Review: Crankbrothers Mallet Boa Shoes

Jul 7, 2021
by Seb Stott  


The Crankbrothers Mallet pedal has long been a popular choice for gravity focused riding. In fact, they're almost ubiquitous among World Cup downhillers. They don't work nicely with every shoe out there, so it was interesting to see Crankbrothers come out with their own shoe with the same name and the same riders in mind as their popular pedals. The shoes will work with clipless pedals from other brands, but they're made to fit the eccentricities of the Mallet pedal in particular. They even come with Crankbrothers' own cleats installed and ready to go.

There are three options for the closure system: the Mallet Boa, the Mallet Speed Lace and the Mallet Lace, in descending order of price. There's also the Mallet E shoe, which is aimed more at trail/enduro riding and is available with the same three closure options at the same prices.



Mallet Boa Details
• Boa dial plus Velcro strap
• Includes CB cleats but SPD compatible
• More rearward cleat adjustment range than Mallet E
• Colors: black
• Sizes: 5-14 (US) / 37-48 (EU) / 4-13 (UK)
• Weight: 1,010 grams (pair, size 12US/46EU/11UK)
• MSRP: $199.99 / €199.99 / £179.99
crankbrothers.com
Extra UK (Crankbrothers' UK distributor) sent me both the Mallet Boa and the Mallet E Boa to test. Both shoes weigh the same and feel similar to wear, except the regular Mallet has the option to move the cleat 5mm further back, which I like.

The 5mm at the back of the cleat slot slot is marked in red and dubbed the "Race Zone"
The Mallet E (right) can't have the cleat set as far back as the Mallet.

Performance

With the cleats set as they come out the box, the friction against the pedal was too tight to clip in to Mallet DH or Mallet E pedals as easily as I'd like. One option is to wind the pedal pins in, but I added a cleat spacer to raise the shoes away from the pedal. This is not only easier than screwing all the pins in (especially if you have multiple pedals), but means there's loads of grip when you have to ride out a section out unclipped. They're really easy to clip in and out with a spacer added, though. As the shoes wear, I'll probably remove the spacer to maintain contact.

With most shoes, I have to place the cleat as far inboard as possible so the shoe sits further away from the crank; otherwise it can be tricky to unclip from Crankbrothers pedals as the shoe hits the crank first. The Mallets have no such issue even in the neutral mid-line position. In fact, I ended up moving the cleats slightly outboard so the shoes sat closer to the cranks to improve pedaling feel by effectively reducing the Q-factor.

Although the Mallet has space to run the cleat 5mm more rearward than the Mallet E, into the bright red "Race Zone", even when slammed fully back they didn't feel too far back to me. It's far enough back, but no more rearward than some gravity-focused shoes. Compared to the Mallet E, I prefer the more rearward position the Mallet provides; it gives me a feeling of a more solid connection to the bike when descending and makes it easier to drop my heals on technical terrain. I don't feel any disadvantage when pedaling with the cleats further back, and there's some science to support this feeling.

My feet are pretty average-shaped and most size 46 shoes fit me just fine. I found the Mallets sizing a little on the generous side, especially in length. They cinch down nicely with the Boa dial and Vaelcro strap, but I had to do both up pretty tight to make my feet feel secure. Once I'd done that, there's no heel-lift when walking or pulling on the pedals.

Stiffness is mid-pack, which means they're comfy to walk in but there's not enough flex to feel any bending around the pedals or any loss of power. The tongue and sides are quite padded, so they can feel a bit vague and bulky unless cinched up really tight, but they remain comfy even when they are. There's a good amount of protection from rock strikes around the front, but the trade-off is they are quite sweaty on long, warm rides. And in wet weather, they take longer to dry out than most shoes.

Both shoes have seen better days, but how do they compare?


Toe to Toe: Crankbrothers Mallet Boa vs Specialized 2FO Clip 2.0

Specialized's 2FO Clip 2.0 is currently being phased out by the 2FO DH, but they're still my go-to for trail/enduro/DH riding. How does the Mallet measure up?

My 2FOs are a whole 8 grams heavier than the Mallets, which isn't really a difference at all.

While the Mallets run a touch on the big side, the Specialized shoes are more typical for the size and a better fit for me. Despite this, the Specialized's laces make it harder and more time-consuming to get them nice and snug without being tight in certain places. Laces also make the 2FO cheaper than the Boa mallets, of course.

The 2FO (right) is slightly shorter in overall length and the cleat slot runs slightly further towards the heal.

I have the cleat almost fully inboard on the 2FOs to stop them from hitting the cranks when unclipping; this puts the shoes in a similar position to the Mallets with the cleats set slightly outboard. I'm using a cleat spacer and have the cleat fully rearward with both, and it's slightly further back on the 2FO. Not that I want the cleat any further back on the Mallet.

The Specialized shoes are a little stiffer and the insole has more arch support, which I find results in less foot pain on long descents. Both shoes offer similar protection and padding, but I'd say the 2FO is a bit more ventilated. Overall, both shoes are remarkably similar but my preference sits slightly towards the 2FO.



Pros

+ Comfy and secure on and off the bike once fastened tight
+ Very easy to clip in if used with a cleat spacer or short pins
+ Plenty of cleat position options

Cons

- Sizing on the longer side
- Slightly bulky and sweaty in hot weather




Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesThe Mallet's slightly generous sizing (particularly in length) is worth being aware of and could make it worth trying before buying if you can. But they offer plenty of adjustment in the cleat-position, easy clipping-in (once set up right), good comfort in most conditions and a sole that's just stiff enough without being awkward to walk in. They're solid shoes for gravity-focused riding and a worthy partner to the Mallet pedal. Seb Stott



108 Comments

  • 53 1
 Crankbrothers: PLEASE sell your cleats in bulk, like packs of 4 or 5. For those of us who use your pedals for all our bikes and all our shoes, and who ride a lot of miles, it is insane to replace cleats at $27.00 a pair. Cleats are a wear-item and need replacing pretty regularly - save yourself some packaging and me some money by offering 4 packs!
  • 14 2
 CB cleats wear out way to quick (like a month).... Shimano on the other hand lasts forever. Too many times I couldn't get out of the pedals because of worn cleats that I'll never use CB ever again.
  • 10 0
 @jaydawg69: yeah wtf my shimano cleats last forever...didn’t know cleat wear was even a thing
  • 2 1
 For what it's worth the Premium cleats last considerably longer than the ones that come with the pedals.
  • 12 0
 it's like CB has a subscription model for their pedals....
  • 6 5
 Cleats are a wear item? I have spd cleats on shoes from the 90s that still work as good as new.

“If you can't spot the sucker in your first half hour at the table, then you are the sucker.” - Mikey McDermott
  • 2 0
 also, can we get cleats from different material? These guys are made from plastic, I swear. They are gone in a month.
  • 1 0
 @nvranka: the whole Shimano shoes could not wear
  • 4 0
 @danbgbg @Loki Might be a business opportunity there, kind of like Cascade Components' links. Slightly different version of CB cleats sold in bulk. Jagwire? Problem Solvers? Hello? is anyone listening?
  • 4 0
 Fit new cleats: they feel a little tight, ride a dozen times then they feel good, ride another dozen times and start loosing a foot now and then, ride a dozen more times and start loosing a foot at speed and crashing. Buy some more well over priced cleats, fit and start again!

f*ck that, been there done that, spent a fortune each year on cleats. Should of skipped the whole process, saved a load of cash and bad crashes, and just bought shimanos to start with.
  • 2 1
 @StraightLineJoe: Again, the CB Premium cleats last way longer than the ones that come with the pedals. I would also add that I started with SPDs and hated the way you clipped into them. I find the CBs to be much easier to clip into.
  • 3 0
 @SuperHighBeam: CB Premiums wear out after a month. Truly shameful imo.
  • 1 0
 @jaydawg69: I guess I don't ride enough. I've had mine for at least a year and they're alright. I'll never go back to SPDs. I not aware of any other brand that has as low profile of a cleat. I like my clipless bike shoes to be walkable as [stiff] street shoes.
  • 9 0
 is the 2f0 the furthest most rearward cleat slot on the market? I'm a flat rider and venturing into clips, all the shoes I've tried (read borrowed) don't go back far enough for my liking for descending. Looking at some of the shoes though, a few minutes with the dremel could sort this....
  • 6 0
 Interesting you mention wanting cleats further back (there's a poll about this coming soon). I think they're definitely up there.
  • 4 0
 @seb-stott: I have some ankle issues from Skateboarding years back, basically the tendons are a floppy mess, only way I can feel stable and pain free is having the axle of the pedal almost in line with the arch of my foot when descending, I think I'm a anomaly but might be others who prefer a "middle foot" position....
  • 5 1
 @seb-stott I used to run my cleats all the way back on my 2FO and used to get cramps under the arch of my foot after long rides. I had a bike fit and the guy moved them forward by 1cm or so. Now the cleat sits more under the ball of my foot. I noticed a slight difference when riding, which I got used to pretty much straight away and I no longer get cramps.

Is running cleats all the way back a bit of a misconception? I get the feeling that it depends on the rider/setup (I do have big feet btw 47EUR)
  • 4 0
 @Brasher : I drilled an extra set of holes in the soles of my shoes to have the cleats further back. Works brilliantly.
  • 6 2
 As a flat pedal rider myself I’ve always wondered why nobody puts the cleats in the right place. Literally everyone runs the cleats as far back as they go and still complain that they not far enough back. What’s the logic behind this?
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: So, I swap back and forth between flats and clips. When I used to only use clips for road riding, the cleat placement is way forward, with the pedal spindle under the ball of your foot. However on flat pedals, I have my foot closer to the spindle under the forward part of my arch. When I started riding clips off-road, I was using the typical road position and found that having my foot cantilevered off the back of the pedal put a lot of strain on my ankles and calf, especially when i was descending and had my heels down. I started moving my cleats back, until they're basically maxed out to help get the strain off my ankles. I've since moved mostly to clips off-road and now use my same shoes (Shimano AM-7s) for off and on road, and I can tell that for road riding, I'm not in an optimum position for power. I'm sure a fit pro would tell me (at least one has) that my feet are too far forward, but I'm not buying another set of shoes, and I'm not moving my cleat position for road riding, and for off-road the foot forward position is way more confidence inspiring and closer to my flat experience.
  • 4 0
 @thenotoriousmic: i remember hating not being able to slide my cleats further back when i first switched from flats because my calves couldnt even handle a full lap without needing breaks. Got used to it though and now feels weird riding with the pedal axle in the middle of my foot
  • 1 0
 I have the speed-lace mallet dh shoes, and drilled the cleat slots back to a midfoot position. Also switched from flats recently
  • 2 0
 I’ve got a pair of Leatt shoes that go very far back. Too far imo. But might be worth checking out.
  • 1 0
 @endurogan: I ride downhill with flats, under the arch and xc with spd at the ball of my foot.
  • 1 0
 Check out the Giro Chamber II. When I went from flats to clips I choose this shoe in part because it was supposedly the shoe with the most rear-ward cleat position. It's Aron Gwin's shoe and was supposedly developed with help from him.

Two years later and I've been loving them, great shoes, great cleat position (I keep them slammed all the way back)... can't go wrong.

Funnily enough, I decided to put my flats back on a few weeks ago after riding only clips for 2.5 years. Wanted to ensure I hadn't picked up any bad clip-in habits. Enjoying being back on flats so much I've kept them on since. Even picked up the new Crank Brothers Stamp flat pedal speed lace shoes after my older five tens were so worn out they were killing my feet. Really liking the CB shoes.

Will probably keep switching back and forth while definitely using clips for enduro racing... and definitely using flats when riding the really gnar double black+ stuff.
  • 5 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: fair enough but still if 99.9% of riders have the cleats slammed or even drilling the shoes so they can get the cleat further back then why are theses shoe companies still placing the cleats where absolutely nobody wants them?
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott: but they don't want them up there, they want them down there
  • 1 0
 I have a few pairs of shoes on the go (Ion rascal, Northwave Spider plus and Specialized 2fo cliplite Boa). My now dead Shimano AM9 were the furthest back I've ever had a cleat placed and I loved it, since I have taken the Dremel to some of my shoes, none of my current batch yet, but that may change...
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: that's one of the shoes I'm using, and 5/10 Hellcats, both don't go far back enough unfortunately. The Giro is close, but could go down another 5mm I think.
  • 6 0
 only just got mine last week and so far so good, agree about needing the extra spacer, shame the shoes didnt come with one though so i opted for shorter pins in the mean time, theres also a rubber pad in the heel (or atleast there is on the standard mallets) which if youre sessioning downhills or at your local push up bike park get a little sore on the heel while walking if youre wearing thinner socks, this might be something that softens up over time but worth mentioning for sure.
  • 3 0
 Interesting, I always found them comfy for walking in. How did you find the sizing out of interest?
  • 3 0
 @seb-stott: nt that they werent comfy, overall they were fine, i just noticed if i wasnt wearing my waterproof socks which are thicker they rubbed on the back is all, but then i was up and down the hill for about 4-5 hours, which is typically way more than your average biking shoe id say? sizing wise as a size 12 they were pretty good, quite wide fitting which was ideal for me, a little longer in the toe than say a fiveten equivalent, but i never felt like they were baggy or oversized
  • 2 0
 I run these shoes and can confirm about the heal. Do yourself a favor and purchase in some thicker socks. I use the compression socks from walmart. They work great for me
  • 1 0
 @MartyMcfly2810 that's odd, mine came with the spacer pre-installed under the cleat. Fresh cleats come supplied with the spacer too IIRC.
  • 1 0
 @Primo123: ive got some now Smile that was just my finding on my first ride, learnt the hard way haha
  • 1 0
 The toe box looks visibly narrower/tapering on the 2FO’s. They wouldn’t work for me.
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott: I wear size 13 and the CBs are shorter than my 5.10s.
  • 6 0
 I know stiff shoes aren't really trendy for DH riding, but I'm old skool and like concrete in my shoes. Does anyone make a gravity oriented shoe that doesn't feel like old slippers?
  • 2 0
 I'm with you there. I've just started using Shimano's ME7 which I think they dub for "enduro" use. I previously used AM9s and found them too soft but the ME7s have a noticeably stiffer sole and seem pretty well protected against rock strikes etc. Slightly less padding than the AM9s but not by much. They're also much more breathable and dry quicker, though less waterproof.
  • 1 0
 If you can pick up the Specialized Cliplite Boa or Lace, they're both STIFF. as mentioned in the article, they're being phased out though so best be quick!
  • 2 0
 I’m still riding an old set of giro chamber shoes that are stiff. Not like spandex and gram counting stiff, but stiff enough to make a good feeling shoe. I haven’t ridden any of their newer shoes but I’m on season 3 with the current ones and will probably replace with similar. They’ve been durable and I use them for park and trail.
  • 5 0
 I can recommend the 5.10 Kestrel Boa. Off course, they are in the pricier side of things but their power transfer is amazing and they are tough as nails.
  • 2 0
 Another vote for Five Ten Kestrel Boa, top shoe!
  • 1 0
 @IllestT I had some SCOTT AR Boa's recently which are definitely pretty stiff. Unfortunately they are way too high volume for my slender little feet but easily the stiffest "dh"/enduro type shoe I've ever used. These crankbros are nice too though (and for me are true to size (42) in length, and just about the right size in a volume sense too). I'm pleased with them.
  • 1 0
 @amanite55: I second that I have the previous version and there nice and stiff. Although I couldn't get them to work with Mallet DH pedals couldn't unclip
  • 1 0
 @amanite55: I split a one straight in half at the cleat about 6 rides into them sliding down a short rock roll that I misjudged. Adidas wouldn't work with me at all, money out the window.
  • 1 0
 Sam Hill edition Impact (flats) from fiveten
  • 2 0
 The 2FO Clip Lite is stiffer than the 2FO. I like it for DH and pedal-heavy riding.
  • 1 0
 Fiveten still make some super stiff shoes I use the Kestrel Boa as my main shoe and its super stiff due to the carbon plate but they also make some more gravity shoes that are super stiff.
  • 1 0
 I have the Ride Concepts transition pedals for DH, and they’re fairly stiff. Not like BMX/Road racing carbon-sole levels of stiffness but they’re reasonable; with minimal flex other than in the toe area.
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott: thanks. The 2FO Cliplite is actually what I already have!
I was hoping there'd be something stiffer, but I guess it's just XC race shoes beyond here
  • 4 0
 Specialized all the way! Great shoe (in clip and flat) but the biggest advantage is how fast they dry out compared to other shoes. They dry while you are riding in them they are so good.
  • 3 1
 I’ve worn the Boas since they were released- disagree with two key points:

1. They do not have enough toe protection from rock strikes. My toes have gotten crushed from a rock flying up from the front wheel multiple times
2. I’ve ridden these things in Moab in the summer. They are not too hot, no clue how the author came to that conclusion

The lacking toe protection to me is enough to not buy these again. Otherwise, amazing shoe.
  • 1 2
 I ride with AM9's all summer long. Used to ride with the heavier Shimano AM9's with the thicker leather. Love the lace cover. Hate wet feet on a ride of any length. I've never been bothered by hot feet on rides. I'd take dry toes and no puddles in my shoes a thousand times over. Still surprises me to this day that people like having mesh toed MTB shoes at all. It's luxurious I'm sure...until it's not.
  • 1 0
 I ride these and some SIDI dominators for clips. (5.10 and these in flats for my flat pedal bikes). These are much much warmer than my SIDI shoes. So good in the spring or snow. When my feet will get wet they are thick and warm compared to the SIDI. I don’t live in Arizona so I can’t tell how they compare when everything is hot as hell anyway, but when it is cold out I like these because they keep my feet warmer than other shoes. I just wish they were more durable.
  • 1 2
 @blowmyfuse: so english is your first language? Wink
  • 1 1
 @SterlingArcher: stalker. trolling is your only contribution
  • 1 2
 @blowmyfuse: grow a pair of F’ing balls. Yeah, whoever responds to you is automatically a stalker. Hahahahahaha
  • 1 2
 @wesleyfleatus: playing the victim mentality. Nice.
  • 2 1
 @wesleyfleatus: nah, he only chases me around. Doesn't try to contribute or discuss the topic. He just attacks me as his personal vendetta.

But looks like you're gonna be #2 on his list soon enough.

Seriously just look at his posts..most of his posts are just hatred towards other users and insults if he comments on anyone besides me. IF. Maybe he'll take you on and be your dingleberry instead of mine now.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: looks like you’re the real stalker LOL
  • 1 0
 @wesleyfleatus: you talk to yourself
  • 1 0
 @wesleyfleatus: if ur gonna use a burner account at least use a name that people can’t immediately see who’s behind it LOL. Stay in school kids!
  • 2 0
 I bought these March 15. Peeling the sole off from around the cleat on the thinner inside. It flaps now and gets dirt under it. Can’t walk up anything steep but it hasn’t torn off yet or let dirt into the inside of the shoe. Some other poster had the same issue and posted under me on the online deals page.
  • 6 0
 all these shoes are garbage, im riding in crocs literide pacers
  • 1 0
 I bought these around the time when the press release came out so I've been riding in them for about 6-7 months. I love them. They have been super comfortable and really durable. No problems with durability, the velcro is still good and the Boa system has been flawless. I had a pair of Specialized 2F0 Cliplites for some time and loved their weight and stiff shank. But for fit, I guess it's different strokes for different folks as I found that these Mallet Boa's had a way better fit for my feet. I'm a 42 across the board in almost all bike shoes and have always found that Specialized shoes have a slightly different fit. I have a wider fore foot, higher instep. These Crank Bros have been perfect. The non-slip heel is a nice touch too. Like Seb, I added one small shim under the pre-installed spacer and called it good but I do that with almost all riding shoes.
  • 1 0
 Trying these on they seem to be quite padded and soft vs. other models I've tried (e.g. 510 kestrel boa). Did you notice them pack out a bunch @joepax ? Feel like I'm in between two sizes and wondering whether I should go slightly smaller and expect them to loosen up once packed out.
  • 1 0
 @stevenmulcahy123: I actually thought the same thing. I ordered both a 42 and a 41.5 (kudos to crank bros for having half-sizes). I appreciate the upper padding and it never rubs or bothers me on rides. They fit true to size and I stayed with the 42. They haven't packed out much but they've broken in. Still riding them, still love them. I had an older pair of kestrel boas, not the new ones, so I can't speak to that. But I'm still super impressed with the new mallet boas.
  • 1 0
 If it doesn’t have a solid toe box and doesn’t cover the inside ankle at the crank, it has to be a no.
I’m in a pair of Ride Concepts now and couldn’t be happier.
Grippy sole (flats), solid toe and ankles covered. I’ve had them for a few months now and the soles are showing no signs of wear. My last 5.10’s were visibly worn by that point, and completely shot a few rides after that. Since 5.10 introduced their first MTB shoes, the quality of the soles have really… slipped. Their modern offerings are nothing like a Sam Hill or Karver of olden days.
It bears repeating that taking a rock strike on the toe, or grinding your ankle off the crank are better experienced as a “that would’ve hurt”, as opposed to a “f#€k! That hurt!”
  • 1 0
 I've been running these for a several months now, mainly Laguna beach. Great shoes. Could be a little stiffer side to side. The boa def has a spot on top that gets tighter than the rest. I'd like the boa to maybe pull from lower point each side to possibly alleviate this. The velcro strap is quite long but it works well enough. They hike a bike good on sandstone. I too felt the need to add spacers to clip in easier but after few rides they seemed to break in and not needed.
  • 1 0
 That BOA version is a very clever design. I have found that the laced versions of this style of shoe result in a notable annoyance with the Velcro strap. I have to completely untread the Velcro on my 5.10 Hellcat Pro's every time I use them to tie/untie the laces. From the looks of things this BOA design would allow to only unhook the Velcro and loosen the BOA to get out and vice versa to get in. The Velcro strap would hold up better under that circumstance too. The strap on my 5.10s is delaminating and fraying because I have to constantly unthread and rethread through the plastic loop to be able to tie/untie the laces.
  • 1 0
 I’ve been using the pull tie version for the last few months and I am really happy with them, the quality is great and they are really comfortable. My only complaint is they run a little hot. Perfect riding shoe for all but the hottest days, highly recommended!
  • 1 0
 Its really starting to piss me off that shoe companies don't make the cleat box go further back! WTF? They say they have the "DH Zone" or whatever, but its not any farther back than any other shoe. What's the big deal? Why is it so hard that literally zero shoes are made that have the option to slide the cleat back to a normal riding position .I don't get it !
  • 1 0
 As others have pointed out, the rubber inside to prevent heel from slipping is a major pain on hike-a-bikes. I have the normal Speedlace flats and after a few steep hikes, my heels were rubbed raw.
  • 1 0
 When I set my cleat far back towards my heel my toe gets caught on the crank when trying to release. Tried using playing cards as a shim under the cleat and that helped a bit as a spacer. I might just suck with clips
  • 1 0
 Doesnt sound like they are that well designed for the 'eccentricities' of the Mallet pedals if you still need spacers?

Anyone tried the flat pedal versions of the shoes?
  • 3 0
 Yeah, I thought that too. But to be fair, they do "work" without a spacer, it's just a little too stiff to clip in easily. It's an easy job to install a spacer (much easier than winding in pedal pins), and as the sole wears down you can always remove the spacer to stop them getting too "floaty".
  • 2 0
 As far as I know, they designed it like this in order to allow people to use other brands´ cleats. For example the Shimano Cleats are 7mm high (while CB ones are 6mm) and since the sole is also 7mm high where the cleats sit, it allows for a good interface between the shoes and pedal while using different brands. That´s where the spacers come in handy when using CB pedals.
  • 2 1
 @valleytroll yes I have. I am liking them so far. They're a nice stiffness so pedal quite well (I don't like very soft floppy shoes that bend over the pedal), and grip seems to be good for what I've used them with so far. I haven't yet ridden them down any very rough tracks though, weather hasn't been great lately!! That'll be the true test.
  • 1 1
 Yes for flats and these exact reviewed pair. Both have durability issues. Flats have supportive soles but rubber somehow grips less than 5.10 and wears faster. Lining fabric by the heel cuff wears out quickly. Flying rocks cut and slice the toe box noticeably. The pedal pins put 2-3” slices into the sole somehow - Ive never seen that on other shoes.
  • 1 0
 @gravitysgirl: cheers nice one . Thanks for info
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott: did you have to add a spacer to the one that they come fitted with, or did they come without a spacer already fitted? The website suggests they come with one fitted, which is how mine arrived and they were spot on out the box.
  • 1 0
 I’m seriously considering trying the flat pedal version of these shoes when my Five Tens wear out. I’ll probably go with the normal lace version though.
  • 3 1
 I did the same - going back with 5tens though after a few rides.
  • 1 0
 @bartco: Why are you going to go back to Five Tens? What don't you like about the Crankbros shoes?
  • 3 1
 @WalrusRider: I have both. 5.10 feel glued on. These don’t grip nearly as well and skate around. Also the soles get cut up more from the pins somehow. They won’t last me a season at the park but 5.10 rubber which seems softer and grippier lasted me all of last year. (I’m talking flats). The durability of the clip mallet e is bad, sole is peeling off from around the pocket. And the heel cup fabric is wearing through even though I have them fitting right and undo them all the way before removing or putting them on. And rocks hit the toes and put big cuts in the material. 5.10 wins hands down.
  • 2 0
 @WalrusRider similar to @Jvisscher - mine aren’t near as grippy as my five tens and are already showing wear on the bottom after 4 or so rides. I’m not riding the stamp pedals though and I know they’re designed to work best with those (I’m on OneUp pedals).
  • 1 1
 Worst flat pedal shoes going. Waste of money. I’m going straight back to 5ten
  • 2 0
 @bartco: worth noting - I’m on OneUp pedals for flats and small xtr for spd
  • 1 0
 I tried on these new CB shoes and found them to be the most comfortable pair of skate style of riding shoes so far. I currently own the 510 Kestrel and Specialized 2FO kicks.
  • 2 0
 200eur? I guess i'll just stick to my old 5.10 Minnaars then.
  • 1 0
 I still have a pair too
  • 1 2
 Why all the testers don't take some photos before & after,
with clean product, so we can compare them !?
It's so difficult !?
  • 1 0
 Are these actually shaped like a human foot?
  • 1 0
 Crankbrothers are awful for flats, next to no grip!
  • 1 0
 I’m taking about the Stamp shoes sorry not the pedals.
  • 1 0
 Ahem, Vaude Moab Tech....? Going on 2 years now....anybody?
  • 1 0
 Popped out with mallets a lot. Went to saints, haven't looked back.
  • 1 0
 best shoes i have ever worn for enduro racing
  • 2 3
 How about try flat pedals and you can switch between the 'race zone' and comfortable pedalling zone any time you like.
  • 4 1
 I find the fully-rearward cleat position just as comfy for pedaling as a more forward position.
  • 6 0
 nah, for that you use two cleats per shoe
  • 2 0
 @iiman: lol
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