Review: Banshee Titan - A Friendly Beast of a Bike

Mar 2, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  



Banshee stepped back into the spotlight this season with a complete overhaul of their lineup, which included the introduction of a brand new model – the Titan. It's a big-wheeled aluminum bruiser with 155mm of rear travel that uses a dual-link suspension design called KS2 (the initials come from Keith Scott, Banshee's co-owner / designer).

The Titan is currently only available as a frame, which means riders are free to choose the parts that end up on their dream bike. The frame is designed around a 160 – 180mm fork, allowing it to be built up into anything from a tough all-mountain rig to a beefier freeride / bike park oriented machine.
Banshee Titan Details

• Wheel size: 29"
• 7005 aluminum frame
• Travel: 155mm rear / 170mm front
• 64.5 or 65-degree head angle
• 452mm chainstays
• 12 x 148mm rear axle spacing
• Frame only price (w/Float X2): $2,299 USD
• Weight: 33.8lb (size large, as shown)
www.bansheebikes.com

My test rig showed up with a SRAM X01 Eagle 12-speed drivetrain, Code RSC brakes, e*thirteen LG1 tires and carbon wheels, a 170mm Fox 36 Performance Elite fork, and a Float X2 shock. Keep in mind that the 33.8lb weight is with a DH casing rear tire - lighter casing tires would be an easy way to shed a few hundred grams.

The Titan is available in three color options – raw, black, or red, and in sizes M, L, and XL. The frame, headset, and a Float X2 Performance shock is priced at $2,299 USD.


bigquotesThe Titan lives up to its name on the descents, and it's happiest when blasting through a pile of rubble, or rocketing off the lip of a stepdown. It has a very stable, planted feel, and the stomp-ability of this bike is top-notch. Mike Kazimer




Banshee Titan review

Construction and Features

The Titan is constructed from 7005 series aluminum, which Banshee says allows them to make a stronger, stiffer frame than if they had gone with the commonly used 6061 aluminum. The down tube and seat tube are welded to a forged shock cage, and that cage is also connected to the swingarm by two short links. Positioning the shock just above the bottom bracket helps create a low center of gravity, but there's another benefit – there's now room for the all-important water bottle inside the front triangle, something that wasn't possible on Banshee's previous models.

There's internal cable routing through the down tube, and although my test bike showed up with the brake and derailleur housings routed under the bottom bracket, it’s also possible to run them above the bottom bracket, which would eliminate any chance of them getting squashed against a rock or root.

Rather than welding ISCG 05 tabs to the frame, Banshee uses a splined plate that slides over the bottom bracket shell. That way, the plate can be easily replaced if an impact occurs that's hard enough to damage the threads.


Banshee Titan review
The KS2 suspension design has the shock vertically oriented in a forged cage just above the bottom bracket.
Banshee Titan review
The dropout position can be raised or lowered to alter the head angle and bottom bracket height.



Banshee Titan review

Geometry & Sizing

The Titan's geometry numbers fall smack dab in the middle of what has quickly become the norm in the all-mountain / enduro category. The bike has a 64.5-degree head angle in the low setting, a 470mm reach for a size large, and a 76.75-degree seat angle. If you take a look at the chart, you'll see that the seat tube angle is listed for three different saddle heights, a helpful bit of information that would be nice to see from other manufacturers.

The one number that's slightly out of the ordinary is the chainstay length – at 452mm for all three sizes, it's on the longer side of the spectrum. Off the top of my head, the Nukeproof Mega 290, Pole Stamina 180 and Geometron G16 all come to mind as having chainstays that measure 450mm or more, but these days numbers between 435 – 445mm are more common for bikes in this category.

The Titan has inserts on the dropouts that can be flipped to alter the BB height by 8mm and head tube half a degree. The system has a very utilitarian look to it, but in this case it's more about function, not fashion - the hardware is nice and stout, and it doesn't take long to make the swap.



Banshee Titan review
There's more tire clearance than it appears from this photo - I had plenty of room with a 2.4" Minion DHR II and the e13 LG1 shown. Clearance shouldn't be an issue unless you're planning on running a 2.5" or wider tire with extra-tall knobs.

Suspension Design

The Titan's KS2 suspension design uses two short links to connect the swingarm to the front triangle. There are bearings at all pivot points, including where the upper link connects to the trunnion-mount shock, in order to keep the amount of unwanted friction to a minimum. The Titan's leverage curve is progressive until the last bit of the travel to keep the bike from bottoming out too easily while still making it possible to use full travel.

The anti-squat value in the 32/50 tooth combination is approximately 116% at 30% sag, and it drops off as the bike goes deeper into its travel to minimize pedal kickback.

Banshee Titan review
Banshee Titan review







Test Bike Setup

I ran 175psi in the Fox Float X2, which put me at 17mm of sag (Banshee recommends running between 15.5 – 17.8mm of sag). Up front, I ran 73 psi in the Fox 36.

I ended up swapping the 30mm stem that the bike showed up with for a 40mm model to suit my personal preference, and I also used a slightly lighter set of tires to see how much of a difference that made on the overall handling. As it turns out, the difference wasn't that dramatic. On flat terrain, or when spinning my way out to the trailhead I'd notice the improved rolling speed, but otherwise the general feel of the bike remained the same - that lighter rubber didn't magically turn the Titan into an XC whippet.

Most of my testing took place in the Pacific Northwest, but I did escape to Moab, Utah, for a much-needed dose of dry desert riding.



Me.
Mike Kazimer
Location: Bellingham, WA, USA
Age: 37
Height: 5'11" / 180cm
Inseam: 33" / 84cm
Weight: 160 lbs / 72.6 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @mikekazimer

Banshee Titan review


Climbing

The Titan is a calm climber, but the Float X2 does move a bit if you stand up and really start hammering. It doesn't have quite the same level of snap out of the gate as the new Specialized Enduro, or Ibis Ripmo, and on longer climbs I usually took advantage of that climb lever to get a little extra support for those hard efforts. The lever is easy to access, and despite Mike Levy's vehement anti-lever sentiments, I never experienced any guilt when I flipped that switch.

On certain trails, particularly ones filled with sections of awkward rocky steps, the Titan felt a bit cumbersome, and I felt like I was working a harder than usual to maintain my speed. Switching the dropouts to the higher position, which steepens the head angle a bit and raises the bottom bracket, is one way to add a little zip to the Titan's manners. Like adding hot sauce onto scrambled eggs, it's not a drastic alteration, but it helps - the bike felt more at home in flatter, chunky terrain in that higher setting. I used the high setting for the trails around Moab, Utah, but preferred the low setting for the steeper trails I frequent in the Pacific Northwest.

Depending on what style of climb you're tackling, long chainstays can either be a boon or a bane. Preparing to face off against a rubble-filled straightaway, the type of section where maintaining traction is the key to success? In situations like that the Titan shone, with the longer back end and relatively slack head angle providing plenty of stability to keep on churning up and over the rough stuff. As expected, it was on the slower speed, tighter and twisty bits that the longer back end became more noticeable. It's still possible to get through those sections of trail, it just takes more effort and some advance planning.

Overall, the Titan feels most at home when it's used to grind up logging roads and then plunge down a gnarly trail once the climbing is over. The steep seat tube angle combined with the relatively tall front end creates a comfortable, upright climbing position, but it never felt like it was in a hurry on the climbs or on flatter sections of trail. Luckily it's another story once gravity takes over...


Banshee Titan review


Descending

The Titan lives up to its name on the descents, and it's happiest when blasting straight through the chunder, or rocketing off the lip of a stepdown. It has a very stable, planted feel, and the stomp-ability of this bike is top-notch - the way that it sticks to the ground after landing really makes it stand out. It's like smacking something with a dead blow hammer – big impacts are nicely muted, and I never worried about getting bucked or blowing through the travel too quickly, no matter the size of the drop or jump.

Based on looks and geometry numbers alone it'd be easy to think the Titan could be a handful, but out in the real world it's very manageable, especially once it's up to speed. Of course, that's on a size large – those 452mm chainstays might be more noticeable on the size medium and its 445mm reach. The long chainstays pay dividends on fast straightaways and anywhere that extra control is wanted, delivering loads of stability for carving big arcs, and they create a very centered position that instills confidence in steep terrain. Just like on the climbs, the longer back end is more noticeable on tighter sections of trail, but I never felt like I was wrestling with the bike to get it to do what I wanted.

The Titan isn't exactly a poppy, playful bike, but it doesn't feel overly lethargic or sluggish either, likely because Banshee didn't go super slack with the head angle or super long with the reach. It has a well-balanced nature that prevents it from feeling like you've hopped aboard a runaway freight train. If anything, it has the air of a freeride bike rather than an enduro race machine to it - whenever I rode the Titan I found myself gravitating towards steep trails with big jumps and drops rather than sprinting my brains out trying to snag a KOM.



Banshee Titan review
Banshee Titan

Norco Sight 2020 review
Norco Sight

How does it compare?

There was a period of overlap between my time on the Banshee Titan and the Norco Sight, which let me ride the same trails in the same conditions to see how the two compared. The Titan does have a little more travel – 155mm vs the Sight's 150mm, and 10 more millimeters of cushion up front thanks to that 170mm fork. That's noticeable on the trail, and the Titan did a better job of handling those bigger hits and misjudged lines compared to the Sight, although keep in mind that this is comparing a Float X2 to the RockShox SuperDeluxe. The Sight's rear suspension did feel a touch more sensitive off the top than the Titan's, but both bikes offer plenty of traction for dealing with loose, slippery terrain.

As far as the geometry numbers go, the Sight's head angle is .5-degrees slacker, and the reach is 15 millimeters longer than the Titan in a size large. Despite those differences, the Titan's wheelbase is just 3 millimeters longer than the Sight's, thanks to those 452mm chainstays vs. the Sight's 440mm chainstays (for a size large). Neither bike is lacking stability, and it's really a matter of personal preference when it comes to choosing which geometry to go with.

I did find the Sight to be a little easier to whip around, especially at slower speeds. Both bikes can handle just about anything, but for longer rides with a mix of terrain I'd be more likely to grab the Sight, while the Titan would get called into duty for missions with lots of big, burly moves or extra-rugged trails.

Banshee Titan review


Banshee Titan review
Banshee Titan review

Technical Report

e*thirteen LG1 tires: A bike like this deserves beefy tires, and e*thirteen's LG1 tires were a good fit. I would have opted for the extra-sticky MoPo rubber compound for the front tire if this were my personal bike, but even the slightly harder compound still delivers plenty of bite for digging in and finding traction.

Fox Float X2 Performance shock: The Performance level X2 doesn't have the same range of adjustments as its high-end sibling, but that also means that it's easier to set up, and you won't find yourself wondering if you need one more click of high-speed rebound or compression. I was able to find a setup that worked well with minimal fuss, which left more time for riding rather than wrenching.

Head tube length: It's worth noting that the Titan's head tube is on the longer side of the spectrum, at 130mm for a size large. That's something to keep in mind if you're planning on swapping over a fork from another bike with a shorter head tube - the steerer could end up being too short depending on where it was cut.


Banshee Titan review


Pros

+ Excellent stability
+ Shines in rough terrain and on big hits
Cons

- Long chainstays aren't for everyone
- Currently only available as a frame only




Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesThe Titan is a friendly beast of a bike with an appetite for the steep and deep. It takes a little extra effort to get it up to speed, but once you're there the stability and capacity for smoothing out rough trails is very impressive.  Mike Kazimer








309 Comments

  • 311 155
 I can’t be the only person who has no interest in 29ers! How is every single review about 29ers nowadays? Soon as I open the link.. Oh’ another 29er.

I’ve ridden 29ers and they aren’t for me, clearly there is a market for them but in my extended group of riding buddies no one rides a 29er (there are a couple of ebikers but we don’t talk about them).

Trail / AM I’m down with 27.5 it’s the best of both worlds. DH I’ve had to go 27.5 as some lowlife scumbags stole my TR500 in October which was running 26 but could have done either 26 or 27.5 and that was such a fun bike. So flickable and whips where effortless. I had to replace it and was either 27.5 or 29. Ended up with a 27.5 YT Tues CF and it’s alright but nowhere near as dun or playful as my TR500 running 26 inch wheels and kinda just feels like a big tank thundering through stuff.

Where are all the fun / playful bikes with smaller wheels for people who wanna play with their mates in the woods sending jumps and getting sideways?

Quick look as the last few reviews and they’re all 29ers 

Banshee titan
Marin Rift Zone
Norco Sight
NS Synonym
Kona Process (although to be fair available in 27.5 but not reviewed)
Orbea Oiz (I don’t need a small)
Hope HB.130
  • 74 20
 Yup, I agree, same feeling here.
  • 64 5
 RUNE!
  • 34 1
 I understand your criticism and would also love to see more 27.5" reviews. Especially since many tests have shown that wheelsize is only a small part of what determines the ride of a bike.
There is a new version of the banshee Rune, using the new suspension layout and 27.5" wheels, but i'm not sure if you can translate over much of the Titan review. The Rune is a different kind of bike, which shorter chainstays, lower stack and a different suspension tune.
  • 71 2
 Even though I prefer 29ers myself, I agree to your critisism.
  • 10 1
 @Ttimer: loved all previous versions of the Rune. Always looks like a burly fun bike. Would certainly be happy reading the review on that!
  • 12 28
flag Hamburgi (Mar 2, 2020 at 2:04) (Below Threshold)
 Same here...
But the industry want to sell the 29ers as hell... and everyone wants to be faster..
im super happy with 27,5" and yes i want to have fun and dont win races or want to be fast as hell....

But in the future i will see, everyone of us is riding a 29er
  • 22 4
 This 29er hype is so bad that the official distributors for SRAM and RockShox in South Africa told me they aren't bringing in any 27.5 forks.
  • 87 20
 I used to be all over the more playful vibe (I come from a mostly dirt jump / DH background), I now have two 29ers and have never really felt either weren’t playful or fun. And I was as much of a hater as the next guy, I can throw my evo around as much as I ever could my old 26” glory, and it jumps well. You have to spend a few rides getting used to the feel but as human beings we are experts at adapting, hence I call BS on the “they aint fun or playful vibe”. The biggest deciding factor on whether a bike is fun is its angles, rather than its wheel size.
  • 3 6
 you have to dig around a bit, but there are several enduro bikes and a few trail bikes that have been reviewed on PB that have 27.5 versions. The RM Slayer is one i can remember, and I think the Propain Tyee (they're not offering smalls in 27.5, they're doing a separate 27.5 range). I'm sure there's others I can't recall though.

I personally can't find a bike in 27.5 currently which has geo and sizing and spec/cost I want (enduro bike) so have basically given up and accepted I'll try a 29er this time. If i don't like it/can't get used to it, I guess by that time we'll be back to another wheel size being more commonly sold.

I'm actually really due for a new bike, otherwise i might try harder to resist the industry doing what it is (plus I am kind of curious enough to roll the dice).

Otherwise i guess you scour the second hand market, although old bikes might have less favourable geo, regardless of wheelsize, if you accept that geo has actually improved (not swung too far to 'modern')
  • 8 4
 @Ttimer: If many tests have shown that wheelsize is only a small part of it, what's all the fuss about anyway?
  • 18 10
 "in my extended group of riding buddies no one rides a 29er"
this might be uk thing
  • 25 2
 They’ll come back, companies will market them as the fun bikes they are. Geo got really good as 26” were dropped, I don’t think people realize how fun and capable a 26” bike is with proper geo. Look at the 2015 process 167, one of the last 26” bikes made with modern geo, funnest bike I’ve ever ridden.
  • 22 31
flag SLBIKES (Mar 2, 2020 at 3:49) (Below Threshold)
 Well 29ers were mass produced before 27.5 was even a thing. Progression was 26, 29, 27.5, you had 650b but never massed produced, If you ride a well made 29er for some time you will not go back to a 27.5. Been riding and racing a 29 for over 12 years, tried a 27.5 last year, could not believe how awful it was, most people I find that do not like a 29er are not willing to put the time in on one. I put 20 years on a 26, no need to go backwards.
  • 28 3
 @SLBIKES: I think our styles of riding may differ greatly. But good for you if 29 feels good go for it. No hate but I wouldn’t suggest people who ride smaller wheels are ignorant to the advantages of 29 just prefer the way a smaller wheel rides.

I’ve ridden the 3 wheel sizes and my preference it still 26 I only ride 27.5 on my bikes now as the industry have given me little alternative
  • 21 1
 @SLBIKES: you name it yourself: "Been riding and racing a 29"... not everyone of us is racing and looking for higher speed, strava segments etc.
Some of us just want to have a versatile and agile bike. I've tried 26, 650b and 29 - as a absolute non-racing type of rider, I prefer a 27.5. It doesn't go as fast as the 29, yet 650b are still more playful and lots of fun to ride.
  • 10 13
 27.5 is slowly being phased out. Bike company’s build what there race teams want to use.
  • 19 3
 The guerilla gravity megatrail is 27.5, thanks to their modular frame you can also get it as a mullet without compromising the Geo. Currently running this set up, best bike I've ever ridden and good value too.
  • 12 0
 Megatrail
ridegg.com/megatrail
Mullet set up (megasmash)
ridegg.com/megasmash
  • 2 2
 @Oolex: Cape Cycle Systems se ma se poes Razz
It's because RSa is so befok with marathon riding they couldn't give a shit about other things. You know how hard it was to even find a Lyrik until recently with them Frown
  • 8 12
flag benmoosmann (Mar 2, 2020 at 4:35) (Below Threshold)
 How in the world is a Trail 27.5er the "best of both worlds"?

You typically want a trail bike to be fast and efficient as opposed to being focused on playfullness, downhill and bike park stuff. So if anything, a Trail bike should have 29" wheels and longer travel should be at 27.5"
  • 10 8
 @usmbc-co-uk: Couldn't agree more. I was very much against 29ers, until I actually tried one.

And I've never felt like my Commencal Meta TR 29er wasn't "playful" enough.
  • 27 2
 @usmbc-co-uk: a bike becomes less manoeuvrable, more flexible and heavier in direct proportion to any increase in wheel size.
  • 26 1
 @benmoosmann: again I'd say it depends on what how you choose to ride trails. Are you aiming to get around as fast as possible? That's not much fun to me.

I ride pretty much everything, Trail, AM, DH, Bike Parks and a wee bit of DJ/Street. But when I am riding trail i'm not head down looking to get around in the fastest time possible. I look for side hits, little kickers to boost off, anything to have the most fun on the way down. The most fun for me is not looking down the well worn line down the middle but the edges of the trail where the fun happens.

As for being the best of both worlds 27.5 is more rollable than a 26 inch wheel and will smooth out bumps in a trail to a degree but is more maneuverable and easier to flick around the bike / around corners than a 29 inch wheel.

I'm no slouch when the trail points down and i'll happily go out for a 30+ mile trail ride but flat out efficiency isn't what i'm after. I'd rather have a bike I personally find more fun and that's a playful bike with smaller wheels.
  • 2 0
 @johntaylorphotos: That's a lot of bike for the money! finding decent 26 inch rubber is a mission in itself though
  • 7 4
 can we also have non boost bikes back please. cost me a lot last year when I got a crash replacement frame and it was boost. I now have a non boost 27.5 with 11 speed and a boost 29er with 12 speed. I don't like change.
  • 2 0
 True- even tought I really enjoy and dont want to sell my 29er- my TR500 or Commencal Meta SX were a blast to ride and in no way wore than the 29ers.

Commencal ditched the 650b Meta (AM and TR) sadly.
  • 13 2
 I'm currently looking at the Banshee Spitfire V3 as my next trail bike. Purely for the ability to run 26
  • 4 1
 Do you recon PB is influenced by the market? It's as though 27.5 is being phased out but they are still just as good...it's not what you have but how much you have when riding it....
  • 6 0
 @Kiwijohn42: if it isn't a 29er, it's an e bike these days.... what's happening around here???
  • 5 0
 @Kiwijohn42: You Tell 'em, King! #RuneForever
  • 2 0
 @Oolex: If true (not calling you a liar) that is bollocks.
  • 1 0
 Amen to that
  • 8 0
 @Garpur44 Buy a Rune. Get the 12x148 short axle configuration. it will let you run 26" wheels with a modern progressive geo. So there ya go @Banshee-Team cares that you ride little wheels.
  • 11 9
 You act like pinkbike buys bikes to review. Companies ship them these bikes for reviews. also, 26 is dead.
  • 2 0
 I share the same opinion to!
  • 4 2
 Pick a wheel size and...
  • 2 1
 @pbuser2299: Based on what evidence?
  • 17 2
 We need a 29er filter!
  • 5 0
 @klerric: Bike companies will produce bikes that sell. Most ran two versions of each model concurrently (see stumpy, process etc) and if one size isnt selling there isnt much sense buying more stock in. Its hard economics not Pinkbike
  • 3 0
 IMO, if you're interested in 27.5 releases and press (and you have every right to be so) then I suggest you start preaching to the riders/consumers instead of the press

Brands will follow the money, publications will follow the brand's releases
  • 4 2
 My Ripley is more playful than my HD4. Ripley roles over sharp bumps faster. Like the HD4 better for climbing. My butt doesn't hit the rear tire as easily on drops. 29r and 27.5 have their strengths. But you cannot argue 29 is faster...that sells. Even if most of us cannot outride our 27.5.
  • 3 0
 @sml2727: 27.5 being phased out because the bike companies build what the race co's are using - not disagreeing with you, but pretty dumb if this is the mentality of the bike co's. The majority of the population is not/can not ride at the level of the race teams, and thus may not benefit from their exact tech. ie. think about how stiff a racer sets up their suspension. Does that mean the rest of us should copy? Racing is great for developing new tech - but it doesn't all have to end up on the gear the public ride, sometimes you pick and choose or modify to fit.
  • 9 1
 The Norco Sight comes in 27.5
  • 3 1
 Why would you say something so brave, yet so controversial?

All jokes aside my last 7 bikes have either been 26 or 27.5. Fun>Fast
  • 3 0
 I'm in the market for a mid-travel 27.5+/29 full suspension and you can't find much info on them. I realize that they're a dying breed since manufacturers have decided that 29 is the thing, but there are some that still exist. Give us a review of the Shredd Dog, Prime, Switchblade, 5010, Mayhem, etc. I know I can look all over and find small bits of info about each of them, but there's nothing for direct comparison. Bonus points for aluminum frames!
  • 3 2
 @canuck-rider: I'd like to see you throw a 360 on a 29er though
  • 7 2
 I AGREE WITH YOU!!!!! I owned a 29er, I gave it a damn good try and they are just not for me nor will they ever be.
  • 3 1
 @usmbc-co-uk: see Physics>classical mechanics>statics; dynamics. Tire clearance and acceleration are fun. You're right about profits, though. It's economics and Pinkbike.
  • 2 0
 As I think someone else mentioned above me, wheel size in this day and age tells a very small portion of the story when compared to other critical features on the bike. I ride both 29 and 27.5 and can't tell the difference anymore, really. Both bikes "feel" as they should/were intended. With that said, to your point, it would be nice to see a few more 27.5-specific reviews. But, I don't think we can necessarily point the finger of blame at PB. They test what they get, and bike companies seem to be putting add'l emphasis on 29ers at this point. Point being, I don't think it's intentional from PB. I just think it's what the market and majority of riders are riding, so they test them. And since many bikes are capable of running both wheelsizes with minor if any tweaks to the frame geo, I think they are going to continue to test a greater quantity of 9ers at this point in time. It'll shift next year to 800cc wheels, though, so don't worry. Then we'll be all whining about not seeing enough 9er reviews Wink
  • 1 2
 @Oolex: I was running 29er Rockshox Revelation on my 27.5+, it works but I think legitimate 29er forks would be best
  • 4 0
 With you 100%. I came from the BMX world and love to pop off of every side hit I can find. IME, 29ers can't offer the playfulness I want in a trail bike.
  • 63 26
 Ugh, the “29ers aren’t playful” argument hurts my brain. In any case, the reason you’re seeing mainly 29er reviews is because the bulk of what’s being released rolls on 29” wheels.

We do have a Yeti SB140 review in the works; hopefully that’ll satisfy some of the desire to read about bikes with slightly smaller wheels. There was also a Transtition Scout First Ride not that long ago: www.pinkbike.com/news/first-ride-transition-scout-carbon-2020.html
  • 28 8
 What sucks for me is that the top comment here is about a wheel size/review choice debate instead of the bike. Seriously... most comments on here are about hating on 29er reviews and why it isn't made of titanium rather than a discussion on the bike review. Lame....
  • 10 4
 @benmoosmann: you probably won’t feel it until you jump back on 27.5. I drank the 29 kool aid for a few years. Really enjoyed it. But don’t kid yourself about the playful thing. There really is no contest between the two.
  • 4 1
 It's because almost all the brands are focusing on the "new" thing, being 29ers and there are a lot more coming out these days! They did review the Transition Scout didn't they?
I understand your comment though. Have the same feeling but it's not the reviewers that dictates what's new it's the brands.
Btw I'm all about 27.5" myself!
  • 6 2
 I'm tall so 29ers work best, but I've tried a few 27.5, Ibis HD5 comes to mind. But if you just want to party like a hooligan, the Trek Remedy has been my favorite, much more than the HD5. Maybe because its not as slacked out trying to be all Enduro-y, and just felt way more fun? My buddy runs a Trek Remedy with Rockshox Super Deluxe rear, quite stiff suspension setup, and rocks everything from DJ's to regular trails. There is just something about the Remedy - it feels like the best of both worlds.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdVprjvl-wE&feature=emb_title
  • 7 2
 wheelsize debate are so 2018!
  • 4 7
 The people are clamoring for 29ers, perhaps they are outselling 27.5, but for going big and riding chunk, I'm all in for the smaller wheels. 29ers to me are short travel bikes for epics and flow.
  • 2 0
 @catweasel: Same here, love my GG Megatrail.
  • 2 5
 @mikekazimer: It's cool Mike, it's just a thing, the pendulum will swing back. I kinda feel bad for all the folks buying long travel 29ers and not feeling the low later on down the road, but that's why we demo.
  • 4 1
 @Zeatalion: it was first impressions. My impression of the video snippets that weren't just rehashing spec is that Sapp looks a lot more comfortable on the Scout than Switchblade in 29" setup. That he mentions 'freeriding' at 3:10 in Scout vid makes one doubt his qualification, though, just as Kazimer is unqualified to review 27" since he privileges economics over physics--occupational hazard.
  • 7 3
 I agree. I would like to add that the industry seems to “force” people towards the 29 wheels. I am not criticizing the value / improvement of this new size but I do have to point the dishonesty of the industry.
Ti be more specific, when a rider is paying “serious cash” for a product, in our case wheels, the industry has to honer the trust of the customer by providing, at least, spare parts.

We can see nowadays that is getting progressively hard to find decent tires in size 26. This is dishonesty, because when I was buying those expensive rims, laced on high quality hubs with expensive spokes, NOBODY told me that there will be a day were I cannot locate a pair of 26 X 2.7 tires…!

Mind you that this example expands to most of the bike parts, starting from the frame. I love progression and I am eager to try the latest improvements, but the industry have to keep the other side of the “deal” & keep supporting their customers.
  • 8 6
 @uncajohn: Wow what a rant, so progress is dishonesty.
  • 5 1
 @Garpur44: Although some of the 29er long travel bikes I tested felt very fast, I also still like the feel of the 27.5. I'm loving my Rune V3 so far!
  • 4 3
 @TheOriginalTwoTone:
By all means NO (how did you manage to end up with that conclusion?

All I say, is that the industry has to keep supporting yesterday’s products. How hard is that to understand.

Progress is essential, without progress we are lost.
  • 4 1
 @mikekazimer: I’d like to see a review of the Rune V3 with a 26” setup. If anything just to stir the pot. Dig the review. Titan looks like a blast.
  • 7 1
 @Curtis-Gillen: I hear what you’re saying dude!

I’ve tried the 29er thing, just isn’t as much fun to me. Everyone has different values and priorities when it comes to how they want their bikes to feel.

I resisted for as long as I could but both my current rides are rolling on 27.5. The Nomad feels great this has been my 3rd Trail bike with big wheels and I’m loving it. But since my TR500 has gone I’m missing the smaller wheels odd as on the DH bike arguably you’d seen the most benefit but it just doesn’t seem as much fun to me.

I was expecting my initial comment to get neg propped harder than Waki talking about well, pretty much anything but been pleasantly surprised I’m not alone.
  • 1 1
 @DaFreerider44: lol, you’d only be able to under rotate once a wheel set or you’d be dining out on a ton of Taco’s
  • 9 0
 Wait for your head to explode when they do ride a 27.5 and say the only thing that would make it better is if it had 29" wheels
  • 3 1
 @FloImSchnee: 29ers were late to the party of long travel and good geo, so this is a sort of retribution.
  • 3 2
 @usmbc-co-uk: geo > travel > wheel size. It would make so much more sense if we sat here arguing about a 64 vs 66 head angle.
  • 3 12
flag kookseverywhere (Mar 2, 2020 at 9:39) (Below Threshold)
 ok boomer
  • 3 2
 I'm only speculating here but...The reason you aren't seeing reviews on playful bikes with smaller wheels is because the Industry is going away from smaller wheels. I do think 27.5 will be around for a bit longer but I do think 26 is officially dead as it relates to a trail or DH bike....maybe Kids DH bikes will have 26" wheels.

The reason for this departure is likely because...many of these companies rely on actual racer feedback to develop their frames...this is part of the reason bike companies bankroll these guys...to provide some other value other than win races.

That being said, racer feedback is based on how they feel on a bike as well as actual data collected on a controlled course. At the end of the day, 26" wheels cannot compete or win races...especially not at a WC level. 27.5" wheels also struggle when compared to 29" wheels but there are rider size limitations that prevent some people from riding a 29" wheel bike...I think this is why companies are playing around with mutt bikes.

In any case, as the old adage goes, "Win on Sunday sell on Monday". Bike companies aren't making bikes that are easy to whip so people can post cool whips on instagram on their fresh 26" bike...Bike companies are making bikes based on racer feedback and data.

Combine that with the fact that...0.1% of us can ride like Brandon Semenuk and racing bikes is much more accessible to the average person when compared to riding down a slopestyle course.
  • 8 5
 Well guess what boyz? Theres a new wheel size lurching around the corner...its called 31...some claim its fastest, longest, stable and as flickable as a 24.
And In no time 29rs are obsolete , just like our beloved 27.5rs and our evenmore beloved 26rs.
pinkbike will be flashing 31 wheelers only, you know why? Cause thats what its PAID to do .

If that wont make you shredders throw away ur 9months old wheelset and order a new bike than u boyz r in the wrong sport....
Thank god for progression!
  • 5 4
 @mikekazimer: Turn the clock back 5-6 years and you could simply substitute 26" for 27.5" in the above complaints.
  • 2 0
 This is why I was so psyched to see the new transition scout release!
  • 4 3
 @uncajohn: You said they were dishonest for not telling you that 26er would die 20 years later.
Can I have a peak at that crystal ball you seem to think exists.
Companies don't make stuff that doesn't sell. That's how you lose money. Sorry that your beloved 26er falls into that category.
  • 5 0
 @mikekazimer: Mike you need to test the downcountry Phantom as well.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

I'll step outside now.
  • 3 1
 @Kiwijohn42: I agree I would love a review of the new RUNE. Sold my 2018 V2 about 8 months ago and I am starting to miss it.
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer: I understand the frustration of never being able to make anyone happy; especially on the internet. I am thankful for the many reviews and the time taken by everyone at Pinkbike.

I believe the frustration could be in that Banshee released an entire new line up of bikes and the first one reviewed was the 29er. Banshee is a great company that caters to all wheel sizes (even 26"). I don't know if one is in the works but a review of their other popular bikes such as the Rune and Spitfire would be awesome.

Cheers.
  • 7 1
 Came here to say this EXACT thing, thanks for putting it in words already. I’m still on 26 for a lot of my riding and so are many other freeride-types. 650b is the closest I get to wagon wheels...
  • 1 0
 @Curtis-Gillen: How does the new V3 feel compared to the V2? Dm me if ya like. Thanks!
  • 5 1
 @DirtbagMatt: yeah I'm just under 6'3. I went and checked the new Enduro and Megatower, still having a hard time with that big of front wheel. 27.5 is a great sweet spot. Luckily Keith builds bikes the way he does, so I'm confident we'll always have something.
  • 4 3
 Totally agree. I had a 29er and could not get on with it at all. 27.5 all the way for me!
  • 2 0
 @Oolex: good for you, buy Fox or DVO
  • 4 0
 Completely with you bro! I love the look of the geo/travel on so many of these bikes but the wheels man! I’ve tried a few 29ers now and they just simply aren’t as much fun!!! Yeah they’re fun if going fast is your thing but in Surrey where I live, they just deaden the trail and make cornering harder work!
  • 1 0
 Duplicate
  • 1 3
 the titan can be run setup 29f 27.5r or with 27.5+ wheels thanks to the variable fork length and dropout height.

This bike offers something different with the long chainstays, with length and height adjustable dropouts.

I think it is very lame to come right out and complain about something different type of bike being reviewed, other than all the fun playful bikes with smaller wheels.
  • 2 1
 @TheOriginalTwoTone:

Ha!
We all know that. What i cannot be sure of is why you conclude that i was against... progression (!!!).
Also.
Your bike don;t have to last only one (1) season. If you are going to invest above average on a bike you are going to expect the support you deserve.

So, stop acting like a spoiled brat. There are no crystal balls and nothing is stationary. Our sport is the outcome of such a proggression.
But.
The industry have to support "yesterday" products, that's all.

One more thing.

Asside from the 29 wheel evolution, progression can be found on other parts too. Do yuo support these too? I am quite sure that you will reject a "different looking" fork (like the structure bike) because it does not look "progressively cool"..

Am i wrong?

IYou seem to know occult. IWould you share your knowledge on crystal balls!?
  • 9 0
 I upvoted you but only to get you closer to 116 which is a multiple of 29.
  • 4 0
 just get the 2020 sight in 27.5" like me, it is sick. I feel almost weird on a 27.5" XL bike these days, but who cares, I love the ride!
  • 5 2
 @usmbc-co-uk: is not like they can't do as smaller wheels do, is that it requires way more effort to do it. You can't chaeat physics mate
  • 5 1
 @vonroder77: Well, the Titan is the newest bike from them even though they almost all got the redesign. Makes sense that Banshee would want to promote this new beast.
  • 3 0
 @Explodo: Skip the 27.5+. All the weight of 29er and none of the benefits of either 27.5 or 29.
  • 4 0
 I'm 6'4. After 20 years of little wheels, I'm stoked to have so many amazing options that feel more...proportional.
  • 6 0
 @sml2727: funny thing is we just saw two sponsored enduro racers from team SC hiting athe AndesPacifico on 27.5 whells... one came 2nd overall and only Iago Garay chose the megatower... maybe its just a more relaxed type of race.
  • 1 0
 @hubsession: Very fun bike , I had one. Would have loved a coil to try.
  • 5 3
 Worry not, everyone, 26" wheel bikes will be back just as soon as the bike industry needs something new to shove down our throats. That is, after we've all bought 27.5 then 29, then e-bikes (well not e-bikes). THEN they will decide we need playful bikes again. It will include some marketing BS about 'getting back to mountain biking's roots'.
  • 2 0
 @benz-tech: I hope it includes steeper head angles and 2x front shifters based on "new technology" so that we can properly come full circle.
  • 2 0
 I think we will see more bikes designed around both wheel sizes. A flip chip at the rear axle like this bike and a spacer under the head tube like guerilla gravity and you could run 27.5, 29 or mullet without compromising geo
  • 1 0
 @SLBIKES: Plenty of people don’t want or need the stability of 29’er just as they wouldn’t wish for riding flexier wheels over smaller rocks and roots on their fav trail.
  • 2 4
 @FloImSchnee: 29ers rule, I tried to go back and it sucked, smaller wheels were sketchy AF haha
  • 3 0
 @vonroder77: Yeah buddy, gotta keep smaller wheels for the people.
  • 2 0
 I feel your pain, although I love 29ers for long rides with technical descents. I do still ride my 26ers and after some descents to get used and get my confidance leveled, I'm also with you. Flickable & Fun bikes.

But the market is going on the safe & predictable big wheel, Low, Streght, Long bikes.

Some call it progress... I call it another bike type.

Cheers
  • 1 0
 @sml2727: nah mate, they build what they think people will buy and in some cases what they want to ride themselves.
  • 3 0
 @vonroder77: I just replaced my V2 Spitfire with a V3 Rune. It climbs better & sure as hell descends faster.
  • 19 1
 Just so you know, Banshee offered Pinkbike a choice of any of their new bikes, and they asked for a titan. We aren't pushing it over a rune or any other bike, but media see that a new bike name = more attention, which is fair enough.
  • 1 0
 @usmbc-co-uk: Science, the wheels are bigger, the forks/tubes are longer? They can either be as stiff, or the same weight, they can't be both.
Also skidding your bike round GT.
  • 1 0
 @benz-tech: They are back , just projected at kids now. Look at the new YT Primus.
  • 1 0
 @benz-tech: You do know that Mountain Biking roots wanted nothing to do with 26er right?
  • 1 1
 @usmbc-co-uk: 452mm back end would take some serious getting used to before it became fun! I 100% agree with your statement though!
  • 2 0
 Get yourself Rune or Spitfire
  • 1 0
 @mtbgeartech: I agree; It would be cool to know which bikes brands submit vs. what Pinkbike actually wants to get their hands on for review. I'm sure it might take some of the beatings off of the poor peeps at Pinkbike.
  • 2 0
 @BansheeRiders: oooh, are you saying that they don't review just what they're sent? Wow, who could've tell, cause that's what they say once a d again XD
  • 2 0
 @Kiwijohn42: I’m stoked to be building up a V3 Rune this Spring!
  • 1 0
 @ismasan: might do normally, but we gave them a choice.
  • 2 0
 @BansheeRiders: when PB say so they don't lie, technically. They review what they're sent.
BUT, I think they definitely have a word in what's sent.
  • 1 0
 @togood2die: it's true and it is bollocks.
  • 1 0
 I used to think that - had a GG Trail Pistol that can run 27.5 or 29" wheels and I always ran the 27.5. Now I have an Ibis Ripmo and love the 29" wheels??????? The Ripmo feels way more playful and fun than my GG with 27.5 wheels. . . . .
  • 2 0
 @mikeyb76: But it's not...

Would only be a good comparison if you ran the same bike with the different wheels sizes and even that is a compromise.

I've been changing between 27.5 and 29 bikes about every 2 rides lately and the 27.5s are always noticeably more nimble and playful.

One explanation I have is the distance of the axles to the ground. Considering changes in lean angle the arc of the axle travels a shorter distance the smaller the wheel diameter. Other geo variables play a role as well but this makes sense to me.
  • 1 0
 @mtbgeartech: It’s also about bb height in relation to axle height. The more bb drop you have, the more stable, 29’ers have the most bb drop. Bmx bikes have bb rise, poppy and squirrely. 29 tires also have a longer contact patch, instead of more square like 26 or 27.5, so they don’t want to turn as fast but have more stability and traction. Also, the gyroscopic mass of the larger wheel.. Hold each side of the axle in your hands and spin a 29 wheel and then a 26 or 27.5, the 29 is much harder to lean over, When you lean a bike over, the gyroscopic effect basically helps turn the handlebar in the direction of the lean bringing the wheel back under the bike. More gyro effect will be more stable but not as flicky.
  • 1 0
 @mtbgeartech: you didn’t read my comment. I ran both wheel sizes on my GG trail pistol. The trail pistol wasn’t as playful as my Ibis Ripmo using the same exact 29er wheelset. The chain’s stays are shorter on the Ibis and the fork offset is shorter making the Ripmo very playful ????????????????
  • 1 0
 @mikeyb76: Gotcha. I read it as you only ran the TP as a 27.5. The result is that the ripmo is more playful than the TP. That's completely possible but its apples to oranges. If you could run 27.5 on the Ripmo would it feel more agile?
  • 2 0
 @emptybe-er: I agree with the BB height thing. I get why ultra stable is important for racing and Strava*shole-ing but it also equals "kinda boring" IMO.

If I could find a 29er that felt like my Bronson I'd be all over it. So far the Ripmo, Hightower 2, Tallboy 4, Megatower, Foxy Carbon 29, and Carbine have not felt as good to me though. Some were certainly "faster" but they didn't put a smile on my face like the Bronson does.
  • 1 0
 @mtbgeartech: I guess I can always try!!!!!
  • 1 0
 @mikeyb76: I don't think it would work very well. BB would be too low, steering would be messed up a little.
  • 101 3
 So, not the bike you reach for when the trails get titan twisty
  • 5 5
 That was the only good pun I've ever seen on pinkbike.
  • 2 0
 @panaphonic: punaphonic
  • 6 0
 All the good ones can be found at PunHub
  • 3 0
 @panaphonic: many years under the tutelage of my father, pun-fu master Timmins
  • 40 1
 we need Privateer 161 review
  • 18 0
 We’re planning on getting one in once it’s available.
  • 6 0
 @mikekazimer: when you got it, can you do review and comparison with air and coil?
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: Would have loved to have seen the Prime V3 mix it up in your trail bike test for 2020. Any future plans in the pipeline of getting to throw a leg over one of those?
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: So you do have choices on which bikes you review? Interesting.
  • 32 0
 Maybe I missed something...but why compare its specs to another bike when it comes as frame-only?
  • 12 1
 Agreed. something like the RAAW Madonna V2 would have been a way better point of comparison, since a lot more people are probably cross-shopping that one instead of the carbon Norco. They could even have built up both frame sets with similar components, would probably have made for a more interesting comparison
  • 6 0
 @benmoosmann: This is exactly the comparison I was most curious about.
  • 4 2
 @Ian713 and @dumr666 Not shipping yet, it will be available as a complete:

www.privateerbikes.com/products/privateer-161-bike
  • 1 0
 @hevi: yeah, I know. Build spec is more or less exact copy of what I would put on a bike. I am keeping my eye on that. This year is gonna be or Titan or 161 or Meta
  • 26 0
 I wonder if anyone bothers Nissan by asking them if their truck is made of Titanium? There are at least the 3 mentions in this thread where someone is bagging on @BansheeRiders for something that doesn't mean shit. Perhaps they were going for a connection to the mythological significance of the Titans rather than word origins of metal materials...Are we as bikers really so literal? Sipping on our espresso and craft beer whilst pointing out anything to make ourselves feel better....Do we need to question things like this? Like does the Norco Sight actually help our vision?? Who cares. Cool bike, Keith! My brother just ordered one and as the previous owner of a Scythe, Legend, Rune, Spitfire, and Paradox over the last ten years I would say that while they were great bikes, these improvements are spot on for a 6'4" rider whose only gripe was reach and stack! Killing it!!
  • 8 0
 Cheers for the support!
  • 23 0
 One thing i really like about the Titan is that the actual and effective seat angles are very similar. Thats great for tall riders and people with long legs! You can see it in the picture next to the Sight. Its one of the benefits of long chainstays.
  • 8 0
 Yeah I think its a super great thing that Banshee is so upfront and specific with their geometry numbers. A lot more manufacturers should start doing that.
  • 2 0
 Absolutely!
  • 2 0
 I have one and love it. I also have installed the even Longer dropouts that they have available. Awesome!
  • 3 0
 Agree. I love Banshee bikes. At 1.93m tall I find the fit, longer rear centres, steepe STA and adjustable set up makes for a wicked ride.
  • 2 0
 @chasejj: what size? im thinkin of doing this too with a medium
  • 1 0
 @getsomesy: XL- Best bike I've ever owned. That is maybe 20 bikes. Most FS. Only drawback is 1 WB mount. I'm gonna drill and install insert under the DT for another WB. I am running the Longer Dropouts. Most centered geo I've tried. Came off a 2017 GG Trail Pistol. Feels much more balanced and KS2 link is close to DW in performance characteristics. A little heavier (1 lb.) than my GG with same build. But stiffer all over and worth it.
  • 13 0
 Hoorray Titan review!

@MikeKazimer

Thank you so much for the comparison to the Sight. That will be much easier to find a demo on, and is a bike I've been very interested in since it was announced.

Can you also mention how you liked it in comparison to the Raaw Madonna V2?

Also, the linkage/rear triangle on the titan looks like it could accumulate mud. Did you have any issues with that? I'm also in the PNW, so you ride in very similar conditions. And I figure if anyone could answer this question for me, it would be you.

Considering both of these as frames for my next build, so I appreciate all your help, as its hard for me to get my hands on these in person beforehand Smile .
  • 12 12
 But how does it compare to the Grim Donut?
  • 4 6
 @sambobcat: Yes! Grim Donut is the new standard by which all bikes should be compared.
  • 2 0
 I live in Bellingham and have no issue with undue muck. I ride in all weather. I put a piece of gorilla tape on the swingarm to reduce the mud lying at the shock. The shock can get more crap on it than I’m used to but haven’t had any issues over the last few months.
  • 2 3
 Finally, a comment about the actual bike review.

Did the Titan climb better than the Sight? Its rear suspension looks more efficient but just a guess, a comment about his would be nice.

Also, seems seat post insertion is limited because of pivot in middle of seat tube and there was no mention.
  • 7 0
 I'm happy to see stronger 7000-series metal used by Banshee ('normal' grade in BMX Race, and Road bikes). Aluminum is great for full-suss mountain bikes, but I'm continually bummed to see the lower 6000 aluminum in widespread use in all the chinese factories making Big Brand mass-market complete bikes. 6000 series all get noodly in a hurry. I want a bike I can ride, then give to a friend or sell on PB without second thoughts. 7000 allows for this.
  • 3 0
 I also live in the PNW and have been getting some miles on my Titan this winter. No issues at all with accumulation of dirt - there is quite a bit of space for dirt to escape the shock cradle that you can't really see in pictures.

It may be a non-issue, but one of the things I don't like about the X2 shock design is that it flips the shock orientation compared to other designs, meaning that the dust wiper faces upward and invites dirt to just kind of sit on it. I'm curious to see if it leads to faster contamination/shorter service intervals compared to shocks where dirt can be pushed downward off of the seal/stanchion. Not an issue unique to the Titan by any means though.
  • 1 0
 @filmdrew:

This is another reason I mentioned the "high quality AL" frame for both the RAAW and the Titan. I like it when I see manufacturers actually making the best use of their chosen material (Aluminum).

@andrewfif

Do you have a Titan then? If so, how tall are you, and what size did you get? I'm 6'1", and see that their sizing chart would put me on a large... but its got less reach than my current bike, which I already feel is borderline too small in reach for me. Curious what you went with.

Thanks for the info on the mud!

@mikekazimer

A penny for your thoughts on the Titan vs the Madonna v2?

But seriously, thank you for all your work on this. I've been anticipating this review for a while, as there just aren't many industry reviews of it. This really helps me get an idea of what it is like.
  • 1 0
 @ocnlogan: I was on the fence on size, also 6.1, and went the large. Theres a heap of info on mtbr.com banshee forums with a few people in the same boat, sounds like they all went large and we're happy. Keith has been bang on sizing over the years so I'm happy to trust his recommendation
  • 1 0
 @jazzawil:

Thanks man. I've been posting over there as well. Its just the sizing is so far different than many of the other similar bikes I've been looking at (Sight, and Madonna v2 primarily), so I'm always curious what people went with.

It seems the overwhelming majority went with the recommended sizing, and most seem very happy.

Thanks for the info Smile .
  • 1 0
 @PinkyScar: tough crowd
  • 1 0
 I made a custom fender for my Titan that attaches to the swing arm. Works great. Keeps the seat tube and links a bit cleaner. Two zip ties and all good!
www.vitalmtb.com/community/Northwest,10123/setup,40686?ptab
  • 1 0
 Sorry I didn’t see this. I got an xl and I’m 6’1. It’s actually the same size reach of a Yeti sb150 that it replaced when corrected for stack. I’m a happy with the xl. The large may be sweet too though. Dropper insertion isn’t great but not bad @ocnlogan:
  • 16 0
 @mikekazimer The 2020 Orange Stage 6 has 469mm chainstays IIRC - you need to get one tested for this reason alone.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer
I agree with @chakaping it would be good to see a test on the new Orange Stage 6 to see what you think of the longer chainstays..
  • 1 0
 #“Me too”@HarrySimpson:
  • 2 0
 @HarrySimpson: @CrispyNuggs: And also because it's an amazing bike anyway, but people who haven't ridden them wouldn't believe me eh?
  • 15 3
 Update the Darkside! 73mm BB, an inch more reach and a tiny bit steeper seat angle with dropper compatibility.
  • 3 0
 I put on works compononets reach adjuster 5mm and 55 stem but yeah, still waiting for new Large to have reach somewhere around 455 or 460...perfect bike otherwise
  • 1 0
 And better build quality. Myself and quite a few other Darkside owners have snapped their frames around the same area.
  • 1 1
 @turco999: it is 300-500g lighter than current Alu Enduro frames.
  • 1 0
 an inch more chainstay too!
  • 8 0
 @MikeKazimer, might want to add a note or correction regarding the cable routing. What's shown is incorrect. Utilizing the foremost under-stay guides, both cables route above the BB and beneath the lower shock mount.

I agree with most of the descending comments. But I've found the Titan to be an exceptional technical climber here in Phoenix.
  • 7 0
 Pity I'm too short for the Titan.
Think I'm going to replace my Spitfire with a Rune this time round.

forums.mtbr.com/banshee-bikes/banshee-titan-lt-29er-2020-a-1115193-post14496587.html#post14496587
Keith shows the proper way to route the cable and hose: above the BB shell, not under it.
  • 4 4
 Thank you, wanted to write the same about the cable routing. Sometimes I do have questions about the technical knowledge of pinkbike.
  • 7 0
 @squarewheel, that’s the way that the bike arrived - I’ve updated the review to note that there’s a better way of routing things.
  • 1 1
 @mikekazimer: Which distributor assembles a bike like this? As they sell frame only, I hope the bike wasn't assembled by Banshee ;-)
  • 1 0
 @squarewheel: Banshee don't assemble complete bikes, they sell frame only.
  • 1 0
 @BansheeRiders:
Banshee sells frames to distributors who in turn can sell complete bikes.
Well that's how it's done in NZ.
  • 5 0
 Nice review as always.

I am curious if you tried riding with less sag, say the very end of recommended at 15.5mm and if it changed the pedaling much? It just seems a bit curious that the anti-squat is so high but having feelings of more pedal movement especially with a suspension design that is often compared to good pedaling designs such as Maestro or DW link.

Also can you give a comparison to the RAAW Madonna V2? These two seem very similar; wheelbase is only 4mm different, RAAW is longer reach, Banshee is longer CS.
  • 7 0
 See .wtf you need carbon for with an alloy frame that nice.
  • 4 1
 I feel like Noroco Sight got a much easier pass in the climbing department of the review, while Titan got more scrutiny. It's not that Titan should not be scrutinized as it was, quite opposite, but that Norco wasn't. Sight review was focused more on geometry and less on suspension with some doubtful statements at that i.e. level of suspension bob. Now we read that Titan requires the assistance of the Levy-dreaded lever while Sight did not, despite the lower antisquat and higher leverage numbers (cue:"The Sight's rear suspension did feel a touch more sensitive off the top than the Titan's"). I might be wrong, but it seems weird. As a taller and heavier rider however I feel Titan would work better for me than Sight. It seems to favor taller riders with its longer chainstays anyways. I'm looking forward to seeing how Madonna V2 stacks up, although it will probably be tested in a size smaller than XL with higher LR rocker.
  • 3 0
 Don’t disagree; indications are that the Sight is also heavy AF, pushing 9lbs for carbon frame+shock in XL size. While weight should’ve be the only or even primary metric for a bike like the Sight, they DO bill it as an AM/Trail bike not a winch-and-drop sled. Does seem odd the oringinal review and this re-visiting both imply that the Sight is an excellent climber.
  • 2 0
 I think the X2 is the culprit. My Firebird has high AS and a progressive LR, similar to the Titan. With the X2 being so sensitive and a high starting LR, it's gonna be easy to start it moving. When I tried a DPX2, it pedaled better. I think the smaller air chamber plus some extra base compression in the Dpx2 helps pedaling. X2 has so much more traction ...it's always a trade-off. Ive had a Prime V3 for two months now with similar curves and a DPX2. It pedals VERY well.
  • 4 0
 @Drew-O: 9lbs for XL frame with the shock fitted isn't bad. It sounds like Norco designed a bike for a 200lb+ rider to ride for several years, rather than a frame you can ride as long as you never, ever crash it.
  • 2 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: Fair enough. My XL Ripmo frame was ~6.7lbs with X2 shock. That's definitely on the light side, but both are aimed at the trail bike (not mini-DH bike) segment.

That said I did break a Ripmo frame. I'm 190lbs and ride aggressively, but generally don't thrash bikes. So maybe the Ripmo is a bit under built, and the Norco is a bit overbuilt.
  • 2 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: I'm all in for carbon fibre vs aluminium weight savings being invested into a superior strength frame.
As much as a carbon fibre not being recyclable indeed is a problem, quite frankly I cannot be sold on the idea that my conscience should be at ease knowing that an overpriced aluminium frame that costs in the $2k5 region can be scrapped for less than $5, if the frame is weighty and you get a "good" price.
  • 5 0
 More companies need to use adjustable dropouts. The fact that you can easily mullet this without wrecking the geo is a major selling point for short people.
  • 7 0
 Pick a wheel size..... Be a Dick about it
  • 3 19
flag RoadStain (Mar 2, 2020 at 9:27) (Below Threshold)
 Listen, Cunuuuuk, as long as you keep your freaking stupid metric system NORTH of our borders and know that your wheel size (whatever that may be) is wrong by default.....(heh, all you metric suckers are FORCED to use the word 29er in INCHES!!!!)

Eat a bag of.........
  • 4 1
 Glad to see we have this review out... And having ridden the Titan I totally agree on its "stompability" and awesome speed characteristics... But not to contest with the fabulous @mikekazimer, but I do not find the tight cornering to be an issue....
I did at first, until I realized after a couple rides and reviewing time data that I was actually riding through the corners faster, the bike was providing more traction and better control and in essence made it feel like it was too long.
Happy to say, bike is and feels fast and confident. And while maybe not the most spirited climber, it always gets me up to the top with plenty of energy in the reserve to have fun doing what the Titan was made to do... Shred on the way back down.
  • 2 0
 Good to hear! I think Mike kazimer is bored with his awesome job of testing mountain bikes. Actually, his whole crew is kinda lame. They need some better riders with better attitudes
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer you may want to include that the dropouts are also swappable for for +9mm longer dropouts that make for 462mm chainstays (which im stoked about for weight distribution) and are 29+ compatible.

Considering that bikes are getting so long in the front, and that most fast mountain bike trail riders speak favorably of long chainstays, it may bear consideration to look at how a bike works with not only 450ish chainstays but 460+ chainstays.
  • 6 2
 Can we get a review of the Banshee Prime next? Its basically the same bike, but with much more manageable/practical amounts of suspension.
  • 3 0
 It's dope. I demoed an Occam, Ripmo, Ripmo AF, Stumpy (regular, not Evo).

Went with the Prime V3 based on my experience with my Phantom V1.

Each of those other bikes has its merits and beats the Prime in certain categories. Banshee is better than all of them as a complete package when you look at pedaling, cornering, descending, value, quality and customer service.
  • 4 0
 A 430mm seat tube on a medium is pretty long. Some people (like me at 174cm) might have trouble getting a 150mm or longer dropper to fit.
  • 2 0
 Yes!! Ultimately why I got on a geometron g16 after being on a mk2 banshee rune for years. I could get a 150mm dropper on my medium rune, but the length was never good for me.
  • 3 0
 The new Banshees are not very short leg friendly - I have a Rune V2 which is great but looks like that's the last Banshee I'll own given their current sizing tread. That said ended up getting an Evil Offering which is an absolute trail destroyer
  • 4 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: Yea, it would be one thing if this was on a trail bike. However, given the Titan's intended use and without doing the seatpost insertion math, I think the seat tube should be at least 20mm shorter.
  • 4 0
 @Paddock22: it’s a shame bc sooo many features on the banshees I like but like they say all good things most come to an end
  • 7 4
 How is a 150mm rear travel AM bike considered a bruiser? Maybe if it was 180mm front/ 170mm rear. 150mm is a nice AM riding amount of travel but not in the heavyweight bruiser category.
  • 6 2
 It's 155mm and rides deep like a 170mm. Don't let number ruin your life. Ride a bike before you knock it based on 3 digits on a page.
  • 2 0
 People consider the Transition Sentinel a bruiser too, and nobody argues that. it has 145mm rear travel. Don't get caught up in the numbers.
  • 4 3
 @Buggyr333: I here ya but when I think bruiser I think 180/170mm. Something I can hammer the crap out of all day at the park but not have the weight penalty and race only feel of a full DH rig. I’m sure the Sentinel is great but it wouldn’t last one full season at the park without breaking something.

180/170mm = Bruiser
170/165mm = Light heavyweight
160/150mm = Middleweight
And so on...
  • 2 0
 That's not the way you are supposed to route the cables on this bike. They're supposed to go below the bottom shock mount and then above the bottom bracket. Its unfortunate that the cable routing was mentioned as being an issue when they weren't set up as designed.
  • 2 0
 And for the love of god use flush cuts on the zip-ties.. that BB zip-tie is a knuckle cutter.
  • 1 0
 @robmurray12: here's a handy trade trick for you, grab some needle nose, clamp it close to the fastener And twist it until it breaks. No more sharp points.
  • 3 0
 So you reviewed a bike that comes as a frame only and couldn't tell us what the frame weighs ? I guess in your defense it did show up as a bike. Always puzzled why this basic stat is so obscure.
  • 4 0
 8.5 lbs in medium
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer I'm curious about impressions with the E13 LG1 carbon wheels? Any thoughts on that component, especially in relation to the 7000 series AL used to make a "stiffer" frame? Was the bike "jarring" in Moab on those square edges from stiff frame and stiff wheels?
  • 2 0
 Nice review @mikekazimer, I'm glad you ended up with the bike as you tend to review them similarly to how I [hope to] ride a bike in the PNW. The Titan looks to be great when pointed downhill and let loose, which is about half of what I want in a bike, but the other half where the trails get tighter and techier may be rough to manage on this bike... Decisions, decisions.
  • 3 1
 I love my Titan! It's so gratifying to see such a good review. It's all 100% true. BTW, long chainstays are blowing my mind! So stable. Exactly the balance I wanted.

www.vitalmtb.com/community/Northwest,10123/setup,40686?ptab
  • 3 1
 I'm experiencing the same. Even made my CS longer with the optional dropouts. So much balance. Front end stays DOWN on climbs. Perfect.
  • 2 0
 I think we should review pinkbike's reviews. They suck. The whole pinkbike crew sucks. They're obviously bored with MTB and they see this as clocking into work. Get some testers who show more enthusiasm for MTB, and actually have fun. Lameoids
  • 5 0
 I like this and the finish/design is beautiful.
  • 4 0
 This is identical to my MK1 reign, but scaled up about 15%, so it should be f*ckin amazong.
  • 2 5
 You are riding MK1 Reign? What are you, a dwarf?
  • 3 1
 @WAKIdesigns: welcome to my Ted Talk on the OG Reign (1m72 in the morning).
  • 2 1
 Great review, "stomp-ability" - thats a new one! Although I would have loved to see this compared to the new RAAW Madonna instead of the pricey Norco Sight C.

That would have been a better match IMHO, people who'd consider buying this will much more likely be cross-shopping the RAAW Madonna V2 than the Norco Sight C.
  • 2 1
 I just realized that the 33.8lb weight is with carbon cranks, wheels, and maybe bars (hard to tell?). Sure, the DH rear tire may add a half pound, but with no tire inserts or anything else strapped to the frame, that's still a heavy frame.
  • 3 0
 That weight is exactly what mine (XL) weighs with similar spec. It is a pound heavier than my GG Trail Pistol it replaced. But the chassis is SO MUCH more balanced and suspension is much better in the rough. I'll live with it.
  • 1 0
 @BansheeRiders curious about the 235mm max seat post insertion on the large. The BikeYoke Revive 185 is 289.5mm (including actuation mech)/258mm without and the Revive 160 is 264.5mm/233mm. Is it not possible to run a longer dropper post on the large Titan?
  • 1 0
 Insertion of 235mm is correct and probably the worst thing I've seen about the frame so far. Seat post length @ 455mm on Large is pretty short though so likely you'll be able to get correct seat height without fully hilting the dropper. Also there is room underneath the 235 insertion point for actuator so it may or may not interfere.

I'm woking on my build and have a 210mm OneUp I want to run and I'll probably have to shim it to 200mm, maybe 190mm. I am 72.5" tall for reference with 170mm cranks. I need longer brake hose line so have not been able to complete or ride my build yet. I've
  • 3 0
 "Like adding hot sauce onto scrambled eggs" Kaz, you're walking on Levy's lexical field !
  • 4 0
 Long live the no guilt switch.
  • 3 0
 Beautiful looking bike. Mountain bikes just keep getting better looking.
  • 1 2
 If they made that drop out triangular/rectangular shaped and had multiple hole options to raise, lower, extend, reduce, now that would be cool.

Banshee sure likes long chainstays.... esp with a 27.5 bike that's intended to be playful.
  • 1 2
 What's with the first comment? Angry that most riders have ditched the small wheels? People like to ride fast. This new trend of smug, condescending, princess mid-school bmxers trying to be cute with their jibs and bunnyhop tricks on Enduro bikes is cringy and sad. Your profile cranks, longneck grips, and super low seat posts aren't cool.
  • 4 0
 29ers invented going fast? They just make going fast easier.. It’s ok if you can’t bunnyhop or manual, but that doesn’t have much to do with wheel size.
  • 2 0
 I think it's more likely that you're not cool
  • 1 0
 that tire clearance on the rear triangle looks tight. Great looking bike tough.
  • 4 0
 Not really. What you are seeing in the picures is a strut that is set off to the side of the tyre. There is a picture of it if you scroll down on the banshee website: www.bansheebikes.com/titan
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: ah that explains it Smile couldn't tell by the pictures here. Thx for the link
  • 2 0
 Ouuu that’s a sick banshee
  • 2 0
 Y'all fuckin' my eyes out with this wheel size shit.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer just double checking, your tested a large and ran a 40mm stem?
  • 1 0
 Yes, that's correct.
  • 1 0
 You could fit a bigger tire in the back if you bang out the aluminum fender!!
  • 1 0
 Nice revire, however geometry in size small looks - odd, size large more or less balanced
  • 2 2
 Long chainstays ? Doesn't look like you could have anything shorter on this bike.
  • 1 0
 Does anyone have Titan with a coil shock? Is it any good?
  • 5 0
 I just put one in this weekend but need a lighter spring and possibly a lighter compression tune. Next week I am in Finale and will report on it afterwards in the mtb-news "Banshee Titan Austauschthread".
  • 1 0
 Yes I've ridden with a coil. Bottom line..... OMG. The bike rides like nothing else with a coil. Sensitivity comes alive. Coil allows it to use more of its travel more often due to linear spring rate. Game changer
  • 1 0
 I have a Storia on order....will know in a couple weeks
  • 1 0
 @dirtydawgnz: what coil you running
  • 1 0
 @camleman: I've tried EXT and CCDB. Both are a gamechanger
  • 1 0
 This bike really makes me want to raw the paint on my spitfire.
  • 1 0
 Gorgeous looking bike. Want!
  • 1 0
 How would this compare to a full on dh bike?
  • 1 0
 Sounds like a very similar bike to my Meta AM29
  • 1 0
 KS2 looks like Maestro
  • 1 0
 Maestro looks like KS2
  • 2 2
 Looks like a Turner back from the early 2000!
  • 4 1
 I have 3 Turners in my garage. Not even close .
  • 2 3
 Great name for a frame made out of Ti. Titan.
Surprised this hasn’t been done before. Yes I know it’s aluminum
  • 1 2
 495mm of reach is pretty short by today's standards but combined with a 76' seat tube angle means it fits downright tiny.
  • 1 0
 Definitely would buy.
  • 3 3
 This thing is loooong
  • 9 0
 That's what... Ah, nevermind.
  • 7 8
 2008 called wanting their reign back haha
  • 3 1
 Ah ah I agree, it also looks like the 2006 Giant trance.. so weird
  • 4 5
 I had though that by 2020 we would have substantially lighter bikes.
  • 3 1
 @jimmyconnors: that would be cool, wouldn't it. Sadly we are all riding porkers now.
  • 2 3
 But how does it compare to the Grim Donut?
  • 7 9
 At last!! Grim donut next and you can bow out for 2020
  • 5 10
flag YanDoroshenko (Mar 2, 2020 at 0:18) (Below Threshold)
 Wait, this was not the Grim Donut?!
  • 1 3
 ah refresh it, at least better to take clean my eyes.
  • 5 8
 GRIM DONUT
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.067349
Mobile Version of Website