Review: Chromag Dagga Pedals - All Grip, No Slip

Mar 10, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  
Chromag Dagga pedal review



There aren't too many riders on the planet that can two-wheel drift like Chris Kovarik, so it's only fitting that he would get his own signature pedal designed specifically for those foot out, flat out antics. Enter the Chromag Dagga. The Dagga begins as a forged block of 6061 aluminum that's then CNC machined into the shape that's shown here.

It's the Dagga's pins that steal the show. There are 12 on each side, and they stand nearly 8 millimeters tall at full height, although the stock configuration uses a washer that drops that down to a still-tall 6 millimeters. The pins use an M4 thread at their base, where they're threaded into the platform, and then they taper down to an M3 thread at the top for better sole penetration. No matter what, they're quite tall and ready to sink into whatever comes their way (hopefully shoes, not shins).


Chromag Dagga Details
• 12 adjustable height pins per side
• Forged & machined aluminum body
• Chromoly spindle
• Dimensions: 120mm x 115mm
• Colors: purple, black, blue, red, silver
• Weight: 487 grams
• MSRP: $180 USD
chromagbikes.com

The big pins grab your attention first, but the Dagga's overall dimensions are on the larger side of the spectrum as well, measuring 120 x 115mm. That's the largest platform size in Chromag's pedal lineup, and the Q-factor also tops Chromag's charts. The pedals are slightly concave, measuring 14.3mm at the center and 16mm at each end.

Inside there's a chromoly spindle that rotates on a bushing and a cartridge bearing. Chromag's headquarters are in Whistler, BC, where there's no shortage of rainy days, so it's not surprising to see two rubber seals designed to keep water from getting its way into the pedal body.

Available in five colors, the Daggas retail for $180 USD.



Chromag Dagga pedal review
The Dagga's pins stand 6 millimeters tall, and that's with the included washers installed. Taking those out will raise them up even further.
Chromag Dagga pedal review
The aluminum pedal body measures 14.3mm thick in the center, and 16 millimeters at each end.


Chromag Dagga pedal review
The platform underfoot measures 120 x 110mm
Chromag Dagga
All of the pins thread in from the opposite side with a 3mm hex head.


Performance

When it comes to flat pedal platform size, I'm a fan of the crop of larger-than-average offerings that have been released recently. Having a platform that matches the width of my shoe sole just makes sense – tiny platforms are best left to clipless pedals, or for riders with tiny feet. I also liked the wide stance that the Dagga's allow. There are all sorts of opinions out there about the ideal Q-factor, but the position that the Dagga's put my feet in was comfortable and natural feeling, and the fact that there's no big bearing bulge next to the crank arm means there's plenty of possible foot positions. Chromag recommends using the Dagga's with thicker soled shoes, and I have to agree - these wouldn't be very comfortable with soft, floppy skate shoes.

The Dagga's pins look menacing, but my shins have remained scab free over the last four months of usage. That's thanks to the fact that I've yet to fully slip a pedal – there's so much traction, especially when paired with Five Ten's sticky rubber, that sliding off the platform is highly unlikely. Now, not everyone will be a fan of having that much grip – riders that want to be able to reposition their feet more easily may want to consider removing some pins, or purchasing the shorter pins that Chromag uses on their other pedals. As it is, the Dagga's deliver an incredibly locked-in feeling, and once my feet were in place I didn't have to worry about them moving unless I wanted them to, no matter how chunky the trail.

Speaking of pins, I removed the single pin that sticks up in the middle of the pedal on each side in order to let the center of my shoe's sole sink down a little further, since the platform shape is more flat than concave. Yes, the very center of the platform is a little thinner than the edges, but the outer perimeter dimensions are all the same. More recently, I took out the most inboard pin for the same reason - there are enough pins that removing a few to customize the feel underfoot is entirely feasible.


Durability

The Dagga's have held up extremely well to everything I've subjected them to. I've only bent one pin so far, and that happened after a solid smash into a sandstone outcropping in Moab, Utah. There are some scuffs and scrapes on the bodies, but nothing out of the ordinary. There was plenty of grease remaining when I pulled out the axles, and the bushings and bearings are still spinning smoothly. Overall, a very impressive showing on the durability front.


Pedals

How Do They Compare?

How to the Dagga's stack up to other contenders? Let's start with the Anvl Tilt V3. The Anvl's platform is slightly smaller, but the difference in feel underfoot isn't dramatic. When it comes to outright grip, the Dagga's take it, although both options deliver plenty of traction for the roughest trails. Other details to consider: the Anvl's pins are all top loading, while the Dagga's thread in from the backside of the body. Then there's the price – you're looking at $100 for the Anvl, and $180 for the Dagga.

Kona's Wah Wah II pedals are another entry into the big platform party (there's also a smaller version for smaller riders), and they actually measure a couple millimeters wider than the Daggas, although that inboard bearing bulge makes the size difference negligible. When it comes to grip, the Dagga's come out on top. The Wah Wah has fewer pins, and they're not as tall, although the platform size does help make it easy to keep your feet where they belong, and it is easier to move your feet around when necessary. The Dagga pedals get another point for their superior weather sealing, but they're also $60 more than the Wah Wah II.




Pros

+ Maximum traction
+ Excellent durability

Cons

- May be too grippy for some riders' tastes
- Pricey





Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesChromag's Dagga pedals top the charts when it comes to all out grip, making them an excellent choice for DH riders or anyone who doesn't want to worry about slipping a pedal. Ever. They're at the upper end of the price scale, but the high quality construction should mean that they'll keep on spinning for season after season. Mike Kazimer








186 Comments

  • 86 3
 Lightweight or cheap, choose neither.
  • 49 1
 Lightweight or durable -- because you drop weight by using DU bushings instead of bearings. Just saying. And yes - I'm fun at parties.
  • 22 14
 ZTTO pedals in purple, 20 bucks: www.aliexpress.com/i/4000030950922.html
  • 8 1
 @zoobab2: yes! I've been riding them for 6 months now, absolutely no problems. The grip is there, they take the beating pretty well, look good and are reasonably priced. Would recommend.
  • 27 9
 @zoobab2 what I love with product reviews like that and comments like yours is that it feels like Outdoor Dentist Show meets Passion For Savings
  • 2 8
flag WAKIdesigns (Mar 10, 2020 at 2:27) (Below Threshold)
 @BenPea Light, strong, cheap - Pick... as if you could find something that’s cheap!
  • 23 30
flag zoobab2 (Mar 10, 2020 at 2:27) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: Not everybody is a dentist. Unfortunately, Pinkbike has turned into a website for dentists, instead of testing affordable and low end components, especially chinese ones. But I guess there is no bias for canadian/american components here, Pinkbike is located nearby Chromag offices.
  • 67 1
 @zoobab2: Sure, if PB were sent pedals from this Chinese brand they should test them and write an article, why not? But I doubt they have and the pedal isn't anything new, anything novel, it wont perform better than other pedals and doesn't claim to - it is just cheap.

Chromag put back into the industry, employ people in Canada and design / make parts there too (through NSB) - They designed the pedal with one of the legends of DH racing and make performance benefit claims over other products so surely this justifies PB testing them?

People have tested Superstar pedals on virtually every platform online and in print media, they are cheap, no(especially as made in the UK) What about all of the composite pedals everybody, inc PB has tested, they are cheap too.

Yea to some extent lots of the PB reviews are of parts that many cant afford, but this site isn't a public service its upto PB what they want to write about and nobody is going to get particularly excited about ordering a pair of pedals from Alibaba, people want to read about the nice stuff - its why so many people fawn over sports cars they wont ever be able to afford.

Having said that, yes these are almost crazily expensive for a flat pedal.
  • 18 0
 @zoobab2: take a look at North Shore Mountain Bike dot com. Honest reviews of affordable bikes, a lot of discussion about min/maxing a bike build, and fresh humor. They might not have the production volume of PB, but they compensate it with quality reviews.
  • 6 0
 @southoftheborder: Agree with that NSMB do some great, in depth and seemingly honest reviews and this article about the dagga pedal is good reading - nsmb.com/articles/developing-chromag-dagga-pedal
  • 12 15
 @justanotherusername: yeah and then they get whacky and say to run 29+ Minion or fkng 12deg backsweep bars... it's fine, it's just that everybody go south from time to time. Pinkbike reviews go anywhere from random set of words put together like X bike has bars and when you turn them the bike turns to really valuable insightful stuff with comparisons, making everything well grounded in reality. At some point you won't need reviews. I haven't read a single full review of E29 yet it's on top of my list. because I know it doesn't matter what Mike Kazimer thinks of it. Pedal review? all you need to know is whether it lasts or not. Grip is meaningless - everyone has a rather fixed personal preference, it's like wanting to know whether you want Odis or Esis - you have to try for yourself damn it... yeah, actually there is no going around it. After owning 3-4 different pairs of pedals you will know how grippy these are by just looking at the picture.
  • 12 1
 @WAKIdesigns: And lets be fair, most of the grip comes from the pin type, amount and length, you could make a solid block of aluminium grippy if you stuck this length of pins in them.
  • 9 6
 @justanotherusername: exactly. Then add a bit of concave and make them as thin as you can as long as you keep basic reliability. I do lean more and more towards plastic pedals. There's some weird complaint nature to them. I love OneUp Alloys, but I prefer their plastics. This thing here is bollocks. Someone got so into the "legendary status", "iconic chromag design" they left the ground completely. It's unnecessary, consequentially expensive complication meeting full on added emotional value for die hard Chromag fans.
  • 17 8
 @zoobab2: These pedals are unnecessarily complicated and expensive, but I personally won’t give anybody points for ordering some unchecked random stuff to arrive in a separate package from China, with a thought: oh if it’s shit, at worst I will just lose 30 Bucks. No, actually there are no medals for that. I have seen random shit from Random companies selling on AliExpress and won’t effing risk my health, how they treat their employees, potential intellectual property theft, pollution - everything can be wrong there and NOBODY can be held accountable.

That’s just my opinion don’t worry about it.
  • 9 9
 @WAKIdesigns: at what point does the extra price you charge for your ethical practices become unethical itself. There's a tipping point at which one group of people stops being exploited and another starts. One man's fair trade is another's marketable guilt trip.
  • 13 7
 @BenPea: not really, I don’t say it from ideological reasons, rather pragmatic. Let’s take crankbros. They made really functionally sound Pedals that were state of shit art when it came to reliability. They got held responsible for it (got tons of crap) like for their wheels and because they wanted to stay in business they improved and now make some of the beat pedals. Random company from far East answers nobody, they don’t need to give a tiniest shit. Not only that, people who bought something from them won’t even complain. They lost 30$ whoopie do. But... if Chromag sold pedals for 30$ people would pound them into the ground. Please, this is an easily preventable shit show, why would you even look at the teaser/ trailer for it? You can call it evolutionary idealism, environmental idealism (I am very short on that though). In 2002 I was a broke student, I still didn’t buy much Ameoba or Zoom Or Uno crap because it was terrifying! But now hey ho, let’s but a carbon fork for 90$ from AliExpress, please, you fully deserve to get your jaw broken and open all the way to your Adams apple and grind all the teeth on asphalt until you come to a full stop. Or get the rim at half price of Light Bicycle fold in half in a corner with similar effect. And after this happens you will not get a penny from anyone and that company will keep selling their shit.
  • 17 1
 @BenPea: How on earth can it be unethical for a company to charge what it likes for a completely non essential, luxury product when there are hundreds of alternatives available?

Unethical to charge high prices for drugs needed to keep people alive, or food or similar, flat pedals though?! - who exactly is being ‘exploited’, someone that makes a free choice to buy this product over a competing one.

Strange outlook.
  • 3 0
 Too grippy and expensive? A jedi craves not these things........
  • 4 1
 @justanotherusername: It was just a question (perhaps misguided) and you are correct. The profit achieved from such a product would need to be insane before the term "exploitation" is relevant. But a fair price is a fair price.
  • 2 5
 @BenPea: there are two ends to the term fair price. To be honest I bought 22£ pedals on Superstar at one point and they are most reliable pedals I have had so far. But I still lean towards OneUp, Time and CBros. Would lean towards Shimano if their cleat retention mechanism was my thing
  • 3 0
 @transportguy: me too! but slightly different, enlee 86. Either way, here it's 100 reais, or a Cranckbrothers for 600 reais. I could get 6 pairs of ztto, and would do this everyday of the week.
  • 5 5
 @WAKIdesigns: I think it's the weight that makes me err on the side of "they're taking then piss here". 200g more than my 40€, 10-year old Wellgos, which I put longer pins on to also make them "too" grippy. Are Cromag funding the education of orphans instead of investing in more sophisticated machine tools? If so, I think they need to make more noise about it.
Right, I'd better stop before I make twat of myself (don't say it).
  • 3 1
 @WAKIdesigns: At least Superstar has stopped rebranding stuff from Taiwan, I ride their Nano pedals milled in the UK, I love them, but their shorter pins were still too long for my poor shins.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: I have been testing stuff for a bike magazine, it took me a while to understand that the brands were sending them stuff to have press coverage about their products. At least unsponsored Youtubers like Trybo bike tech have started to make their own testings outside of the biased magazines: www.youtube.com/channel/UC4OcWuM54xEM8IrIYuqx5yg

BTW I love my Superstar Nanos, expect I wanted some shorter pins
  • 6 0
 Ya, Chromag is expensive. Probably even too expensive but for me the choice to ride Chromag is supporting great things made where I live because I make my living here and they should be able to too.
  • 3 4
 @zoobab2: I haven't owned a single flat pedal where I haven't filed down the pins (other than first Hope which had dumbest pins out there) On OneUps I filed them down to 2.5-3mm. As long as I use 5.10s I don't need longer pins and my shins are thankful for that Smile
  • 1 0
 @zoobab2: Ali Express also sell quick-release platform pedals for only $12. So the pedal can detach from the crank arm with some kind of quick-release mechanism., what could go wrong?
  • 1 3
 @GeoMurph5: AliExpress is Asian EBay...
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: there is so much personal preference involved; with probably every pedal i have owned i have done the opposite (ok not with the old syncros but thats an other story). the best flatpedalriders on the planet ( hill, fearon, kovarik) always run huge pins though. if you dont need or want all the grip, dont get these pedals, for all maxgrip fans (like myself) the pedals are good news.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Kinda but at least if you buy from a seller based in your own country on Ebay you have some warranty, buy from Alibaba from over in China and the parts junk and I imagine you may as well throw that £20-30 away.

Not sure why I would bother when the Nukeproof Composite is up for sale for £25.00 on CRC and the one-up like you run are £40.00
  • 1 4
 @optimumnotmaximum: I know, I agree. Preference. I had Hills pedals, the Boomslangs and they had way too long pins for me. I have never had anything more irritating under my feet because eventually, every now and then, my foot would get bounced to the side and it was impossible to move it back without putting my other pedal all the way down. In some cases I had to come to a near full stop to reposition the foot. Ironically it was these pedals that set me to clip in for riding in the woods.
  • 2 6
flag WAKIdesigns (Mar 10, 2020 at 8:30) (Below Threshold)
 @justanotherusername: I am not buying anything from them. If I am to pay less money I am simply buying used stuff on classifieds. Ironically there's just been a flush of used carbon forks, sellers stating they're "cheap chinese". They sold for 80-120€. They disappeared instantly. Stupidity knows NO boundaries and I do think in such cases it's great. We need natural selection, we need idiots to remove themselves from this world. If someody somehow reads that: if you recently bought a cheap carbon fork or handlebar from Alibaba or Aliexpress, please do not reproduce. Please kill yourself in a place suitiable to handle your corpse.
  • 1 0
 @zoobab2: I don't want to spend my time reading reviews on aliexpress stuff. Even if you try to review one, there are so many look alikes built to all sorts of different standards it boggles the mind. I'm glad you found something affordable that works, but I want to read reviews on the at least reasonably good (and consistently made) stuff. Sure there is going to be a tendency toward testing local stuff, it's natural to build relationships. As long as you're honest if a product doesn't work well, what's the issue? This isn't the New York Times, it's mountain bikes.
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: eBay is Asian eBay
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: funny, i own both pedals and think the grip on the boomslangs is not good enough. i used to race dh with clips and i like to be really heavy or really light on the bike/pedals . in order to do so i need to run clips (which keeps me from going sideways) or flats that can be run basically without pressure. the pins on the boomslangs let go too fast as they are not ribbed. on my enduro i run hills with flexible 5.10s to feel when the pedal lets go, a good combo but the pins could be narrower and the platform bigger. thats why the Daggas are really appealing to me.
  • 2 0
 @southoftheborder: user name doesn't check out Wink
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: agree - was surprised at the lack of concave on the platform, so I guess they overcame this with the mega long pins.
  • 1 0
 @zoobab2: no it's just that MTB is a kinda pricey hobby. Some people are way into it and drop tons of cash, and those who don't like to hear about the "shiny bits" and lust after them. You know how many bike mechanics and waiters in mountain towns and hotel managers there are who will go spend $10k+/yr on mtb related stuff? You should check out snowmobiling and then feel better. Everything is twice as expensive and breaks twice as often, yet it's carpenters and electricians and plumbers out there thrashing the stuff and pouring all their extra cash into it. (I mean I guess tradesmen are in demand but that's sorta beside the point.)

Point is some people have different spending priorities, whether that's good or bad, and people love the shiny gear, whether that's good or bad as well. Plus, who needs a review on $20 chinese pedals? Just spend the $20 and if they suck, donate em.
  • 1 0
 @GeoMurph5: any link, sounds like a funny pair of pedals :-)
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: natural selection
  • 1 0
 30€....that's my budget????
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: "Light, strong, and cheap"... pick any TWO!
  • 2 0
 @zoobab2: why the fark would u Want pb test Chinese garbage? Ain't nobody got time fo dat! Bring on those 12k rigs..
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: to be fair.. I know some serious shredders rolling on LB wheelset without a hiccup. Hucks to flat and some serious casing to boot.. They seem to be holding up fine... These are some brave lads.
  • 1 0
 These pedals are amazing I have used them for the redbull world championship pumptrack and they grab every thing from shoe to cement and if you miss step they will grab your Calf @justanotherusername:
  • 2 1
 @bohns1: I am fine with LB. possibly better than Enve.
  • 1 0
 @bohns1: About wheelsets, I had a pair of expensive enduro Easton Haven wheels in 26 inches, the rear rim was bent, a spoke was destroyed. Gave the rear wheel to the shop, they told me the distributor for Belgium changed to Shimano. After 3 weeks, they told me Shimano had their own wheels, they could not get a spare spoke (a special one) in spare, I finally ordered 3 on Bike-components.de. Got the spokes, mechanics install it on the wheel, first race, spoke exploded. Mechanic replace it with another spare spoke, same story. I asked to order a spare rim, a nightmare to get one, you have to go through an approved repair certified Easton center.
Plus try to find a enduro rim with 24 spokes. I finish to order a spare second hand used rim on Pinkbike BuyAndSell from a greek guy, mount the rim, the rim has a flat :-) if I have a message for Easton and all other wheelset manufacturers: boycott proprietary wheelsets!

At the end of the day, I want alloy wheelsets with standard non-straight spokes, with standard 32h rims and spokes I can obtain in any bike shop.

Standards in this industry makes me nuts!
  • 2 1
 @zoobab2: Easton wheels aka Race Face are utter crap in every single respect...
  • 1 0
 @zoobab2: easton?? Havent heard that name in years in the bike industry..
  • 1 0
 @bohns1: me neither, last time I heard about them it was 5 years ago, the pro Lapierre DH team was sponsored by Easton, one of the riders told me they had so many issues with their wheelsets. Good ridance.
  • 44 1
 For $180, they should come with shin pads
  • 30 1
 For those who don't know, marijuana is known as dagga in South Africa. Chromag clearly has their finger on the pulse of the market.
  • 15 0
 Pedals should have been green.

So now we have Assegai and Dagga. What other South African terms can we get into MTB?
  • 8 0
 @Jacquers: Zef?
  • 6 1
 There are pedals made from resin, but these ain't them. So finger on the pulse, but not on the carb hole.
  • 5 0
 @Jacquers: Panga, Sjambok, Tsotsie, Knobkerrie (great for tires)....
  • 5 18
flag hubsession (Mar 10, 2020 at 3:56) (Below Threshold)
 @Jacquers: Genocide?
  • 7 0
 ...you will need to smoke some dagga to ease the pain from the mutilation those pins will do to your shins.
  • 1 1
 @Jacquers: I'd love to seem some "good-c*nt" cores to rival those boys over at cush core
  • 1 0
 They named the Dagga as a pisstake on how Aussies say Dagger.. interesting to know the South African meaning tho, guess that's a bonus. Win win there Smile
  • 1 0
 @moodgedog: I think they already clarified it's slang for marijuana?
  • 27 7
 Take my money! Chris is my all-time favorite rider — never seen anyone corner like him, including when qualifying #1 at the Big Bear NORBA dual slalom in 2000 by about 1.5 seconds on a 25ish second track. It was stunning to watch him — everyone was in awe, the whole crowd, even the other top riders.

But the highlight of the weekend for me was DH practice, when Chris showed up...I was scoping a rock lip, thinking I could hit it and jump the whole rock garden. Chris slowed to a stop next to me and scoped it too, so we hiked up to try it. I wanted to be the first person to hit it (fresh tracks on the run-in), so I dropped in before he could get on his bike and boosted it, clearing the 30-foot section to the roar of the practice crowd. About 10 seconds later, I heard the crowd cheering again...Chris had hit it too (and we were reportedly the only two to hit it the whole weekend, as it got wet shortly after). I slowed down after that section and Chris pulled up next to me and gave me a high five — probably the highlight of my racing career — particularly as we were both on red M1’s with flat pedals, both totally stoked to soar over a jagged rock garden and amp up the spectators while at it. He’s such a cool dude and always lights up the scene when he’s around. Hoping to ride with him again at Whistler or Dry Hill soon!
  • 2 0
 wow sounds neat!
  • 17 1
 Man if the PB comments section is any indication everyone is riding a 2004 kona scrap with plastic walmart flats utterly unwilling to spend any money on a decent bike part becuase their 3x8 drivetrain still "works great"

This place is for people who want to support people doing cool stuff in the industry and making innovations, not producing the cheapest possible passable garbage that semi functions for 6 months.
  • 8 0
 I'm more bothered by the people complaining about the high end reviews. I'd rather read about the engineering accomplishments of a Ferrari than read an article about a base model, gently used 1997 Ford escort.
  • 18 0
 Claws like a drop bear
  • 5 0
 Had to google that one. Too funny.
  • 4 0
 I had to google a drop bear too, made my day!
youtu.be/EwmoiUrC02g
  • 12 1
 180$ for flat pedals? I think not.
  • 2 0
 $180 for any pedals I think not. Egg beater eleventy billion Ti, still no...
  • 3 1
 It gets better - Canadians looking to "buy local" will pay $247 !!!!
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: if I bought three sets of those pedals for all three of my bikes, that would be the same price as a summer trip to the French alps , all included!
  • 4 0
 @cliffdog: how long are you staying ? 1 or 2 days ?
  • 7 0
 I found the DMR Vault Brendog Signature spot on as pedals which offer a great grip but still allow a bit of a foot readjustment when releasing a foot pressure from them. also the durability is awesome!
  • 2 0
 My Magnesium Vaults are already a bit wobbly after just over a 1000KM / five months Frown

I guess Israel is drier than Basel in winter though.
  • 2 1
 @korev: need the service kit. The bushing wears out pretty good. Especially with the occasional pedal strike.
  • 3 0
 @korev: Basel, great city! My company just built another factory in a little town near Basel called Büsserach
  • 3 0
 @korev: I rebuilt a set of vaults a few days ago, $20 in parts and about 20-30min and they feel like new. Easiest pedal rebuild so far, I was impressed.
  • 1 0
 @Ryanfitz81: Thanks for the tip. I actually have one in my cellar that I bought for my previous pair (which I broke on a rock).
  • 2 0
 @emptybe-er: Thanks Smile
  • 1 0
 @mtbgeartech: If you ever come over then there's some good riding just to the north of there
  • 1 0
 @korev: I will be there once per year most likely. I'll bring my bike next time! I want to get down to the Alps as well.
  • 2 0
 I’ve been running the dmr vault brendogs since release love how they rode but If you’re a pedal basher like me sooner or later you start bending them and the pins won’t stay in anymore, I was going through a set a year. I picked a set of the daggas up last august and have been hooked ever since and they’ve held up better then the vaults. The concave took a while to get used to seemed to be similar grip as the vaults
  • 2 1
 @bgoodis: When I bashed a pin loose I just drilled and tapped a new hole in roughly the same spot. Cost less than 10 bucks for the tap and the pedals still going strong.
  • 1 0
 @Ryanfitz81: that might work in some cases but the whole plate starts twisting and breaking eventually can’t see Swiss cheesing them making it Last that much longer would work for a few pins but seems to happen to most overtime
  • 3 1
 @bgoodis: Jesus man. You got to work on your crank position skills.
  • 1 0
 @Ryanfitz81: ya well, you aren’t wrong, but a lot depends on where you ride and how frequently, Lots of rocky climbs and low BB height, smacky smacky.
  • 1 1
 @bgoodis: ok I see your point. I’m mostly riding Finale Ligure which many consider very rocky but to be fair there ain’t too many uphill pedal strike climbs. Plenty for going down.
  • 4 1
 As a large footed rider I'm stoked to have more pedal options. I ran the original ethirteen LG1's and currently favour Deity Tmac's . I'll definitely be trying these out. Thinking of trying Pedaling Innovations as well. I hope more companies come out with big options.
  • 3 1
 You must try stamp large too
  • 1 0
 I'm a size 11.5 US shoe...how are those TMac's working out. Seems like people love those. Wondering if they are big enough. I'm on Diety Blade Runners and don't love them, my feet hurt at times. Going to throw on some composite 60$ Wah Wah2's and see what that's like.
  • 1 0
 Search up catalyst pedals. I don't run them but they seem huge
  • 1 1
 Don't waste time and money, just buy the Pedaling Innovations Catalyst. Nothing better out there. Only pedal of its size giving such a large interface with your shoe. Just buy the damn things and love riding your bike with them forevermore.
  • 2 0
 @Noeserd: I like the stamp L too, and I really like how the lower-end stamp 2 and 3 have a different spindle so the pedal isn’t as close to the crank. The only thing that sucks about wider rear-ends, hard on the kankles.
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: Do NOT buy the plastic Wah Wah 2's. They are not a safe product. The plastic is not thick enough around the spindle and WILL break on you.

I broke a pair in only two months. It was an experience I never want to repeat.

I have the aluminum Wah Wah 2's now, and feel confident enough with them.
  • 1 0
 @Ktron: Interesting. Looking at those now. Whats up with the whole "midfoot riding position" stuff etc? Can I just throw these on an ride and they are awesome? Why do you guys like them so much?
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: I'm size 12.5 and love the Tmac's. I'm always looking for a bigger pedal though.
  • 1 0
 @Ktron: I haven't gone for the Pedaling Innovations because they're pretty narrow. Long yes, but they're only 95mm wide. For the average foot that should be fine, but mine are wide as well as long.
  • 1 0
 @Noeserd: How are the stamps for grip? I really like the size and that they are thin (my BB is a lower) but it seems like their default pins are a bit less than grippy. Can you extend the pins a bit? I have a bigger foot and my Deity Blade Runners make my feet hurt sometimes. I think they are too small.
  • 1 0
 @Ktron: sure. but they use set screws instead of pedal pins and set screws are the worst pin choice possible. they round out to smooth quite quickly and set screws are not a great option when wet either. Dude has a good idea but the execution is medium. didn't use the pair i had for very long before selling them for something with more traction
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: your foot feels more like you’re doing a squat, rather than a calf raise or similar, as your contact points are the ball and heel of your foot, rather than just the ball.

Result is a very stable feeling, especially through the smashy smashy. Likewise when putting the power down.
  • 1 0
 @psyguy: I generally consider myself to have wide feet. At least, I’m one of those continually bitching that every time a shoe comes out it is for a “normal” foot which will pinch me.

Can’t say I have noticed any problem with width.
  • 1 0
 @Ktron: The bigger problem with the width of the Catalyst pedals is the inability to angle your foot any direction but straight. If you are even slightly duckfooted, it's hard to find your foot position.

The grip provided by the pedals is also pretty mediocre. It's not awful, especially with the new Catalyst Evo, but still not on par with other flats I've used. The OG Catalyst also had issues with bushing wear.
  • 5 0
 Width - go. No bulge near crank arm - go. Grip - go. Durability - go. Colors - go. Price - no go. Lack of a composite version - no go.
  • 2 0
 Composite versions are never truly the same. There are so many changes that need to be made that when there is a composite and al version they are very different platforms. You would be better off looking for a pedal that's specifically composite. This pedal couldn't exist with your desired spec in plastic.
  • 1 1
 Do you mean not having a composite version is a bad thing?
Having snapped carbon cranks from a rock strike I would seriously have doubts about running composite pedals.
  • 1 0
 @Ryanfitz81: I ripped off an aluminum crank arm jumping a puddle, everything breaks. I've broken my share of composite pedals, I can attest a pedal breaking is less catastrophic than a crank.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: I get your point about alloy and composite versions not being perfectly the same. However, having obliterated a good amount of expensive alloy pedals, I'm running composite -real stuff, not cheapo AliExpress junk- and couldn't be happier. Hence my disappointment, because these Dagga seem really badass.
  • 1 1
 @RonSauce: that sounds more like you need to check that your sh@t is tight before you ride. Either that or you’re the god damn Incredible Hulk.
  • 2 0
 @Ryanfitz81: it's the incredible hulk option. I've also sheared off chainrings, and I kill one BB a season. The crank arm was actually due to a defect, but still, everything breaks.
  • 2 0
 @Tasso75: when it comes to pedal strikes I'd rather break a composite pedal. Al pedals will grab a rock and stop, I've had better luck with the plastic bounding of a rock, or ripping out a pin. Better than the dead stop OTB.
  • 2 0
 I love the DAGGA! I'm a bit of a platform pedal junkie and have tried just about every popular pedal out there. The OneUp Aluminum and TMacs were my previous favorites but the DAGGA just feels perfect. I have a size 12, EEE width foot and having something that grips this well with such a wide platform is awesome. The pins are in the perfect locations as well. They all make contact with the sole of the shoe unlike some I've tried that have pins located too far inboard near the arch of the foot to make contact. Yes they're expensive but I love them regardless and would buy them again.
  • 1 0
 How do these compare to the vaults grip wise? I'm one of those the more grip the merrier people.
  • 2 0
 @Wormfarmer: I used to run vaults and now these. I would say the daggas are grippier, mostly due to the pin design. They feel bigger underfoot too. I’ve only had them a couple of months but I like the daggas a lot and really hope the bushings last longer than the vaults
  • 1 0
 Holy crap, if these have more grip than TMacs I don’t want ‘em! My Freeriders were literally stuck to my TMacs the other day. It surprised me so much I almost did the clipless rookie slow motion fall.
  • 1 0
 How are the TMac's for your big feet? I'm 11.5 US with a normal width. I'm on Diety Blade Runners but my feet hurt on those on the downs sometimes.
  • 2 0
 @patricktb: thanks for the feedback! Went ahead and ordered a pair,. Even if grip is the same as vault, the wider platform and q factor should be nice as I often find my feet a bit off the end of the pedal.
  • 7 2
 So basically same size , weight and durability as XTs but 4x the price....
  • 3 0
 XTs don't have this level of grip and due to the offset the actual platform is smaller. But yeah, you pay for the bling...
  • 1 0
 Thoughts about the shape of this pedal & the Deity T-Mac vs the parallelogram shape of pedals like the Vault and Nukeproof (which was just re-designed to give it even more offset)

The only place I see damage on the dagga pictured is the leading outside corner which is exactly where Nukeproof removed additional material / reshaped their pedal.

I havent tried a non-parallelogram pedal as of yet but would like to - I cant see the shape change making much difference to pedal strikes (a few mm?) but can see it changing the result of a strike e.g. glancing off vs just mashing into.
  • 1 0
 I really liked my Atlas pedals but the durability of the bearing is the worst I have ever seen. But they have a super nice low profile so what do you expect. The most durable pedal by a million is still the DMR V12, Still have my MAG's from 2005 and bearings are still the same as when the came out of the box... how!
  • 1 0
 If you make a pedal that needs absolutely monster pins and one point of critique is that it may have too much grip , aren't you better just going to clips?
The whole comfort , freedom factor of flats seems to go in the obsession with grip that SPDs solved ages ago. It seems a ridiculous solution.
It's like people who like to ride gloveless using sandpaper grips because they find their hands slip a bit.
  • 1 0
 I bought these pedals recently, after hesitating hard because of the price. A few weeks later and I am super hyped on them. I personally think the high cost is worth it if you really like flats, ride a lot, and don't want your feet jangling all over the place. You want cheap pedals? there are plenty of options. Want the best flat pedals out there? Buy the Chromag Dagga.
  • 1 0
 Does they come with spare pins, rebuild kit for that price? Performance wise majority of flat pedals works equal based on pin configuration, typically issue is reliability and durability;

I had six pack nylon pedals for years, and just service and rebuild them once in a while, same with oneups, since service kits easy to purchase online, and composite platform soft enough not to be destroyed by terrain


Those are probably look nice and work well, however considering the price more of niche product for the fanboys
  • 1 0
 Does the flat pedal market really have constant need for new designs? I get that small brands need to do something, but there are a bunch of small companies making boutique flat pedals, stems, and bars. Those parts are all super cheap and reliable, and I’ve simply never felt like I need to upgrade my stem.
  • 1 0
 Pedals are a contact point so personal preference plays a big role. I went from the OneUp to the Dagga and prefer the Dagga even through they have approximately the same sized platform. Stems are bike jewelry. I'm not sure anyone would be able to tell the difference between 10 different 35mm reach 0 degree rise stems.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a good pedal apart from one little detail: the outside cap screw is flush with the pedal body. Hit the floor hard just once and that screw won't budge, whenever you need to replace the bearings. That's exactly why most of my beloved DMR Vault pedals end up in the bin... - but the daggas are even more expensive... .
  • 1 0
 Do those pins taper down after the threads? Looks like they do, which is awesome since having threads in the strike zone with pins that thread in from the opposite side is a huge pain in the ass
  • 3 0
 Shin replacement is not really affordable yet guys.... back to the drawing board.
  • 6 0
 There are rumors of some mystical atrifact called a "knee and shin guard". Many a rider has been searching for it and some of the elders are said to still possess one. But everyone who tried to bring it forth has been slain by the cool bro- knights of the shredding table.
  • 1 1
 @Ttimer:
I recommend these "Suneate" for protection from all pedal pin injury. Comes in Light, Medium or Heavy Protection varieties and they look super bad-ass on the trail.
www.guardiansvaultaustralia.com/suneate
  • 1 0
 @Dropthedebt: what the actual f*ck
  • 1 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: Just goes to show we haven't come very far with basic design or, the basic design is the best, and it's just down to styling and materials.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: Shin guards help but freak accidents happen even when wearing them. If you need proof, check my photos in my profile. NSFWS (not safe for weak stomachs)
  • 8 5
 Really heavy, really expensive and fkng purple... Does that mean that Sick Bicycles is coming back?
  • 1 0
 I wonder noticing the weight as well on paper. Are pedals considered "rotational weight" or something close too?
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: i think pedals rotate!? But its plus 50g compared to vaults or nukeproof, not something to lose shit about. Big chunk of alloy= heavy, simple.
  • 1 0
 Love chromags stuff, have the contact pedals ok my bikes and those are absolutely the best pedals I have ever used. They are a Small shop located in Whistler BC and it's a mandatory stop when I go to Whistler.
  • 3 0
 My shins are screaming HELL NO!!!!
  • 3 2
 So you can basically make any pedals very good if the pins are tall enough. Right. I'll stick to my Superstar Nano-X Evo - probably best choice for anyone in Europe. Smile
  • 2 0
 And at a price of £49.99 no other pedal can compete , I ordered some last night !
  • 1 0
 The Nano's are great value,but I'm tired of bushings..on gusset with all bearings now.
  • 1 0
 I like the crank to pedal offset but flat pedals need a bit of concave at least, hard pass.
  • 3 2
 Unless your feet are above a size 11,then you need a proper sized pedal. I'm size 16, dmr vaults are too small, there are no proper sized pedals for me.
  • 1 0
 Good pedals but if you are really hard on them (racing / riding DH a lot) they wont be close to as durable as something like the Dagga, a well placed strike and the nanos crack / bend.

Great option for 90% of riding though, especially if you wat for sale pricing which is pretty much half of the year to buy them.
  • 2 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: Have you tried attaching 2 scooter decks to your cranks?
  • 2 0
 @Matt115lamb: Burgtec MK4 plastic at £40?
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: To be fair you can usually get the superstar for sub £40 as they are always on sale.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername:......to be faaiiiirrrrrrr.
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: not even these?
pedalinginnovations.com
they do an xl version too
  • 1 0
 @whistlingcoyote: not in the slightest. They are only 95mm wide for the standard version, and if they're saying size 13 for the xl (12 UK) still pointless, they'll probably be 105mm wide, same as a vault. I'd actually need 155x155 pedals to get the same support as someone in size 12uk on vaults.
  • 1 0
 On my 5th or so pair between different bikes. Never going anywhere else.
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: I wear size 15 and have been enjoying these daggas a lot. Feels substantially bigger than vaults although actual measurements aren’t too different
  • 2 0
 @patricktb: don't forget, 16uk is 17us. But yes, 105mm square vs 115x110 doesn't sound massively diff, but these are square profile, the vaults have the parralelogram profile that means the actual area is only 105x98ish. Width is definitely my problem, my shoes (merrell moabs, not overly chunky, actually make my feet look less clown like vs other shoes) over hang the edge of my vaults by nearly 50mm, and I really could do with a wider stance to reduce the rediculous amount of crank rub I always get, so 155x155 is still a conservative estimate. I'll one day mill my own pedal bodies, using the axle from pedal with full width axles but then make my pedals have the reduced width style axle set up (if all that makes sense? Basically extend the outer corners of a vault out by 50mm). But I need a milling machine for that. Hopefully this year.
  • 2 0
 @patricktb: but yes, I'm thinking I might grab some of these ASAP to put me on, they do seem like they'd help a lot.
  • 3 0
 Skipped the review, to see How Do They Compare? to Vaults, and er....
  • 1 0
 I switched from vaults to these similar grip much more durability
  • 1 0
 I rode these pedals all last summer on the dh bike. They are sweet and grip is never an issue except when trying to reposition your foot. Love em
  • 2 0
 Or you could buy a couple of sets of Race Face Chester's and have pretty good grip and save money
  • 1 0
 This is Kovarik's old pedal. The man sure does love a long pin. It's Aussie made.

chunked.com.au/Products-PEDALS.html
  • 1 0
 Check out the Black Kats by Deity!! They're concave and not flat like these, so they're super grippy! And they're cheaper! Just sayin.
  • 2 0
 Too grippy, not grip enough. oh my pinkbike.
  • 2 0
 Really missing a trick not offering them in Gold!!
  • 1 0
 Man ive been drooling over them for months now. i thought i held on pretty well not buying them -now this article -arrghh
  • 1 0
 You need to get . I held off and then I bought them a couple weeks ago . Well worth it .
  • 2 1
 $180 for something that us gonna be looking like shit after 2 months? No thanks
  • 1 0
 I installed some magnesium pedals on my DH bike, 3 days in Morzine, the orange paint was already gone.
  • 2 0
 @zoobab2: thats just asking for trouble, the paint on mag pedals and even magpedals in general cant take the abuse of dh riding. the dagga is a forged alloy pedal which to my expirience hold up best. u can get them insilver too, wont look too bad after even months
  • 3 1
 I’ll take 5 pairs of OneUp composite please.
  • 2 0
 @dmrbikes DMR Vaults or nothing. No slip, just grip to rip!
  • 1 0
 Live in Yorkshire, which is wetter than an otters pocket. Hope F20's. 3 years no servicing. Say no more.
  • 1 0
 Karver - aren't self given nicknames the best?




(...err, no)
  • 1 0
 hate to have a pedal slip with those on. instant visit to the ER
  • 1 0
 my shins hurt just looking at them
  • 1 0
 All Grip, No Slip, Weights Like a Brick
  • 1 0
 Can't believe you can write that many words on flats
  • 1 0
 These vs. Race Face Atlas?
  • 1 1
 These pedals are the real deal. Great looking , strong , excellent grip .
  • 1 1
 Heavy as sh*t, expensive as f$ck...
  • 1 1
 @CircusMaximus: Heavy not really.They aren’t a xc pedal. You don’t even notice . You get what you pay for . Top of the line product . And I don’t know anyone who paid this price? Look around and you will find a deal .
  • 1 1
 What about a review about that Ochain spider? Looks very intresting.
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