikes.

For ease of use and to get a quick fitness fix, a spin bike works best.

For compact, occasional use or as a dedicated trainer, a resistance rear wheel trainer is great. Using you mountain bike requires fussing with set up and break down, which is fine if you’re snowbound for winter, but if you ride during the winter you’ll probably want a dedicated bike for your trainer.

Rollers are simply the best if you want to ride indoors, yes they take practice, yes they require more focus, BUT that’s part of the training too.

I think about spin bikes and rear wheel trainers like lifting weights in the gym, narrow purpose, not “natural“.

I think of rollers like CrossFit, it’s more practical, it’s harder, but it’s also more fun and better for you.

The biatch about rollers is you need a roller specific bike. I no longer ride bike, so my trainer of choice is a spin bike. I also mountain bike year round, two to three rides weekly even in the middle of winter.

But let’s face it, unless you’re a spin nazi or gym rat, indoor training sucks.

I have F-Su off every week, so I’m going riding for the next three days OUTSIDE!
  • 1 0
 Would have loved the opportunity to review these haha. Hit me up next time would ya
  • 2 0
 I wish I could afford one of these things Frown
  • 2 0
 90db is ridiculous. It should be supplied with hearing protection.
  • 1 0
 So... wheel off direct drive trainers on the full sus bikes... are we running the suspension locked out... or...?
  • 1 0
 Yes. There will be flex and weirdness being felt regardless. I now use a hardtail setup because the flexing going on the FS (SC Hightower). Did not feel right and probably loads the frame way different than intended.
  • 1 1
 It’s kind of weird that you’re testing indoor training stuff it’s testers that can’t ride rollers. That’s like having a bike test rider that can’t ride on flats.
  • 2 0
 i ride with cap as well on indoor bike...very important!
  • 2 4
 One thing this review won't say is that Garmin, Saris and Kick'R all have high return rates (read they're often broken). As an exemple the Tacx Flux series is nearly 100% defective.
  • 2 0
 Peleton?
  • 4 1
 That's more spin class rather than riding. Seems the same, but really very different.
  • 5 1
 @Chuckolicious: i dont like the fact that although the peleton v2 has speakers and a big screen they are gimped so you cant use them properly if you dont continue to pay the £40 a month fee.....thats after spending 1500+ on the bike to begin with.......thats crazy to me. Its like you buy the bike and then lease the full use of the features forever after....but if your really in to the spin class approach then it may be worth it.
  • 1 1
 @rabidmonkfish: Yea, it's a racket for sure. But for the people that like that kind fo thing, spin class, good on them!
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: dont forget the share holder
  • 1 0
 Sweeeeet!! ????????????????
  • 1 0
 Which one can you manual the best on?
  • 1 0
 My question is. What bike frame is he using for the first couple tests?
  • 1 0
 That's my main road bike, a 2015 Trek Emonda SL6
  • 1 0
 The Wahoo has less moving parts?
  • 4 5
 10k bike + 1k$ indoor trainer to pedal you bike inside? Sounds fun
  • 2 2
 Looks flexy bru.
  • 3 3
 Nerds....lol
  • 1 2
 I wonder how many people "Zwift" on eBikes, just for the ego.....
  • 2 5
 Waiting for that review for years.#sarcasm Freeride is maybe dead
  • 2 4
 Seriously ?
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