Review: Aenomaly SwitchGrade Saddle Angle Adjuster

Mar 9, 2022
by Matt Beer  
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How often do you come across a new invention and say to yourself, "I had that same idea!" SwitchGrade creator, Noel Dolotallas, didn't sit on his hands when he envisioned the idea to build a manual seat angle adjuster. The SwitchGrade is an aftermarket component that grants three positions of angle adjustment: -10, 0, and 12-degrees. Noel and his team at Aenomaly Constructs set to work to build the SwitchGrade at home in the greater Vancouver area and spent countless hours adapting the gadget to work with a variety of popular dropper and fixed posts.

Aenomaly SwitchGrade Details

Adjustment: 3-positions (-10, 0, +12 degrees)
Compatibility: Fox/Race Face*, OneUp*, PNW, RockShox*, TranzX, X-Fusion, and more
Weight: 170 g w/hardware (claimed & actual)
Colors: Black
Price: $284 CAD
More info: aenomalyconstructs.com

You may remember seeing the theory before on the Wu Post that Specialized built back in 2017, but that complete unit was limited by a 34.9 mm diameter seat tube and 150mm of drop. The SwitchGrade mounts to an existing post and saddle without any hydraulic mechanisms. A spring-loaded lever found under the nose of the saddle requires a slight unweight from the seated position to change positions. This increases the rider's clearance of the seat while descending in the positive position, and can increase the effective seat tube angle by up to 1-degree while climbing in the negative position.


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Construction and Features


The SwitchGrade replaces the fixing clamp on a given post, and is cut from solid 7075 and 6061 T6 aluminum with stainless steel mounting hardware and. In order for the SwitchGrade to work with the largest cluster of posts available, a certain "type" will have to be chosen based on the compatibility guide listed above. For example, if you wish to fit the component to a 2021 Fox Transfer, you will need to purchase specific barrels and hardware for an additional $10, which will soon be available in a black anodized finish. OneUp's dropper post will require a second "type" selection for the stock alloy air cap to be replaced with a low-profile nylon one. These workarounds are effective in reducing the SwitchGrade to just one unit in Aenomaly's catalogue.

Hidden from plain sight, a mechanical spring pushes the grooved lever back into the resting position after firmly engaging the angle of choice. That lever is short enough to keep out of harm's way when the saddle is set farther back on the rails and reachable when the saddle is slammed forwards. Off the bike, the "Blackout" anodized finish of the SwitchGrade is subtle and visually the stack is barely noticeable. The stack height will vary from 5-15 mm depending on the post - our 2021 Fox Transfer sat near 14mm, but the SwitchGrade's adjusting angles allow for more wiggle room.

In the descending positive, you can gain as much as 35mm of "functional drop", as Aenomaly puts it. Inversely, 20mm of saddle height can be gained in the negative position for climbing. There are a lot of sizing factors at play, but the main point is that, despite the increase in stack, a rider will recover more saddle height adjustment from the same length dropper post. Depending on the distance between the saddle and tire at full bottom out, double checking the clearance of the positive SwitchGrade angle would be a smart idea too.

Mounting a SwitchGrade is straightforward, or even easier that a traditional saddle, thanks to the clear instructions with specified torques and online video guidance. There's less juggling required than normal as the post head acts as a third hand to hold the new pivoting unit in place while the saddle slides into the rail clamps.

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Ride Impressions

From the start of the first ride, the SwitchGrade's benefits were quickly recognizable while climbing a steep road and technical trail. Aenomaly's claim of increased dropper post range showed immediately and lowering the post in the frame due to the taller ride height of the negative saddle angle was a requirement. This position also promoted more relief on the important body parts, even with a saddle that I previously felt comfortable on. The weight was focused further on the sit bones and highlighted how wrong a neutral saddle angle was for climbing. It actually makes riding the neutral setting unpleasant for climbing as you get the feeling of sliding off of the saddle.

Although you can offset the saddle fore and aft adjustment on the rails, keep in mind the steeper effective angle will reduce the effective top tube length. That -10º uphill position does push more body weight onto your hands to influence quicker steering and is therefore best left for mega-steep or long climbs. To take the SwitchGrade even further, an adjustable angle setting or more purchase options could work for everyone's preferred saddle angles. I'd lean closer to 7 or 8º, since moving the neutral angle is contrary to the idea of having the negative adjustment in the first place.

While meandering along undulating trails with short ups and downs, setting and forgetting the SwitchGrade in the neutral position is the way to go. Navigating precarious objects one-handed isn't ideal and you could find yourself pushing the saddle from negative all the way through to positive in the heat of the moment. Learning how to weight the saddle and depress the lever to change settings while seated can be done with practice though.


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On the descents, not only does the +12-degree sloping saddle lend valuable real estate to move around the bike, it also provides a more inviting angle should you contact the saddle. Let's keep sharp edges away from that region. The positive sloping seat angle makes total sense for descending since it closely matches the pitch of the trail, keeping you from sliding forward, should you need to rest or reset.


The system as a whole is highly beneficial, given the rough weight increase of 100 grams. Starting with a comfortable saddle is always crucial, however the SwitchGrade opens the door for more specific use case angles, highlighting the major importance of a negative rise for climbing without the drawback of descending against a sharp edge. An increase in performance on the trail would be tricky to quantify, but as far as comfort goes, the adjustments in either direction are more than welcomed.

We could debate the price all day, but the value is evident. If you were given a SwitchGrade at no charge, I'd go all in and bet that it would remain on your bike. To think that riders scoffed over the cost and function of dropper posts years ago now seems silly. The functional gains and compatibility of the SwitchGrade are huge talking points that are backed by solid performance.

DURABILITY

Through plenty of bike washes and gritty winter conditions, the SwitchGrade remained impressively silent without any rattles or creaks, even on the Fox Transfer post with plenty of interfaces. Although my preferred saddle position was quite forward on the test bikes, shielding the SwitchGrade under the wider portion of the saddle, the width of the system stayed out of harm's way and never showed any signs of wear from muddy pants chafing the anodized surface. All of the hardware stayed tight throughout testing, but I would have preferred to see Loctite applied from the factory, preemptively securing the bolts.




Pros

+ Simple mechanical design
+ Fits a wide range of dropper posts
+ Incredibly useful for long climb/steep descent-style riding

Cons

- Requires coordination to adjust on the fly
- Some riders might find the negative saddle position too aggressive




Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThe Aenomaly SwitchGrade is a clean and effective component that maximizes matching the angle of the saddle to the functional post height. Returning to a fixed, traditional clamp leaves much to be desired, like the first time you tried a dropper post - you don't know what you're missing until it's taken away. The price may be a bit rich for those on a tighter budget, but the mechanical system is transferable across a broad range of posts and has proven to be quiet and flawless through winter grit.

All body types will benefit from the improved ergonomics when climbing and feel less vulnerable with a seat in a friendly, positive angle while descending. The -10 negative climbing angle may be a touch aggressive for some riders' tastes, but the advantage of more clearance for descending could outweigh that slight drawback.
Matt Beer




Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
348 articles

226 Comments
  • 348 9
 Interesting. I just set my saddle to feel good at full extension. When I have my post dropped I'm not sitting on my saddle.
  • 270 1
 How did you know to do this all on your own?
  • 12 0
 if the back of your saddle is pointing up, you have less clearance when suspending above the bike. I guess this isn't as big of a difference with super long droppers but it does come in handy for myself
  • 11 10
 Do you have it set ideally for going up steep grades or for on flat ground? Or just somewhere in between?
  • 14 2
 @notsosikmik: My case is a little special. I ride a mulleted Marin Mount Vision and the actual seat angle of like 63.1 degrees. so having it set in the "best" climbing position makes the seat just slightly negative and good for climbing before that it just hurted my balls
  • 22 8
 Didn't Specialized create basically the same thing several years ago but it automatically tilted according to the dropper height? Pretty sure they abandoned the whole thing idea fairly quickly.
  • 9 3
 @tbubier: it was over complicated with the way it works. This give you control over ur saddle angle. Also u can have it with pretty much any and every dropper you could want. No weird 34.9 seat tube These things are really well machined (I have bought one after meeting them from sea otter) and Noel is a great dude..
  • 24 0
 @tbubier: yes. 2nd paragraph, 1st sentence.
  • 11 3
 @Daweiknowdaway: How was it over complicated to use? It did exactly the same as this with the addition of being automatically actuated in the exact situations the Switchgrade is designs to be used in. That's _less_ complicated.

34.9 seat tube is not weird, it's the future.

Good that it's a high quality part, but that has nothing to do with how it's different from the Wu Post.
  • 5 4
 @scottzg: Eesh my bad. Truth be told I just come here for the pictures. Words aren't really my thing.
  • 6 0
 @tbubier: Yes, mentioned in the article. I think the Wu Post was too limited in its application:

*only came in 34.9 post diameter, while being the best size for droppers, it was then (and probably still, unfortunately) not nearly common enough to be the only size available
* only came in 150mm drop exactly at the time that longer posts (with shorter stacks as well) were growing in availability, popularity, and install-ability (meaning more bikes would take a long dropper)

So it just didn't fit a lot of riders and fit even fewer bikes.

* it was also limited by the mechanical locking system that only provided full up, full down, and 14 individual intermediate settings. I've ridden both the Fox DOSS and OG Command Post with only 3 positions, and the latest Command Post with the 14 positions, and the discrete positions can be kinda nice since they make it easy to find that 1/4 down "rolling trail pedaling" position. But the mechanical system just doesn't feel as nice to use as a good hydraulic system, and most people have become quite used to the infinite positioning on modern posts.
  • 8 10
 People thought dropper post were a waste of time and money when they first came out.

Why over-complicate a seat post when you already have a quick release lever you can use at the top of the hill?
  • 5 0
 I would say this is substantially different from the S Wu post. I still have a Wu post in my spare parts bin (unless I threw it away recently). The Wu post only tilted back when dropped. You could not tilt it forward like this. The Wu post also has WAY less than 150mm of travel, 125 at best. They counted the back of the saddle dropping down as a part of the drop. So for a person like me who runs the saddle pretty far forward, that means the back of the saddle only dropped about 10mm while the front raised up about 50. I replaced the Wu with a 150mm Transfer and was MUCH happier. I now have a 170mm PNW shimmed down 5mm to give me the maximum available drop on that frame for my legs and that is even better.

I can't say I have any use for this. I never feel like I need to tilt the saddle forward. But I also live in an area where most of my pedaling is climbing. I don't ride on flat ground very often.
  • 5 0
 @rockyjonny, I do the same but last week I caught my spuds on the back of the seat which was angled down for climbing. I reckon it would have been a far less painful experience if it had been tilted up.
  • 11 0
 @TrailFeatures: Why over-complicate shifting with derailleurs and shifters when you can manually move the chain
to a different gear at the top of a hill?
  • 4 2
 @TrailFeatures: You haven't used a dropper post yet I guess?
  • 9 2
 In Russia, saddle adjust you.
  • 2 0
 @tbubier: comment with pictures please
  • 4 0
 @racecase: it probably sound so obvious but when you started Mtb from DH and moved to Enduro like I did you first setup your saddle nose up because it is much better to ride DH properly without slamming your saddle too low. But then you get numb in places that should never be numb. So you set it up flat or slightly nose down as it is more comfortable to climb and wish your saddle wasn't this way on the way down. Probably not something your realize if you don't have a DH background tho.
  • 1 0
 That's because you've got legs
  • 3 0
 @mr-moose: mashed tatties
  • 1 0
 @Daweiknowdaway: how does the mount vision go as a mullet? I’ve been toying with the idea of putting a 29er on the front of mine for ages.
  • 4 0
 @racecase: There's shockwiz for setting up shock parameters. I'm waiting for Saddlewiz to set the saddle as well!
  • 5 0
 @rockyjonny That's a good way to get sorted for sure and something that many folks likely go about it too. Not sure anyone wants to sit down while descending, except maybe for little breathers lapping Aline all day. Positive saddle tilt for descending is more about increasing standover, altering the position of the saddle's edges for precise knee/thigh steering, more clearance to move over and around the saddle, and angle the butt of the saddle away from your sensitive bits in case they accidently meet. Best way to illustrate is to observe the angles of pro DH'ers, slopestyle, freeriders who represent the ultimate in gravity-oriented riding.

little more... www.instagram.com/p/CZaASnjP_k9
  • 2 0
 @mr-moose: totally agree, a key benefit of a positive tilted saddle for descending is to protect your bits and reduce the chances of getting caught up
  • 1 0
 @Balgaroth: 100% THIS!

I followed the same path and, back when freeride was just getting started, many bikes on the shore had positive tilted saddles because let's face it, we ride mostly to enjoy the downhills.
  • 1 0
 @mihauek: ha! Stay tuned...
  • 2 0
 @tbubier: based on thje little i learned about that invention from the comment you just wrote, seems like that was the right choice.
  • 64 8
 With most modern bikes standover height being generally pretty low, if paired with a correct dropper length I feel like this is pretty much unnecessary.
  • 19 3
 I agree partially. Running a 210mm dropper, the additional drop is barely noticeable, especially on a 29er. However, the real benefit lies in the steepening of the saddle angle on uphills. I don't wanna miss that anymore, it's that much more comfortable and efficient. Also, the downhill position does indeed look a lot cooler.
  • 7 1
 I currently run this with a 210mm dropper. Angling it up on downhills - it does provide a little more clearance. Angling it down on uphills - yes 10 degrees seems a lot but it helps a lot as Trippleacht mentioned. comfort and efficiency.
  • 4 2
 Or the fact that this gadget rises up your seat from the stock setup...then gives you back like half of that space
  • 10 0
 Really depends on the type of terrain you ride - for steep trails that require a bit of body english at the back end of the bike, this helps a ton. I have it on my 210, and I could never ride without one now - it's significantly more comfortable on the downs. I would even argue that it's better than having a 240 post.
  • 2 0
 "With most modern bikes standover height being generally pretty low" for us short folks, not short enough. Most 29ers I can barely stand over with a 28" inseam, unless they are of the XC variety.
  • 2 0
 Right. And didn’t Pinkbike generally excoriate the Specialized WU dropper post that debuted like 5 years ago? Wasn’t there also another product recently featured on Pb that does basically the same thing? This isn’t new increasingly unnecessary with newer bikes.
  • 2 0
 @quillankr: Or, like I have, you could pair it with a 240 post and have alllll that seat stuff outta the way for slapping DH sections. There is zero downside.
  • 1 0
 @gnarlysipes: the problem with that Wu post was the 6 month life expectancy.
  • 1 0
 @trippleacht: right on both fronts! The SwitchGrade was intended to complement the utility of a dropper post which governs saddle elevation only. But as a saddle moves along a vertical path dictated by the dropper axis, angles change and so, as you rightly pointed out, rotating the saddle forward to achieve negative tilt counters the effect and improves climbing position.

@nskerb I wrote a blog about this that you might find interesting www.aenomalyconstructs.com/blogs/news/how-to-make-better-use-of-your-dropper-seatpost
  • 1 0
 @quillankr: right on!! Stoked to hear about it!
  • 1 0
 @texican: I think we have a solution for you!
  • 1 0
 @Linc: Can't say thanks enough for being one of our early supporters! Won't forget it. Wow 240.
  • 1 0
 @makkelijk84: Fair, but the negative reviews were rolling in before the post was on the market 6 months.
  • 42 1
 You forgot this Con: "Expensive"
  • 21 0
 "Expensive", unless specifically mentioned otherwise, is implied for all MTB-related reviews these days...
  • 6 14
flag neilpritchett (Mar 9, 2022 at 9:13) (Below Threshold)
 How much did you spend on your bike?
  • 5 0
 Cheaper than next year's model with remote adjustment (hydraulic or AXS platform).
  • 48 10
 How does a smaller, and purely mechanical, mechanism manage to be more expensive (by a lot) than most of the great droppers on the market?
  • 122 3
 because if you make a dropper you can sell thousands of them, whereas if you make a saddle angle adjuster you will sell roughly 6 of them worldwide.
  • 5 0
 Hahaha as said, they know in advance they will not benefit from an economy of scale. So here you have 50% of the price covering the R&D of the product LOL ^^
  • 29 0
 The website says "Designed on the North Shore, machined in Whistler, assembled by hand in Vancouver.", most droppers are made overseas etc etc.
  • 13 4
 Fair point, but unfortunately these types of comments just highlight lack of understanding of scaled production, manufacture and how the bike industry works.
  • 16 2
 @riderdownn: no, I understand. Really what I'm doing is critiquing the price point and illustrating how it needs to come down if they want to sell more than 6. I wouldn't be interested unless the price point was sub $80-$100.
  • 7 10
 @rickybobby18: I don't see why anyone would be interested them even at $50. I am only sitting in my saddle when it is fully extended.
  • 3 4
 How'd you figure it's more expensive than most posts? Rockshox and fox are 300+, and even one-up which are pretty good value are about the same cost...
  • 10 1
 @neilpritchett: PNW, TransX, OneUp, etc. are $150-$199 range in USD. Lots of options in that range. The Reverb and Transfer are overpriced outliers. I believe the non-Kashima transfer is sub $200 even.
  • 1 2
 Maybe they give you a $10 refund if you return the part of the clamp it replaces? That should lessen the blow somewhat.
  • 35 2
 Everyone wants locally made, until they see the price tag.

Then they’re are suddenly fine with it being made overseas.
  • 5 1
 @rickybobby18: that's fine - you are the type of clientele that shops for low price items and goes for deals etc. There are many companies with sale models just like this, target an item at a certain price for them to profit properly, now increase the MSRP and provide coupon codes, discount etc....

This device is definitely not a must have and I also consider this to be a premium item (hence premium price). In order to target that market, you keep prices high and have a higher profit margin. Given this companies scaling, I am not sure what type of model they are running, but definitely not targeting the low end market.
  • 1 5
flag RadBartTaylor (Mar 9, 2022 at 16:59) (Below Threshold)
 @TrailFeatures: ha so true, some of the ones that complain the most about overseas production are the ones that can't afford local made stuff and also the same ones that complain about pay not being high enough....
  • 4 0
 It’s also produced in BC so costs are more transparent/have less externalities if you’re into that. And benefits the local economy more.
  • 1 0
 @RadBartTaylor: Then again, for people in Europe, Africa etc BC is not any more local or less overseas than South East Asia. It's fine. Lots of products are being made in Europe so these are overseas too for those in North America (and a lot overland too if you're on the west coast).
  • 1 1
 @TrailFeatures: nah, I'm good with outsourced overseas, less expensive hit to my wallet. Period. I like the idea of home grown but I like my hard earned money better than an idea.
  • 2 0
 @TrailFeatures: The sad thing is that we could probably do affordable (=/= cheap) products "inland" with economies of scales and a bit of moderation in our buying sprees. But greed pushed everything overseas to make it even cheaper to produce.

@TW80 the problem with thinking this way though is that you never know if you won't be the overseas worker of someone else someday.
  • 1 0
 @RadBartTaylor: It’s almost like if companies were willing to invest their massive profits back into the local economy and pay their workers a livable wage it would benefit everyone….

Crazy.
  • 2 0
 @TrailFeatures: To anyone not living in North America, Canada is as much overseas as asia.
  • 31 0
 A well engineered product that attempts to improve the ergonomics on a bike is always welcome. It’s not a product for me, but I’m sure there will be people who find it valuable.

Also thank you for not making an overpriced, over engineered, CNC flat pedal or stem.
  • 10 0
 I couldn’t agree more - like it or not this thing is pushing the envelope!
  • 32 2
 I wanted something like this since I was a kid so I pulled the trigger on a preorder... I've been riding it for a while now and I really like it for the steep climbs in WNC. I think one big benefit that's not mentioned is how the climbing position allows your pelvis to pivot and make much more room in your chest for deeper breathing when climbing. Also having the seat angled forward allows you to slide up on the back seat to get to that perfect amount of leg extension during high exertion. It makes a really nice 'click' during use that sounds quality. my minor gripes are that I wish it was a little lighter and had adjustable stops like the article mentioned. It adds new comfort and functionality to my bike much like droppers did when first introduced. 8/10 would recommend.
  • 1 0
 @astro99 absolutely a key benefit! Breathing is much easier as your diaphragm opens up with the widened hip and torso angles afforded by the negative tilt. Great to hear you're enjoying a positive experience!
  • 20 0
 Thanks Pinkbike! Stoked to see our first official review. Matt did a great job of covering what the SwitchGrade is and does and associated benefits. So good, our hats off to you! We've made so many friends from around the world along this journey and I see many of you have chimed in - thank you! Stay tuned we're just getting started...
  • 3 0
 If you do make a cable actuated version, I want to request a retrofit kit for the one I just bought! I’ve been pumped for this thing to become available, but when I first looked it wasn’t available for the Bike Yoke, and now it is!
  • 1 0
 Hey guys, i was watching the development process but he final price put me off for now. One question: i hang my bike from the saddle to store it. Is that okay with the switchgrade?
  • 2 0
 Used mine only a couple times so far (and only 1 day was climbing) and love it!
  • 2 0
 @Muckal: Absolutely. It's a nice and sturdy CNC piece. While there's probably fee people who ever felt the urge to upgrade their seat clamp, there will be now.
  • 1 0
 @Muckal: it should be fine but may cause undue stress on your dropper
  • 20 1
 If you’ve ever raced, or//and pay attention to contact points, angling the saddle back is a godsend for your inner thighs contact points// control on dh tracks // weird off camber at speed…… but I digress.

…. This little gizmo is worth it 100 percent now that we pedal small dh bikes for hours to ride dh style trails.
I’m hyped to get the funds together to pull it off.
Expensive -yes, but:
tough
and comes in colors
and solves a problem that many taller riders (myself) have
and can be mounted on many future different bikes?
And made in Canada!
How many boxes do these guys have to check off to get a pass here?
  • 2 0
 yes!
  • 1 0
 @maximumradness we've got a whole host of boxes ticked off on our website's "Top 10 reasons" in case you need more (not that it seems that way!)

And you're bang on with respect to how it positive affects contact points - in fact one of the most key benefits of the SwitchGrade. Cheers!
  • 20 3
 I love the comment spread here! Everyone who hates the idea hasn't tried it, and everyone who actually has one really likes it.

Also I feel like its a cool product in the sense that say you have an older frame you really love, but the seat tube angle is uncomfortably slack, boom problem solved. This thing isn't that expensive if it you combine with the an angleset on your "outdated" frame. Modern geometry frame for only a few hundred dollars!
  • 6 0
 I think everyone who has one probably saw the benefits before the purchase though, so more likely to like it! I think what is missing to the argument is the terrain people ride - if you ride up hills with a consistent gradient it's easier to steepen your saddle and not think this is necessary. If you consistently ride rolling terrain this probably won't help you either. However, if you have a massive variety of gradient on your doorstep, then the likelihood that this will be of benefit will increase... Personally I'd like one, but they've not done a Bikeyoke compatible version yet...
  • 4 0
 @slimboyjim: They JUST released a BikeYoke version.
  • 4 0
 I had to buy one for all my bikes after I tried one.
  • 3 0
 Exactly - typical PB comments - naysayers haven't tried it. I tend to be an early adopter (I was ridiculed when I first got a dropper post - "unnecessary!!!") and bought one of these on initial presale. Just got to use it yesterday on a steep climb (lotsa steep climbs in Whistler and was heading up Mackenzie FSR in Pemby which is relatively steep at times) and it was great! Descend mode was awesome when I was riding steeps in Squamish on the weekend too - definitely had some extra clearance. For only using it a couple days, the benefits are very obvious for the riding I do. If all you have is rolly up/down riding and mellow climbs, ok, skip it. But for the riding I do, it's great!
  • 22 6
 "If you were given a SwitchGrade at no charge, I'd go all in and bet that it would remain on your bike."

You would definitely lose that bet.

I cannot see the need for this gizmo for any of the riding I do. My seat drops low enough on the descents that it is completely out of the way, and I don't have the need for negative angle for the climbs. Not to mention the extra saddle stack height it adds would make me have to look for a shorter dropper post.
  • 2 0
 I would 100% use it at no charge. But I would say the same about a lot of mtb products. At this price, the benefit isn't worth it in my eyes. Think of the other items you can get for the same/less that improve riding more (dropper, inserts, bars, etc)
  • 12 1
 I have one and love it. I'm seeing a lot of knee jerk hater comments and think you all need to try this before talking Sh*t. As a tall rider with a shit back it has made a huge difference in my comfort while riding, as well as my back pain after riding, which to make makes it worth every penny. Not only has it improved my comfort but it also makes a big difference on steeper tech because it is so much easier to keep weight over the front. As for going down, it's nice to have the saddle tilted back for steering with your legs, pinching the saddle, as well as the added clearance.

Would be the nice to have a cable actuated version, sure, but do I want another cable....no. That being said I don't find myself changing it often enough to warrant it. Tilt forward, go up. Tilt back go down. If I'm on undulating terrain I leave it neutral. Pretty simple. I'll never not have one.
  • 14 0
 I just leave my seat rattling in the mount
  • 12 2
 It's funny to see how much hate there is about this product simply because of its price! Yeah, it may cost a good deal, but Beer makes a great point when saying it's irrelevant - after having one for a couple of months now I will struggle to ride without one on my pedal bike now.

If you ride relatively low-angle terrain and don't ride aggressively, you may not notice a big difference. But there is a reason downhill racers don't nose their seats forward even though they run their seat as low (or lower) than the height you can obtain with a long dropper post. Go tilt your seat back before your next decent, then come back here to delete your comments!
  • 11 1
 Finally....now I can stop going out with two spare seat posts with two separate saddles set at different angles for climbing and descending.
  • 1 0
 Yeah wow
  • 1 0
 Underrated comment
  • 8 0
 This is a much more interesting product release than another fragile overpriced carbon bike, or putting a battery in some component that didn't previously have a battery.

I don't know I would use this all the time, but I have often thought about how useful it would be for pure DH situations where you want the saddle angled up for better clearance. For reference I am 5'10" riding a 210mm dropper. Yes I could use more room.
  • 8 0
 I was going to put my order in a few weeks ago but other priorities came up, this just reminded me it exists and will be perfect for a future build. As someone who likes to trials/jib/jump on the same bike I also pedal to the top of mountains (well, hills mostly) seat angle is a huge compromise. Having a flat or nose down seat is not great for the jibbing stuff and nose up sucks for steep climbs.

This looks like a great (if expensive) option that means I don't have to compromise any more Smile
  • 1 0
 @aliclarkson you hit the nail on the head! In fact "no more compromise" was the impetus behind the SwitchGrade.
  • 10 1
 I just set my seat height, angle, and fore/aft the way I like and never think about it again.
  • 6 0
 I think this is a good idea. not so much for the DH sections, as a long dropper would mostly remove the need for saddle rearward tilt (although having not tried that, I don't know how big a benefit it has).

But, my JRA saddle position would be quite flat, but for steep uphills, of which I have a lot, tilting the saddle down at the front would be an awesome way to get better seated for the tricky stuff uphill, but not absolutely knacker one's taint area and nerve bundles by mashing it into the nose.

I tend to run my saddle favouring steep climbs, so the benefit here to return it to nice and flat for Just Riding Along is something I've been thinking about for some time.

Interesting.
  • 3 0
 I was excited to see a review of this thing, and the taint numbness is an issue I get even with the most comfortable saddles. I went ahead and bought one in case the world doesn’t end within the next month
  • 7 0
 Have used it and can confirm it is super rad. I was a skeptic but especially on a bigger bike it’s super killer for fire road grinds and then steep trails. I agree wholeheartedly with Matt’s review.
  • 6 0
 I think this an amazing product, and like droppers, some version of this will change the game. Having the saddle just that much more out of the way really helps me out. And getting the tilt right on the up is the right idea in my book
  • 10 2
 pretty cool I think i'd rather just have a 25-50mm longer dropper post tho.
  • 2 3
 not all frames and rider heights will allow that
  • 2 0
 @Jshemuel: You have to be able to further insert your current dropper by up to 15mm to use this, so you're either reducing drop if your post allows (not ideal), or you're putting it further into the bike (as you said not always possible). Yes, a full 25mm longer dropper might need more like ~50mm extra insertion, but it's very likely that if you can fit this device you can probably also fit a post with at least 10-20 mm more drop, or more if you switch to something like a OneUp with its super short stack.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: fair enough
  • 2 0
 While it's hard to argue that more drop 'seems' desirable - and usually is to an extent - one thing to consider is that a long dropper means the rider will move even further back over the rear axle on steep climbs. This unweights the front wheel even more while adding to the sensation of sliding off the back of the saddle. The SwitchGrade's negative tilt accomplishes a few things:
- provides support because the rear of the saddle is raised and effectively negates the grade
- steepens effective seat tube angle >1 degree due to rotation
- lifts the rider an addition approx 20mm again due to rotation

Hope this sheds additional light on the subject.
  • 2 0
 @AenomalyConstructs: longer dropper isn't going to move the rider further over the rear, because the top-out height, and thus top fore-aft position, is the same no matter the drop. It's only going to move the saddle further forward when fully dropped, which is almost always good.

I appreciate the little tweaks the SwitchGrade does to the saddle position via the rotation, but it's not going to affect the fore-aft position of the clamps at neutral vs a longer dropper.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: perhaps the best way to illustrate is to envision what occurs when a long dropper is extended along an already slack actual seat tube angle which is dictated by, and follows, the axis of the seat tube. As the dropper post is extended, the system (dropper post and saddle) will extend further back. You can try this at home by attaching a string from the bottom bracket to the saddle while cycling the dropper from slammed to full extension. When riding up a steep trail this issue is exacerbated. While the theory remains the same, a bevvy of other variables change too (ie. friction, load etc) that make an already hard thing to do (climbing) even harder than it needs to be. Taller riders especially 'get the shaft' even more so due to their reliance on longer dropper posts.

With respect to fore-aft position, as the saddle rotates with the SwitchGrade it will lift up roughly 20mm and forward roughly 10mm which, in effect, alters the ending position of the saddle to mimic that of moving forward on the rails but with the added benefit of proper seated support. Moving one's saddle forward on the rails for improved climbing position is a band aid in our opinion because it creates issues in other areas (eg. groin pain, discomfort).

Appreciate the opportunity to converse on this topic.
  • 2 0
 @AenomalyConstructs: I understand why the saddle moves back as it is extended because of the seat tube angle, but you're missing the fact that the max height of the saddle, for a given rider on a given bike, is the same no matter the drop length. Even on a solid post, zero drop, the max saddle height is still the same.

So unless you're saying that with the SwitchGrade people tend to run a lower max saddle height in neutral, the fore aft position at top out of the dropper is not going to change. The fore aft position at _bottom out_ will change with a longer drop, but forward, which is generally ideal.

Taller riders don't just rely on taller droppers, they need a taller post overall, and that's why they "get the shaft", not just because of more drop.
  • 3 0
 @AenomalyConstructs: Top position of the saddle is the very same regardless of the available drop of your seatpost.
  • 8 0
 Did we just take a strange step back to having to fiddle under your dropper looking for a lever?
  • 6 1
 I spend a lot of time sessioning spots and plain old dirt jumps on my trail bike. As do a lot of UK riders. A lot of the time I wish I just had a rigid post in with the saddle set nicely for pinches and descending. I’m very interested in this.
  • 5 0
 When you go to the grocery store do you complain about the stuff you don’t buy that is there or being too expensive? Probably not. Why are guys complaining for a brand new , innovative product that you are not going to buy? Unless you try it and have an opinion then. I have been riding my own prototype for 6 years now and it makes total sense for improving your riding experience.
  • 4 0
 I think it looks really neat, but I just don't ever see myself using it if I bought it. Most of my riding is long climb/steep descent-style riding but I have never felt like my seat is an issue. I just use a long travel dropper and me seat is out of the way and then put it up and it is right back into pedaling position. Maybe I'm wrong but it would be really hard for me to pay that much to try something novel like this.
  • 12 0
 "you don't know what you're missing until it's taken away." I totally agree with Matt here. I don't wanna miss it anymore, mainly for the steeper position. Paired with a steep seat angle climbing has never been easier.
  • 5 0
 Next time you shuttle your trail bike, lean the seat back and you will see how valuable this is. Let's just say the is a reason not a single downhill racer runs their seat nosed forward even when the seatpost is dropped way in the frame.
  • 4 0
 if your climbs are actually steep, then the Switchgrade is great so you don't have a seat pushing into your dick. Bonus that it provides a better platform as well at the negative angle. But if your climbs are long and mellower, ya, less benefit. It was very very noticeably more comfortable on a very steep climb that I did yesterday, as well as providing a better angle for pressure while climbing.
  • 7 0
 Now your bike can look 5% cooler when taking a photo of it leaning against something!
  • 3 0
 Way more than 5%
  • 2 0
 @Tsoxbhk we studied this in depth and our calculations proved it be 82.546 % cooler Wink . Cooler still if you're one of those magicians that make bikes seem to lean on their own with a scenic backdrop.
  • 5 0
 This speaks to my vanity and I will purchase it so my overly capable trail bike can feel like a mini dh bike when I’m sitting about to drop into a lap. Congratulations you have earned my dollars.
  • 7 1
 Been waiting for this product for years. Great review Matt. I'll sure be getting one.
  • 3 0
 Where I live and ride this would not be useful (my saddle probably stays in one position for no more than 6 straight minutes at any point in a ride and constantly adjusting the saddle angle would be super annoying) but from the riding I have done in places with actual mountains where you are going up, steeply, for and hour and then down, steeply, for 20 minutes that would be very nice to have.
  • 4 0
 I like the concept, but I'd only want two tunable positions, one for raised, one for lowered. I see the benefit of tipping the nose up in the lowered position so my knees can better grip the seat when airborne
  • 1 0
 @leaf-pine you may just want to sign up for our newsletter... Wink
  • 4 0
 Best of luck with this product! Great to see innovation. I can't say I have any problems with saddle orientation, however it does pain me to see people with the nose of their saddle pointed down (hard on your wrists)
  • 4 0
 If I had extended road climbs where I live, I could really see the advantage of this product and would seriously consider. Also, it makes the Wu seem like a much better idea who's time just hasn't come yet.
  • 1 0
 Too bad that the Wu post was patented, so no other manufacturer could try the concept.
  • 3 0
 I think what @AenomalyConstructs has created here is a game changer, many kudos!! and do not sympathize with all of the haters in this comment thread and I think they just don't understand. My urban bike is one that I use to get around town (with the seat post high) as well as drop into the local skatepark or pumptrack (with seat post low) along the way. To exemplify the absurdity of the negative comments just tell me what's wrong with this picture:

www.pinkbike.com/photo/22192102
  • 3 0
 Externally adjustable travel fork, like fox TALAS or Rockshox Dual Position is way better solution. Less weight added, lowers stack Steeper STA & HTA for climbing, and lowers saddle nose. Too bad the a*sholes in the media Unduely canceled And shit Talked one of the most useful and versatile technologies in mtb.
  • 4 1
 I've had mine for a few months - started on a 210mm dropper, now on a 240mm dropper. Before the Switchgrade, I'd always previously set my seat angle nose-down for climbing - but even fully dropped with these long arse droppers - the post is never as far out of the way as you'd want for attacking a DH section. Even worse riding a bike park, jumping, or cutting shuttle laps. For tall riders that want to move and flick around the bike without jamming into the seat, or ex-DHers that know the feel of supporting the seat against your leg, it's a huge and noticeable improvement.
  • 6 0
 Have one of these on the way and am excited to try it.
  • 3 1
 If the same lever could operate the dropper you've got a neat no-cable setup.

If that package could match the $$$ of an internally routed dropper it could find a decent market, but operating a lever on the bar and then a lever on the seat when you change incline might get annoying... Would be interesting to test it.
  • 2 0
 I think you're on to something.
  • 2 0
 I have owned an office chair style dropper post and it was convenient & tidy, but not great to use. I'd rather see one remote operate both mechanisms. It could look a lot like a front derailleur shifter but with two cables attached (just to get around the Specialized lawyers). One lever and cable would actuate the post, and the other would run the Switchgrade. Just spitballin'
  • 9 3
 I was just thinking about where I could add another 0.4 lbs to my bike
  • 2 0
 "The system as a whole is highly beneficial, given the rough weight increase of 100 grams." 100/454=.22lbs
  • 2 0
 @woofer2609: Stated mass is 170g? ~0.37lbs
  • 3 0
 @steflund: maybe they are subtracting the original hardware that is being replaced to go from 170g to 100g?
  • 2 0
 @like2pedal: Ah, you're right that could be the case.
  • 3 1
 Even our descending/shuttle trails have some flatter pedal sections that require my dropper to go up-down-up-down pretty quickly. There's no way in hell I'm taking one hand off the bars multiple times to reach under my crotch and flip this lever to hopefully end up in the right position out of three.

My saddle is set for optimal climbing at max extension and it's perfect 95% of the time. "Nose up" might look cooler when the saddle is lowered but until that action is tied into the lever actuated dropper movement like the WU post it's a non-starter for most riders.
  • 17 11
 Nice... a $280 solution to a problem that doesn't exist, top work.
  • 6 22
flag neilpritchett (Mar 9, 2022 at 9:16) (Below Threshold)
 Lucky you're American which means you MUST be correct Big Grin
  • 3 1
 To all the riders saying their seat is low enough to not use going down this device is clearly marketed towards someone else. Lots of guys (particularly old school dh guys) like a seat that can still be sat on and pedaled in the low position.

Not one of those guys Btw just point out who this meant for.
  • 2 0
 Read the whole article on their website and I'm sold on testing dropping the nose of my saddle by 5 degrees for my next ride. Just spent $$$ on a new 240mm OneUp dropper to solve the downhill clearance issues, so unlikely to buy anything else until gas drops below $2/ltr FFS
  • 14 9
 An expensive solution in search of a problem.
  • 3 0
 How to add two pounds to the highest point on your bike . First slap in a dropper post , extra cable and another lever on your handlebar . Then add an seat angle adjuster .
  • 8 4
 ive been riding for a long time and never thought .."sure wish my seat did something else" .
  • 5 2
 taking bets with myself on which mtb archetype shows up with this thing first...toss-up right now between can't-shut-up spreadsheet supermonitor and friend of owner
  • 4 1
 I’ve been looking for a solution to my numb nuts and sore hands… I think riding with my saddle nose level on flat and rolling terrain will help my hands and nose down on extended steep climbs would help my nuts… I’m hoping. I bought one and I’ll justify it to myself as a comfort device rather than something I needed. It makes sense to have an adjustable seat height and angle
  • 2 0
 @babathehutt: i wish your huttnuts well.
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer how did you deal with the change in effective saddle height between the flat and tilted down positions? Did you set your max extension for the negative tilt? And then the flat position may be a little low? Or set the flat for your normal post height and then you need to tap the dropper down a few mm for the negative tilt? Or was it not enough to be noticeable?
  • 2 0
 That's a great question and something I thought about, but may have skimmed over too sparely in the review. Personally, I set the max post height using the negative position for max efficiency on long climbs where maneuvering around on the saddle isn't as crucial. I actually loved the first generation Fox DOSS post for its three set heights because of this - you always arrived at the exact same heights. The short drop to neutral is going to vary based on frame geometry, body positioning, and seat rail placement, so there is a lot of wiggle room, so to speak.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the follow up
  • 1 0
 @feldybikes: Anytime!
  • 5 0
 Wonder if this would help with some peoples back pain
  • 2 0
 @DHmental - absolutely! Here's a quote found on our website addressing this:

"As a doctor of physical therapy who regularly treats individuals with back pain, and a lifelong mountain biker, I'm digging the concept of SwitchGrade. A nose down saddle position increases what is called anterior pelvic tilt. This promotes optimal lumbar spine alignment which can help prevent or alleviate lower back pain in many cases. I can also see the obvious performance benefits that could be had on long, steep climbs in the saddle." - Dr. Josh Harris DPT, Dip Osteopractic

Read more on our website.
  • 1 0
 @AenomalyConstructs:
I am working in product development for 20+ years and done blood flow testing and pressure mapping for chamois and saddles i worked on. Based on what i learned i can not recommend riding nose up or nose down for extended periods of time.
Simply said Nose up, even slightly, applies excessive pressure on the perineal area, nose down causes the rider to slide forward which in turn reduces the available area and therefore increases pressure where its not wanted.
Especially for females this could cause lasting damage since the tissue in the area in contact with a saddle is quite different than that of males.
That said every combination of rider+saddle has a different sweet spot.
  • 4 0
 I run it here in the front range, love it. super high quality. Thanks Noel!
  • 2 0
 I'm not saying I agree, but I understand where they're coming from... The type of person I imagine would buy this is the person who climbs for 90 minutes to get that 15 minute downhill.
  • 2 0
 I can see this being a huge benefit for long fire road/enduro stage climbs. For an average trail ride in undulating terrain, I don't really see the value.

Really cool idea and it's awesome that it was brought to market.
  • 3 0
 If the Big S can't put enough marketing behind a new idea to make it work...
  • 2 0
 I love the craftsmanship.. this looks super neat.. I have a pretty fat a**, so I am comfy in almost any position.. but I can see, where this could come in handy....
  • 1 0
 In case you're interested, please contact me, I import them to Switzerland

traildevils.ch/Market/Aenomaly-SwitchGrade-alle-Typen-7237d0d6ef09c3a2501108db7bfad546
  • 4 1
 Essential for an XL kona process. Slack seat tube angles can go fuck themselfs.
  • 4 0
 I'm waiting for the AXS version....
  • 4 0
 If only it came in oilslick, then it would be really cool
  • 2 0
 I see this as really useful on road or gravel bikes. Sometimes steep climbs can really put bad pressure but changing the seat angle is no good for regular grades or flats.
  • 3 0
 Came here hoping to find a saddle that can change the grade of the climbs. Left disappointed.
  • 1 0
 I'm sure there is someone out there who has been manually adjusting their saddle angle before long steep climbs. I'm not that person and I have never seen it done. Whoever you are, congratulations. Someone sees you.
  • 1 0
 I really would like to know why anyone would want the front tip of a saddle point up?

I tried to ask this question before like when specialized launched WU... no answer / reason revealed itself yet though...
  • 1 0
 @michibretz - the benefits of positive tilt (nose-up saddle) is most readily seen by observing pro DH racers, freeriders and slopestyle riders who do so because it improves steering precision, increases clearance and is safer. Hope that helps!
  • 1 0
 @AenomalyConstructs:
What a great not-answer.
I though you are a physical therapist with orthopedic knowledge so I would hope to get an explanation of the mechanical advantage over a saddle set up as intended by the developers of said saddle.
Because if i observe pro downhillers i do not see them use a saddle the same way my the same way the guy who buys this. Especially not after smoking some weed at the trailhead…
  • 1 1
 If I have understood this correctly, this product is supposed to benefit bikes with shorter dropper posts.
That would make my XC race bike the perfect candidate. It has an 85mm dropper, so not all that much. I do most of my riding on it; everything from flat gravel to steep techy ups and downs. I've never had a problem. If you feel like you need to adjust saddle tilt to climb, you've more than likely got the wrong saddle and setup. You need to get a proper bike fit from a qualified professional (no, that doesn't include measuring your "sit bones", which is a complete nonsense).
The biggest issue I have is that, given it's adjustability, it is unlikely that, when you want it in the seated position, it will be in the exact same position as last time. That is, if you have had a proper bike fit, as everyone should, the saddle will almost never be where it should be if you endlessly adjust it on the trail.
Ironically, I seem to be the only person that doesn't have a fundamental problem with the price. I subscribe to the theory that something is worth what somebody is willing to pay for it, and clearly people are willing to throw money at this company. The only price niggle I have is that it is very steep for somebody who likes the idea, but would like to test first. I'm not saying £50 is throw away money, but at least then it probably wouldn't be the end of the world.
I also don't agree with the idea that you can't critisise if you haven't tried. I don't need to test a fat bike to know that I wouldn't benefit from one.
  • 1 0
 It isn't infinitely adjustable, there are 3 positions. The middle one will be the result of the 'proper bike fit', which is optimized only for riding level terrain.
  • 2 0
 I think I'd benefit from seeing someone pedaling seated in one of these modified positions.
  • 3 0
 Make one for BikeYoke droppers please!
  • 3 0
 Oh, looks like they do have one now - missed that update
  • 4 1
 This thing is the best. Thanks Noel!
  • 1 0
 @buckow Can't say thank you enough!
  • 3 0
 I like it. Not gonna pay for it, but seems pretty great
  • 3 0
 Should have called it the TATA Taint Angle Trim Adjust.
  • 3 0
 Congrats on the launch, Noel!
  • 1 0
 Heh, my '83 Ross came stock with a seatpost with the same functionality. Coupled with the Hite Rite I have on there it's practically cutting edge!
  • 2 1
 Surprised this isnt a BETA article! like that potenitally highly informative brass spoke nipple article or the one about the FOX tights with BUILT IN KNEE Pads.....lmfoa
  • 1 0
 Next up, saddle "instant" angleset with remote. Adjust your saddle on the fly while you ride. The cockpit on the handlebars is going to have ten levers for functions. Lol.
  • 1 0
 I'll just wait for the remote lever option, if droppers don't integrate this first. Brain version, which automatically adjust saddle horizontally, would also be nice...
  • 3 0
 *Note to Self* After inventing a niche product DO NOT SHARE with pinkbike.
  • 1 0
 I can see it being a good fit tool to figure out how you like your saddle position. Other than that...I've never felt the desire to adjust my saddle tilt while riding.
  • 1 0
 I don't dispute Matt's opinion that this component is a benefit, and the product looks well made. But that price is astounding...
  • 1 0
 Looks really cool and I think it would help on my climbs mainly, but if I’m going to pay that price, would love to see a more bomber warranty.
  • 2 0
 Can i share my saddle setup in strava?
  • 1 0
 This definitely looks like it's geared more towards the constant flip-chip changer / lockout suspension'er type of folk.
  • 3 2
 This is like shoes with adjustable size; really clever, but also really stupid.
  • 4 0
 Are you talking about laces?
  • 2 0
 So, they stole Specialized's idea. Yeah, prepare for a lawsuit there.
  • 3 1
 I love ideas like this. I hope they sell a billion of them.
  • 1 0
 Yet more faff and expense.

Bikers feeling like they're being bled dry yet?
  • 1 0
 I am pretty sure this is good idea... Specialized dropper makes much more sense to me...
  • 1 0
 someday I hope they make one that is compatible with 9point8
  • 5 4
 Perfect for those who have a BMX background.
  • 1 0
 holding out for AXS switchgrade.
  • 1 1
 I think we can all just admit that this is purely for aesthetics, right? No shame in that.
  • 2 0
 Saddle tilted 10° forward is so hot right now
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: Damn right, I want my saddle pointing the same way as... oh wait...
  • 1 0
 Uhm excuse me but my idea was specifically a softride dropper linkage
  • 1 0
 What idea?
  • 2 1
 Is this compatible with current AXS?
  • 1 0
 Can things just cost less please.. No, fine then I'll just look lol
  • 1 0
 Next must be remote adjustable crank length.
  • 1 0
 With actual seat tube angles, who needs this?
  • 1 0
 A solution for a problem that doesn't exist.
  • 1 0
 I'm sold, been hopeful for a product like this. Thanks Noel Dolotallas!
  • 1 0
 I saw Yoann Barellie using this on a YouTube video but couldn't find any more information. Thanks Pinkbike!
  • 2 1
 Yeah, I’m out.
  • 1 0
 yes, more weight
  • 1 1
 They forgot, Cons - a stupid idea
  • 6 8
 WHICH FLOPHEADS ARE GONNA BUY THIS
  • 18 9
 People who live in the mountains and climb steep climbs daily.
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