Review: Dakine's Thrillium Heavyweight Pants & Dewit Waterproof Apparel

Nov 18, 2021
by Henry Quinney  
Next up in our wet weather round-up are the latest winter offerings from Dakine. This features the Dewit jacket and pants, which boast features including a 20K waterproof rating, and the heavy-duty Thrillium pant.





The Thrillium Heavyweight pants certainly pack a punch. In fact, heavyweight doesn't quite do them justice. I've never picked up a pair of non-waterproof riding trousers before and thought that maybe they wouldn't be great to go for a long pedal in. However, it's also immediately apparent that these aren't meant for that. As the name would suggest, they're not all about being thin and super lightweight.
Thrillium Heavyweight Details
• Five sizes - S - XXL
• Built-in Webbing Belt
• QR Waist Buckle
• Vented thigh and waist
• 3 zippered pockets
• $180 USD
www.dakine.com

These pants are so heavy they could almost qualify as a piece of body armour in themselves. They fit, which I'll come onto in greater detail later, leaves plenty of room for knee pads and their hard-wearing material firmly sets them up for bike park laps. However, in cold yet dry climates, these could also work well as winter trousers. Saying that, it would have to be pretty cold indeed. On cold days November days in British Columbia they were good, but it's actively raining I'd rather ride in an all-out waterproof trouser.


The pants have three pockets. Two standard affairs that sit at the fore of the pant above the thing and one that sits slightly lower on the left-hand side. It's not as big as the others and has a loop to attach something to for extra security. The main pockets themselves are very deep and can easily fit a phone.

The fit of the pants is somewhat peculiar, and sadly they aren't alone in this - the waterproof Dewit pants suffer the same fate. By every metric on the Dakine size chart, these should fit me. They do around the waist, and are true to their size (mine are a medium 32/34") but the fit around the leg is very baggy. This might be a style choice, but I would prefer them to be cut dramatically slimmer. That said, every cloud has a silver lining and if you struggle with pants being too racey, then you may well be in luck.
Henry Quinney
Location: Squamish, BC, Canada
Age: 29
Height: 6' / 183 cm
Inseam: 32" / 82 cm
Weight: 183 lbs / 83 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None


The waist belt works well, and the venting is a nice touch. I imagine if you were riding these on hot bike park laps it would be very welcome. They breathed okay in colder temperatures and were adequately warm. Sadly, I haven't been able to test them in anything other than cold and colder but not yet coldest.

As somebody who hates tearing trousers on silly crashes, I think these trousers could be a smart buy for shuttle days or bike park laps in changeable conditions or colder temperatures. Unfortunately, the fit was nowhere close to being right for me.

[HR

Pros

+ Thick material for cold rides
+ Would work well for bike park laps, if it's not too hot
+ Lots of pockets

Cons

- Very baggy





The Dewit pant is another black garment that has subtle branding. I really like this. I would say it's completely at the other end of the spectrum to the dungarees I recently tested. They're a full waterproof trouser that aims to pair well with the Dewit jacket. They have a three-layer material and are rated to an impressive 20K waterproofness rating. The pant features a button closure at the waist and a drawstring adjustment on the inside of the waistband.

Dewit Pant Details
• Five sizes - S - XXL
• 20 000mm waterproof
• Three-layer construction
• 2 zippered pockets
• DWR treated
• Elastic ankle cuff
• Zippered ankle
• $225 USD
www.dakine.com

The pants have more features than most other waterproof pants I've tried. Some are good, but I think that others create a rod for their own back. These pants breathe well, or as well as one could expect any waterproof item to, but the fit, again, was just far too baggy.

They had a strange fit that was almost bootcut. This was then exacerbated by the inclusion of a zip around the calf. It would be great to see them dramatically slimmer cut, and then you could make full use of the zip and elasticated ankle. In their current fit, however, they probably won't fit many people well that don't have large legs.



Joking aside, this was a problem that both the POC waterproof trousers and dungarees did suffer from as well. I understand that this isn't the super-stretchy material that you might find in a non-waterproof pant, but at the same time, it doesn't mean it has to be just this baggy. I was riding these trousers watching them constantly graze my oiled chain on every rotation. It seems needless. I would love to see the same trouser come with the same features that include very deep pockets and the aforementioned zipper that would make getting them off with cold wet hands all the easier, but just so much narrower around the calf.



Pros

+ Deep pockets
+ Subtle looks
+ Breathes adequately

Cons

- Far too baggy




The Dewit jacket carries on where the pant takes off. This includes the same 20k rating, as well as the three-layer construction found on the trouser. It also includes elastic cuffs and a helmet-friendly hood that is equipped with a draw chord to tailor the fit. It also has large chest pockets. These pockets are some of the better placed on the jackets I've come across. Not so high that it pulls on your shoulders and not so low that your phone is swinging about at will through rough terrain. The chest pockets also feature a pocket-within-a-pocket to make finding keys or cash easier.
Dewit Jacket Details• Five sizes - S - XXL
• 20 000mm waterproof
• Three-layer construction
• Large chest pockets
• DWR treated
• Helmet compatible hood
• Elastic cuffs
• $290 USD
www.dakine.com


The jacket is subtle enough that it can be worn off the bike without looking like a kook. The rear of the jacket does feature a bike-specific dropped hem to hopefully provide enough coverage that it stops trail-spray working its way between jacket and trouser.


It's far better fitting than the trousers on review and fits true to size. I'm 6' and found the large to be generously sized but not overly so. I could have probably gone down a size for a less casual bike-fit, though. I like the elastic cuffs on the wrists and they stop any unwanted drafts coming through. In fact, I think features like this actually help a jacket breathe. Instead of just unzipping or trying to get waves of cold air through the jacket, I find it's better to just put up with some short-term sweating until the jacket begins to breathe, instead of just having a cold wind to chill your sweat.


The jacket is fully waterproof, as opposed to something that can pack down nice a small. Sure, you can stuff it in your bag, but it's definitely something better suited to slightly colder temperatures rather than splash protection in the warmer months. Its material isn't particularly thin or light, which is great in winter but maybe not if you want a jacket to do you all year round and one that you wear several layers underneath.



Pros

+ Well placed pockets
+ Subtle enough to double up as everyday jacket
+ Breathes adequately
+ Elastic cuff and hood adjustment

Cons

- Might be a bit thick for warmer days





81 Comments

  • 99 4
 literally all of these manufacturers need to make LONG sizing. They falsely assume that everyone with a 34 waist is 5’7”. Look at Leatt’s size chart some day. Their recommended size for someone over 6ft tall is a 40+ in waist. They do realize that athletic people ride bikes, right? These sizes only make sense for people that spend all their time surfing the couch.
  • 5 1
 I totally agree!
  • 16 1
 Yeah, that's why I haven't bought pants yet. I am 6'3" with a 35 inseam so any riding pant is going to look like a pair of capris.
  • 11 0
 Totaly agree, this kind of "one size kind of fits all" sizing would be annoying but acceptable at a $40-60 price point. It is pretty inexcusable at over 200.
  • 3 0
 @HB208: Same problem here but at least the longer baggy MTB shorts don't look like shants on us....
  • 4 0
 @HB208: I’m in the exact same boat as you
36” inseam and all my pants for bike park etc literally look like capris
Best I’ve found so far is Forbike but they are still short
  • 9 0
 They REALLY need to make longer pants for taller skinny riders…
  • 5 0
 @stormracing: I just end up wearing shorts rain or shine.
  • 3 4
 the body shape for this demographic has decidedly become more pear shape over the yrs...does not bode well for folks that get off the couch frequently
  • 2 0
 I'm 6-4 (192cm) and 180 lbs. Have some Endura Singletrack II pants that fit well. Took a lot of trial and error to find something that fit, though.
  • 2 0
 So frustrating. Way more people are big(waist circumference) or tall(inseam) only. Why do all manufactures assume you must be BIG if you're tall.
  • 2 0
 that's the main reason I only ride shorts, it is f*cking insane, any L-size jacket will be baggy, for 200$ I would expect Long option as well;

Any diving suite have 3 options within particular size and cost 2 times less
  • 2 1
 Yeah even with street clothes I struggle to find shorts or pants that fit my 29ish waist that fit correctly
  • 4 0
 @HB208: 6'5", 36" inseam. Even if I try to get on the pants bandwagon, they'll still all look like shorts.
  • 1 0
 @Jaylynx: Because that is the average american lol
  • 1 0
 Yep...33'' waist 37'' inseam. If I buy mtb pants I may as well be wearing shorts + knee pads...
  • 6 0
 Yep, to add my data point (free of charge, @Outside)

6"0"; 32 waist.
  • 2 1
 I would argue with you but your imperial data kills me
  • 1 0
 Come to think of it, I definitely see more tall and skinny people than I do tall and wide.
  • 3 0
 I think 7mesh do longer trousers that you can trim down? Not cheap though...
  • 2 0
 It would be great if they made different options for length as they do for waist size. When you think about it, it's strange that brands don't when it comes to riding pants. I can get a pair of 32X32 or 32X30 jeans or whatever but when it comes to mountain bike pants, some of us are rocking capris while others are rolling up the pant legs.
  • 1 0
 @Brentainbiker: That is how it should be but every additional size costs more money, so to maximise profits companies have decided that they are just going to offer badly fitting trousers. Since they are all doing it, what are we going to do?
  • 1 0
 I feel this frustration with finding mountain bike pants that fit. NF's pants have proper inseam lengths, cost nearly the same as these and are super durable.
  • 1 0
 @crustin: i wear the roadies jersey from Endura in size small. I am 6'1 185lbs with a rather short torso, i get it, but still, anything other than a small looks like a freaking grocery bag on me. Same with the O'Neal Element Jersey, Medium fits ok, small would probably be better and large is waayyyy to wide.
  • 4 0
 My fellow tall dudes: Eddie Bauer Guide Pro Pants are an excellent option for those of us looking for up to a 36" inseam. Athletic, fairly rugged, quick drying, zipped pockets, room for knee pads and also come in a "slim" cut to keep the cuffs out of the chainring or even a lined version for colder temps if you're not into tights or layering. Icing on the cake is they are a mere fraction of the price of all these astronomically priced dedicated MTB pants. I gave up looking for anything else. There's some other pants there available in longs but the OG Guide Pro's are a staple, i'm telling you!

www.eddiebauer.com/p/12951063/men's-guide-pro-pants

www.eddiebauer.com/p/12951535/men's-guide-pro-pants-slim

www.eddiebauer.com/p/12951203/men%27s-guide-pro-lined-pants
  • 2 0
 @JFutey: Right on, thanks for this additional info. I ordered the Guide pants in regular and slim last year, just for casual wear and have been tempted to ride in them, but have not done so. I was anxious that mud spray would become permanently embedded in the seat of the pants, making them useless for wearing them in public, or at work. (Here in the PNW, office attire leans towards “look like you’re ready to go backpacking at a moment’s notice”) So now with Guide Pro Work pants on the way, I will save those primarily for riding and outdoor work.
  • 2 0
 Endura my man.

Can't help the 36" lads but I'm a 32 X 34. And endura waterproof and mt500 trousers fit great.

Totally agree on the point though. Fox stuff is the worst.
  • 2 0
 @sngltrkmnd: I did a super wet weekend at the bike park wearing these and was covered in a mix of clay and silt mud and it washed right out even after sitting dirty a week before I got back home.
  • 1 0
 @russbates: I've got the MT500 Spray II trousers. 5"11 with 34 waist and they're a great fit.
  • 28 1
 So, do they keep you warm while tripping balls in the woods?
  • 16 1
 Dang, I remember when Dakine sold a Goretex riding jacket for $120...yeah the same waterproof rating, better breathability rating, and an extremely well known membrane... all for $120. Just a couple years ago. Bummer when you see the changes to inferior membranes and quality but price has increased more than double!
  • 5 1
 I remember that too! I have that jacket
Legit and nice Goretex riding jacket! Very high quality. On par with other high end jackets I own that cost x3 as much if not more

Got it for $120, you are correct.

Bummer seeing Dakone go cheaper membrane and quality and increasing the price so much!
Wish I could still buy that jacket
  • 8 1
 Yeah. $120 is my cutoff for rain and cold weather MTB gear. Above that, doesn't make sense to spend ski jacket prices for something I may shred on some rocks or branches.
  • 17 0
 The irony of Henry Quinney modelling appropriate outdoor clothing......
  • 3 0
 I feel like all future videos we see of him he's gonna be looking like the Michelin man.
  • 10 3
 For the pants-curious but frugally-minded, hiking pants work great too. My legs are cozy and clean in a pair of $20 Eddie Bauer hiking pants from Costco, and even top-shelf hiking pants cost much less than mtb-specific pants. Plus you'll look like less of a turd at the watering hole afterwards.
  • 11 1
 Who wears pants anyways?
  • 6 0
 Been wearing Columbia Sportswear hiking pants for years. $20 each at the outlet mall. If they get trashed, not a huge deal. If it gets colder, wear thermals underneath.
  • 4 0
 Just got the Fox Defend pants for about $100 CAN with DWR. They are my second pair. I use them for Mt. Biking and Commuting. Full waterproof never works for me as i sweat a ton and just end up soaked from the inside anyway.
  • 1 0
 I was just entertaining the idea of picking up some Eddie Bauer Guide Pro Work pants for riding. Not to be a schill but they're on sale for $75 this week.
  • 3 0
 @healthy-not-sick-biker: Exactly. Running the Banana-Hammock G-String keeps the Cougars away too!
  • 3 0
 @MDana87: Hmmm when i wear the banana hammock the Cougars come running, what am i doing wrong.
  • 2 0
 Very much agreed. My Eddie Bauer Guide/Switch 5 Pocket (my latest purchase--nicely tapered legs for cycling) hiking pants have worked extremely well as cool/coldish weather (Tahoe, not AK or MN) and fat biking pants. The EB hiking pants have great stretch, breath well, and have just as much weather protection as "cycling specific" softshell pants. ...and I completely agree about the subdued/normal appearance of the pants while enjoying post ride beers.
  • 1 1
 @fabwizard: nothing. nothing at all.


YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO YOLO
  • 9 0
 Dakine sizing their gear preemptively for the surging E-bike population
  • 7 3
 Dakine is a a good brand. Too bad everybody wants to buy FOX. Fox quality is quite bad but still everyone is loosing their shit for it. We have sweet protection, dakine, mons royale, 7mesh in the shop and nobody touches them. Fox on the other hand flys out the door and back again for warranty jobs. #boycottfox
  • 1 0
 two years of winter riding on my fox defends and not a thread out of place. my only complaint is a bit of fading to the red. And yes they have been crash tested regularly. I an now a month in on my second pair and no issues either. both pairs the dwr works great and no issues.
  • 6 1
 Fox stuff is fine, its not top notch but it's definitely not shit.
  • 1 0
 Around here everybody is wearing Sweet and Mons Royale. I really like MR but wool gets absolutely shredded after one season.
  • 1 0
 Fox is really not great. Maybe depends on the line you buy from them.
Had 2 pairs of Ranger shorts. Both failed when Material got so thin at the saddle contact point (constant rubbing while pedaling is an expected load for mtb, isn't it?) it disappeared.
  • 3 0
 Pretty insane that pants and a jersey costs more than some peoples first bikes. Whose buying $250 mtb pants and $300 jackets??

I'll snag a pair in a year when the online retailers are putting them on clearance for $80.
  • 4 0
 Can you imagine crashing with like $1500 worth of MTB specific clothes, shoes and helmet on. You wouldn't be worried about your body, you would be worried about ripping your jacket. Trying to struggle your broken arm out of your sleeve so the EMT's don't cut it off!
  • 1 0
 I was a skeptica but after years of wearing random pants/shorts and jackets I forked out for some Endura gear. Great quality and super hardwearing. Knee pads fit well under them. The jackets are breathable too, which makes more of a difference than I expected. Didn't want to love the fancy gear but I do.

Makes rides more enjoyable having decent stuff in my experience.
  • 1 0
 I got some endura pants and they fit well. I could probably get by all year with shorts in California but the pants are nice for cold mornings.
I’ve only had them for one ride but they seem good.
  • 4 3
 The quality of Dakine's DH Thrillium pant blows the TLD Sprint pants out of the water. If these are anything close to as good they'll be worth their weight in gold.
  • 1 0
 Love my Thrilliums - have the shorts and the Pants unbeatable fit and quality. Unfortunately according to Dakine Europe none of this stuff is coming our way this year...
  • 16 13
 Finally, baggy is making a comeback. "Skinny jean cut" needs to go away.
  • 6 1
 Tell notoutsideceo that
  • 2 3
 Yea finally, we need boot cut ridding pants !!! Out with skinny
  • 3 2
 Glad I'm not the only one! Often have to upsize to fit my calves in regular mtb trousers, and then use a belt / add belt loops to prevent the trousers from falling off ...
  • 2 1
 @diogocamacho: Agreed. This allows the rider to pedal up with knee pads at the ankles, and then hoist em up for descents once at the summit.
  • 7 0
 @healthy-not-sick-biker: The tighter the better! I don't care what those Gen-Zers and Tick-Tokers say...skinny jeans are here to stay.

Be safe be well,
Incognito Robin
  • 2 1
 I find all of Dakine's offerings to be insanely baggy. Going from 100% pants to Dakine feels like wearing a kimono by comparison.
  • 3 0
 Nice try Dakine but nope. Way too cheap. I want my POC Dungarees back!
  • 2 0
 Ah yes! more products that will never be available in the empty warehouse that is the Canadian store...
  • 3 0
 The look on Henry's face says it all.
  • 2 0
 yeah, like "ok, who took my fungi?"
  • 1 0
 You'd think he'd be happy not to be wearing a pair of $500 Swedish fly-fishing waders.
  • 3 0
 I’m still working out what the first paragraph means
  • 3 0
 the thrillium pants rule
  • 1 0
 The small Thrillium pants are really skinny but seems like the other sizes are baggy, weird
  • 1 0
 Dakine really sucks. Falls apart shitty warranty.
  • 1 0
 the thumbnail looked like a forest fire. god california messes with me
  • 1 0
 Who hell has $180+ rolling around? down deep back of your couch???
  • 1 1
 all my dentist friends wear these...
  • 1 1
 I’m 6’1” 175 33 waist
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